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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 19, 2021 8:00pm-8:46pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm. us teenager kyle rittenhouse, who shot and killed two men during racialjustice protests in kenosha, wisconsin last year, has been cleared of all charges. during the high—profile and politically divisive trial, his defence said he had feared for his life. prosecutors argued the 18—year—old was looking for trouble that night. here, and the double child—killer colin pitchfork, who was released two months ago, has been arrested and returned to prison over a breach of licence conditions. he was jailed for murdering two teenage girls in the 1980s. austria announces the toughest actions in europe to come back to run a virus. the country cousin to fall lockdown on monday and will become mandatory for people to be vaccinated from early next year.
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cricket bosses promise action after the racism experienced by yorkshire player azeem rafiq. as migrants are moved from the polish border into a warehouse in belarus, the president of belarus admits his security forces may have helped them try to cross into the eu. and mobile phones and driving how the rules are getting much tighter from next year. hello, and a warm welcome to bbc news. kyle rittenhouse, the american teenager who shot and killed two men and wounded another during racial justice protests last year on the streets of kenosha, wisconsin, has been acquitted of all charges. this is how reacted to the verdict. during a highly—charged case, kyle rittenhouse had argued that he acted in self—defence,
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while the prosecution argued he had been looking for trouble that night. let's hear more from the judge. as to the first count of the information, joseph rosenbaum, we the jury find the defendant, kyle h rittenhouse not guilty. as to the second count of the information, richard mcginnis, we the jury find the defendant, kyle h rittenhouse, not guilty. as to the third count of the information, unknown male, we the jury find the defendant, kyle h rittenhouse, not guilty. as to the fourth count of the information, anthony huber, we the jury find the defendant, kyle h rittenhouse, not guilty. as to the fifth count of the information, we the jury find the defendant, kyle h rittenhouse, not guilty. that was the product as it was delivered in the last two hours in kenosha wisconsin. mr kyle
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rittenhouse�*s attorney said he was thankful to the jury for coming to what he described as the correct verdict. to what he described as the correct verdict. ., _ ., ., verdict. to say that we were are relieved would _ verdict. to say that we were are relieved would be _ verdict. to say that we were are relieved would be a _ verdict. to say that we were are relieved would be a christmas l relieved would be a christmas understatement. kyle is not here, he is on his way home, he wants to get on with his life, he has a huge sense of relief for what the jury did tan today, he wishes none of this would've ever happened, but as he said when he testified, he did not start this and we are thankful all and more ways than one that the jerry finally got to hear the true story, and when i say the media, i'm talking about social media and things like that, the story that came out from the beginning was not the true story, and that was something that we had to work to overcome in courts. we think we did
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that. , ., ,., w ., that. let me give you some reaction from the family. _ that. let me give you some reaction from the family. this _ that. let me give you some reaction from the family. this is _ that. let me give you some reaction from the family. this is a _ that. let me give you some reaction from the family. this is a family - from the family. this is a family spokesperson for kyle rittenhouse where we are also very happy that kyle can live his life as a free and instant man, but in this whole situation, there are no winners, there are two people who lost their lives, and that is not lost on us all." reaction from the family of anthony huber, one of the men who died, saying, "today's but it needs is no accountability for the present who murdered our son. it's in the unacceptable message that armed civilians can show up in any town can incite violence and he is the danger they have created to justify shooting people. there is another political reaction, but let's leave it with the families for now that by taking a look at political reaction. our correspondent nomia iqbal takes a look at the background to the case. protesters have been in a standoff outside court over the last few days. they've already made their minds up about this case.
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the shooting happened against the backdrop of nationwide protests over racism and police brutality following the murder of george floyd. in kenosha, another black man named jacob blake had been shot by police several times, and on the third night of riots, kyle h rittenhouse entered the city. he said he came to provide security. in a series of confrontations, he shot dead joseph rosenbaum, who had chased after him into this car park. he then killed another man who ran after rittenhouse thinking he was an active shooter, a third man survived. police later arrested the teenager and charged him with murder. he cries. at his trial, there were tears... ..challenges. .. when you point the gun at someone else, that's
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going to make them feel like they are about to die, right? that's what you wanted him to feel. no! so, why...?! shouting by thejudge... don't get brazen with me! and a controversial defence by his team in regards to the shooting of jacob blake. other people of this community have shot somebody seven times, and it's been found to be ok. my client did it four times in a three quarters of a second to protect his life from mr rosenbaum. i'm sorry, but that's what happened. the facts of what happened that night are not up for debate. kyle rittenhouse killed two men and entered a third. the political divide is to deal with gun ownership in america. nomia iqbal with that report. and i've been speaking to nomia from outside the courthouse in kenosha.
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after more than 26 hours of deliberations, they finally released their verdict today and have cleared the 18—year—old kyle rittenhouse on every single charge. ijust want to read you a statement that has been released from the family of the second man that he shot dead last year. anthony huber. they have said that it sends the unacceptable message that armed civilians can show up in any town, incite violence and then use the danger they have created to justify shooting people in the streets. and that is the core argument that many liberal groups are making about the fact that mr rittenhouse has been cleared because this isn't just about what happened here in kenosha. this verdict has been seen as a referendum on the very polarising issue. —— on the very polarising issue of gun ownership. he is the second amendment personified, and for them, pro—gun right groups,
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this a victory for the second amendment. what sort of message does this send out and not face any consequences. what sort of message does that send out? that people can turn up two protests with guns and not face any consequences. kyle rittenhouse was very emotional when that verdict was read out. i suppose for a lot of people here, a lot of protesters outside the courthouse, itjust leaves a very worrying conclusion. i spoke to the family, the uncle of jacob blake, a black man that was shot by a white police officers who ended up... he said to me if kyle rittenhouse had been black, he believes that the police would have shot him. there's so many issues that this trial embodies, but for many liberal groups, this is sending out police officers who ended up...
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—— a worrying message. because of double jeopardy, kyle rittenhouse can never be tried for this case again. there can be no appeal and he's walked out of court a free man. just to illustrate what he saying about there being so many other strands affecting this case, you can see that in the reaction, because if we move away from the family and the reactions i was giving you, here is some kind of political campaigning reaction, the american several liberties union on twitter said, despite his decision to travel across state lines and injure one president take the lives of two people, he was not held responsible for his actions. unfortunately, this is not by contrast, the national rifle association has treated the essence of the second amendment, which of course guarantees the right to keep and bear arms past ratified in 1791 as an addition to the us constitution by tweeting a well regulated militia being necessary to
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the security of our free states, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. we have jermaine williams, a democratic politician on twitter, "what is the value of white tears, not even that many in this country, clearly more than black lives, and those who fight for them." finally, madison copthorne, us representative for north carolina has issued an instagram video in which he says kyle rittenhouse is not guilty, my friends can he have a right to defend yourself, be armed, be dangerous, and be moral. let's talk now to lisa bloom. we have a value in his country to be able to stand back from some of deputy rory of the case of this kind can generate. as a layer, you at least have that detachment as well. what is your analysis of what we saw in this trial?—
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in this trial? sorry, go ahead and start again- _ in this trial? sorry, go ahead and start again- i— in this trial? sorry, go ahead and start again. i think _ in this trial? sorry, go ahead and start again. i think it's _ in this trial? sorry, go ahead and start again. i think it's a - start again. i think it's a dangerous to take what happened in a trial on a very specific set of facts and enlarge it to a political message. the law of self—defense protects anyone if they feel that they are threatened, if their life or bodily integrity is being threatened, you can shoot and even kill in that situation. this is a case for almost the entirety of the incidents were caught on video, so thejury could look incidents were caught on video, so the jury could look at the video, the jury could look at the video, thejury the jury could look at the video, the jury deliberated for 25 hours and determined that in each of the three people who kyle rittenhouse shot, he shot in self—defense, he was being threatened with rocks, being chased, being swung at with a skateboard like a bat, a gun brandished on him, so thejury determined that self—defense applied, and therefore he was not guilty. that does not mean that people are now free to take guns and roam around and be vigilantes because if they do, and if they
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shoot, the jerry because if they do, and if they shoot, thejerry is going to look very carefully moment by moment that what they did. you very carefully moment by moment that what they did-— what they did. you make an important oint, the what they did. you make an important point, the context _ what they did. you make an important point, the context of— what they did. you make an important point, the context of this _ what they did. you make an important point, the context of this was - what they did. you make an important point, the context of this was the - point, the context of this was the shooting of jacob play, point, the context of this was the shooting ofjacob play, a black man by a white police officer in succession to all the other instances that had happened and sparked some very, very violent protests a lot of damage to property. groups including rittenhouse had come into the town to help defend people, and the prosecutions case came to be in effect rittenhouse had provoked the violent reaction that he then felt threatened by. thejury didn't accept that case, but presumably as he sat on the facts, that could be the sort of situation that could be used as a defence, because some lawyers have said, well, look, and wisconsin, it's quite a low standard, you have to do show that you felt threatened and edits for the prosecution to disprove that you felt threatened, which is difficult. that's correct. and it's much easier to win a self—defense case as kyle
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rittenhouse did in wisconsin and thenit rittenhouse did in wisconsin and then it would be in many other states, such as california or new york, which are tougher on cases like this. but the bottom line is thatjury like this. but the bottom line is that jury did like this. but the bottom line is thatjury did not believe that rittenhouse, then 17 years old, walking around with a large automatic weapon in ar 15 was the one who incited violence. you know, the prosecution argued that people thought he was an active shooter, especially after the first shooting and second shooting, and they were trying to protect themselves and protect others, but the jury did not agree with that. is protect others, but the “my did not agree with math agree with that. is an upper reminder— agree with that. is an upper reminder of— agree with that. is an upper reminder of the _ agree with that. is an upper| reminder of the complication agree with that. is an upper - reminder of the complication that comes into and the judgements that are made in split seconds are less than a second by people who are carrying weapons on the streets in this highly charged atmosphere. there is no indication, you could argue that this is a well ordered militia, but there's no debate about
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whether this whole question of gun rights should be reconsidered. it's gone back to the us supreme court again recently. gone back to the us supreme court again recently-_ again recently. while, i assure you there is a very _ again recently. while, i assure you there is a very vigorous _ again recently. while, i assure you there is a very vigorous debate - there is a very vigorous debate about gun rights, and ifor one believe that the more guns we have on the streets, the more people like rittenhouse we have walking around with automatic weapons, the more people are going to die, whether it self—defense or not. people do feel threatened by it. that's the problem. at least he thought he be convicted of a gun charge because he was 17 years old and you are supposed to be 18 to lock around with a gun, but he was allowed off on that because he had a long barreled gun, and apparently even a 16 or 17—year—old in wisconsin can walk around the back on. if you live in smaller, he would been convicted of illegal possession. that in smaller, he would been convicted of illegal possession.— of illegal possession. that is an extraordinary _ of illegal possession. that is an extraordinary paradox. - of illegal possession. that is an extraordinary paradox. even - of illegal possession. that is an | extraordinary paradox. even the 'udue said extraordinary paradox. even the judge said he — extraordinary paradox. even the judge said he thought _ extraordinary paradox. even the judge said he thought the - extraordinary paradox. even the judge said he thought the lie - extraordinary paradox. even the | judge said he thought the lie was confusing, and if he couldn't
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understand how can the average person understand a? more guns on the streets means more gun violence. that's what it means. i’m the streets means more gun violence. that's what it means.— that's what it means. i'm not asking our that's what it means. i'm not asking your epinion — that's what it means. i'm not asking your opinion on _ that's what it means. i'm not asking your opinion on the _ that's what it means. i'm not asking your opinion on the verdict, - that's what it means. i'm not asking your opinion on the verdict, but - that's what it means. i'm not asking your opinion on the verdict, but do | your opinion on the verdict, but do your opinion on the verdict, but do you think the conduct of the trial, the instruction to the jury can all of those issues were well handled? i do. a lot of people have complained about thisjudge seeming do. a lot of people have complained about this judge seeming to be very pro—defendant, thejudge about this judge seeming to be very pro—defendant, the judge would about this judge seeming to be very pro—defendant, thejudge would not allow the prosecution to word —— he the word victims in regards to the people who are shots, for example, but overall, i do think it was a fair trial and the fact that there was so much video means that the jury was so much video means that the jury could really look at what happened and make up their own minds. i want to emphasise people on the right here are calling rittenhouse a hero, the law protects people, even if they are a full, evenif people, even if they are a full, even if they are a vigilante, even if they are misguided. you have the right to defend yourself in the moment if you feel that your life is being threatened. this is not a verdict to say that rittenhouse is a hero. it's simply a very narrow verdict saying that he shot in
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self—defense. verdict saying that he shot in self-defense.— verdict saying that he shot in self-defense. �* . ., , self-defense. and a reminder, as he said that this — self-defense. and a reminder, as he said that this case, _ self-defense. and a reminder, as he said that this case, however - self-defense. and a reminder, as he said that this case, however you - said that this case, however you take it, has, you know, profound impacts on him and his family, and the families of the victims, and on the families of the victims, and on the injured man as well, so nobody walks away from this. i think the fact that rittenhouse said there are no winners in a case like this. that's correct, and the victims family has said this is not the end, they will proceed civil lawsuits, so i think there is more to come. aha, i think there is more to come. a great pleasure to speak with you. thank you so much for giving us some other this friday. lisa bloom there with her analysis with the kyle rittenhouse verdict in kenosha wisconsin. speaking to reporters in the past hour, president biden says he abides by thejury�*s decision. luck, i stand luck, istand by luck, i stand by what the jerry luck, i stand by what thejerry has concluded. the jerry system works, and we have to concluded. thejerry system works, and we have to abide by concluded. the jerry system works, and we have to abide by it. the president _ and we have to abide by it. the president was _
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and we have to abide by it. the president was speaking there on his return to the white house after temporarily transferring power to the vice president because of his annual medical checkup mr biden underwent an anaesthetic, which means of chris he was unconscious. this is for a routine colonoscopy and a procedure underground by previous presidents come as a result of that, they developed terms in the constitution without vice presidents taking over as acting president during that period. technically speaking, that makes her the first woman ever to hold presidential power in the united states, even if it was only for a matter of one hour and 25 minutes. but, you know, you have to start small. the ministry ofjustice has said that double child killer colin pitchfork has been arrested and returned to prison — after being released just two months ago. (00v)it�*s understood pitchfork was taken back to jail today it's understood pitchfork was taken back to jail today following mounting concerns amoungst officials about his behaviour. he was jailed in 1988 for raping and murdering two 15 year olds, lynda mann and dawn ashworth in leicestershire. well a short time ago,
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navtej johal our correspondent in nottingham —— who's been following the case —— told us more about the background to today's decision. when he was given a licence for raping and murdering the 215 euros and that's a don ashworth where his victims and he was arrested after an extensive inquiry involving the dna testing of testing of thousands of men from the area where the killings took place. at the time he committed his first crime, pitchfork was a 22—year—old married father of two. and his release on parole in september was highly contentious, but the government said he was subject to some of the strictest conditions ever imposed on a prison or on parole. now, as he say, this news has only emerged in the last hour or so. the ministry ofjustice has said that collin pitchfork has been arrested and recalled to prison. it's understood pitchfork was returned to custody today over a breach his licence conditions and his three release will be a matter for the parole board. now in his
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early 60s, he was not recalled for committing any further offences but because probation staff identified concerning behaviours, and the step was taken as a preventative measure. now, in a statement from probation service spokesperson said, "protecting the public is the number one priority, so i know vendors breach the conditions of their release and potentially pose an increased risk, we don't hesitate to return them to custody." now, barbara ashworth and the mother of don ashworth has told piet she is pleased that pitchfork has been recalled to prison. she says it's a safer place when he is behind bars. i want to have to worry about other people being hurt for the time being. after spending 33 years in prison, the parole board completed pitchfork met all the criteria for release from prison, subject to conditions. the decision was attacked by several mps and victims family member is prompting the government to formally challenge the decision on the grounds it was
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irrational. but this was rejected by a judge lead review injuly leaving opponents powerless to stop the release. tonight, however, just two months on from his release, he is backin months on from his release, he is back in prison. and we'll be getting more reaction at 8:30pm when we speak to the formerjustice secretary and lord chancellor, robert buckland. a record number of coronavirus infections across much of continental europe is pushing countries back towards tighter restrictions even full lockdowns again. from monday, austria will return to a national lockdown. it's also become one of the first countries in the world to make covid vaccination compulsory. germany's health minister called the situation there a national emergency and told germans a lockdown couldn't be ruled out. elsewhere, much tighter restrictions for the unvaccinated are being introduced. across the uk, the number of new infections remains high, but is falling, according to the latest study, prompting experts to say the uk could be on a different path, as our health editor hugh pym reports. looking ahead to christmas,
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but before then, the austrian people are facing bleak winter weeks with a 20—day lockdown from monday. they will only be allowed to leave home for work, exercise or shopping for essentials. and vaccination against covid will become compulsory in february. translation: despite months of persuasive efforts, - despite media campaigns, despite all discussions, we did not manage to convince enough people to get vaccinated. at the start of the week, austria planned restrictions on those who hadn't been jabbed, but infections carried on rising, and now a tougher set of measures. translation: idon't- actually mind being at home, i have a job which i can do from home, doesn't bother me much, but i will miss the cafe. translation: there is no other way, even though i don't like it. _ in literature, you can read that - pandemics last at least three years,
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and we should avoid that. so, will germany follow austria with lockdown restrictions? ministers said nothing was being rolled out and rising case numbers had created a national emergency. while uk daily cases relative to the population haven't surged, germany's have accelerated and are now not far behind. the netherlands and austria have imposed different forms of lockdown as their infection rates soared. so, what does this mean for the uk? some argue that more immunity is being built up after previous infections and the rest of europe is now following. maybe they are actually experiencing what some parts of the uk experienced a little bit earlier in the autumn with delta, with things opening up, and with the vaccines not fully kicking in, particularly for people in mid—life, that may be the pattern. i wouldn't assume we are going to follow the same trajectory as europe or watch it very closely, and obviously there is concern. the latest infection surveyed from the office of national statistics suggests that in england last week,
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one in 65 people had the virus, lower than the previous week. in wales, it was one in 55, also down. in scotland, with one in 95 people, case rates were said to be broadly level. in northern ireland, with one in 65 people, the trend was said to be uncertain. experts say the future path of coal that is hard to predict, much will depend on the vaccine roll—out. the scottish government says it certificate scheme has contributed to a small rise and take—up among young people, and it may be extended. as in all the uk's nations, case data will be watched as closely as ever. hugh pym, bbc news. the england and wales cricket board says the culture of the game has to change and promised "wide—ranging action to tackle discrimination" after a crisis summit at the oval today. it follows azeem rafiq's revelations of racism — while playing for yorkshire county cricket club. today, a former england player, alex hales, apologised for causing offence,
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after a photo emerged of him dressed up in black make—up, while at a party in 2009. our sports correspondent laura scott reports. after another turbulent week, cricket's latest response is crisis talks at the oval as the game joined forces in tackling the discrimination problem. what do you want to get from the meeting? clarity and togetherness, i suppose. does cricket have a racism issue? well, we have work to do, no doubt. last night alex hales became embroiled in the scandal after a photograph emerged showed him dressed in a racially offensive way in 2009. he said his appearance was a tribute to the late rapper, tupac. but apologised. i deplore all forms of racism and discrimination, i have been lucky enough to play around the world, with players of different races and cultures.
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earlier this week, there was praise for azeem rafiq, as he gave testimony to mps about his experience of racism in cricket and spoke of his hopes that speaking up would bring about change. i'm very determined that this is going to be looked back. aa the moment where not only sport, but society as a whole went _ in a different direction. but the player has been forced to front up to his own mistakes, apologising after facebook pages from 2011 emerged showing him anti—semitic comments. he later apologised for another offensive social media post. azeem rafiq's only use of discriminatory language has been described as awkward.
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others say it only shows the scale of the problem within cricket. today came an acceptance within the game that action is needed to resolve this crucial issue. in a joint statement, cricket chiefs said they were shocked and shamed and saddened by azeem rafiq's experience. you talk of initial steps, the issue is nothing new, what makes this plan different to previous plans? i think that will be the proof will be in how we deliver it. this will be the first time the game has come together to take such urgent action. despite some counties having suggested a vote of in confidence, harrison said he has been backed. english cricket has come up with a broad direction of travel. but with the soul and survival of the sport at stake, they must translate those intentions into action.
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it's already illegal to call or text on a hand held phone while you're driving in the uk. but from next year the rules are getting even tighter. drivers will be banned from taking photos, filming, searching playlists or playing games — even while stationary — on mobiles and tablets. those who break the law will face six points on their licence and a 200 pound fine. caroline davies reports. # happy birthday to you...#. joe cairns was 1a years old when his mother last waved him off to school. i always told him, i love you. not always would he say it back. she chuckles. sometimes he would. we got him settled in the van and i waved goodbye to him. the minibusjoe was riding in was hit by a lorry. the lorry driver was checking his social media on his phone moments before the crash. finding that out, i do remember being physically sick. you know... it was just that reaction
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that my boy was killed for nothing. for likes, you know? checking his social media. the driverjames majury was jailed for eight years for dangerous driving. the current law bans driving while texting and calling, but this change will mean that it's easier for police to charge drivers holding their phone regardless of the reason. from next year, they'll be very few exemptions for why you're able to hold your phone while you're driving. one of them will be if you're making an emergency phone call. but another proposed one is if you're paying for something contactlessly — for example a toll or maybe a drive—through restaurant — but your car has to be stationary. you can still use devices like satnav, for instance, but they have to be in a cradle. the law was introduced in 2003 when calls and texts were what most mobiles were used for. although police can charge drivers with other driving offences if they are using their phone and not in control of their vehicle, this change will close a loophole. if you get caught now, you're going to get a £200 fine
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and six points on your licence. that is quite significant. the police will be able to enforce the law is much more strongly. joe's family continue to tell his story, to make drivers think again about how and when they use their phones. he had a life, a whole beautiful life to lead. through somebody�*s choice that day, they took his life away. and he is no more. and it has to be out there, it has to be how dangerous it is to use your phone whilst you are driving. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen. good evening. it's been another mild day. in fact, we had 17 degrees across aberdeenshire because we're bathed in these south—westerly atlantic winds. but it is going to change through the course of saturday and sunday as we get that arctic air in. so, for what remains of the evening, it's largely dry, just misty and drizzly in the west,
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but you can see the heavy rain advancing on our cold weather front in the north. so, quite wet for northern and western scotland by the end of the night. quite mild, though, a few spot down to 6—7 degrees celsius, a little bit of mist and fog in the gaps, which will lift during the course of saturday morning. then we'll see some brightness developing, but there's quite a lot of drizzly rain in some coastal and hillier areas, and then on this weatherfront, some more significant rain coming southwards. behind it, temperatures will actually drop during the day, back down to around about average, with some sunshine, but also some showers. and those showers will filtrate further southwards on sunday, as will the cold air. it will feel much colder fpr all, particularly accentuated by the brisk wind, even in southern areas. hello this is bbc news with me, shaun ley. the headlines — us teenager kyle rittenhouse, who shot and killed two men during racialjustice protests
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in kenosha, wisconsin last year, has been cleared of all charges. during the high—profile and politically divisive trial, the defence for kyle rittenhouse said he had feared for his life. prosecutors argued the 18—year—old was looking for trouble that night. the double child—killer colin pitchfork, who was released two months ago, has been arrested and returned to prison over a breach of licence conditions. he was jailed for murdering two teenage girls in the 1980s. austria announces the toughest action seen in europe to combat coronavirus. the country goes into a full lockdown on monday, and it will be mandatory for people to get vaccinated. cricket bosses promise action after the racism experienced by yorkshire player azeem rafiq. and mobile phones and driving — how the rules are getting stricter from next year.
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more now on the recall to prison of the double child—killer colin pitchfork. he was released two months ago after spending 33 years in prison for the rape and murder of two teenage girls in leicestershire in the 1980s. the mother of dawn ashworth said she was "pleased" that pitchfork had been returned to prison. we can speak now to the conservative mp robert buckland, who was justice secretary and lord chancellor at the time of colin pitchfork�*s release two months ago. thank you so much for being with us this evening. what do you make of this evening. what do you make of this news? ~ ~ ., , this news? well, i think that first of all let's _ this news? well, i think that first of all let's remember _ this news? well, i think that first of all let's remember the - this news? well, i think that first| of all let's remember the families in the victims of this murder and remember the seriousness of the offences which he committed. and be thankful that the probation service who are responsible for the monitoring of the licence conditions of this offender have acted swiftly
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to return him to prison in a way that i think will give maximum reassurance to the public. this was one of the most appalling crimes in recent history. the number of licence conditions imposed upon him were significant. and i urged the parole board to reconsider the case because of concerns about this particular individual�*s ability to potentially manipulate and deceive people who he was working with. that's what i urged reconsideration. that's what i urged reconsideration. that was rejected, now only if you mess later we see this man returning to custody where i think he belongs in the first place. you to custody where i think he belongs in the first place.— in the first place. you rightly said at that point _ in the first place. you rightly said at that point you _ in the first place. you rightly said at that point you were _ in the first place. you rightly said at that point you were just - in the first place. you rightly said at that point you were just a - at that point you were just a secretary and there were limits to what you could do as a politician within the legal system, now you are
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no longer in thatjob and you can talk a bit more freely about this. there is a big debate and has been a debate for some years about whether the parole board is fit for purpose. what's your view?— the parole board is fit for purpose. what's your view? well, i'd ordered a root and branch _ what's your view? well, i'd ordered a root and branch review _ what's your view? well, i'd ordered a root and branch review of - what's your view? well, i'd ordered a root and branch review of the - a root and branch review of the parole board when i was just a secretary and i am expecting and hoping the results of that review to be published very soon. the extent of my ambition was significant. while some believe there very dedicated professionals in the parole board, i think there is a lot that could be done the first of all reform transparency in the way it did itsjob. maintain its independence and i think that's important because these need to be decisions informed on the evidence rather than anything else, but here is the thing, i think making sure that the tasks that are applied and are as rigorous as possible and that are as rigorous as possible and that a mechanism that involves the secretary of state was also as
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effective as possible giving the secretary of state that sort of safety valve approach that could allow you serious and concerning cases to be looked at again, especially cases which invoke a wider public interest. clearly the colin pitchfork case dead.- wider public interest. clearly the colin pitchfork case dead. there is a dancer colin pitchfork case dead. there is a dangerjust _ colin pitchfork case dead. there is a dangerjust from _ colin pitchfork case dead. there is a dangerjust from a _ colin pitchfork case dead. there is a dangerjust from a management| a dangerjust from a management of offenders one of you if people start to commit very serious crimes, start to commit very serious crimes, start to believe that they no longer have a chance at parole, whether for maybe entirelyjustified reasons they don't but if i start to believe that, is not arrested they become a problem insidejails that, is not arrested they become a problem inside jails and that the management of offenders then becomes a real issue in prisons even if it's not one outside? i a real issue in prisons even if it's not one outside?— not one outside? i don't think an bod not one outside? i don't think anybody is — not one outside? i don't think anybody is seriously - not one outside? i don't think anybody is seriously arguing l not one outside? i don't think i anybody is seriously arguing that not one outside? i don't think - anybody is seriously arguing that we should move wholesale to a position where there is not any prospect of release or parole but remember in this case, it was one of the
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greatest crimes. two children being murdered. nowadays, colin pitchfork would have started off with a whole life order and that would've been with the court would have started in terms of its sentence. and therefore we probably would not be having this debate in the first place. so nobody i think is seriously saying that there would be a wholesale abandonment of the system but what is important is that the parole board is as responsive as possible to the widest possible sources of evidence and is shall we say as cautious as possible about cases like this, especially in a case like this where there was some evidence about the individual positive ability of misleading or deceiving those in authority. and there is a wider public interest was that we want to make sure there is maximum confidence in the system and nothing undermines public confidence more than cases like this which are so egregious and so serious that a
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release is having the capacity of creating the impression that somehow the system is not imposing a just punishment for very serious offending. punishment for very serious offending-— punishment for very serious offendina. ., ., ,, punishment for very serious offendina. ., ., ., , ,, ., offending. you would doubtless have a lot of debates _ offending. you would doubtless have a lot of debates and _ offending. you would doubtless have a lot of debates and discussions - offending. you would doubtless have a lot of debates and discussions in i a lot of debates and discussions in your own constituency in south swindon about the legal system and how it works and whether offender rights in respect to victim rights and all those debates but there were people washington that he will go actually he would not have these problems and would not get ourselves in all these messes if we still had the death penalty in this country for murder. the death penalty in this country for murder-— for murder. look, i have always been very consistent _ for murder. look, i have always been very consistent about _ for murder. look, i have always been very consistent about my _ for murder. look, i have always been very consistent about my opposition l very consistent about my opposition to the death penalty. i think fundamentally it is not the sort of deterrent that some people believe it is in otherjurisdictions and countries that have a definitely. there's no evidence to deter people from committing most serious of crimes... �* , crimes... but there will be those who say it _ crimes... but there will be those who say it is _ crimes... but there will be those who say it is a — crimes... but there will be those who say it is a punishment - crimes... but there will be those who say it is a punishment that l crimes... but there will be those i who say it is a punishment that fits the crime better than the
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convolutions we end by having them prisoner in prison for life or you have committed this heinous crime and you self said the victims families who feel if they are forgotten if the debate is always lapis of the offender. find forgotten if the debate is always lapis of the offender.— forgotten if the debate is always lapis of the offender. and i agree with that which _ lapis of the offender. and i agree with that which is _ lapis of the offender. and i agree with that which is what _ lapis of the offender. and i agree with that which is what just - lapis of the offender. and i agree with that which is what just prior| with that which is whatjust prior to my leaving office i spoke to a consultation into a victim law which i want government to get on with bringing into force because i think the victims need to be much more at the victims need to be much more at the centre of offence but can i come back to the definitely that i do not believe and return to it would be right. i think that some of the miscarriages ofjustice cases which we are all from your with should be a stark reminder that however hard—working and however careful ha rd—working and however careful people hard—working and however careful people are in the system, the prospect of a miscarriage ofjustice takes somebody�*s life is very serious indeed. and one that we should not ignore and therefore i think that for a whole range of reasons, going back to the death
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penalty would not be the right approach. what is the right approach is the progressive changes that i've and others have been making to the system, extending the starting point for whole life orders to a wider range of murders and toughening up the early release system by ending automatic early release at the halfway point for a whole range of serious, violent and sexual offenders and that legislation introduced we passed by parliament introduced we passed by parliament in a couple of months�* time. that�*s the way you help increase confidence in the system rather than a return to a very distant past where frankly societal attitudes were very, very different. less focus on the present and let�*s remind ourselves that happening now, if colin pitchfork or anyone like him was committed of these heinous offences, the whole life order would be the starting point for their imprisonment. robert buckland, conservative _ point for their imprisonment. robert buckland, conservative mp - point for their imprisonment. robert buckland, conservative mp for - point for their imprisonment. robert buckland, conservative mp for and l buckland, conservative mp for and former lord chancellor and it secretary of state forjustice
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committee so much for being with us on bbc news. committee so much for being with us on bbc news-— the president of belarus, alexander lukashenko, has said that he will not stop the flow of thousands of migrants through his country as they try to enter the european union. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, president lukashenko admitted that his armed forces may actually be helping migrants cross the heavily—guarded border into poland. steve rosenberg spoke to the belarusian leader at the presidential palace in minsk. it�*s not often you get the chance to meet the man who�*s been labelled europe�*s last dictator. the west says alexander lukashenko is using migrants as a political weapon. we confronted him with claims his troops have been cutting borderfences to help migrants into the eu. translation: our guys are helping the migrants get into the _ polish territory? it�*s perfectly possible. i think that�*s absolutely possible. maybe someone helped them. i won�*t even look into this. thousands of migrants have been coming to belarus
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to try to slip into europe. alexander lukashenko denies bringing them here. but he warned the eu six months ago. translation: you told the eu that belarus has been stopping migrants and now they would have to catch them themselves. the migrants took that to mean belarus is open to them. translation: i told the eu i won't hold migrants. - they�*re not coming to my country, they�*re going to yours, the west stopped talking to us and working with us. if you don�*t want to, fine, we�*ll sort this problem out ourselves as best we can. this was belarus last year. alexander lukashenko under pressure, accused of rigging an election and stealing the presidency.
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but he launched a brutal crackdown on his critics and on civil society. translation: we saw protesters being beaten, and we saw young people coming out of detention tention centres with injuries. translation: 0k, ok, i admit it. people were beaten at the detention centre, but there were police beaten up, too, and you didn�*t show this. sincejuly, 27 ngos have been shut down in belarus. i will answer your question with no bother, we will massacre all the scum the west have been financing.
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you�*re upset we have destroyed your structures and those you have been paying for? europe doesn�*t see alexander lukashenko as a legitimate president. he claims not to care. a pariah in the west he knows there is also vladimir putin�*s russia to fall back on. steve rosenberg, bbc news, minsk. the cutting down of trees in brazil�*s amazon rainforest has hit its highest level in over 15 years. a report by the country�*s space research agency found that deforestation increased by 22% in a year. brazil was among a number of nations who promised to end deforestation by 2030 during the cop26 climate summit in glasgow. joining me now is barbara davies-quy, who is the deputy director of size of wales, a welsh charity on a mission to protect a global area of tropical forest twice the size of wales. thank you very much for being with us. this is disappointing news was a big raise is also very serious questions about is it possible for them to get to their commitment that they mayjust them to get to their commitment that they may just about a week ago they mayjust about a week ago given how the pace of the four station is continuing? the how the pace of the four station is continuing?— continuing? the levels of deforestation _ continuing? the levels of deforestation are - continuing? the levels of deforestation are really l continuing? the levels of - deforestation are really shocking. we have seen if you set around 20% increase last year, which was around
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60% the size of wells cut down and we have seen over the last year devastating legislation being rolled back by the brazilian government, rolling back environmental rights, rolling back environmental rights, rolling back environmental rights, rolling back indigenous people�*s rights, so really the rhetoric, signing big deals, at the moment we have not seen any of that come to reality. we have reports from our partners in brazil and in other parts of the amazon that they are seeing devastation in companies are coming in trying to exploit their land for mining, for us to wait, for agriculture. and the amazon is crucial if we want to limit global temperature rises to 1.5 degrees. aha, temperature rises to 1.5 degrees. a lot of this is down to the people who effectively are creating the economic demand for this and some of those people are us in countries like the uk. what can governments here and in other countries do to try and play their part, notjust in
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lobbing the resilience to do it because they are huge pressures for mercy to carry on doing it, but also in actually policing the products? we are part of the deforestation economy. all of these products are being imported into europe, into the uk, into wales, and our charity and the bwf last week lost a report to show wales�*s level of the four station footprint. for example we import 190,000 tonnes of soy. we need to seek strong legislation here in the uk and at the eu level to ensure that companies know where their products are coming from and that they are not causing deforestation of places such as the amazon and other rain forests and we need to see that being monitored and we also need to ensure that global trade deals don�*t perpetuate this problem. and also support countries to adapt and have ethical supply
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chains with the b does not make sense that we are

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