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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 19, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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that he murdered two men and attempted to kill a third during chaotic racialjustice protests in wisconsin last year. his trial polarised america, highlighting divisions around contentious issues like gun rights. the president of belarus, alexander lukashenko, has told the bbc it is "perfectly possible" that belarusian security forces have helped migrants try to cross the border into poland. he denied inviting the migrants to belarus. austria has become the first country in western europe to go back into full lockdown as covid infections surge again. all austrians will be required to get vaccinated from february next year. kamala harris has become the first woman in american history to become acting president of the united states. she took over for 85 minutes as head of state and commander—in—chief, while president biden had a medical procedure.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are geri scott, political correspondent at the press association, and benedicte paviot, uk correspondent for france 24. tomorrow's front pages. the daily mail reports about an anti—vax group that the paper says has picketed over 100 schools. the ft is leading with austria, which will become the first country in europe to make coronavirus jabs mandatory from next year. the daily telegraph's main story is the government plans to tackle cross—channel migration — asylum seekers will have to obey strict rules at new holding centres or face having their applications rejection. as part of those plans to tackle the migration crisis, the times reports that borisjohnson
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is enlisting the help of the cabinet office to find a solution in stopping migrants making the crossing in small boats. the mirror's lead story is the double child killer colin pitchfork who has been sent back to jail after breaching the terms of his release. the guardian carries an allegation by the labour peer lord parekh that the tories are "fuelling racism" by rejecting multiculturalism. and it's set to be a merry christmas for retailers, according to the daily express, which says britons are determined to spread the festive cheer with an £85 billion spending spree. doesn't sound much, but more like access. let's begin with the eye, a new lockdown in europe but no need to wait in the uk just yet? that to wait in the uk “ust yet? that contrasting _ to wait in the ukjust yet? that contrasting headline, - to wait in the uk just yet? twat contrasting headline, new lockdown in europe, very much referring to austria as of monday. there'll be at
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least three weeks of a very tough lockdown. austrian chancellor says thatis lockdown. austrian chancellor says that is because there aren't enough people who are vaccinated, too many people who are vaccinated, too many people who are going to hospital with covid, therefore to face up to the reality that this stringent lockdown is needed. and what he's also made very clear is that he's introducing a law whereby, and that will be a first in the eu, that vaccinations will be obligatory, and that will come in february 2022. so you've also got increased, beefed rules in germany, beefed—up rules in the netherlands, and i think from memory, in norway. but the uk doesn't need a plan b, according to scientists. apparently britain can
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prevent a repeat of last winter's deadliest covid wave, and that is what the scientific advisers are apparently telling the government. but what is very much needed as part of the armoury to help prevent a deadly wave is more booster shots, that needs to be speeded up and more take up on that, and it's likely that under 40s will get invitations to help immunity. then there's the interesting case of pregnant women set to be offered jabs at their appointments, because there is an acknowledgement that they were given rather confusing advice — of course, pregnant women having to make decisions for at least two people, themselves and their baby. we can move on to — themselves and their baby. we can move on to the _ themselves and their baby. we can move on to the similar— themselves and their baby. we can move on to the similar in _ themselves and their baby. we can move on to the similar in front - themselves and their baby. we can move on to the similar in front of l move on to the similar in front of the ft - i move on to the similar in front of
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the ft — i keep getting, it's a bit like in this country, it's not until next year. everyone is saying it's mandatory, butjust not yet. it's a bit like augustine... i'm probably misquoting them. j bit like augustine... i'm probably misquoting them.— misquoting them. i think it's a mixture of— misquoting them. i think it's a mixture of carrot _ misquoting them. i think it's a mixture of carrot and - misquoting them. i think it's a mixture of carrot and stick, i misquoting them. i think it's a l mixture of carrot and stick, isn't it? it's_ mixture of carrot and stick, isn't it? it's really that they want them to come _ it? it's really that they want them to come around by themselves and get the job _ to come around by themselves and get the m i_ to come around by themselves and get the job. i think it's quite a controversial move — in this country. _ controversial move — in this country, we'll be doing that for nhs and social_ country, we'll be doing that for nhs and social care stuff, nevertheless the entire — and social care stuff, nevertheless the entire population. but we have a hi-h the entire population. but we have a high level_ the entire population. but we have a high level of vaccine take up here, at least _ high level of vaccine take up here, at least for— high level of vaccine take up here, at least for the first two doses, it's not— at least for the first two doses, it's not quite as good for the booster— it's not quite as good for the booster dose but the first two doses, — booster dose but the first two doses, absolutely. in some places across_ doses, absolutely. in some places across europe, that's not necessarily the case, people haven't been so _ necessarily the case, people haven't been so keen to get theirjab, so
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that's— been so keen to get theirjab, so that's why— been so keen to get theirjab, so that's why we are seeing these measures. we've heard ministers and the prime _ measures. we've heard ministers and the prime minister himself warned about— the prime minister himself warned about the — the prime minister himself warned about the storm clouds gathering over europe in this third wave, it could _ over europe in this third wave, it could obviously reach us. we are not in a completely different position. like you _ in a completely different position. like you say, there is still the winter— like you say, there is still the winter to— like you say, there is still the winter to tough out first, it february _ winter to tough out first, it february will be too late to bring it in, _ february will be too late to bring it in. but — february will be too late to bring it in, but this is more about trying to urge _ it in, but this is more about trying to urge people, jump before your bush _ to urge people, jump before your push type — to urge people, jump before your push type situation. i to urge people, jump before your push type situation.— push type situation. i misquoted him, but the _ push type situation. i misquoted him, but the thought _ push type situation. i misquoted him, but the thought is - push type situation. i misquoted him, but the thought is the - push type situation. i misquoted i him, but the thought is the same, according to the church history. the church history review, to properly source my quote. what do you make of the ft�*s story? thejudgment source my quote. what do you make of the ft�*s story? the judgment of politicians has taken a different approach to the problem in france —
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and arguably more effective one so far? yarmouk what was the last you said? i think very much is. what you are referring to, and allowing me to say, that implementation of the vaccine passport is interesting. each time the president has gone on air and said each time the president has gone on airand said "we each time the president has gone on air and said "we will be toughening up air and said "we will be toughening up the rules, we will be really enforcing the vaccine passport, so if you want to go to the theatre, the cinema, to a restaurant or cafe, then you need to get with the programme and get your vaccines." as far as take—up is concerned, i was looking at the latest figures — 51.5 million people have had the first dose, 50.5 million the second dose. so we are talking about a 76.5%
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take—up in the french population for the first vaccination, 75% — we don't hear that very much in this country because the united kingdom was one of the top 2—3 countries in the world, world leading and world beating. but some you eu countries have very much caught up. so it's really interesting to see how effective this is. every time the french president almost says it, people start queuing up for their vaccines because they want to be able to go to the cinema, the theatre, to restaurants and caf s and have some sort of normal life. mask wearing is much more strictly implemented, has been since implemented, has been the beginning and, unlike boris johnson, president macron doesn't need to be reminded to wear his mask and has never made it a political thing at a thing at all. i think that is interesting, and yes, it's very effective. in france you
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have 117,000 dead — far too many, of course — in the uk, 143,000. now things are accounted slightly differently, there's more testing done here, but ultimately those are terrible figures and terrible tragedies within families. there's also long covid, which we haven't even got those figures. very worrying, and people need to balance up worrying, and people need to balance up their own freedom and that of other people's. that's where this thing is a level or.— thing is a level or. without lowering — thing is a level or. without lowering the _ thing is a level or. without lowering the tone, - thing is a level or. without lowering the tone, how - thing is a level or. without| lowering the tone, how has thing is a level or. without - lowering the tone, how has all this affected his political standing? 0bviously he's got to face reelection next summer. he obviously he's got to face reelection next summer. he has got to face reelection _ reelection next summer. he has got to face reelection in _ reelection next summer. he has got to face reelection in france, - to face reelection in france, president serve five—year terms. yes of course, some of these measures
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have been very difficult. people are extremely unhappy, they've been very vocal. butjust because you're very vocal. butjust because you're very vocal it doesn't mean you're the majority. the people who have been very vocal, the anti—factors exist in france as in the uk and elsewhere — but they are a minority, the great majority of french people, after being vaccine hesitant, have actually — 76.5% with the first dose, and 75% of the french population with a second dose. that just shows people have, you know, looked at the figures, look at what's happening, informed themselves and decided they are absolutely willing and queuing up to get vaccinated. that's a good news story because that's helping in what is a very strong virus. this is not over, we forget this because it's
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been going on and on — but it is important to socially distance and wear a mask, it's hugely important to ventilate rooms. all those things, you know, how big a problem is that to do those things? not that big a problem, not that big a sacrifice. �* ., , ., ., sacrifice. i'm glad you mentioned the ventilation, _ sacrifice. i'm glad you mentioned the ventilation, it's _ sacrifice. i'm glad you mentioned the ventilation, it's the _ sacrifice. i'm glad you mentioned the ventilation, it's the one - sacrifice. i'm glad you mentioned the ventilation, it's the one thingj the ventilation, it's the one thing that had less attention than any. it might end up being in the winter the most important thing we can do. the front of the telegraph, this isn't the first headline we've had about changes to government migration policies — is there a sense in the government, you picking up a press association and the government that everything they've done so farjust isn't working? everything they've done so far 'ust isn-t workingrfi isn't working? yes, over the last coule isn't working? yes, over the last couple days. _ isn't working? yes, over the last couple days, we've _ isn't working? yes, over the last couple days, we've heard - isn't working? yes, over the last - couple days, we've heard suggestions we will_ couple days, we've heard suggestions we will send immigrants to albania, then we've — we will send immigrants to albania, then we've been told those are not
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happening. we had bunkers suggestions about a giant wave machine — suggestions about a giant wave machine in the channel, propellers and hets— machine in the channel, propellers and nets to — machine in the channel, propellers and nets to ensnare these boats — it should _ and nets to ensnare these boats — it should be _ and nets to ensnare these boats — it should be said that it was said earlier— should be said that it was said earlier this week that is just not happening. but it does seem like it's a _ happening. but it does seem like it's a try— happening. but it does seem like it's a try anything type situation in this— it's a try anything type situation in this crisis. the numbers of migrants _ in this crisis. the numbers of migrants we are seeing crossing the chahhet_ migrants we are seeing crossing the channel - _ migrants we are seeing crossing the channel — the governmentjust doesn't — channel — the governmentjust doesn't seem to be able to get a -rip doesn't seem to be able to get a grip on_ doesn't seem to be able to get a grip on tackling it. they talk often about _ grip on tackling it. they talk often about reducing the pull factor, the reason _ about reducing the pull factor, the reason these migrants might want to come _ reason these migrants might want to come to— reason these migrants might want to come to the uk. what we've heard at home _ come to the uk. what we've heard at home is_ come to the uk. what we've heard at home is that — come to the uk. what we've heard at home is that a lot of it is to do with— home is that a lot of it is to do with our— home is that a lot of it is to do with our labour market. so it hasn't quite _ with our labour market. so it hasn't quite been — with our labour market. so it hasn't quite been caught yet and it sounds like what _ quite been caught yet and it sounds like what rudy patel is impressed with increase is centres where asylum — with increase is centres where asylum claims will be affected if
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they don't abide by the strict rules in place. _ they don't abide by the strict rules in place, like curfews and tracking of movement, things like that —— priti _ of movement, things like that —— priti patet — of movement, things like that —— priti patel. she also seems like the idea of digitising the whole process so it sued _ idea of digitising the whole process so it sped up and you can save money on paperwork, there's an app and all sorts— on paperwork, there's an app and all sorts of— on paperwork, there's an app and all sorts of things. this is the latest, and it— sorts of things. this is the latest, and itiust — sorts of things. this is the latest, and itjust shows howl sorts of things. this is the latest, and itjust shows how i don't want to use _ and itjust shows how i don't want to use the — and itjust shows how i don't want to use the word desperate, but important _ to use the word desperate, but important it is that this is tackled because — important it is that this is tackled because this is something in this caravan — because this is something in this caravan |— because this is something in this caravan. . ~' , because this is something in this caravan. n , ., because this is something in this caravan. , ., ., because this is something in this caravan. , ., caravan. i take my hat off to you because i _ caravan. i take my hat off to you because i thought _ caravan. i take my hat off to you because i thought i _ caravan. i take my hat off to you because i thought i was - caravan. i take my hat off to you because i thought i was the - caravan. i take my hat off to you - because i thought i was the only one working between the paper reviews, but you have found a piece on the press association five minutes on the subject. i'm usually impressed. the times also says there is a ministerial change on this issue, as well? it ministerial change on this issue, as well? , , , , well? it is interesting because, cominu well? it is interesting because, coming to _ well? it is interesting because, coming to the _ well? it is interesting because, coming to the rescue _ well? it is interesting because, coming to the rescue is - well? it is interesting because, | coming to the rescue is stephen barclay, chancellor of the duchy of
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lancaster whose been draughted it to oversee this whitehall attempt to find solutions and "ensure departments beyond the home office play their part". because this is notjust play their part". because this is not just about play their part". because this is notjust about big sound bites — why does it matter? it matters because people are throwing themselves in growing numbers in winter, what will happen in the spring? 23,000 in the last year, three times more than last year, three times more than last year. they are risking their lives increasingly, gangs are making huge amounts of money, some of those criminals are british but not only. and this is all coming through belgium, the netherlands, and onto the shores of france — and that pull factor, it would seem, is very much because these migrants know, are very and they have coughed up
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something like 4000 euros — very lucrative for these gangs that need to be dismantled, some of them are but they're still far too many — they are profiteering on misery and people risking their lives. and the pull factor is that these illegal migrants can disappear into the black economy in the united kingdom — unlike france where that is much harder, because in france you can be regularly checked for your identity if there's any suspicious behaviour at all by french authorities in french police, let alone if you want to go to a hospital or things like that. this is why the continent of france, of course, in the front line are very worried about this. it's not just a are very worried about this. it's notjust a question of money, it's about legislative, enforceable systems that means there's far less of a pull factor and that fewer
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people will be risking their lives. that's the hope, that's the objective on both sides, whether it's the uk, france, or even belgium and the netherlands.— and the netherlands. another story on the times. _ and the netherlands. another story on the times, this _ and the netherlands. another story on the times, this is _ and the netherlands. another story on the times, this is a _ and the netherlands. another story on the times, this is a former- on the times, this is a former editor of the daily mail who applied to be the head of off column, which also regulates the bbc. and to be the head of off column, which also regulates the bbc.— also regulates the bbc. and he is ha- also regulates the bbc. and he is happy man- _ also regulates the bbc. and he is happy man- he's _ also regulates the bbc. and he is happy man. he's basically - happy man. he's basically complaining about the fact that he has decided to step down. he basically tells anyone from the private sector not to bother. so he thinks he's being treated really very unfairly — and it says that there hasn't been any pressure put on him, but he says to anyone from the private sector who has convictions and is thinking of applying for public appointment, i
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say the following — the civil service will control and leak everything, the process could take a yearin everything, the process could take a year in which your life will be put on hold. he goes on to complain even more. what will be interesting is he was afraid, at the age of 73, that if he did this, all this kind of looking at sleeves which the government has been mired in in the past two weeks of headlines —— sleaze would be looked into. the interesting thing is, who's now up for the job and who can do the job, and who will get that much coveted and who will get that much coveted and front—line job? and who will get that much coveted and front—linejob? if and who will get that much coveted and front-line job?— and front-line “ob? if he's right, then maybe _ and front-line job? if he's right, then maybe it'll _ and front-line job? if he's right, then maybe it'll be _ and front-line job? if he's right, then maybe it'll be mr— and front-line job? if he's right, then maybe it'll be mr blobby. l and front-line job? if he's right, i then maybe it'll be mr blobby. £85 million spending spree for christmas?— million spending spree for christmas? , ., ., , , christmas? yes, we are all spending our money apparently _ christmas? yes, we are all spending our money apparently in _ christmas? yes, we are all spending our money apparently in the - christmas? yes, we are all spending our money apparently in the run-up| our money apparently in the run—up to christmas. already we are spending _ to christmas. already we are spending it, we had warnings from retail— spending it, we had warnings from retail giants that supply issues
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might— retail giants that supply issues might hit shoppers this christmas, so everyone is getting out early. call me — so everyone is getting out early. call me a — so everyone is getting out early. call me a cynic but there's a reason retail— call me a cynic but there's a reason retail giants — call me a cynic but there's a reason retail giants wanted this early. but people _ retail giants wanted this early. but people are shopping in stores rather than online, making sure the economy bounces _ than online, making sure the economy bounces back. and it is good news for the _ bounces back. and it is good news for the retail sector because there was a _ for the retail sector because there was a worry— for the retail sector because there was a worry that maybe people's pockets — was a worry that maybe people's pockets had been hit by the pandemic and the _ pockets had been hit by the pandemic and the rising cost of living, things— and the rising cost of living, things like that, and they wouldn't be spent — things like that, and they wouldn't be spent. so that is good news, there _ be spent. so that is good news, there are — be spent. so that is good news, there are those who did save during there are those who did save during the pandemic — obviously not everyone. _ the pandemic — obviously not everyone, some were hit very hard, but others _ everyone, some were hit very hard, but others managed to squirrel some away~ _ but others managed to squirrel some away~ this'tt— but others managed to squirrel some away. this'll be the proper christmas hopefully — we still got a wild to _ christmas hopefully — we still got a wild to go — christmas hopefully — we still got a wild to go for a couple of years, so you can _ wild to go for a couple of years, so you can see — wild to go for a couple of years, so you can see why people want to smash out and _ you can see why people want to smash out and make the most of it, can't you? _ out and make the most of it, can't ou? �* , , ., , �* out and make the most of it, can't ou? . , , �* ., out and make the most of it, can't you? absolutely, i'd love to know where the — you? absolutely, i'd love to know where the figure _ you? absolutely, i'd love to know where the figure comes _ you? absolutely, i'd love to know where the figure comes from, - you? absolutely, i'd love to know where the figure comes from, i l you? absolutely, i'd love to know. where the figure comes from, i hope it's not a press release from a retail campaign group. when we were talking about christmas in the last hour, we learned about your
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christmas which is all about quality, ratherthan christmas which is all about quality, rather than quality. christmas which is all about quality, ratherthan quality. so there's interesting advice for those planning part of that spending splurge, if they are planning to put some items in there shopping basket. you got me there. absolutely. chocolate — what excellent news that actually it's good for your heart. yippie! actually it's good for your heart. yin tie! ~ actually it's good for your heart. yippie! dark chocolate apparently is tood for yippie! dark chocolate apparently is good for your— yippie! dark chocolate apparently is good for your heart, _ yippie! dark chocolate apparently is good for your heart, that _ yippie! dark chocolate apparently is good for your heart, that the - yippie! dark chocolate apparently is good for your heart, that the editor| good for your heart, that the editor of the european heartjournal. so you don't have to quote me, you can quote him. cardiovascular medicine journal, that's your source, dark chocolate. but other chocolates are available, as well— as long as they're good, don't have lots of vegetable fat, give me french, belgian, i could continue any time supply i bought some belgian chocolates for my aunt the other day. chocolates for my aunt the other da . ., ., ., .,
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chocolates for my aunt the other da. ., ., , ., day. not good on the carbon side of thints, day. not good on the carbon side of things. but — day. not good on the carbon side of things. but they _ day. not good on the carbon side of things, but they were _ day. not good on the carbon side of things, but they were like _ day. not good on the carbon side of things, but they were like works - day. not good on the carbon side of things, but they were like works of| things, but they were like works of art. you tasted them? ijust looked at them, they were awesome! they were for her, not for me. but the other thing they say is, coffee might also be protected, but wine is at best neutral. disappointed by that? ., �* , at best neutral. disappointed by that? ., �*, ., at best neutral. disappointed by that? ., a ., ~ that? no, it's good for you. but in moderation! _ that? no, it's good for you. but in moderation! quality, _ that? no, it's good for you. but in moderation! quality, in _ that? no, it's good for you. but in i moderation! quality, in moderation. my moderation! quality, in moderation. my favourite is champagne and good red wine. ~ ., my favourite is champagne and good red wine. . ., ., ,., my favourite is champagne and good red wine. . ., ., y., my favourite is champagne and good red wine-_ it - my favourite is champagne and good red wine._ it might | red wine. what about you? it might not be great — red wine. what about you? it might not be great for _ red wine. what about you? it might not be great for you, _ red wine. what about you? it might not be great for you, but _ red wine. what about you? it might not be great for you, but you - red wine. what about you? it might not be great for you, but you won't| not be great for you, but you won't stop me _ not be great for you, but you won't stop me from having a couple glasses of white _ stop me from having a couple glasses of white. ., ., , ., i. of white. you told us about your mum's to _ of white. you told us about your mum's to kill— of white. you told us about your mum's to kill us _ of white. you told us about your mum's to kill us on _ of white. you told us about your mum's to kill us on lies -- - mum's to kill us on lies —— tequila sunrise. lovely to have you both on. that's it for the papers this hour. the papers will be back again tomorrow evening with lukwesa burak presenting and the reviewers will be
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benjamin butterworth, who's the late editor an dserior reporter at the i, and ros altmann, former pensions minister. dojoin us then if you can but for now, goodnight. hello, i'm sarah mulkerrins at the bbc sport centre. cricket chiefs in england and wales have apologised unreservedly, saying they were shocked, saddened, and shamed by the testimony of azeem rafiq. a game—wide meeting was held today following rafiq telling a committee of mps that english cricket was institutionally racist. at the oval, members of the ecb were joined by representatives from all 18 first—class counties and the players' union, with the pressure on to come up with a plan of action that goes far enough to tackle this issue.
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we will continue to listen, to make swift and positive change to the culture of the game, we will embrace and celebrate differences everywhere knowing that, with diversity, we are stronger. today, as a game, we discussed a series of tangible commiements to make cricket a sport where everyone feels safe, and everyone is included. we will now finalise the detail and publish these actions next week. 0ur game must win back your trust. there are just a few weeks to go until the start of the ashes, but cricket australia has been plunged into uncertainty after their captain was forced to step down. tim paine gave an emotional apology after it emerged he sent sexually explicit text messages to a female colleague. the private exchange was four years ago, but paine decided to resign as captain when it became clear the incident was going to be made public. he said the cricket australia investigation in 2018 had exonerated him, but he "deeply"
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regretted his actions at the time and to this day. he said standing down was the right thing to do for him, his family and for cricket. the first test starts on 8 december in brisbane. to australian cricket fans, i'm deeply sorry that my past behaviour has impacted our game on the eve of the ashes. for the disappointment i have caused to fans and the entire cricket community, i apologise. i've been blessed with a wonderful, loving, and supportive family, and it breaks my heart to know how much i have let them down. the chair of the women's tennis association has told the bbc there will be no wta events in china next year without proof that peng shuai is safe. the chinese player hasn't been heard from since alleging she was sexually assaulted by a high—profile former chinese politician. an email was allegedly sent
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from peng to the wta — but its chair, steve simon, has questioned it's authenticity. he told the bbc�*s tennis correspondent russell fuller that no amount of money would prevent them from pulling out of china if their conditions are not met. this is not about the money, this is doing what is right and making sure peng shuai is safe and free, and everything that comes with it based upon the allegations. we want to find out are the allegations is true — and, if they are, what is the result of that? just to be clear, if you don't get this independent and verifiable proof that peng shuai is safe, and there is not a full and transparent investigation, then there will be no wta tournaments in china next year? that would be my position, yes. newcastle united head coach, eddie howe, will have to wait to make his debut in the stjames's park home dugout after testing positive for covid. he will be absent from his new clubs match against brentford tomorrow after testing positive
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during a routine test earlier today. howe will now self—isolate for ten days. assistant head coaches jason tindall and graemejones will take charge in his absence. kevin de bruyne will also miss manchester city's game against everton on sunday, after testing positive for covid. manager pep guardiola said de bruyne had tested positive after returning from international duty with belgium. he will also miss the champions league game with psg and next weekend's home game against west ham. in the championship, queens park rangers are up to fifth after a 2—0 win over luton town. chris willock got his team off to a flier with this wonderful finish afterjust nine minutes. charlie austin doubled the lead in the second half to make sure that qpr would finish the night in the play—offs, while luton stay 11th. to formula one now — where qatar is hosting its first—ever grand prix. after second practice,
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valteri bottas was quickest in the mercedes, piere gasly second, max verstappen third in the red bull, and hamilton could only manage fourth. significantly, hamilton was wearing a special helmet with the rainbow flag on it — human rights are a contentious issue in qatar, especially lgbt rights. london irish beat saracens in the premiership rugby cup at the brentford community stadium. they ran in three tries in the first half to lead 21—0 at the break, and then added another in the second through cillian redmond. sarries responded, but london irish held on to win by 29—20. it's now two wins from two for them in a competition that had a two—year absence because of the pandemic. rory mcilroy is still in contention after his second round of the dp world tour championship in dubai. he's a shot behind the leaders — and that's because he made a mistake at the 18th,
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finding the water. he went on to double—bogey that hole. that put him at nine under so far, for the tournament. shane lowry is one of the leaders, along with sam horsfield and john catlin on ten under — that chip—in for eagle on the 14th was the highlight of his round. and that's all your sport for now. goodnight. good morning. it's been a mild november for many of us so far, and once again on friday we were seeing temperatures peaking way above the average for the time of year. in fact, in aberdeen, we saw a high of 17 celsius. and in aberdeenshire, generally, there was a lot of blue sky and sunshine, particularly in the morning. but let's just fast—forward a few days. all is set to change, notjust in aberdeenshire, but a cold northerly wind will bring a dramatic change to the feel of the weather i suspect
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right across the country. so, get out and enjoy saturday's weather if you can. still under this influence of high pressure, still relatively mild ahead of this frontal system that's going to continue to bring some outbreaks of rain out of scotland into northern ireland, gradually drifting towards northwest england and north wales. a very weak affair by then, some scattered sharp showers tucking in behind. now, ahead of that weather front, we will continue to see some well broken cloud with some glimpses of sunshine, with highs of 12 celsius. but behind it, those temperatures are starting to fall away, and there will be plenty of frequent showers with that brisk northerly wind. the real cold air, though, is set to arrive during saturday into sunday. as that weather front continues to sink its way steadily southwards, it's going to drive that northerly wind direction right across the country, and you really will notice the difference to the feel of the weather when you wake first thing on sunday morning. in fact, in rural sheltered areas of scotland, we are going to see a touch of frost, but the temperatures are going to fall away further.
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so, on sunday, yes, there'll be lots of sunshine around, but a brisk northerly wind just taking the edge off the feel of the weather, and it could drive in plenty of coastal showers from time to time, with perhaps some of those showers just filtering a little bit further inland across south east england. top temperatures on sunday, a little more subdued, 8—10 celsius as a maximum. now, as we move out of sunday into monday and tuesday, we have still got that high pressure with us, still under the blue colours, that cold air circulating around that high pressure with that northwesterly flow. so, basically, as we go through the week, it does look likely that the colder weather is set to stay with us, perhaps not quite as cold on wednesday and then colder still towards the end of the week. that's when we run the risk potentially of a few wintry showers into the far north.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. a us teenager who shot dead two people and injured another during racialjustice protests last year has been found not guilty of murder in a trial that polarised america. police in the netherlands fire warning shots as people take to the streets, protesting against the partial lockdown imposed to curb rising covid cases. belarus's authoritarian leader, alexander lukashenko, speaks exclusively to the bbc. he admits that his forces may have helped migrants cross into the european union. translation: i told the eu i'm not going to detain - migrants on the border, hold them at the border, and if they keep coming from now on, i still won't stop them. the women's tennis association threatens to pull out of china
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as the outcry intensifies over missing chinese

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