Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  November 19, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

6:00 pm
at six, austria becomes the first country in europe to make vaccinations compulsory, as coronavirus cases on much of the continent hit record numbers. austria is going back into a complete national lockdown. christmas markets in parts of germany are cancelled, in what ministers say is a national emergency. across the uk, cases remain high but experts say the vaccination rates and the booster programme could make the difference. i wouldn't assume we are going to follow the same trajectory as europe. we're watching very closely and obviously there is concern. also tonight: police reveal the hospital bomb in liverpool contained ball bearings as shrapnel and could have caused significant injury or death. cricket bosses promise action after the racism experienced by yorkshire player azeem rafiq.
6:01 pm
as migrants are moved away from the polish border into a warehouse in belarus. the president of belarus admits his security forces may have helped them try to cross into the eu. and mobile phones and driving — how the rules are getting much tighter from next year. and coming up on the bbc news channel: tim paine steps down as australia test captain before the ashes over a historical investigation into sexually explicit texts to a female colleague. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. a record number of coronavirus infections across much of continental europe is pushing countries back towards tighter restrictions — even full lockdowns again.
6:02 pm
from monday austria will return to a national lockdown. it's also become one of the first countries in the world to make covid vaccination compulsory. germany's health minister called the situation in the country a national emergency and said a lockdown couldn't be ruled out. elsewhere much tighter restrictions for the unvaccinated are being introduced. across the uk, the number of new infections remains high but is falling according to the latest study, prompting experts to say the uk could be on a different path as our health editor hugh pym reports. looking ahead to christmas, but before then the austrian people are facing a 20—day lockdown from monday. they will only be allowed to leave home for work, exercise or shopping for essentials and vaccination will become compulsory in february.
6:03 pm
vaccination will become compulsory in february-— vaccination will become compulsory in februa . ~ ~ ., in february. translation: we did not manaue to in february. translation: we did not manage to convince _ in february. translation: we did not manage to convince enough _ in february. translation: we did not manage to convince enough people to | manage to convince enough people to get vaccinated. fist manage to convince enough people to get vaccinated-— get vaccinated. at the start of the week, get vaccinated. at the start of the week. austria _ get vaccinated. at the start of the week, austria planned _ get vaccinated. at the start of the | week, austria planned restrictions on those who hadn't been jabbed, but infections carried on rising. now a tougher set of measures. translation: i don't mind being at home, _ translation: i don't mind being at home, i_ translation: i don't mind being at home, i have ajob translation: i don't mind being at home, i have a job can i do from home _ home, i have a job can i do from home but — home, i have a job can i do from home but i _ home, i have a job can i do from home. but i will miss the cafe of course — home. but i will miss the cafe of course. , ., ., course. there is no other way, although _ course. there is no other way, although i _ course. there is no other way, although i don't _ course. there is no other way, although i don't like _ course. there is no other way, although i don't like it. - course. there is no other way, although i don't like it. in - although i don't like it. in literature _ although i don't like it. in literature you _ although i don't like it. in literature you can - although i don't like it. in i literature you can read that pandemics _ literature you can read that pandemics last _ literature you can read that pandemics last at - literature you can read that pandemics last at least - literature you can read that l pandemics last at least three literature you can read that - pandemics last at least three years and we _ pandemics last at least three years and we should _ pandemics last at least three years and we should avoid _ pandemics last at least three years and we should avoid that. - pandemics last at least three years and we should avoid that. will. and we should avoid that. will germany follow _ and we should avoid that. germany follow austria? and we should avoid that.“ germany follow austria? ministers said nothing was being ruled out. while the uk daily cases relative to the population haven't surged, germany's have accelerated and are now not far behind. the netherlands and austria have imposed different
6:04 pm
forms of lockdown as rates soared. what does it mean for the uk? some argue more immunity have been built up argue more immunity have been built up after previous infections and the rest of europe is following.- rest of europe is following. maybe they're experiencing _ rest of europe is following. maybe they're experiencing what - rest of europe is following. maybe they're experiencing what some i rest of europe is following. maybe i they're experiencing what some parts of the uk experienced earlier in the autumn, with delta, with things opening up, and with the vaccines not fully kicking in particularly for people in midlife. that may be the pattern. i wouldn't assume we are going to follow the same trajectory as europe, but we are watching closely and there is concern. . , , , watching closely and there is concern. ., , , , ., concern. the latest survey from the office for national _ concern. the latest survey from the office for national statistics - office for national statistics suggests in england last week, one in 65 people have the virus. lower than the previous week. in wales it was also down. in scotland with one in 95 people, case rates were said to be level. in northern ireland, with one in 65 people, the trend was said to be uncertain. experts say
6:05 pm
the future path of covid is hard to predict and much will depend on the vaccine roll out. the scottish government says it is scheme has contributed to a small rise in take up contributed to a small rise in take up among young people and it may be extended. case data will be watched as closely as ever. our europe correspondent bethany belljoins us now from vienna. lockdown, a full national lockdown from monday, the population has to be vaccinated from february, what has the reaction been there? frustration and some anger about the prospect of a new lockdown, but the real controversy here in austria tonight is about the plans of government to make everybody get a covid jab by february. austria is the first country in europe to announce plans like this. it say social it says it is doing it
6:06 pm
because austria's rates too low. it is one of lowest raids in western europe. some people say it is a good idea, but others say the move is unconstitutional and they have called for protests. the government says there are plans for this to be legal, because we can do this during a pandemic. others say it is about time everybody gotjabbed. thank time everybody got 'abbed. thank ou. here, the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk, show there were a4,000 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period — that's nearly 4,000 more cases than last friday. so, an average ofjust over 40,000 cases were reported per day, in the last week. more than 8,000 people were in hospital with covid as of yesterday. there were 157 deaths, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test, meaning the average number of deaths over the past seven days was 148. the total number of people who've died with covid,
6:07 pm
now stands at 143,716. 0n vaccinations, just over 88% of people aged 12 and over have now received a first dose. and 80% have been double jabbed. and more than 14.2 million people have received their booster jab. the england and wales cricket board says the culture of the game has to change and promised "wide—ranging action to tackle discrimination" after a crisis summit at the oval today. it follows azeem rafiq's revelations of racism while playing for yorkshire county cricket club. today, a former england player, alex hales, apologised for causing offence, after a photo emerged of him dressed up in black make—up, while at a party in 2009. our sports correspondent laura scott reports. after another turbulent week, cricket's latest response is crisis talks at the oval as the game joined forces in tackling the
6:08 pm
discrimination probl what do you want to get from the meeting. clarity and togetherness. does cricket have _ clarity and togetherness. does cricket have a _ clarity and togetherness. does cricket have a racism _ clarity and togetherness. does cricket have a racism issue? i clarity and togetherness. does i cricket have a racism issue? well clarity and togetherness. does - cricket have a racism issue? well we have work to — cricket have a racism issue? well we have work to do. _ cricket have a racism issue? well we have work to do. last _ cricket have a racism issue? well we have work to do. last night - cricket have a racism issue? well we have work to do. last night alex - have work to do. last night alex hales became _ have work to do. last night alex hales became embroiled - have work to do. last night alex hales became embroiled in - have work to do. last night alex hales became embroiled in thel hales became embroiled in the scandal after a photograph emerged showed him dressed in a racially offensive way in 2009. he said his appearance was a tribute to a rapper. but apologised. appearance was a tribute to a rapper. butapologised. i appearance was a tribute to a rapper. but apologised. ideplore all forms of— rapper. but apologised. i deplore all forms of racism _ rapper. but apologised. i deplore all forms of racism and _ all forms of racism and discrimination, i have been lucky enough _ discrimination, i have been lucky enough to— discrimination, i have been lucky enough to play around the world, with players of different races and culture _ with players of different races and culture. ., , ~ ., , culture. earlier this week there was raise culture. earlier this week there was praise for azeem _ culture. earlier this week there was praise for azeem rafiq _ culture. earlier this week there was praise for azeem rafiq as _ culture. earlier this week there was praise for azeem rafiq as he - culture. earlier this week there was praise for azeem rafiq as he gave l praise for azeem rafiq as he gave testimony to mps about his experience of racism in cricket and spoke of his hope that speaking up would bring about change. i'm determined that this is going to be looked _ determined that this is going to be looked back— determined that this is going to be looked back at _ determined that this is going to be looked back at the _ determined that this is going to be looked back at the moment - determined that this is going to be looked back at the moment where| determined that this is going to be . looked back at the moment where not
6:09 pm
only sport. _ looked back at the moment where not only sport. but — looked back at the moment where not only sport, but society— looked back at the moment where not only sport, but society as _ looked back at the moment where not only sport, but society as a whole - only sport, but society as a whole went _ only sport, but society as a whole went in _ only sport, but society as a whole went in a — only sport, but society as a whole went in a different _ only sport, but society as a whole went in a different direction. - only sport, but society as a whole went in a different direction. butl went in a different direction. but the -la er went in a different direction. the player has been forced to went in a different direction.- the player has been forced to front up the player has been forced to front up to his own mistakes, apologising after facebook pages emerged him making anti—semitic comments. he later apologised for another offensive social media post. azeem rafiq's only use of discriminatory language has been described as awkward. others say it shows the scale of the problem within cricket. today came an acceptance in the game that collective action is needed. in a joint statement, cricket chiefs said they were shocked and shamed by azeem rafiq's experience. you talk
6:10 pm
of initial steps, the issue is nothing new, what makes this plan different to previous plans? i nothing new, what makes this plan different to previous plans?- different to previous plans? i think that will be — different to previous plans? i think that will be the _ different to previous plans? i think that will be the proof _ different to previous plans? i think that will be the proof will - different to previous plans? i think that will be the proof will be - different to previous plans? i think that will be the proof will be in - that will be the proof will be in how we deliver it. this will be the first time the game has come together to take such urgent action. despite some counties having suggested a vote of in confidence, harrison said he has been backed. cricket has come up with a broad direction of travel. but with the soul and survival of the sport at stake, they must translate those intentions into action. counter—terrorism detectives investigating the explosion outside liverpool women's hospital last weekend have revealed that the bomb contained ball bearings as shrapnel and could have caused significant injury or death had it detonated properly. our north of england correspondent judith moritz is there. yes, there is still a police presence here and the police say there is still a lot of scientific work to do on the device, but they
6:11 pm
have learned a lot in the last five days and know it was containing ball bearings. they are looking at how the materials for the bomb were purchased and they're not yet certain what caused it to go off. they haven't ruled out the possibility it exploded unintentionally and the taxi stopping may have caused it to explode. they say had it gone off in different circumstances, it would have caused significant injury or death and say there no connection between what happened here and what happened in manchester in 2017. they say they have learned a lot about the bomber, emad al—swealmeen, because they have spoken to his brother. the president of belarus, alexander lukashenko, has said that he will not stop the flow of thousands
6:12 pm
of migrants through his country as they try to enter the european union. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, president lukashenko admitted that his armed forces may actually be helping migrants cross the heavily—guarded border into poland. from minsk, steve rosenberg reports. it is not often you get the chance to meet the man who has been labelled europe's last dictator. the west says alexander lukashenko is using migrants as a political weapon. we confronted him with claims his troops have been cutting border fences to help claims his troops have been cutting borderfences to help migrants into the eu. border fences to help migrants into the eu. �* ,, �* border fences to help migrants into the eu. ~ ,, ~ , , the eu. translation: our guys are helinu the the eu. translation: our guys are helping the migrants _ the eu. translation: our guys are helping the migrants get _ the eu. translation: our guys are helping the migrants get into - the eu. translation: our guys are helping the migrants get into the - helping the migrants get into the polish territory? it is possible. i think that is absolutely possible. maybe someone helped them. i won't even look into this. maybe someone helped them. iwon't even look into this.— even look into this. thousands of mi . rants even look into this. thousands of migrants have — even look into this. thousands of migrants have been _ even look into this. thousands of migrants have been coming - even look into this. thousands of migrants have been coming to i even look into this. thousands of - migrants have been coming to belarus to try to slip into europe. alexander lukashenko denies bringing them here. but he warned the eu six
6:13 pm
months ago. them here. but he warned the eu six months ago-— them here. but he warned the eu six months ago. translation: you told the eu that belarus _ months ago. translation: you told the eu that belarus has _ months ago. translation: you told the eu that belarus has been - the eu that belarus has been stopping migrants and now they would have to catch them themselves the migrants took that to mean belarus is open to them. told migrants took that to mean belarus is open to them-— is open to them. told the eu i won't hold migrants- _ is open to them. told the eu i won't hold migrants. they're _ is open to them. told the eu i won't hold migrants. they're not - is open to them. told the eu i won't hold migrants. they're not coming l is open to them. told the eu i won't| hold migrants. they're not coming to my hold migrants. they're not coming to nry country. — hold migrants. they're not coming to my country, they're going to yours, the west— my country, they're going to yours, the west stopped talking to us and working _ the west stopped talking to us and working with us, if you don't want to, fine — working with us, if you don't want to, fine we — working with us, if you don't want to, fine, we will sort this problem out ourselves, as best we can. this was belarus — out ourselves, as best we can. this was belarus last _ out ourselves, as best we can. this was belarus last year. _ out ourselves, as best we can. try 3 was belarus last year. alexander lukashenko under pressure, accused of rigging an election and stealing the presidency. but hi launched a brutal crackdown on his crickets and on civil society. we saw protesters
6:14 pm
being beaten and young people coming out of detention tention centres with injuries. i out of detention tention centres with injuries-— with in'uries. i admit it. people were with injuries. i admit it. people were beaten — with injuries. i admit it. people were beaten at _ with injuries. i admit it. people were beaten at the _ with injuries. i admit it. people were beaten at the detention l with injuries. iadmit it. people- were beaten at the detention centre, but there _ were beaten at the detention centre, but there were police beaten up too and you _ but there were police beaten up too and you didn't show this. since jul . and you didn't show this. since july. 270n60s— and you didn't show this. since july, 270ngos have _ and you didn't show this. since july, 270ngos have been - and you didn't show this. since july, 270ngos have been shut| and you didn't show this. ’5 rice: july, 270ngos have been shutdown in july, 270ngos have been shut down in belarus. i july, 270ngos have been shut down in belarus. . , july, 270ngos have been shut down in belarus. ., , , ., july, 270ngos have been shut down in belarus. . , , ., , ., belarus. i will answer your question with no bother, _ belarus. i will answer your question with no bother, we _ belarus. i will answer your question with no bother, we will— belarus. i will answer your question with no bother, we will massacre i belarus. i will answer your question | with no bother, we will massacre all the scum _ with no bother, we will massacre all the scum the west have been financing _ the scum the west have been financing. you're upset we have destroyed — financing. you're upset we have destroyed your structures and those you have _ destroyed your structures and those you have been paying for?— you have been paying for? europe doesnt you have been paying for? europe doesn't see _ you have been paying for? europe doesn't see alexander _ you have been paying for? europe| doesn't see alexander lukashenko you have been paying for? europe . doesn't see alexander lukashenko as a legitimate president. he claims not to care. a pariah in the west he knows there is also vladimir putin's russia to fall back on. the brexit minister david frost says significant gaps remain
6:15 pm
across most issues relating to the northern ireland protocol, that's the part of the brexit deal designed to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland. the uk and the european union have been holding talks to try to ease the row about trading arrangements for northern ireland, with european from brussels, jessica parker reports. the uk may have left the eu, but britain is still here talking. morning, everybody. because of issues with the treaty that both sides signed up to. our preference is to see if we can find a negotiated way through this problem. if we can't, article 16 remains on the table. that means potentially suspending parts of the protocol. so, how are discussions going? i wouldn't expect any breakthroughs on anything today, but there are some issues that we are making better progress on than others. thanks very much. then in for those talks, which happen in private. a haulage firm in county antrim. they've had to adjust a post—brexit changes, extra paperwork for goods coming from great britain after
6:16 pm
northern ireland continued to follow certain eu rules. the eu has proposed easing checks, the uk wants to go further and change how the treaty is policed. here, they want clarity. we need to know what next year is going to look like. we need to know what next week is going to look like. the uncertainty is where we are at currently, and we need europe and the uk to get together to thrash this out and get a deal. there are ripples of movement in areas like medicine supply. one minister said he's confident of progress without suspending parts of the protocol, a move that could lead to a wider trade dispute. things seem calmer than they were. the eu getting this message earlier. ——the eu giving this message earlier. right now, we need the uk government to reciprocate the significant _ move the eu has made. i notice and welcome a recent change of tone from the uk government, -
6:17 pm
and we hope that actions will follow words. - so, lord frost walked through these doors once again today as talks continue and the mood music does seem to have improved. but there were always likely to be ups as well as downs in this process. this journey has still got some way to run. lord frost leaving brussels this afternoon. both sides speak of urgency on talks that aren't quite stuck, rather moving slowly. jessica parker, bbc news, in brussels. our top story this evening: austria becomes the first country in europe to make vaccinations compulsory as coronavirus cases on much of the continent hit record numbers. coming up, we are live at children in need. tonight will feature ed sheeran, 0ti mabuse and zippy.
6:18 pm
coming up in sportsday on the bbc news channel. the wta chairman tells the bbc there will be no events in china next year without proof that peng shuai is safe. she has not been heard from since she made sexual assault allegations against a chinese government official. it's already illegal to call or text on a hand held phone while you're driving in the uk. but from next year the rules are getting even tighter. drivers will be banned from taking photos, filming, searching playlists or playing games — even while stationary — on mobiles and tablets. those who break the law will face six points on their licence and a £200 fine. caroline davies reports. # happy birthday to you...#. joe cairns was 14 years old when his mother last waved him off to school. i always told him, i love you. not always would he say it back. she chuckles. sometimes he would. we got him settled in the van and i waved goodbye to him.
6:19 pm
the minibusjoe was riding in was hit by a lorry. the lorry driver was checking his social media on his phone moments before the crash. finding that out, i do remember being physically sick. you know... it was just that reaction that my boy was killed for nothing. for likes, you know? checking his social media. the driverjames majury was jailed for eight years for dangerous driving. the current law bans driving while texting and calling, but this change will mean that it's easier for police to charge drivers holding their phone regardless of the reason. from next year, there'll be very few exemptions for why you're able to hold your phone while you're driving. one of them will be if you're making an emergency phone call. but another proposed one is if you're paying for something contactlessly — for example a toll or maybe a drive—through restaurant — but your car has to be stationary.
6:20 pm
you can still use devices like satnav, for instance, but they have to be in a cradle. the law was introduced in 2003 when calls and texts were what most mobiles were used for. although police can charge drivers with other driving offences if they are using their phone and not in control of their vehicle, this change will close a loophole. if you get caught now, you're going to get a £200 fine and six points on your licence. that is quite significant. the police will be able to enforce the law is much more strongly. joe's family continue to tell his story, to make drivers think again about how and when they use their phones. he had a life, a whole beautiful life to lead. through somebody�*s choice that day, they took his life away. and he is no more. and it has to be out there, it has to be how dangerous it is to use your phone whilst you are driving.
6:21 pm
colin pitchfork has been arrested and returned to prison. he was jailed in 1988 for raping and murdering two teenagers. it's understood he was returned to custody over a breach of his licence conditions. ajury in custody over a breach of his licence conditions. a jury in the state of wisconsin have convicted two men. the shootings took place during violent protests that followed the police shooting of a black manjacob blake. the culture secretary, nadine dorries says left—wing campaigners have "hijacked" social media and made people "afraid" to say what they think. in herfirst television interview since being appointed she insists she doesn't want to start a culture war.
6:22 pm
today she was announcing more than £100 million as part our culture editor, katie razzall, reports. she's got a newjob. how does the crown fit? does it suit me? nadine dorries' appointment as culture secretary raised alarm in some parts of the creative industries, but she was relaxed as she toured london's young vic theatre — a far cry from her combative reputation. she's seen by some as a divisive figure, who's been vocal on social media, particularly against the "left—wing snowflakes," as she's put it, who are "killing comedy" and "suppressing free speech". there's this kind of image that's been painted of me that i'm going to go out on some kind of culture—war battle. it just isn't true. but talking about "left—wing snowflakes" and their "woke agenda" is quite aggressive. well, there are some people who will politicise that. campaigners who kind of hijack the space that young people would like to occupy to talk about some serious issues, some on the left who've hijacked that space, and that's who my comments are targeted at. archive: liverpool. the great atlantic port of the north of england... nadine dorries is culture secretary and a best—selling novelist,
6:23 pm
whose books are based on her upbringing in a deprived part of liverpool. she says she went hungry as a child and shared shoes to go to school. and so i made it my ethos in the department within 24 hours of arriving, every decision we take has a filter, and that is — does this policy help those from socially—deprived areas to access both arts and culture and sport? we express our solidarity! she got a sneak preview at a rehearsalfor the young vic's new play. this theatre is one of 925 cultural organisations in england — the majority outside the capital — that she's today announced will share more than £100 million from the government's culture recovery fund. it's the latest instalment to help them through the pandemic. many theatres would not be standing today if the government hadn't supported them over the last 20 months. the funding we're doing now is to help people through the recovery period.
6:24 pm
nadine dorries has taken on the beasts in the tvjungle. oh, god, it's horrible! it's the media jungle she's taking on now, as she decides the price of the bbc licence fee over the next five years. she's long been a vocal critic of the bbc. you could hear the almond milk latte cups hitting the floor across the bbc when myjob was announced. now perhaps there's a change of tone. of course i want the bbc to survive. i'm british. you know, it's the best of british, of course i want the bbc to survive. that's why we have to have those really hard discussions about how do we enable it over the long term to remain that global institution. she's the tenth culture secretary in ten years. not many have faced the criticism from the start that she has. nadine dorries says the reaction to her appointment was snobbish and sexist. will her actions in the role change their views? katie razzall, bbc news.
6:25 pm
andrew marr has announced he is leaving the bbc saying he is keen to get his own voice back. he said he would now focus on writing and presenting political and cultural shows the global and writing for newspapers. patients with a rare genetic condition that causes progressive muscle weakness are to benefit from a new medicine on the nhs in england. risdiplam is the first oral treatment to be used to treat hundreds of patients with spinal muscular atrophy, which can cause paralysis and sometimes prove fatal. our medical editor fergus walsh reports. i'm still an incredibly positive person, but i can't deny the effects that this condition has had on me physically in the last couple of years. good, good. right in my chest. chris has a masters in sports management and is a coach. remember to push off your index finger. he also has spinal muscular atrophy, which causes progressive muscle weakness.
6:26 pm
in the last two years, he's lost the ability to walk. he should be eligible for a new treatment, risdiplam, shown to improve movement and stability. it'd be huge, just to have the certainty that it's not going to get any worse. i may not get back my ability to walk, that's fine. i'm still happy in the skin that i live in, i'm still happy with my lot in life. risdiplam is the first oral medicine for sma, but each bottle has a list price of £8,000 and may last patients just a couple of weeks — although the nhs has negotiated a confidential discount. having it as a syrup, that really makes a difference, doesn't it? oh, yes. doctors say the drug works by boosting the levels of a protein crucial for keeping nerve cells healthy. it really alters the outlook for these people. it gives them a hope for the future.
6:27 pm
rather than facing a decline in their condition, further muscle weakness, they can have the hope with treatment to retain those skills. hello, everyone. i am melville. three years ago, i was the first child in england to test- a new medicine that helps with my sma~ _ yes! nine—year—old melville takes risdiplam once a day after breakfast as part of a medical trial. his parents hope he may never need a wheelchair because he is now so much stronger. basically, he has now more stamina, he is able to handle stairs better. i have a lot of hope and i'm very happy that it's now available for other families. on a day—to—day basis, it's great to see melville improving a little bit every day. so, you want to put that in? there is no cure yet for sma, but the outlook for melville
6:28 pm
and hundreds of other patients looks much brighter. fergus walsh, bbc news. here's louise lear. it's seasonal, really. december is just around the corner so there is a bit of a chill out there. take a look at aberdeen this afternoon. not a cloud in the sky to start with but temperatures peaked at 17. they were the highest values for the second day in array. we are heading for a change. staying with aberdeen, take a look at what's to come. a roller—coaster going from 17, cooler at the weekend, and then as that front clears an injection of even colder air thursday to friday could bring wintry showers. although that's aberdeen, that's the trend across the country in terms of the feel of the weather. tomorrow
6:29 pm
morning, quite a lot of cloud, through central and southern areas of england and wales back cloud will break up. our weatherfront of england and wales back cloud will break up. our weather front sinks into the north of england and north wales, patchy rain by then and sunny spells and scattered showers behind it. feeling that cooler air in scotland. ahead of the front, we may still see double digits. out on saturday into sunday, that front continues to play and it's behind the cold front that the cold air digs in. the northerly winds are going to take over on sunday and a noticeable difference if you're going to be out and about. a chilly start, a touch of frost in sheltered and rural areas of scotland. a cold start on sunday but hopefully it sunny. to compensate, more sunshine than recently, but northerly wind adding that shale and driving in some showers around the coast. —— adding that chilly note. noticeably
6:30 pm
cooler as we get through the week with some wintry showers later on. well, that's if from the bbc news at six. we leave you tonight with children in need, our correspondent colin paterson is in the studio in salford to tell you what's in store. is in the studio in salford to tell children is in the studio in salford to tell in need started in this children in need started in 1980 but this is the first time it's been held in the north. it starts in about half an hour here at media city in salford. i saw ed sheeran rehearsing earlier. last year because of lockdown, there was no studio audience. you will notice their back and they're enthusiastic. cheering it's as if i rehearsed that! think big

64 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on