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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 19, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines: cricket chiefs hold an urgent meeting about racism in the game in england. it comes after another cricketer apologises — for wearing black make—up at a fancy dress party in 2009 my 20s was full of mistakes like that, reckless mistakes off the field that cost me and let down family and let down team—mates and let down friends. austria is to go into a full nationwide lockdown because of record covid cases,— and everyone will have to get vaccinated. here, two children and two women have died in a fire at a house in south east london. a 13—year—old boy is in a critical condition after being shot in the back in birmingham last night. police believe his injuries
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are life—changing. and drivers will be banned from scrolling, filming or searching playlists on their mobile phone from next year. good afternoon. cricket chiefs are holding an emergency meeting to discuss racism in the english game. it comes after shocking testimony earlier this week from ex—yorkshire player azeem rafiq about the racism he faced. he had to apologise himself yesterday for anti—jewish comments he wrote on social media ten years ago. and another player, alex hales, has apologised after a photo was published showing him wearing black makeup at a fancy
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dress party in 2009. laura scott reports. after another turbulent week, cricket�*s latest response to its racism crisis — crisis talks at the 0val today as the game comes together to tackle its discrimination problem, evidence of which continues to emerge. what do you hope to get out of the meeting today? just clarity and togetherness i suppose. does cricket have a racism issue? we have a lot of work to do, no doubt about it. i think it will be resolved today, there is actually a desire to get it sorted, a real desire within the game. last night the former england cricketer alex hales became further embroiled in the scandal after a photo emerged showing him dressed in a racially offensive way at a fancy dress party in 2009. he said his appearance was a tribute to the late rapper tupac shakur but now realises it was incredibly disrespectful and issued a video statement. i deplore all forms of racism and discrimination. i have been incredibly lucky to play around the world
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in different backgrounds, with players of different races, different cultures. earlier this week, there was widespread praise for azeem rafiq as the whistleblower gave harrowing testimony to mps about his experiences of racism in cricket, but he has been forced to front up to his own mistakes, apologising after facebook messages from 2011 surfaced showing him using anti—semitic language. in a statement, he said... he later apologised for a further social media post containing a saying relating to african people. as a result of the scandal, the ecb's chief executive, tom harrison, is under pressure, and there are some who think the very existence of the governing body is now in jeopardy. what i think will happen quite quickly is that the ecb will probably be dismantled and we will see three boards replace
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it which will become part of the national governing body — one will look after the professional game, one will look after the international game and the england teams, and the other will look after the grassroots and the amateur game. meanwhile, australian cricket is dealing with its own damaging episode. 0vernight, tim paine stepped down as test captain over sexually explicit text messages sent to a female colleague. for the disappointment i have caused to fans and the entire cricket community, i apologise. i have been blessed with a wonderful, loving and supportive family and it breaks my heart to know how much i have let them down. with less than three weeks to go before one of the biggest occasions in the cricket calendar, a series of off field incidents have cast a significant and lingering shadow over the sport. laura scott, bbc news. dr halima begum is the director of the runnymede trust,
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which is a race equality think tank. it's good to have you with us. what do you make of the direction this is going in? ratherthan do you make of the direction this is going in? rather than things being sorted out, it seems that more and more rather unfortunate, embarrassing and offensive situations are now coming to light. this isn't surprising or shocking, really, because once the ecb pulled out the call to ask people to come forward to relate their experiences of racism, i think it was going to be inevitable. a lot of people who heard azeem rafiq's testimony, especially south asians, they will think, that is me, i relate to that. it is not surprising that it is coming forward and it has had a snowball effect. it suggests that the sport may be institutionally racist. the evidence is certainly showing this. figs racist. the evidence is certainly showing thie—
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racist. the evidence is certainly showing this-— racist. the evidence is certainly showin: this. ~ ., ~ showing this. as a think tank, your remit covers _ showing this. as a think tank, your remit covers dealing _ showing this. as a think tank, your remit covers dealing with - showing this. as a think tank, your remit covers dealing with race - remit covers dealing with race equality across the board, notjust within cricket, so ijust wonder if what we are seeing in cricket now, as an institution, how different is it or how much worse is it than other institutions you have had dealings with? i other institutions you have had dealings with?— other institutions you have had dealings with? other institutions you have had dealin . s with? ~ ., dealings with? i think there are the institutions. _ dealings with? i think there are the institutions, and _ dealings with? i think there are the institutions, and then _ dealings with? i think there are the institutions, and then there - dealings with? i think there are the institutions, and then there are - dealings with? i think there are the institutions, and then there are the sports. football probably reckoned with racism a lot earlier, certainly this year we have had a thorough conversation about racism. i think people have been more forthcoming about discussing racism. cricket, less so. it is perceived as a gentleman's sport. there is nothing genteel about racism, is there? for cricket, it is probably a conversation that needed to happen. historically, there have been cases of racism we have heard about. what the institution then does it is very easy to discuss racism at the
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individual level. i think individuals make mistakes. if they want to be graceful about it. people make mistakes in their youth years, and in the age of social media, some of those stick with us. i think what is important is to make an apology quickly, with sincerity and immediately. as azeem rafiq did, as well as alex hales this week. we are dealing with the failure of institutions to deal with racism, and when institutions fail to deal with it, it festers, carries on and knocks confidence in the sport. that i think is the issue rather than which individual made a mistake when they were younger. i which individual made a mistake when they were younger-— they were younger. i want to get our they were younger. i want to get your thoughts — they were younger. i want to get your thoughts on _ they were younger. i want to get your thoughts on something - they were younger. i want to get | your thoughts on something else, because the people at the top of the game are meeting today to discuss the crisis and how they deal with it. if you were in that room with them, what would you be advising them, what would you be advising them they need to do, and where should they start? i them they need to do, and where should they start?— them they need to do, and where should they start? i would say that we need to — should they start? i would say that we need to do _ should they start? i would say that we need to do a _ should they start? i would say that we need to do a lot _ should they start? i would say that we need to do a lot of _ should they start? i would say that we need to do a lot of learning - should they start? i would say that we need to do a lot of learning and acknowledge that we made mistakes in
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the past collectively as an institution, and we need to have apologised a lot sooner, because if the institution doesn't take responsibility, individuals are allowed to commit more and more mistakes. i think the ecb needs to take responsibility for not acting earlier, certainly.— take responsibility for not acting earlier, certainly. what does that look like, when _ earlier, certainly. what does that look like, when you _ earlier, certainly. what does that look like, when you say - earlier, certainly. what does that look like, when you say take - look like, when you say take responsibility, what does that mean in practice? responsibility, what does that mean in ractice? ., responsibility, what does that mean in ractice? . ., ., , in practice? have an open conversation _ in practice? have an open conversation about - in practice? have an open conversation about some | in practice? have an open i conversation about some of in practice? have an open - conversation about some of those mistakes, and it has to come from the regulator and the institutions, notjust the regulator and the institutions, not just the the regulator and the institutions, notjust the individuals. it starts looking at what the reporting structures are, what the culture is that allows racism to fester, and the culture that prevents it. the same way that we tackle sexism in institutions and at work, we know what is acceptable and what is not. when anybody makes a sexist remark, the peer pressure is there to call that out, and if that isn't enough, there is a system and process in place for reporting that. that is
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what the ecb needs to be considering and certainly needs to make a public apology and take public action to show that there is action i had to transform the institution so that this never happens again, and that cricket is something that all of britain's communities can aspire to participate in in the future. we are expecting a lot more from the institution as opposed to the individual apologies. they are being made sincerely by the players, but it is the institution that everybody is watching at the moment. indeed, and we will — is watching at the moment. indeed, and we will continue _ is watching at the moment. indeed, and we will continue to _ is watching at the moment. indeed, and we will continue to watch - is watching at the moment. indeed, and we will continue to watch and i and we will continue to watch and see what they come up with. in the meantime, thank you very much. austria is to become the first european union country to reimpose a nationwide coronavirus lockdown, as it tries to slow a record surge in infections. the austrian chancellor, alexander schallenberg, told a press conference that the measure would begin on monday, and last a maximum of 20 days. he also announced austria would make it a legal requirement to get vaccinated from february next year.
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0ur health correspondent naomi grimley is here. if only a few days ago, austria put unvaccinated i think that was partly because that was seen as unsustainable. secondly, the case rates — was seen as unsustainable. secondly, the case rates in _ was seen as unsustainable. secondly, the case rates in austria _ was seen as unsustainable. secondly, the case rates in austria are - was seen as unsustainable. secondly, the case rates in austria are such - the case rates in austria are such that they really need to get ahead of this now, and they think the best way to do this is to close bars and restaurants, put schools back online, and to basically be in a lockdown state for the next ten days. they will review it after that and see whether they extend it if necessary, but it's really a sign of a country getting to grips with outbreaks which have taken them by surprise in the last couple of weeks. the most significant thing it has done has been to require the population by law to get vaccinated
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ijy population by law to get vaccinated by early february. i5 population by law to get vaccinated by early february-— by early february. is that unprecedented _ by early february. is that unprecedented? - by early february. is that unprecedented? of - by early february. is that unprecedented? of any l by early february. is that - unprecedented? of any other by early february. is that _ unprecedented? of any other country unprecedented? of any other country is gone that far? i know there are mandates for certain sectors and so on, but has any country gone as far as that, making it mandatory for everyone? as that, making it mandatory for eve one? ., as that, making it mandatory for everyone?— as that, making it mandatory for eve one? ., . , ., everyone? not in the western world, but there are — everyone? not in the western world, but there are a _ everyone? not in the western world, but there are a handful— everyone? not in the western world, but there are a handful of— everyone? not in the western world, but there are a handful of countries l but there are a handful of countries that have done it globally. indonesia is one, turkmenistan is another. international governments don't really want to do this, obviously because it is the kind of thing which would have civil liberties campaigners worried and possibly cause public unrest. you mention the _ possibly cause public unrest. you mention the high rates of cases in austria. 0f mention the high rates of cases in austria. of course, we look across the water at what is going on on the continent and wonder how it compares with the situation in the uk. i think we have a graph which shows you exactly what is happening in austria at the moment. look at the red line. it has gone into what the scientists call exponential growth. that's a much worse position at the moment than the uk, but the uk has
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had really high rates all through the summer and had really high rates all through the summerand autumn, had really high rates all through the summer and autumn, which has obviously been quite controversial. you can see other countries tracking austria. the netherlands, which has good vaccination rates, better than austria, is also on that steep curve. i should austria, is also on that steep curve. ishould mention austria, is also on that steep curve. i should mention that when it comes to austria's vaccination rate, 67% of the population is fully vaccinated, and that's essentially why they are in this fix, because there is a significant pocket of the population who are unvaccinated, hence this new law which will come in in february. the hence this new law which will come in in february-— in in february. the direction in terms of _ in in february. the direction in terms of the _ in in february. the direction in terms of the situation - in in february. the direction in terms of the situation in - in in february. the direction in terms of the situation in the l in in february. the direction in l terms of the situation in the uk, the latest stats suggest that actually a smaller proportion of the population currently has covid, but there was a caveat with that about there was a caveat with that about the direction cases are going in day by day. the direction cases are going in day b da . . ' by day. there are different indicators _ by day. there are different indicators people - by day. there are different indicators people use. - by day. there are different indicators people use. the| by day. there are different - indicators people use. the ons goes indicators people use. the 0ns goes door—to—door and swabs the general population, and there is at the moment shows that one in 65 of us
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have covid, down from last week, when it was one in 60. when it comes to those daily rates which the government publishes, they are on an upward curve again. the sort of worry for health experts is that, as we go into christmas, there is more mixing, it has been bouncing around — is britain now going to see another upsurge? 0r — is britain now going to see another upsurge? or have they had enough infection in the population hitherto to mean that they have a bit more population resistance and fewer people will get ill now because they have been infected over the summer and in the early autumn? naomi, many thanks. an investigation's being carried out into a fire at a house in south east london in which two children and two women died. a man escaped from the fire in bexleyheath last night. megan paterson is there for us now: megan, what more do we know at this stage?
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megan, what more do we know at this stare? �* , , ., stage? behind me there is still a olice stage? behind me there is still a police called _ stage? behind me there is still a police called on _ stage? behind me there is still a police called on in _ stage? behind me there is still a police called on in place, - stage? behind me there is still a police called on in place, behind| police called on in place, behind the blue screens, police officers still continuing investigations into the causes the fire. the met police say they don't believe the cause is suspicious. there have been no arrests made but they are still establishing what happened here last night. we know emergency services were called at around 8:30pm yesterday, six fire engines, a0 firefighters came, using breathing apparatus. they went into the house, which was fully ablaze, and they recovered those two women and two children. unfortunately, as you say, they died at the scene. the met police say today that those victims are from the same family, that the children are young children, infants they described them as. the man who managed to escape the building is being treated in hospital. we are told he suffered injuries to his legs, but they are not thought to be life—threatening. people in the local area coming down here this morning to lay flowers. this
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afternoon, teddy bears left as well. a real sense of shock, and people who witnessed it last night said it was a devastating and shocking thing to see happening in their community. london fire brigade have said this was a terrible incident to stop it was a terrible incident to stop it was a terrible incident to stop it was a large—scale operation and it is one that has left them sad and shocked. they have extended their condolences to the family. the police will continue to investigate, the core is not established yet, but not thought to be suspicious. it is likely there will be a police presence here for much of today. a 13—year—old boy is in a critical condition after being shot as he was walking down a street in birmingham last night the teenager is said to have �*life changing injuries�* in the attack in the hockley circus area. phil mackie is there. the circumstances around this, have the police given any more details about it?
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very little at the moment. they have been carrying out a lot of investigations, a lot of activity going on here since this incident happened last night. right up until ten minutes ago, this underpass was cordoned off. they havejust ten minutes ago, this underpass was cordoned off. they have just removed the tape from there and beneath the flyover. we think it is in this underpass that whatever happened happened. it was around 7pm. this 13—year—old was shot in the back as he was walking around. he is in a critical condition still. that hasn't changed, but west midlands police say he may well have suffered life changing injuries as a result of the shooting. west midlands ambulance service said they sent a merit team, referring it to being a high—level team that involves a specialist trauma doctor and a specialist trauma doctor and a specialist paramedic because he was so seriously injured. i've been speaking to an eyewitness, a shopkeeper, the
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speaking to an eyewitness, a shopkeeper, ...— speaking to an eyewitness, a shopkeeper, the police activity is windin: shopkeeper, the police activity is winding down _ shopkeeper, the police activity is winding down here. _ shopkeeper, the police activity is winding down here. it _ shopkeeper, the police activity is winding down here. it is - shopkeeper, the police activity is winding down here. it is an - is winding down here. it is an onauoin is winding down here. it is an ongoing investigation, - is winding down here. it is an ongoing investigation, they l is winding down here. it is an i ongoing investigation, they say. is winding down here. it is an - ongoing investigation, they say. the tragedy is that here is another teenager whose life has been severely affected by violent crime, and that keeps happening here in birmingham. it was only at the beginning of the year that a ia—year—old was shot dead outside his house about a mile from here. he is obviously 0k, although in a critical condition in hospital. life changing injuries. we don't know quite what that means at the moment, but we will hopefully get updates both on his condition and on the investigation as the day progresses and the weekend goes on. thank you for the and the weekend goes on. thank you forthe update. _ and the weekend goes on. thank you for the update, phil. _ the bomb used in the explosion outside liverpool women's hospital on sunday could have caused �*significant injury or death' if it had gone off as the bomber intended. police said the device had ball bearings attached to it
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which could have acted as shrapnel. counter—terrorism officers still don't know why the device exploded when it did, killing the bomber but say it could have been triggered by the movement of the taxi he was travelling in. the headlines on bbc news: cricket chiefs hold an urgent meeting about racism in the game in england. it comes after another cricketer apologises for wearing black make—up at a fancy dress party in 2009. austria is to go into a full nationwide lockdown because of record covid cases — and everyone will have to get vaccinated here, two children and two women have died in a fire at a house in south east london. talks continue in brussels today to try to ease the row between the uk and the european union about customs arrangements in northern ireland. the uk is warning that it could unilaterally suspend parts of the northern ireland deal unless major changes are made. 0ur europe correspondent
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jessica parker explains. the two sides are still talking, there has been suggestion of some progress in certain areas and the mood music appears to have improved a little bit as well. the northern ireland protocol, of course, was an agreement signed up to by both sides and it effectively keeps northern ireland in the eu single market for goods, that's to keep trade free and flowing with the republic of ireland. that's led to checks, though, on goods coming from england, scotland and wales. the eu came forward with proposals to try and address some of these problems, the uk says that it does not go far enough. what's more, britain has repeatedly said it could look to suspend parts of the protocol if enough progress is not made, although, interestingly, in the last hour or so, senior cabinet minister michael gove has suggested he is confident progress can be made without triggering what is known as article 16 and the eu has made pretty clear it could take retaliatory action if that does happen. i think it is important to say we are not there yet, talks are continuing.
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there may be some greater sense of momentum but i think there were always likely to be ups and downs in this process and there are still significant gaps between the two sides. deforestation in brazil's amazon rainforest has hit its highest level in over 15 years. a report by the country's space research agency found that deforestation increased by 22% in a year. brazil was among a number of nations who promised to end deforestation by 2030 during the cop26 climate summit. i'm joined now by dr erika berenguer, senior research associate at the oxford university's ecosystems lab. good to have you with us. when there has been this amount of increase in a year, how realistic does that make the pledge that we heard at cop26 of ending deforestation by the end of the decade? it ending deforestation by the end of the decade?—
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the decade? it 'ust doesn't. unfortunately, _ the decade? itjust doesn't. unfortunately, the - the decade? itjust doesn't. j unfortunately, the evidence the decade? itjust doesn't. - unfortunately, the evidence shows that the pledge was lip service to the international community. there are no milestones to be hit, no mechanism to end deforestation by 2030, and more importantly, these data have been available since before cop26 started. the document released by the brazilian state agency was signed on the 27th of october, and the deal was signed on the 2nd of november, so brazil withheld that information, knowing it would probably damage its image and also compromise the pledge. just exlain and also compromise the pledge. just explain what is the cause of this. is this sanctioned, is it official deforestation, or is this illegal activity that is not being tackled? 99% of deforestation in the brazilian amazon, according to data, is illegal. while there is basically
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illegal deforestation, and the reason why it is soaring is because since the beginning of the current administration, we have seen a systematic dismantling of the environmental agency. there are budget cuts. to give you an idea, in his first day in office, he completely extinguished the climate change secretary. we have not seen —— we have seen a government that has been doing this, decreasing the amount of protection of the rainforest. it is natural that deforestation rates will go up. itruihot deforestation rates will go up. what can be done — deforestation rates will go up. what can be done about _ deforestation rates will go up. what can be done about it _ deforestation rates will go up. what can be done about it? _ deforestation rates will go up. what can be done about it? is _ deforestation rates will go up. what can be done about it? is it a case of trying to replace the trees that have been lost, or is thatjust not feasible? have been lost, or is that 'ust not feasible? . �* , have been lost, or is that 'ust not feasible? ., �* , ., have been lost, or is that 'ust not feasible? ., �*, ., , feasible? that's not feasible. the createst feasible? that's not feasible. the greatest way _ feasible? that's not feasible. the greatest way to — feasible? that's not feasible. the greatest way to combat _ feasible? that's not feasible. the greatest way to combat climate i greatest way to combat climate change in the case of the amazon is to preserve forests. if we just
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pla nt to preserve forests. if we just plant trees, we are not replacing the amazing diversity of the amazon holds. in one hectare, one football pitch of the amazon rainforest, we have more tree species than the whole of western europe. that's how diverse it is. to plant some trees, we will just diverse it is. to plant some trees, we willjust have trees but not an amazon forest. what we need to do is combat illegal deforestation, and it is something brazil did successfully from 200a—12, when the deforestation rate decreased by 80%. from 2004-12, when the deforestation rate decreased by 80%.— rate decreased by 80%. thank you very much- — andrew marr has announced he is leaving the bbc after 21 yea rs. the journalist and broadcaster, has presented the bbc�*s political programme the andrew marr show on sunday mornings for the past 16 years. he said from the new year, he'll be moving to global �*to write and present political and cultural
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shows and to write for newspapers'. laws to prosecute drivers who use their mobile phone are to be strengthened. at the moment motorists are banned only from texting or making calls. but from next year it will also be illegal to take photos, play games or scroll through playlists while driving. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent, colletta smith, reports. # happy birthday to you... # joe cairns was 1a years old when he was killed. at the point of the last few months of his life, he was spectacular. hurray! i couldn't be more proud of him, i couldn't. you know, he was always going to deal with different things. but... he was shining. he was.
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two years ago, joe cairns was sitting in the back of a minibus on the way to his special school when a lorry ploughed straight into the back of them. it was a a5 minute journey until the collision and for a5 minutes, that man was on his phone. 0n various applications — text messages, phone calls, but also he was on sky sports, he was on his facebook, and he was playing a game. the driver was convicted, he got eight years for dangerous driving, but changing the law will close a loophole making it easier for police to stop and fine anyone holding their phone and using it for any reason when they are behind the wheel. but you will still be able to use your phone in hands—free mode. if you get caught now, you're going to get a £200 fine and six points on your licence. that is quite significant. the police will be able
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to enforce the laws much more strongly and actually, there is some quite interesting technology coming out as to other ways we can spot people using their phone. for example, putting cameras in fake hgvs. so be careful on the roads. steph, how do you feel when you see people in their cars using their phones, looking down at their phones? he had a life, a whole beautiful life to lead. and he hasn't got it any more. you are missing a part of you, your heart, i gave birth to that boy and i gave him life. and through somebody�*s choice that day, they took his life away. and he is no more. and has to be out there it has to be, how dangerous it is to use your phone whilst you are driving. colletta smith, bbc news, in radcliffe.
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chris spinks is the former head of roads policing in norfolk and suffolk and now runs a traffic safety systems company. from your experience, how important and how much of a difference will this move make? it’s and how much of a difference will this move make?— this move make? it's a huge difference. _ this move make? it's a huge difference. it _ this move make? it's a huge difference. it has _ this move make? it's a huge difference. it has been - this move make? it's a huge difference. it has been very| difference. it has been very difficult at times to prove offences under the old legislation. you had to prove the call had been made all the messages have been sent. but now, alongside other countries, we have managed to open that up so that it will hopefully prevent people from picking up the phone, and it will make them think it is a lot easierfor the police to identify the fence, stop them and prosecute them. because road safety is all about education, as well as enforcement. if we can get the message out there that if you are using your phone, you are going to get prosecuted, it is going to be easier to prove the offence and therefore you will suffer the
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penalty. therefore you will suffer the enal . ., ., , . therefore you will suffer the enal. ., ., , ., penalty. how realistic is it, though. — penalty. how realistic is it, though. that _ penalty. how realistic is it, though, that this _ penalty. how realistic is it, though, that this will - penalty. how realistic is it, though, that this will be i though, that this will be enforceable by police day—to—day? they have so much else they are looking out for, and how much time, how much resource can be dedicated to looking out for drivers who are using phones?— to looking out for drivers who are using phones? that is a big issue. there aren't _ using phones? that is a big issue. there aren't as _ using phones? that is a big issue. there aren't as many _ using phones? that is a big issue. there aren't as many road - using phones? that is a big issue. | there aren't as many road policing officers as their work when i was in the police, and i retired five years ago. nowhere near as many on the right to know, and you are right that they have extra things that are dragging them away, but there are people being killed unlawfully on our roads because of people using their mobile phones and making the wrong decisions. what this new legislation also opens up in the near future is automated detection. it's not possible at the moment in the uk because of having
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the there is technology out there that could be a big deterrent to people using their mobile .if . if there is automated detection, i think we will see some of the same results we have had with average speed cameras bringing speeds down. at the end of the day, the message we have to get across is that we need to save people's lives and stop them being killed unnecessarily on them being killed unnecessarily on the roads. ., ., the roads. looking at the detail, not only does — the roads. looking at the detail, not only does it _ the roads. looking at the detail, not only does it apply, _ the roads. looking at the detail, not only does it apply, the - the roads. looking at the detail, not only does it apply, the new. the roads. looking at the detail, - not only does it apply, the new law, when the car is moving, but even when the car is moving, but even when people are stopped at traffic lights, when they are queueing in traffic that may be stationary, even supervising a learner driver — that is quite a significant step up, isn't it? ~ , ., , is quite a significant step up, isn't it? ~ , .,, , ., ,
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isn't it? well, people should be concentrating _ isn't it? well, people should be concentrating 10096 _ isn't it? well, people should be concentrating 10096 when - isn't it? well, people should be concentrating 10096 when they l isn't it? well, people should be i concentrating 10096 when they are concentrating 100% when they are driving. if they are stopped at traffic —— at a traffic light and they are on their phone, when it goes green, they will either stay there because they are on the phone, or they will think, i can go now, not look up, and potentially run into the back of a car in front, or a cyclist or pedestrian crossing the road. just because you stop for a short period, you still have to be aware of what is going on around you. if you are in a queue of traffic on a busy road, you need to look in your rear—view mirror to make sure nothing is coming up at speed behind you and they are on their phone and haven't noticed you have stopped. driving is a complex set of skills. too many people feel, i do it all the time, i am good and i do it all the time, i am good and i don't have to concentrate, and thatis i don't have to concentrate, and that is not the case. some of the most highly trained drivers can make mistakes, and they are concentrating 100%, so people who don't have that and aren't concentrating are likely to cause even more of an issue and be far more dangerous to innocent members of the public. haifa
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be far more dangerous to innocent members of the public.— members of the public. how many ears is it members of the public. how many years is it now _ members of the public. how many years is it now? — members of the public. how many years is it now? it _ members of the public. how many years is it now? it feels _ members of the public. how many years is it now? it feels like - years is it now? it feels like forever but we have had laws that had banned texting and using a phone held up to your ear while driving, and yet people still do it. do you think this will change driver behaviour, orwill think this will change driver behaviour, or will it be just the same as when that was introduced? i think it will start to change driver behaviour. i don't think it will do it overnight, because of how addicted people are to being on their phones. they fear missing out on something, they have to be connected. and i know from experience that there are young drivers who are not actually learning to drive and taking the test because they don't want to be unconnected to their friends, which i quite frankly find absurd, because the car opens up freedom for you, but it has to be used responsibly. i think my going forward, with the automated detection, and unfortunately people will —— people will only get the message if they are prosecuted and, you know, in the end, potentially disqualified.
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insurance prices are going up massively. we have done it with drink—driving. it took 30 or a0 years to make drink—driving socially unacceptable, and we must keep pushing on to do that with mobile phone use. pushing on to do that with mobile hone use. pushing on to do that with mobile phone use-— pushing on to do that with mobile hone use. , , ., phone use. 0k, chris we must leave it there. thank _ phone use. 0k, chris we must leave it there. thank you _ phone use. 0k, chris we must leave it there. thank you very _ phone use. 0k, chris we must leave it there. thank you very much. - it's children in need today and we've come up with a rather special way to mark it here on bbc news. no, i won't have pudsey co—presenting with me. but before we get the weather from helen — here's an exclusive look at a very special version of our countdown. in 5,6,7,8... they play bbc news theme
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lots of energy there. i have got pudsey with me in the studio. he has got wind off a change in the weather so we just wanted to make sure you knew to get your warm coats ready. going to put pudsey to the side. i will take about what is happening for the of the day but get those warm coats at the ready. sunshine in eastern areas for the rest of today and into this evening. the rain to
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the north behind that rain we have the north behind that rain we have the cold air coming. pretty mild out there, 16, 17 across the coast of eastern scotland today where we have seen some lovely sunshine. 0vernight, it is turning wetter for parts of mainland scotland. further south, mist and fog, low cloud, very little change to the mild conditions. there were two, behind the weather front we get colder air. then it will turn wintering over the hills. we started the cold air tomorrow, get winterwarmers hills. we started the cold air tomorrow, get winter warmers at the ready because it looks cold. i will have more view on hail and l. —— i will have more for you in half an hour. hello this is bbc news.
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the headlines... cricket chiefs hold an urgent meeting about racism in the game in england. it comes after another cricketer apologises for wearing black make—up at a fancy dress party in 2009. austria is to go into a full nationwide lockdown because of record covid cases — and everyone will have to get vaccinated here, two children and two women have died in a fire at a house in south east london. a 13—year—old boy is in a critical condition after being shot in the back in birmingham last night. police believe his injuries are life—changing. and drivers will be banned from scrolling, filming or searching playlists on their mobile phones from next year. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougall. good afternoon. over the last few weeks, english cricket has been engulfed in a racism scandal, now, australia are
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undergoing their own crisis. their captain tim paine has had to step down just weeks away from the ashes after it emerged he had sent sexually explicit text messages to a female colleague four years ago. paine decided to resign as captain when he became aware that details of the incident in 2017 were about to be made public. he said the cricket australia investigation the following year had exonerated him, but he "deeply" regretted his actions at the time and to this day. he said standing down was the right thing to do for him, his family and for cricket. the first test starts on december the 8th in brisbane. to australian cricket fans, i'm deeply sorry that my past behaviour has impacted our game on the eve of the ashes. for the disappointment i have caused to fans and the entire cricket community, i apologise. i've been blessed with a wonderful, loving and supportive family
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and it breaks my heart to know how much i have let them down. as concerns for the safety of the chinese player grow, the chair and ceo of the wta has said he's very, very concerned about her. peng shuai hasn't been heard from since alleging she was sexually assaulted by a high profile former chinese politician. the authenticity of an email allegedly sent from peng to the women's tennis associaison — has been called into question by the chair, steve simon. he spoke to the bbc earlier. when you come out with allegations such as she did and the detail associated within those allegations and then suddenly receive an e—mail reflecting that everything is ok, i am great, there is no issues, there is no allegations here in place. i just have to struggle with that. to football now.
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ahead of manchester city's game against everton on sunday, the club has confirmed that kevin de bruyne won't be involved after testing positive for coronavirus. manager pep guardiola said de bruyne had tested positive after returning from international duty with belgium. he'll isolate for ten days and, as well as sunday's premier league match against everton, he'll also miss wednesday's champions league game with psg and the following weekend's home game against west ham. rory mcilroy�*s still in contension after his second round of the dp world tour championship in dubai. he's a shot behind the leaders. that is because he made a mistake at the 18th, putting it in the water. he recovered to double bogey the hole. that put him at nine under for the tournament. two underfor the two under for the day. unfortunate for mcilroy who'd led after a great first day. he's won this event twice before, in 2012 and 2015. let's take a look at the leaderboard
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on day two in dubai. after that double bogey for mcilroy, he's on nine under for the tournament, two underfor the day. he's a shot behind irishman shane lowry who'sjoint leader after an eagle at the 1ath helped put him on ten under. alongside him is englishman sam horsfield and americanjohn catlin. to formula 1 where second practice is just getting under way in qatar ahead of this weekends grand prix. max verstappen was quickest in first practice, but lewis hamilton was only fourth. there was another disappointment for mercedes who have been denied a review of an incident in brazil where verstappen was said to have pushed hamilton off the track. mercedes were hoping for a time penalty for red bull. significantly hamilton wearing a special helmet with the rainbow flag on it. human rights remain a contentious issue in qatar, especially lgbt rights, so hamilton sending a strong message there. just 1a points between the two drivers in the standings going into this weekend. this race will be a significant one.
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more details on all of those stories on the bbc sport website. that's it for me for now.— on the bbc sport website. that's it for me for now. thank you. we will see ou for me for now. thank you. we will see you later- _ as we've been hearing, austria becomes the first country in western europe to reimpose a full covid—19lockdown of its population. across europe, many countries are facing tougher covid restrictions due to surging cases throughout the continent. france and denmark are using covid passports to curb the spread of the virus. sweden is set to introduce the measure next month. belgium and the netherlands have imposed more restrictions to avoid a full lockdown, with the dutch prime minister imposing a partial lockdown for three—weeks. germany has introduced tougher restrictions for the unvaccinated, excluding them from public places. the czech republic and slovakia have enforced a targated lockdown for its population. austria's lockdown will last 20 days.
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i'm joined now byjohn edmunds, professor of infectious disease modelling at the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine — he's also a member of the spi—m modelling group of scientists, which advises the government. what is your take on the action that is being taken in austria? thea;r what is your take on the action that is being taken in austria? they have had a very rapid _ is being taken in austria? they have had a very rapid increase _ is being taken in austria? they have had a very rapid increase of- is being taken in austria? they have had a very rapid increase of cases i had a very rapid increase of cases so they do have high incidence at the moment so clearly they have had to take some action.— the moment so clearly they have had to take some action. when we look at the difference — to take some action. when we look at the difference in _ to take some action. when we look at the difference in the _ to take some action. when we look at the difference in the trends _ to take some action. when we look at the difference in the trends in - the difference in the trends in case numbers, we saw a graph earlier, austria seems to be back in this exponential rise whereas here in the uk the line is higherfor longer but it doesn't seem to be rising steeply. does that mean we can be a little more relaxed here in the uk? yeah, i mean... relaxed i'm not sure
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is the right word but we have been in this situation for months and months and months. we have had high incidence sincejuly. it has been bumping around but it has been consistently high, much, much higher than everywhere else in europe for many months. really, it is only now that the rest of europe has started to catch up with us. with some countries, at least austria for instance, has overtaken us. but that's quite recent over the last few weeks. central european countries have really taken off. they tend to be the countries with the lower levels of vaccine coverage. if you look at the countries with higher levels of vaccine coverage like portugal, spain and italy, which have also kept some restrictions in place in the most cases as well, then cases are starting to increase their book from a much, much lower level. where are we in relation _
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from a much, much lower level. where are we in relation to _ from a much, much lower level. where are we in relation to these _ from a much, much lower level. where are we in relation to these european i are we in relation to these european countries that have introduced these new restrictions when it comes to the booster programme of vaccinations? are we far enough ahead that we may not end up having to go down the route that some of them have had to? that to go down the route that some of them have had to?— to go down the route that some of them have had to? that is the hope. many countries _ them have had to? that is the hope. many countries are _ them have had to? that is the hope. many countries are introducing - many countries are introducing booster doses at the moment. we have done so we are perhaps a little bit ahead of some countries. i should also say the countries that have come as i mentioned just now, have the biggest problem at the moment have had the lowest level of uptake in the primary course, so many countries in central europe, the czech republic, austria, slovenia, these countries haven't had very high levels of coverage so booster doses isn't really the solution. the solution is to get as many people vaccinated as possible first before then turning to boosters. you vaccinated as possible first before then turning to boosters.- then turning to boosters. you are art of then turning to boosters. you are
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part of the _ then turning to boosters. you are part of the modelling _ then turning to boosters. you are part of the modelling group - then turning to boosters. you are part of the modelling group that l part of the modelling group that advises the government. 0ne part of the modelling group that advises the government. one thing that will be on a lot of people's mines is the shape of things by the time we get to christmas. what is the thinking at the moment in terms of the trajectory that you are currently seeing and what that might mean for how normal or how restrictive christmas might be? it's always hard to be precise about this. at the moment, what we're seeing is two big trends.- this. at the moment, what we're seeing is two big trends. there has been a huge _ seeing is two big trends. there has been a huge wave _ seeing is two big trends. there has been a huge wave of— seeing is two big trends. there has been a huge wave of infection, i been a huge wave of infection, particularly in children, over the last few months since school open, so the good side of that, if you like, i mean, it has been very disruptive, but as we come out of that we will end up with quite a lot of immune children. we are also now vaccinating 12 to 15—year—olds as well which will help. so, that is one thing that has happened or is
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happening. still very high rates of infection in children and that is over spilling into the rest of the community but it is likely to start to come down at some point. it is likely to come down at some point. the other big dynamic is immunity in older individuals which is mostly vaccine derived and that has been declining. that's where the boosters come in. in order to boost that immunity and the quicker we can get round to doing that, the better. it is all a little bit of a race between waning immunity in older individuals and boosting that through the extension of the vaccination programme and what is going on in children. put it all together, it is hard to say, to be precise. my hunch is that cases will stay high for some time because what we are seeing in children is mostly a kind of natural level of
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infection. younger children under the age of 12 are not been vaccinated and so really they are going to have to be infected, unfortunately. if we vaccinated them, we could avoid that but if we don't vaccinate them, then they will gradually become infected and that will spill, gradually become infected and that willspill, continually gradually become infected and that will spill, continually overspill, into older age groups. we'll see high rates of infection continuing for some time, to where we have been for some time, to where we have been for many months on end. it may then start to come down, exactly where we will be at christmas is hard to say. my will be at christmas is hard to say. my hunch is perhaps a little bit lower than where we are now but i think it is very difficult to be precise. i think it is very difficult to be recise. ., , , . ., ., think it is very difficult to be recise. ., ,, . ., ., , precise. i appreciate that will stop at thank you _ precise. i appreciate that will stop at thank you for _ precise. i appreciate that will stop at thank you for talking _ precise. i appreciate that will stop at thank you for talking us - precise. i appreciate that will stop| at thank you for talking us through it. thank you. x�*t�*ou
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at thank you for talking us through it- thank you-— the new culture secretary says some political campaigners have "highjacked" social media and made people "afraid" to say what they think — but says she doesn't want to start a culture war. nadine dorries has today announced another £107 million as part of the culture recovery fund to help venues in england recover from the pandemic. she's been speaking exclusively to our culture editor, katie razzall. she's got a newjob. how does the crown fit? does it suit me? nadine dorries' appointment as culture secretary raised alarm in some parts of the creative industries, but she was relaxed as she toured london's young vic theatre — a far cry from her combative reputation. she's seen by some as a divisive figure, who's been vocal on social media, particularly against the "left—wing snowflakes," as she's put it, who are "killing comedy" and "suppressing free speech". there's this kind of image that's been painted of me that i'm going to go out on some kind of, you know, charge out
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some kind of culture—war battle. it just isn't true. but talking about "left—wing snowflakes" and their "woke agenda" is quite aggressive. well, there are some people who will politicise that, and that's what i'm talking about when i do that. campaigners kind of hijack the space that young people would like to occupy to talk about some serious issues, on the left, who've hijacked that space, and that's who my comments are targeted at. liverpool. the great atlantic port of the north of england... nadine dorries is culture secretary and a best—selling novelist, whose books are based on her upbringing in a deprived part of liverpool. she says she went hungry as a child and shared shoes to go to school. and so i made it my ethos in the department, within 2a hours of arriving, every decision we take has a filter laid over that decision and that is — does this policy help those from socially—deprived areas to access both arts and culture and sport? we express our solidarity!
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she got a sneak preview at a rehearsal for the young vic's new play about political division in 1960s america. this theatre is one of 925 cultural organisations in england — the majority outside the capital — that she's today announced will share more than £100 million from the government's culture recovery fund. it's the latest instalment to help them through the pandemic. so, just let's acknowledge what the government did — £2 billion. and the reason why that money was allocated, many theatres would not be standing today if the government hadn't supported them over the last 20 months. the funding we're doing now is to help people through the recovery period. they can'tjust go from, you know, from zero to heroes overnight. nadine dorries has taken on the beasts in the tvjungle. oh, god, it's horrible! it's the media jungle she's taking on now, as she decides the price of the bbc licence fee over the next five years. she's long been a vocal critic of the bbc. now, perhaps, there's a change of tone.
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of course i want the bbc to survive. i'm british. you know, it's the best of british. of course i want the bbc to survive. that's why we have to have those really hard discussions about how do we enable it, over the long—term, to remain that global institution? she's the tenth culture secretary in ten years. not many have faced the criticism from the start that she has. nadine dorries says the reaction to her appointment was snobbish and sexist. will her actions in the role change their views? katie razzall, bbc news. a life—changing drug that can improve mobility in children and adults with spinal muscular atrophy is to be made available on the nhs. it could be used to treat hundreds of patients a year with this rare and often fatal genetic disease that causes paralysis, muscle weakness and progressive loss of movement. 0ur medical editor fergus walsh met two patients with the condition. i'm still an incredibly positive
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person, but i can't deny the effects that this condition has had on me physically in the last couple of years. good, good. right in my chest. chris has a masters in sports management and is a coach. remember, a push off your index finger. he also has spinal muscular atrophy, which causes progressive muscle weakness. in the last two years, he's lost the ability to walk. he should be eligible for a new treatment, risdiplam, shown to improve movement and stability. it'd be huge, just to have the certainty that it's not going to get any worse. i may not get back my ability to walk — that's fine. i'm still happy in the skin that i live in, i'm still happy with my lot in life. risdiplam is the first oral medicine for sma, but each bottle has a list price of £8,000 and may last patients just a couple of weeks, although the nhs has negotiated a confidential discount.
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having it as a syrup, that really makes a difference, doesn't it? oh, yes. doctors say the drug works by boosting the levels of a protein crucial for keeping nerve cells healthy. it really alters the outlook for these people. ten years ago, we had no treatments available for sma, and things have moved on now to having three available treatments. hello, everyone. i am melville. three years ago, i was the first child in england to test- a new medicine that helps with my sma~ _ nine—year—old melville takes risdiplam once a day after breakfast, as part of a medical trial. his parents hope he may never need a wheelchair because he's now so much stronger. yes! basically, he has now more stamina,
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he's able to endure stairs better. i have a lot of hope and i'm very happy that it's now available for other families. on a day—to—day basis, it's great to see melville improving a little bit every day. there is no cure yet for sma, but the outlook for melville — and hundreds of other patients — looks much brighter. fergus walsh, bbc news. some breaking news. in the first prosecution of its type against the nhs — the dudley group nhs foundation trust has been fined £2.5 million. wolverhampton magistrates�* court imposed the penalty after the trust was prosecuted by the care quality commission over the deaths of two patients in 2018. the dudley group of hospitals was prosecuted for two breaches of the health and social care act with regard to the deaths of natalie billingham
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and kaysie—jane bland in february and march 2018. just to reiterate — this is the first prosecution of its type against the nhs. another line of breaking news reaching us. lord frost has issued a statement following meeting with comision vice president sefcovic. there is potential to generate momentum in discussions. this is about the discussions around northern ireland and the deal that was agreed over northern ireland to allow goods to continue passing between northern ireland and the republic without border checks but they said significant gaps remain between the two. from today, schools in england have a legal obligation to keep the cost of school uniforms down. parents will be allowed to buy items from any shop, and schools are also being asked to make sure second hand uniforms are available. research shows parents could save up
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to £50 on average if they bought all uniform from high street stores instead of designated suppliers. 0ur education editor branwen jeffreys reports. it�*s one of the biggest costs forfamilies, uniform with the school logo. from blazer to sports kit, it can add up to more than £100, but buying from the high street or supermarkets can cut costs. research suggests it can save more than £50 per child. i�*m really fortunate in the fact that the polo shirts and jumpers that my girls can wear, i can actually buy them off the website of the local supermarket and they do the embroidery which saves a little bit of money. not having a prescribed pe kit definitely would save a lot of money. i think having logos emblazoned on t—shirts that they are wearing underneath jumpers which are never seen is completely unnecessary. you know, you can get a pack of three white polo shirts from a supermarket for £5 or £6.
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there is no need to then make that into £15 a pop just for having a logo on. so, schools in england will now have to limit branded items, allow more uniform from any shop, and make second—hand uniforms available. steps some schools take already, but now all will have to. poverty campaigners say more is needed. in wales and scotland, families on very low incomes can get grants, making it easier to cover the many costs of school. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. good afternoon. there�*s not much sunshine on offer today, but a few areas. this was anglesey a little earlier across the eastern side of england and scotland, which is where we have the highest temperature yesterday, 16 celsius. but if you haven�*t heard yet, that is all about to change. so just taking somewhere typically in central parts of the uk for the coming week, seven days, look how that warmth,
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that mild weather ebbs away. and it�*s because we change our wind direction, at the moment we�*ve got the winds being drawn around this area of high pressure from the southwest across the atlantic. we will turn towards the look towards the north for the origin of our air by the end of the weekend. but for the rest of the day, some sunshine is to the grampians, east of the pennines, through humberside, lincolnshire, across the eastern side of the welsh mountains as well. it�*s a breezy day still in the north, very windy actually up in shetland, but the winds are not down on those of yesterday. and i should imagine it feels quite pleasant, particularly with the sunshine. but there�*s lots of low cloud around the hills and coasts in the west. so really rather leaden skies here and damp at times. now, through this evening and overnight, those clear spells will tend to fill in with some mist and fog again. but all weather front starts to get a move on across scotland. so bringing some more persistent rain across mainland scotland overnight. and as you can see, it remains mild. so it�*s behind this weather front that we introduce the colder air. so misty, grey and fog around in southern areas, but then some brighter skies and largely dry. but rain does arrive for northern england. northern ireland clears
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away later in the day. the brighter skies invading here, but also the colder air, sixes and sevens, as you can see. and those showers will turn a bit wintry as we get into sunday across the high ground, because behind our weatherfront here are cold weather. true to its name, the air is going to come right the way down from the arctic. so we will see a real drop in temperatures, some four or five celsius accentuated by the strength of the wind, that will be particularly brisk around northern coast and later on sunday, further south and east. but you can see the frost is starting to develop as well, notjust cold by day, cold by night as well. so a few wintry showers around over the hills in the north. could be a little bit of wintry in the hills across snowdonia, for example. and we may well keep a few showers across kent and essex during the day on sunday and a chilly winter. but i think the notice is how chilly it will feel. temperatures are significantly lower and they get lower still later next week with increasing risk of something wintry in the forecast.
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stay tuned. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. i�*m ben boulos. the headlines: cricket chiefs hold an urgent meeting about racism in the game in england. it comes after another cricketer, alex hales, apologises, for wearing black make—up at a fancy dress party in 2009. my 20s was full of mistakes like that, reckless mistakes off the field that cost me and let down family and let down team—mates and let down friends. austria is to go into a full nationwide lockdown because of record covid cases — and everyone will have to get vaccinated. here, two children and two women have died in a fire at a house in south east london. a 13—year—old boy is in a critical condition after being shot in the back in birmingham last night. police believe his injuries
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are life—changing. and drivers will be banned from scrolling, filming or searching playlists on their mobile phones from next year. good afternoon. cricket chiefs are holding an emergency meeting to discuss racism in the english game. it comes after shocking testimony earlier this week from ex—yorkshire player azeem rafiq about the racism he faced. he had to apologise himself yesterday for anti—jewish comments he wrote on social media 10 years ago. and another player, alex hales, has apologised after a photo was published showing him wearing black makeup at a fancy dress party in 2009. laura scott reports.
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after another turbulent week, cricket�*s latest response to its racism crisis, crisis talks, at the 0val today as the game comes together to tackle its discrimination problem, evidence of which continues to emerge. what you hope to get out of the meeting? just clarity and togetherness i suppose. does cricket have a racism issue? we have a lot of work to do, no doubt about it. i think it will be resolved today, there is actually a desire to get it sorted, a real desire within the game. last night the former england cricketer alex hales became further embroiled in the scandal after a photo emerged showing him dressed in a racially offensive way at a fancy dress party in 2009. he said his appearance was a tribute to the late rapper tupac shakur but now realises it was in could be this respectful and issued a video statement. i deplore all forms
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of racism and disc of a nation, i have been incredibly lucky to play around the world in different backgrounds, players of different races and cultures. earlier this week there was widespread praise for azeem rafiq as he gave harrowing testimony to mps about his experiences of racism in cricket but he has been forced to front up to his own mistakes, apologising after facebook messages from 2011 surfaced showing him using anti—semitic language. in a statement, he said... he later apologised for a further social media post containing a saying relating to african people. as a result of the scandal, the ecb chief executive, tom harrison, is under pressure, and some think the very existence of the governing body is under jeopardy. what i think will happen quite quickly is that the ecb
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will probably be dismantled and we will see three boards replace it which will become part of the national governing body one will look after the professional game, one will look after the international game and the england teams, and the other will look after the grassroots and the amateur game. meanwhile, australian cricket is dealing with its own damaging episode. 0vernight, tim paine stepped down as test match captain over sexually explicit text messages were sent to a female colleague. i apologise to the entire cricket community and fans. i have been blessed with wonderful, loving and supportive family and it breaks my heart to know how much i have let them down. with less than three weeks to go before one of the biggest occasions in the cricket calendar, a series of off field incidents add cast a significant and lingering shadow over the sport. adam collins is an australian cricket commentator and journalist based in the uk.
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adam, this meeting that�*s going on, when they assess the crisis in english cricket, what needs to be done, if you were in the room with him, what would you be advising them needs to be done first and foremost? the very fact that cricket is leading front pages around the country reinforces that these conversations need to be had. it is a whole day meeting, notjust the counties but other stakeholders, who have the chance to front the ecb and tell them what they think. first, there will be a want for transparency on for a bit of vision about how to tackle this. i know there were comments in your package about trying to find a solution. in reality, that�*s not going to happen. what was exposed by azeem rafiq at the select committee earlier this week was profoundly disturbing and there will be a long stretch of time where people will want to be heard, and rightly so, and the culture of
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dressing rooms around the country on the world will be under scrutiny. first, it�*s about listening, then it is about charting a credible path forward. ., ., ~' is about charting a credible path forward. ., ., ,, ., . forward. you talk about the culture - it's notiust _ forward. you talk about the culture - it's notjust english _ forward. you talk about the culture - it's notjust english cricket - forward. you talk about the culture - it's notjust english cricket or i — it�*s notjust english cricket or theissue — it�*s notjust english cricket or the issue of racism. 0ne — it�*s notjust english cricket or the issue of racism. one of the latest of elements coming to light affecting tim paine, the australian test captain ahead of the next ashes, him having to step down because of sexist comments that were made in the past. are we seeing an unravelling or a light being shone on a rather distasteful underbelly in the cricket world that has long been not known about? la. in the cricket world that has long been not known about?- in the cricket world that has long been not known about? lo, i think that's one — been not known about? lo, i think that's one way _ been not known about? lo, i think that's one way of _ been not known about? lo, i think that's one way of interpreting - been not known about? lo, i think that's one way of interpreting it, i that�*s one way of interpreting it, but i think actually they are, to an extent, one of the same —— one and the same. dressing room culture can occasionally bring out the worst in people. the best self is not
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necessarily on display. the sort of abuse that azeem rafiq and others have been exposed to over the years all the sexual extra paid is that players get involved in. that�*s not the whole problem —— sexual escapades. the very fact that we are now having this conversation does advance thanks to an extent, but words will mean little if action doesn�*t follow. i words will mean little if action doesn't follow.— doesn't follow. i must correct m self, doesn't follow. i must correct myself. the _ doesn't follow. i must correct myself, the texts _ doesn't follow. i must correct myself, the texts that - doesn't follow. i must correct myself, the texts that tim i doesn't follow. i must correct i myself, the texts that tim payne sent were sexual in nature, sexually explicit, ratherthan sent were sexual in nature, sexually explicit, rather than sexist. when we talk about restructuring the governance of cricket in england and wales, a restructure at the top, whether you divide it up in terms of a separate entity looking at a grass roots, looking after international side of things, does that make any difference? does that change the culture at all, or does it need to be tackled an approach from a
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completely different way? i be tackled an approach from a completely different way? i think it would be an _ completely different way? i think it would be an enormous _ completely different way? i think it would be an enormous about-face, would be an enormous about—face, given that devolution would be the opposite of what happened over the past 25 or so years, when cricket came under the banner of the ecb more broadly. i understand why there is frustration in the cricket community about what has happened, about the ecb response at yorkshire specifically, and tom harrison, the chief executive of the ecb, had his feet to the coals in that select committee at westminster during the week around why didn�*t the ecb intervene earlier. the ecb position all along is that they are not a regulator in a situation like that and it is for the club to determine what action they take from a disciplinary perspective. i think on the basis of the ecb taking a long time to act, and they did eventually, by withdrawing international status from headingley, for instance, and ultimately saying gary ballance couldn�*t play for england in the short term. there were action items but it took a long time to get there, and the fact that yorkshire
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were left to their own devices for that long and spent so much of that time dragging their heels about the report, only emphasised how important it was that azeem rafiq was able to tell his truth at parliament this week. [30 was able to tell his truth at parliament this week. do you think there needs _ parliament this week. do you think there needs to _ parliament this week. do you think there needs to be _ parliament this week. do you think there needs to be a _ parliament this week. do you think there needs to be a clear _ parliament this week. do you think there needs to be a clear out i parliament this week. do you think there needs to be a clear out? i parliament this week. do you think there needs to be a clear out? do | there needs to be a clear out? do people need to lose theirjobs and have a fresh start with new ideas and approaches coming into make these changes happen? i�*m and approaches coming into make these changes happen? i'm reluctant to net into these changes happen? i'm reluctant to get into the _ these changes happen? i'm reluctant to get into the business _ these changes happen? i'm reluctant to get into the business of _ these changes happen? i'm reluctant to get into the business of saying i to get into the business of saying heads should roll, but they probably will. to an extent, they already have in terms of those who have been stood down in yorkshire and various board members who have left their positions in recent weeks. i think azeem rafiq made a good point, that it isn�*t about isolating individual people but about addressing the culture more broadly, acknowledging that if there is an institutional problem, it is not about heads on sticks but about changing the culture and the conversation more broadly. again, iam mindful that there was a lot of distaste in what has happened this week, a lot of
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animosity. there is a lot of dissatisfaction, but i don�*t think simply it is a case of sacking administrators in finding a new set to replace them. it is a much broader problem than that, and i think the first steps towards getting to a better place have to be about people who have experienced racism specifically to have the chance to tell their story the way that azeem rafiq has this week. hagar that azeem rafiq has this week. how sad do ou that azeem rafiq has this week. how sad do you find _ that azeem rafiq has this week. how sad do you find this whole situation 7 it sad do you find this whole situation ? it doesn�*t seem that long ago that cricket was the darling of the sporting world — the euphoria in england after winning the ashes and bringing it back. it had that crown, and it feels like that is such a different episode to what it is going through now. has it squandered has the game wasted that prime position it had in people�*s aren�*t just a few years ago? x�*t�*ou position it had in people's aren't just a few years ago?— just a few years ago? you feel it has been squandering _ just a few years ago? you feel it i has been squandering opportunities for a couple of decades, and not just in this country either. that is a longer conversation. your right to
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say that the position it held, the very fact that we mentioned, how often does cricket leave the bbc news on television? i will tell you, rarely. usually it is because of something like this, something unsavoury, not about what is happening in the 22 yards that matter most that leads the news, it is when something goes wrong off the field. it is something the sport needs to correct. it needs to find a way to broaden its wings and embrace new people. look, we know that a third of recreational cricketers in this country come from south asian extraction, and think about the heartache that many of those people would have felt this week when hearing azeem rafiq speak. and it is notjust hearing azeem rafiq speak. and it is not just about hearing azeem rafiq speak. and it is notjust about him, but hearing azeem rafiq speak. and it is not just about him, but the fact he has been able to blow a whistle and shed light on this. think about how they would feel right now being told that they are the future of growing the game but at the same time at a professional level there are many hurdles that are still in front of them when they are playing at county level or beyond. again, that the risk of repeating myself, the very fact that we are now able to have a
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broader and more mature conversation around this, hopefully we�*ll get this all to a better place sooner rather than later, but we have to be realistic as well.— realistic as well. adam, really appreciate _ realistic as well. adam, really appreciate your _ realistic as well. adam, really appreciate your analysis i realistic as well. adam, really appreciate your analysis and l appreciate your analysis and thoughts on all of this. thank you. austria is to become the first european union country to reimpose a nationwide coronavirus lockdown, as it tries to slow a record surge in infections. the austrian chancellor, alexander schallenberg, told a press conference that the measure would begin on monday, and last a maximum of twenty days. he also announced austria would make it a legal requirement to get vaccinated from february next year. 0ur health correspondent naomi grimley explained a little earlier how serious the situation is there. secondly, the case rates in austria are such that they really need
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to get ahead of this now, and they think the best way to do this is to close bars and restaurants, put schools back online, and to basically be in a lockdown state for the next ten days. they will review it after that and see whether they extend it if necessary, but it�*s really a sign of a country getting to grips with outbreaks which have taken them by surprise in the last couple of weeks. the most significant thing it has done has been to require the population by law to get vaccinated by early february. is that unprecedented ? have any other country is gone that far? i know there are mandates for certain sectors and so on, but has any country gone as far as that, making it mandatory for everyone? not in the western world, but there are a handful of countries that have done it globally. indonesia is one, turkmenistan is another. international governments don�*t really want to do this, obviously because it is the kind of thing which would have civil liberties campaigners worried and possibly cause public unrest. you mention the high rates of cases in austria. of course, we look across the water
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at what is going on on the continent and wonder how it compares with the situation in the uk. i think we have a graph which shows you exactly what is happening in austria at the moment. look at the red line. it has gone into what the scientists call exponential growth. that�*s a much worse position at the moment than the uk, but the uk has had really high rates all through the summerand autumn, which has obviously been quite controversial. you can see other countries tracking austria. the netherlands, which has good vaccination rates, better than austria, is also on that steep curve. i should mention that when it comes to austria�*s vaccination rate, 67% of the population is fully vaccinated, and that�*s essentially why they are in this fix, because there is a significant pocket of the population who are unvaccinated, hence this new law which will come in in february. the direction in terms of the situation in the uk,
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the latest stats suggest that actually a smaller proportion of the population currently has covid, but there was a caveat with that about the direction cases are going in day by day. there are different indicators people use. the 0ns goes door—to—door and swabs the general population, and there is at the moment shows that one in 65 of us have covid, down from last week, when it was one in 60. when it comes to those daily rates which the government publishes, they are on an upward curve again. the sort of worry for health experts is that, as we go into christmas, there is more mixing, it has been bouncing around — is britain now going to see another upsurge? or have they had enough infection in the population hitherto to mean that they have a bit more what�*s called population resistance and fewer people will get ill now because they have been infected over
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the summer and in the early autumn? i also spoke tojohn edmunds, who�*s the professor of infectious disease modelling at the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine — he�*s also a member of the spi—m modelling group of scientists, which advises the government. he said it�*s still hard to say exactly what the situation will be at christmas. still very high rates of infection in children and that is over spilling into the rest of the community but it is likely to start to come down at some point, you know, in the... well, it is likely to come down at some point. then, of course, the other big dynamic what�*s going on with immunity in older individuals, which is mostly vaccine derived, and that has been declining, that�*s where the booster doses come in, in order to boost that immunity. the quicker we can get round to doing that, the better. it is all a little bit of a race between waning immunity in older
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individuals and boosting that through the extension of the vaccination programme and what is going on in children. put it all together, it is hard to say, to be precise. my hunch is that cases will stay high for some time because what we are seeing in children is mostly a kind of natural level of infection. younger children under the age of 12 are not been vaccinated and so really they are going to have to be infected, unfortunately. if we vaccinated them, we could avoid that, but if we don�*t vaccinate them, then they will gradually become infected and that will spill, continually overspill, into older age groups. so i think that we will see high rates of infection continuing for some time, similar to where we have been for already months on end.
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it may then start to come down. exactly where we will be at christmas, it is hard to say. my hunch is perhaps a little bit lower than where we are now but i think it is very difficult to be precise. the headlines on bbc news: cricket chiefs hold an urgent meeting about racism in the game in england. it comes after another cricketer — alex hales — apologises — for wearing black make—up at a fancy dress party in 2009 austria is to go into a full nationwide lockdown because of record covid cases and everyone will have to get vaccinated. here, two children and two women have died in a fire at a house in south east london. four members of the same family have died in a house fire in south east london. two women, a young boy and a girl were rescued from the home
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in bexleyheath last night, but died a short time later. a man who managed to leave the building was taken to hospital. tolu adeoye reports. how did two women, a girl and boy come to die as a result of a fire at this house in bexleyheath? the question on so many minds today as a family grieves. i saw the blue lights flashing and looked out of the window to see police, ambulance, fire brigade and that�*s it, out the bedroom window i see a commotion round there. it was at around 8:30pm last night when the london fire brigade rescued the group from the first floor of this house on hamilton road, but all four were pronounced dead at the scene. a man who escaped before firefighters arrived is being treated in hospitalfor leg injuries. his condition is not life threatening. we currently have specialist investigating officers from our fire investigation teams on scene. we are working closely with the metropolitan police service and local specialist investigators
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to try and understand the causation of this incident. it is believed the family were of sri lankan heritage. some relatives arrived at the scene earlier, distressed, asking why. local people are shaken. it's crazy, they had two kids. it's very upsetting. i've got kids myself, - that would be a dreadful thing to happen to my kids. and you knew them, did you? i didn't personally know them but i used to speak to them l when we used to walk past. the met police has said, at this early stage they do not believe the cause of the fire to be suspicious but inquiries are ongoing. condolences have been coming in, including from the mayor of london, sadiq khan, who said he is heartbroken and his heart goes out to their loved ones and the community at this awful time. family members are receiving specialist support as the investigation continues into this terrible incident that has cut four lives short so suddenly.
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tolu adeoye, bbc london. a 13—year—old boy is in a critical condition after being shot as he was walking down a street in birmingham last night. the teenager is said to have �*life changing injuries�* in the attack in the hockley circus area. news correspondent phil mackie is at the scene now. they have been carrying out a lot of investigations, a lot of activity going on here since this incident happened last night. right up until ten minutes ago, this underpass was cordoned off. they have just removed the tape from there and beneath the flyover. we think it is in this underpass that whatever happened happened. it was around 7pm last night. this 13—year—old was shot in the back as he was walking around. he is in a critical condition still, that hasn�*t changed, but west midlands police say he may well have suffered life—changing injuries as a result of the shooting. west midlands ambulance service said
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they sent a merit team, referring it to being a high—level team that involves a specialist trauma doctor and a specialist paramedic because he was so seriously injured. i�*ve been speaking to an eyewitness, a shopkeeper, who said that he heard the shot and somebody came into the shop seeking shelter last night. the police activity is winding down here. it is an ongoing investigation, they say. the tragedy is that here is another teenager whose life has been severely affected by violent crime, and that keeps happening here in birmingham. it was only at the beginning of the year that a 1a—year—old was shot dead outside his house about a mile from here, keon lincoln. he is obviously 0k, although in a critical condition in hospital. life—changing injuries. we don�*t know quite what that means at the moment, but we will hopefully get updates both on his condition and on the investigation as the day
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progresses and the weekend goes on. the bomb used in the explosion outside liverpool women�*s hospital on sunday could have caused �*significant injury or death�* if it had gone off as the bomber intended. police said the device had ball bearings attached to it which could have acted as shrapnel. counter—terrorism officers still don�*t know why the device exploded when it did, killing the bomber but say it could have been triggered by the movement of the taxi he was travelling in. deforestation in brazil�*s amazon rainforest has hit its highest level in over 15 years. a report by the country�*s space research agency found that deforestation increased by 22% ina year. brazil was among a number of nations who promised to end deforestation by 2030 during the cop26 climate summit. earlier i spoke to dr erika berenguer, senior research associate at 0xford university�*s ecosystems lab. i started by asking her, in light of this report, how realistic that pledge
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at cop really is. it just doesn�*t. unfortunately, the evidence shows that the pledge was lip service to the international community. there are no milestones to be hit, no mechanism to end deforestation by 2030, and more importantly, these data have been available since before cop26 started. the document released by the brazilian state agency was signed on the 27th of october, and the deal was signed on the 2nd of november, so brazil withheld that information, knowing it would probably damage its image and also compromise the pledge. just explain what is the cause of this. is this sanctioned, is it official deforestation, or is this illegal activity that is not being tackled?
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99% of deforestation in the brazilian amazon, according to data, is illegal. while there is basically illegal deforestation, and the reason why it is soaring is because since the beginning of the current administration, we have seen a systematic dismantling of the environmental agency. there are budget cuts. to give you an idea, in his first day in office, he completely extinguished the climate change secretary. we have seen a government that has been doing this, decreasing the amount of protection of the rainforest. it is natural that deforestation rates will go up. what can be done about it? is it a case of trying to replace the trees that have been lost, or is that just not feasible? that�*s not feasible. the greatest way to combat climate change
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in the case of the amazon is to preserve forests. if we just plant trees, we are not replacing the amazing diversity of the amazon holds. in one hectare, one football pitch of the amazon rainforest, we have more tree species than the whole of western europe. that�*s how diverse it is. to plant some trees, we willjust have trees but not an amazon forest. what we need to do is combat illegal deforestation, and it is something brazil did successfully from 200a—12, when the deforestation rate decreased by 80%. the brexit minister lord frost says significant gaps remain with the european union about customs arrangements in northern ireland after talks with his eu counterpart in brussels. the uk is warning that it could unilaterally suspend parts of the northern ireland deal
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unless major changes are made. so let�*s try and make sense of these ongoing talks — and discuss what the sticking points might be. let�*s speak now to jess sargeant from the institute for government think tank. jess, help us with this — what is at issue here? jess, help us with this - what is at issue here?— jess, help us with this - what is at issue here? what are they trying to resolve? fundamentally, _ issue here? what are they trying to resolve? fundamentally, the i issue here? what are they trying to i resolve? fundamentally, the northern ireland protocol creates special arrangements for northern ireland that allows it to maintain frictionless access to the eu market and prevents the need for a hard border on the island of ireland. the consequence of that is, it makes it harder for businesses in great britain to send goods to northern ireland, and there are lots of concerns about the impact this might have on the ability of northern ireland supermarkets to stock their shelves. there are concerns about the abilities of medicines to be sent between great britain and northern ireland, and the result of this kind of principled disagreement between the uk and the eu about the
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fact that eu law continues to apply in northern ireland, despite the fact that it�*s no longer formerly part of the eu. now, there have been several rounds of discussion on this, and it looks like there are proposals on the table to try and ease the level of checks, to remove some of the challenges that have been created on sending goods between great britain and northern ireland, but there also a political dimension to this that perhaps is making agreement quite difficult. so, this is something that has an impact and in effect beyond northern ireland itself. this is affecting companies, exporters, manufacturers throughout the rest of the uk. i think one of the things that businesses are particularly struggling with is some of the uncertainty around their arrangements, because it�*s not clear what the future of the northern ireland protocol will be. they don�*t know what kind of scheme they will need to adhere to, what requirements they�*ll need to meet in order to be
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able to send goods to northern ireland, but i think the main impact is really being felt in northern ireland. we are seeing businesses in great britain in some cases deciding it�*s just too difficult to serve the northern ireland market, so there is a risk that they will withdraw from that market if there isn�*t some kind of agreement and stability forward. but were they not aware that this point was going to come sooner or later? because that arrangement was temporary, wasn�*t it? it was never going to be an open—ended thing. this day was going to come at some point. this day was going to come at some oint. ., ., , ., ., point. the northern ireland protocol that was negotiated _ point. the northern ireland protocol that was negotiated by _ point. the northern ireland protocol that was negotiated by this - point. the northern ireland protocol that was negotiated by this current l that was negotiated by this current government, by borisjohnson, is different from the arrangements that theresa may negotiated, in that it is intended to be permanent. part of the problem here comes in slightly different expectations from the uk at the eu about what exactly implementing the northern ireland protocol would look like in practice. the uk said it was
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expecting a degree of flexibility from the eu that would seek to try and minimise the sort of checks and controls that might need to take place on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland. the eu argues it was always exactly clear what this would look like, and therefore it doesn�*t necessarily it doesn�*t agree with the uk position that there should be changes now. it has now come around to the position that perhaps additional flexibility is needed because of particular political circumstances in northern ireland itself, and some concerns that have been raised by business groups, but i think this is one of the kind of recurring questions, whether what has happened is what should have been expected and therefore what the argument is to reopen the arrangements. band therefore what the argument is to reopen the arrangements. and from the statement _ reopen the arrangements. and from the statement issued _ reopen the arrangements. and from the statement issued by _ reopen the arrangements. and from the statement issued by the - reopen the arrangements. and from the statement issued by the brexit i the statement issued by the brexit minister, lord frost, it said significant gaps remain across most issues, but it concludes by saying, we agreed discussion should proceed next week, and the european commission vice president and i will meet again on the 26th of november
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in london. it sounds like what these talks have agreed is to talk a little more, but that in itself is an achievement, given there was perhaps a hint of ripping up the deal altogether. i perhaps a hint of ripping up the deal altogether.— perhaps a hint of ripping up the deal altogether. i think in the last week or so _ deal altogether. i think in the last week or so we _ deal altogether. i think in the last week or so we have _ deal altogether. i think in the last week or so we have seen - deal altogether. i think in the last week or so we have seen a - deal altogether. i think in the last week or so we have seen a more. week or so we have seen a more optimistic tone from the uk government, that has been very much welcomed by the eu. as it soared in lord frost —— as it said in lord frost�*s statement, there has been progress on medicines, but there are outstanding issues on customs and some of the checks on certain food products like meat and such like going from great britain to northern ireland. the other thing is, there are some issues that the uk once that aren�*t even being discussed at the moment. i think the most important one there is european court ofjustice that currently has a role in deciding whether eu law is being applied correctly and northern ireland. this is something that the uk wants to see end, and i don�*t think the eu at the moment is particularly receptive to renegotiating that aspect of the
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arrangement, so even if we get progress on the issues that are currently under discussion, there is still going to be further peaceful compromise is necessary in order to actually reach that point about the european court ofjustice doesn�*t appear in a statement. i doubt they have forgotten about it but i am sure they will be glad you reminded of them if they are watching. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. good afternoon. once again, there is a lot of cloud across the country but we have seen some sunshine — this was taken in anglesey a little earlier, also east of the grampians and across the eastern side of northern england in particular. there are breaks in the cloud elsewhere, there is just an awful lot of cloud generally speaking. it is coming in on south—westerly wind, quite a brisk wind in the north. it is really quite windy and wet, as you can see across the far north of scotland. it remains mild as yesterday, 1as and 15s, and it should be relatively mild overnight. where we do keep the clear skies, they will fill in with some mist and some fog.
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we start to see the weather front in the north making progress into the rest of scotland, and then during the day tomorrow, bringing rain across southern scotland, northern ireland and northern england. behind it, brighter skies return but with a rash of showers, and you may have noticed the change in wind direction — it gets colder across scotland and northern ireland tomorrow, still relatively mild with a little bit of brightness in the south. the cold air arrives across most parts on sunday but with some sunshine but they will be a brisk wind to go with it, making it feel chillier. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... cricket chiefs hold an urgent meeting about racism in the game in england. it comes after another cricketer — alex hales — apologises for wearing my alex hales — apologises for wearing 20s was full of that, my 20s was full of mistakes like that, reckless mistakes off the field, that cost me, let down
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family, let down team—mates, let down friends. austria is to go into a full nationwide lockdown because of record covid cases, and everyone will have to get vaccinated. here, two children and two women have died in a fire at a house in south east london. a 13—year—old boy is in a critical condition after being shot in the back in birmingham last night. police believe his injuries are life—changing. and drivers will be banned from scrolling, filming or searching playlists on their mobile phones from next year. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here�*s jane. good afternoon. away from the racism scandal that has tainted english cricket, australia are undergoing their own crisis.— cricket, australia are undergoing their own crisis. their captain has had to step _ their own crisis. their captain has had to step down _ their own crisis. their captain has had to step down just _ their own crisis. their captain has had to step down just weeks i their own crisis. their captain has| had to step down just weeks away from the start of the ashes after it emerged he had sent sexually
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explicit text messages to a female colleague four years ago. he decided to design as captain when he became aware of the details in 2017 were about to be made public. he said the cricket australia investigation the following year had exonerated him but that he deeply regretted his actions at the time and to this day. he said standing down with the right thing to do for him, his family and for cricket. the first test starts on december the 8th in brisbane. to australian cricket fans, i�*m deeply sorry that my past behaviour has impacted our game on the eve of the ashes. for the disappointment i have caused to fans and the entire cricket community, i apologise. i�*ve been blessed with a wonderful, loving and supportive family and it breaks my heart to know how much i have let them down. the chair of the women�*s tennis association has said there will be
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no wta events in china next year without proof that peng shuai is safe. concerns are growing for the missing chinese player who hasn�*t been heard from since alleging she was sexually assaulted by a high profile former chinese politician. the authenticity of an email allegedly sent from peng to the women�*s tennis associaison has been called into question by the chair, steve simon. he told the bbc�*s tennis correspondent russell fuller that no amount of money would prevent them from pulling out of china if their conditions are not met. this is not about the money, this is doing what is right and making sure peng shuai is safe and free. we want to find out are _ peng shuai is safe and free. we want to find out are the _ peng shuai is safe and free. we want to find out are the allegations - to find out are the allegations is true and if they are, what is the result of that?— true and if they are, what is the result of that? just to be clear, if ou don't result of that? just to be clear, if you don't get _ result of that? just to be clear, if you don't get this _ result of that? just to be clear, if you don't get this independent i you don�*t get this independent and verifiable proof that peng shuai is safe and there is not a full and transparent investigation, then there will be no wta tournaments in
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china next year? that there will be no wta tournaments in china next year?— china next year? that would be my osition, china next year? that would be my position. yes- _ ahead of manchester city�*s game against everton on sunday, the club has confirmed that kevin de bruyne won�*t be involved after testing positive for coronavirus. manager pep guardiola said de bruyne had tested positive after returning from international duty with belgium. he�*ll isolate for 10 days and, as well as sunday s premier league match against everton, he�*ll also miss wednesday s champions league game with psg and the following weekend s home game against west ham. to formula 1, where second practice has just finished in qatar ahead of this weekends grand prix. valteri bottas quickest in the mercedes, piere gasly second, max verstappen third and hamilton could only manage fourth. there was another disappointment for mercedes who have been denied a review of an incident in brazil where verstappen was said to have pushed hamilton off the track. mercedes were hoping for a time penalty for red bull. significantly, hamilton was wearing a special helmet with the rainbow flag on it.
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human rights remain a contentious issue in qatar, especially lgbt rights, so hamilton sending a strong message there. just 1a points between the two drivers in the standings going into this weekend. rory mcilroy is still in contension after his second round of the dp world tour championship in dubai. he�*s a shot behind the leaders. he made a mistake at the 18th, putting the ball in the water. he recovered to double bogey the hole. that put him at nine under for the tournament. two underfor the two under for the day. unfortunate for mcilroy who�*d led after a great first day. he�*s won this event twice before, in 2012 and 2015. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that�*s all the sport for now.
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laws to prosecute drivers who use their mobile phone are to be strengthened. at the moment, motorists are banned only from texting or making calls. from next year it will also be illegal to take photos, play games or scroll through playlists while driving. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent, colletta smith, reports. # happy birthday to you... # joe cairns was 1a years old when he was killed. at the point of the last few months of his life, he was spectacular. hurray! i couldn�*t be more proud of him, i couldn�*t. you know, he was always going to deal with different things. but... he was shining. he was. two years ago, joe cairns was sitting in the back of a minibus on the way to his special school
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when a lorry ploughed straight into the back of them. it was a a5 minute journey until the collision and for a5 minutes, that man was on his phone. 0n various applications — text messages, phone calls, but also he was on sky sports, he was on his facebook, and he was playing a game. the driver was convicted, he got eight years for dangerous driving, but changing the law will close a loophole making it easier for police to stop and fine anyone holding their phone and using it for any reason when they are behind the wheel. but you will still be able to use your phone in hands—free mode. if you get caught now, you're going to get a £200 fine and six points on your licence. that is quite significant. the police will be able to enforce the laws much more strongly and actually, there is some quite interesting technology coming out as to other ways we can spot people using their phone.
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for example, putting cameras in fake hgvs. so be careful on the roads. steph, how do you feel when you see people in their cars using their phones, looking down at their phones? he had a life, a whole beautiful life to lead. and he hasn�*t got it any more. you are missing a part of you, your heart, i gave birth to that boy and i gave him life. and through somebody�*s choice that day, they took his life away. and he is no more. and it has to be out there, it has to be, how dangerous it is to use your phone whilst you are driving. colletta smith, bbc news, in radcliffe. the palestinian organisation, hamas, has been outlawed in its entirety in the uk. the organisation�*s military
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wing is already banned, but the home secretary priti patel now says the whole group, which includes its political wing, should be proscribed. hamas controls the gaza strip and calls for the establishment of a palestinian state under sharia law. andrew marr has announced he is leaving the bbc after 21 years. the journalist and broadcaster, has presented the bbc�*s political programme the andrew marr show on sunday mornings for the past 16 years. he said from the new year, he�*ll be moving to global "to write and present political and cultural shows and to write for newspapers". mick rock, the photographer who took iconic images of stars like david bowie and queen has died at the age of 72. 0nce dubbed "the man who shot the �*70s", a statement on his twitter page said, "mick rock has made thejungianjourney to the other side."
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sharon osbourne was among those who paid tribute, saying his work would "live on forever". joining me now is denis 0�*regan, the tour photographer to some of the biggest names in rock, including bowie, queen and pink floyd. give us a sense of the impact his work had. b. give us a sense of the impact his work had. �* ., ., , .,, give us a sense of the impact his work had-— work had. a lot of people, he certainly _ work had. a lot of people, he certainly had _ work had. a lot of people, he certainly had fun _ work had. a lot of people, he certainly had fun part - work had. a lot of people, he certainly had fun part of my l certainly had fun part of my decision to take up photography. i began after i saw david bowie at the hammersmith 0deon in the early 70s. mick rock was involved in a lot of photography over that period. having discovered bowie one day, he decided to retire the next day and i thought he was retiring permanently rather than just that character but at the after party, mick rock photographed mickjagger, lou reed and david go together and it became known as the last supper. that picture motive
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summed up the glamour of that era in one photograph. just two weeks ago, there was a commemorative lodge for david bowie and a lot of us might gather together, a lot of friends gathered together at the cafe def paris because of that photograph. it sounds in some ways that he was a hero of yours. they often say don�*t meet your heroes, obviously you did, what was he like as a person? how much did that influence his work, do you think? i much did that influence his work, do ou think? ., much did that influence his work, do ou think? ~ ., , much did that influence his work, do ou think? ~' ., , ., much did that influence his work, do ou think? ~' .,, ., , you think? i think he was a person who influenced _ you think? i think he was a person who influenced his _ you think? i think he was a person who influenced his work _ you think? i think he was a person who influenced his work a - you think? i think he was a person who influenced his work a lot. i i who influenced his work a lot. i don�*t know... i thought of him as a competitor. i think he had an advantage by having the last name rock being a rock photographer. he
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had a presence but i didn�*t know him that well because he lived in new york and i lived in london and although we travel between the two a lot, ala pat didn�*t cross that often but it was his photography more than anything that i remember him for. when you are a rock music photographer in particular, we talk about iconic images, but what is it that it takes to create that kind of iconic image? what is it about those photographs? what is it that you are looking for when you are trying to capture something that is going to live on way beyond yourself? exactly. i think you need some sort of empathy, you have to have an understanding with the person you are photographing. just stick a camera in front of their face is never going to work. it is better if you are photographing and working closely with people you have got to know in some way. with me, that was on tour. i was with whoever i was
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with photographing day in, day out for months on end. mick was photographing people he socialised with and knew very well and i think really quite often that is the only way to capture the real person. i think you did that very well because of the situation he was in when he moved from london to new york and entered that whole society and that new york 70s seen. i5 entered that whole society and that new york 70s seen.— new york 70s seen. is there any imaue in new york 70s seen. is there any image in particular _ new york 70s seen. is there any image in particular of _ new york 70s seen. is there any image in particular of his - new york 70s seen. is there any image in particular of his that i new york 70s seen. is there any image in particular of his that is | image in particular of his that is in your view perhaps underrated, that isn�*t one of the big iconic ones, that for you has something special about it? i ones, that for you has something special about it?— special about it? i can't think of one offhand. — special about it? i can't think of one offhand, unfortunately. i special about it? i can't think of one offhand, unfortunately. 0r| special about it? i can't think of i one offhand, unfortunately. or even an of his one offhand, unfortunately. or even any of his better-known _ one offhand, unfortunately. or even any of his better-known ones, i one offhand, unfortunately. or even| any of his better-known ones, which any of his better—known ones, which you particularly like and what makes it stand out for you?— it stand out for you? well, i became- -- _ it stand out for you? well, i became... as _ it stand out for you? well, i became... as with - it stand out for you? well, i became... as with a - it stand out for you? well, i became... as with a lot i it stand out for you? well, i became... as with a lot of l it stand out for you? well, i i became... as with a lot of people you photograph, i�*ve done a lot of photography with queen, they are
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often surprised how many of the pictures they see that one person took because they�*ve seen them under so many different circumstances and with me and mick rock it was the same, i had seen that picture of bowie, lou reed and mickjagger, i had seen the cover of queen with them lying on the ground which influence the video later on. it was only as time progressed that a lot of these famous photographs were actually mick rock. also debbie harry. he was a little older than me so he photograph people in a career just before i ended up photographing them. it was at the initial stage of theirjourney them. it was at the initial stage of their journey that he them. it was at the initial stage of theirjourney that he was more involved when they weren�*t as big stars and he was meeting them on a different level. i then worked with a lot of people when they became huge and they were on gigantic tours, so it was a different situation for the two of us. almost opposite in a way. both of them very intimate. because we spent so much
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time with them.— intimate. because we spent so much time with them. thank you very much indeed. speaking about mick rock who has died at the age of 72. let�*s remind you of the headlines this hour. cricket chiefs hold an urgent meeting about racism in the game in england. it comes after another cricketer — alex hales — apologises for wearing black make—up at a fancy dress party in 2009. austria is to go into a full nationwide lockdown because of record covid cases and everyone will have to get vaccinated. here, two children and two women have died in a fire at a house in south east london. india�*s prime minister narendra modi has announced a repeal of three farm laws, which prompted nearly a year of protest from hundreds of thousands of farmers. mr modi made the u—turn in a speech to the nation, to mark the birthday of the founder of the sikh religion.
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farm leaders have welcomed the announcement, as our south asia correspondent rajini vaidyanathan reports from delhi. victory for india�*s farmers in a stand—off that lasted close to a year. relief and celebration, an unexpected win which tasted especially sweet against a prime minister who rarely backs down. addressing the nation on the birth anniversary of guru nanak, the founder of the sikh faith, narendra modi surprised many when he said he would scrap his controversial farm reforms. committed to taking wide ranging action to tackle discrimination and promote inclusion and diversity at all levels. we are committed to tangible action and discussed several areas of focus, including stamping out discrimination, making cricket more open and inclusive and ensuring effective governance and
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leadership. the group work through a series of actions that aim to tackle the serious questions that have been brought up over the last few weeks. each individually agreed to consult with their respective stakeholders, to come together as a game next week and publish further details. we would like to make the following statement as well. the ecb, the mcc, the pca, the edible ca and recreation county cricket at the following. azeem rafiq has shone a light on our game that has shocked and ashamed and saddened us all. racism and discrimination is a blight on our game. to all of those who have suffered or experienced any form of discrimination in our sport, we are truly sorry. i will sport did not welcome you, our game did not accept you, as we should have done. we apologise unreservedly for the
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suffering you have faced. we stand together against discrimination at all levels. and in all its forms, and we are united as a sport to do whatever it takes to eradicate the scourge from our game. we will continue to listen, to make swift and positive change to the culture of the game. we will embrace and celebrate differences everywhere, knowing that we diversity we are stronger. today we discuss tangible commitments to make cricket a sport where everyone feels safe and everyone is included. we will now finalise the details and publish these actions next week. our game must win back your trust. thank you. you are watching tom harrison, the chief executive of the england wales cricket board speaking after their meeting on cricket board speaking after their
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meetin: ., ., ., cricket board speaking after their meetina ., ., ., ., . ,, cricket board speaking after their meetinua ., ., ., ., . ,, cricket board speaking after their meetina ., ., ., ., . ,, . meeting on how to tackle the current crisis facing — meeting on how to tackle the current crisis facing cricket _ meeting on how to tackle the current crisis facing cricket will _ meeting on how to tackle the current crisis facing cricket will stop - crisis facing cricket will stop let�*s listening to what more he has to say. let's listening to what more he has tosa. ., let's listening to what more he has tosa. .,, ., to say. speaking to cricket fans who will be looking _ to say. speaking to cricket fans who will be looking very _ to say. speaking to cricket fans who will be looking very hard _ to say. speaking to cricket fans who will be looking very hard at - to say. speaking to cricket fans who will be looking very hard at the i will be looking very hard at the wider game or tangible action, that is what we will be delivering, whether it is about looking at cultural change to the dressing room, whether it is about standards that we put for recruiters of staff, we have 12 different areas, looking at tangible action to make sure we are impacting on the ground but this needs to make a difference. itruihat are impacting on the ground but this needs to make a difference. what are an of needs to make a difference. what are any of those — needs to make a difference. what are any of those 12 _ needs to make a difference. what are any of those 12 areas? _ needs to make a difference. what are any of those 12 areas? what - needs to make a difference. what are any of those 12 areas? what are i needs to make a difference. what are any of those 12 areas? what are the l any of those 12 areas? what are the reasons behind _ any of those 12 areas? what are the reasons behind why _ any of those 12 areas? what are the reasons behind why we _ any of those 12 areas? what are the reasons behind why we are - reasons behind why we are experiencing cultural difficulties in the dressing room, for example. what are the reasons why this laboratory behaviour of racism —— aberrant behaviour taken place in the space? we will be publishing on
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wednesday, sorry sunday. the whole game came today. 0ther wednesday, sorry sunday. the whole game came today. other members came and we had a message on video. it was a wide representation of the english cricket membership. share was a wide representation of the english cricket membership. are you considerin: english cricket membership. are you considering your _ english cricket membership. are you considering your position? _ english cricket membership. are you considering your position? i - english cricket membership. are you considering your position? i feel i considering your position? i feel very determined _ considering your position? i feel very determined to _ considering your position? i feel very determined to lead - considering your position? i feel very determined to lead this i considering your position?“ very determined to lead this change to the game and make sure that this blight is addressed. as a father of two girls, i do want to make sure that i leave a game that is absolutely has the right safe kind of environment for everyone to feel welcomed and everyone to feel a sense of belonging in. i received the backing of the game today. you talk about tangible and wide—ranging action, _ talk about tangible and wide—ranging action, but— talk about tangible and wide—ranging action, but do your commitments go far enough? — action, but do your commitments go far enough? i action, but do your commitments go far enough?— far enough? i think this is 'ust the first ste -. far enough? i think this is 'ust the first step. m i far enough? i think this is 'ust the first step. i'm not i far enough? i think this is just the first step. i'm not suggesting i far enough? i think this is just the
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first step. i'm not suggesting thatj first step. i�*m not suggesting that this is a silver bullet response or silver bullet answer. it is an urgent and immediate response to the issues that we have faced. we clearly have to go a lot further with a lot more change across a wider range of perspectives, including governance, including the way we are structured. those conversations are to come but what we wanted to do today was take initial steps with deliberate action that are meant to target the issues that are meant to target the issues that we face on the ground. you talk about initial— that we face on the ground. you talk about initial steps, _ that we face on the ground. you talk about initial steps, the _ that we face on the ground. you talk about initial steps, the issue of i about initial steps, the issue of racism — about initial steps, the issue of racism and _ about initial steps, the issue of racism and its commissioning cricket is nothing _ racism and its commissioning cricket is nothing new. what makes this plan is nothing new. what makes this plan is different? — is nothing new. what makes this plan is different? ., ., , is different? that would be the roof in is different? that would be the proof in how — is different? that would be the proof in how we _ is different? that would be the proof in how we deliver - is different? that would be the proof in how we deliver it. i is different? that would be the proof in how we deliver it. thisj proof in how we deliver it. this will be the first time the game has come together to take such an urgent and direct action in response to azeem�*s test to on the testimony of others who have come forward in recent days. others who have come forward in recent days-— others who have come forward in recent days. and a question to you and then richard _ recent days. and a question to you and then richard if— recent days. and a question to you and then richard if i _ recent days. and a question to you and then richard ifi may. - recent days. and a question to you and then richard if i may. are i recent days. and a question to you and then richard if i may. are you | and then richard if i may. are you confident— and then richard if i may. are you confident you have the right person to lead _ confident you have the right person to lead cricket out of this crisis? richer, — to lead cricket out of this crisis? richer, do — to lead cricket out of this crisis? richer, do you think he is the right
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man? _ richer, do you think he is the right man? , ., . ., richer, do you think he is the right man? , ., . ,, , man? yes, i do. cricket needs leadership _ man? yes, i do. cricket needs leadership at _ man? yes, i do. cricket needs leadership at the _ man? yes, i do. cricket needs leadership at the moment, i man? yes, i do. cricket needs| leadership at the moment, not man? yes, i do. cricket needs. leadership at the moment, not a vacuum — leadership at the moment, not a vacuum this— leadership at the moment, not a vacuum. this is— leadership at the moment, not a vacuum. this is a _ leadership at the moment, not a vacuum. this is a challenge i leadership at the moment, not a vacuum. this is a challenge for. leadership at the moment, not a . vacuum. this is a challenge for the home _ vacuum. this is a challenge for the home game — vacuum. this is a challenge for the home game and _ vacuum. this is a challenge for the home game and the _ vacuum. this is a challenge for the home game and the culture - vacuum. this is a challenge for the home game and the culture of the| home game and the culture of the game _ home game and the culture of the game has — home game and the culture of the game has to— home game and the culture of the game has to change. _ home game and the culture of the game has to change. —— _ home game and the culture of the game has to change. —— the - home game and the culture of the| game has to change. —— the whole game _ game has to change. —— the whole game we — game has to change. —— the whole game we not— game has to change. —— the whole game. i've not felt _ game has to change. —— the whole game. i've not felt the _ game has to change. —— the whole game. i've not felt the game i game has to change. —— the whole| game. i've not felt the game come together— game. i've not felt the game come together to — game. i've not felt the game come together to address— game. i've not felt the game come together to address this _ game. i've not felt the game come together to address this issue i game. i've not felt the game come together to address this issue in i together to address this issue in the past — together to address this issue in the past you _ together to address this issue in the past. you have _ together to address this issue in the past. you have to— together to address this issue in the past. you have to go- together to address this issue ml the past. you have to go through together to address this issue in i the past. you have to go through the process— the past. you have to go through the process but— the past. you have to go through the process but it — the past. you have to go through the process but it is _ the past. you have to go through the process but it is about— the past. you have to go through the process but it is about actions, - process but it is about actions, what _ process but it is about actions, what we — process but it is about actions, what we do _ process but it is about actions, what we do in _ process but it is about actions, what we do. in three _ process but it is about actions, what we do. in three to - process but it is about actions, what we do. in three to six i process but it is about actions, - what we do. in three to six months' time, _ what we do. in three to six months' time, there — what we do. in three to six months' time, there has— what we do. in three to six months' time, there has to _ what we do. in three to six months' time, there has to be _ what we do. in three to six months' time, there has to be change, - what we do. in three to six months' . time, there has to be change, change must _ time, there has to be change, change must come _ time, there has to be change, change must come about. _ time, there has to be change, change must come about. it _ time, there has to be change, change must come about. it is _ time, there has to be change, change must come about. it is a _ time, there has to be change, change must come about. it is a tragedy- must come about. it is a tragedy that what— must come about. it is a tragedy that what azeem _ must come about. it is a tragedy that what azeem rafiq _ must come about. it is a tragedy that what azeem rafiq went - must come about. it is a tragedy- that what azeem rafiq went through has brought— that what azeem rafiq went through has brought this _ that what azeem rafiq went through has brought this about _ that what azeem rafiq went through has brought this about but _ that what azeem rafiq went through has brought this about but only - that what azeem rafiq went through| has brought this about but only good can come _ has brought this about but only good can come from — has brought this about but only good can come from this _ has brought this about but only good can come from this now— has brought this about but only good can come from this now and - has brought this about but only good can come from this now and we - has brought this about but only good i can come from this now and we need to see _ can come from this now and we need to see this— can come from this now and we need to see this through _ can come from this now and we need to see this through the _ can come from this now and we need to see this through the eyes of - to see this through the eyes of azeem — to see this through the eyes of azeem rafiq _ to see this through the eyes of azeem rafiq. we _ to see this through the eyes of azeem rafiq. we need - to see this through the eyes of azeem rafiq. we need to- to see this through the eyes of azeem rafiq. we need to win. to see this through the eyes of. azeem rafiq. we need to win the trust _ azeem rafiq. we need to win the trust back— azeem rafiq. we need to win the trust back of— azeem rafiq. we need to win the trust back of those _ azeem rafiq. we need to win the trust back of those mums - azeem rafiq. we need to win the trust back of those mums who i azeem rafiq. we need to win the i trust back of those mums who might be thinking _ trust back of those mums who might be thinking weathered _ trust back of those mums who might be thinking weathered cricket - trust back of those mums who might be thinking weathered cricket is - trust back of those mums who might be thinking weathered cricket is the i be thinking weathered cricket is the i’ili'it be thinking weathered cricket is the right spot _ be thinking weathered cricket is the right spot for — be thinking weathered cricket is the right spot for their— be thinking weathered cricket is the right spot for their children. - be thinking weathered cricket is the right spot for their children. trust . right spot for their children. trust is everything _ right spot for their children. trust is everything now— right spot for their children. trust is everything now and _ right spot for their children. trust is everything now and it - right spot for their children. trust is everything now and it starts - is everything now and it starts today — is everything now and it starts today from _ is everything now and it starts today. from here, _ is everything now and it starts today. from here, i— is everything now and it starts today. from here, ithink- is everything now and it starts today. from here, i think thei today. from here, ithink the process— today. from here, ithink the process will _ today. from here, ithink the process will move _ today. from here, ithink the process will move very- today. from here, i think thel process will move very quickly today. from here, i think the - process will move very quickly so we can start _ process will move very quickly so we can start to — process will move very quickly so we can start to show— process will move very quickly so we can start to show that _ process will move very quickly so we can start to show that our _ process will move very quickly so we can start to show that our actions i can start to show that our actions do speak— can start to show that our actions do speak louder— can start to show that our actions do speak louder than— can start to show that our actions do speak louder than our- can start to show that our actions do speak louder than our words. i can start to show that our actions. do speak louder than our words. [5 do speak louder than our words. [£3 there do speak louder than our words. there any corner of the game unwilling to change?
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inaudible for now, this is a moment to celebrate that we had been able to agree change very quickly across the whole gambit of english and welsh cricket. they were all present today, as the statement indicates. i don't think there is one person in english and welsh cricket that doesn't feel the necessity to take these steps and to make the initial changes necessary to eradicate this situation of racism in cricket, to take it down forever. that is what is important here. once we have taken the initial steps, we will come back with more measures that ensure we go wider with this issue. todayis ensure we go wider with this issue. today is a statement of intent as much as anything to try to regain trust of cricket fans and families around the country.— around the country. would you address speculation _ around the country. would you address speculation you - around the country. would you address speculation you will. around the country. would you i address speculation you will step down _ address speculation you will step down next year after leading cricket through _ down next year after leading cricket through the crisis. i�*m
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down next year after leading cricket through the crisis.— through the crisis. i'm determined to lead cricket _ through the crisis. i'm determined to lead cricket through _ through the crisis. i'm determined to lead cricket through this. - through the crisis. i'm determined to lead cricket through this. i - through the crisis. i'm determined to lead cricket through this. i feel| to lead cricket through this. i feel passionately about this issue. it is something ifeel to my car, to be honest, and i have been trying to drive an inclusive and diverse port from the moment i arrived as chief executive in 2015. ifeel very motivated and very supported to make sure that that change happens in the game. another discussion that is ongoing. these _ another discussion that is ongoing. these are _ another discussion that is ongoing. these are questions _ another discussion that is ongoing. these are questions that _ another discussion that is ongoing. these are questions that need - another discussion that is ongoing. these are questions that need to l another discussion that is ongoing. i these are questions that need to be addressed and need to be addressed fully. we will come back to you with more plans on how we propose to address that question in the coming weeks. . , ._ , address that question in the coming weeks. . , , ., address that question in the coming weeks. . , ., . , weeks. can the players who have been found to have — weeks. can the players who have been found to have been _ weeks. can the players who have been found to have been racist _ found to have been racist previously, how does the game deal with that? _ previously, how does the game deal with that? is it rehabilitation or app with that? is it rehabilitation or app you — with that? is it rehabilitation or app you are looking at the end of their— app you are looking at the end of their cricketing career is? there's a whole range — their cricketing career is? there's a whole range of— their cricketing career is? there's a whole range of ways _ their cricketing career is? there's a whole range of ways we - their cricketing career is? there's a whole range of ways we can - their cricketing career is? there's| a whole range of ways we can look their cricketing career is? there's - a whole range of ways we can look at this going forward. whether it is about education, whether it is about
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understanding, whether it is about through the cultural shift that we need to make in dressing rooms around this country, professional and recreational, these are workplaces in the professional game and we need to understand the mindset shift that needs to happen for people to feel safe and protected in those environments. we have a lot of work to do in this space. cricket is all around the country —— cricket is all around the country —— cricket is all around the country will be thinking about how they can modify their behaviour. i concede it has not been enough so far. we have been clearly found wanting in the space and azeem's testimony demonstrates the distance we need to travel to make cricket truly the inclusive sport we wanted to be. inaudible inaudible i think we need to look at the process. we need to learn lessons from the length of time that was taken. there were questions to be asked in terms of what azeem went
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through. the ecb's investigation is ongoing following yorkshire's report. that investigation will take its place and... report. that investigation will take its place and. . .— report. that investigation will take its place and... what would you do different next _ its place and... what would you do different next time? _ its place and... what would you do different next time? what - its place and... what would you do different next time? what we - its place and... what would you do i different next time? what we need to do is make sure _ different next time? what we need to do is make sure that _ different next time? what we need to do is make sure that we are _ do is make sure that we are listening to victims of racism, that we have proper processes in place to deal with it. the ecb has those processes in place. i think in future more than likely victims of the game, the ecb would step in immediately to take steps to understand and investigate that process fully. to understand and investigate that process fully-— process fully. to that point, the name process fully. to that point, the game could _ process fully. to that point, the game could either— process fully. to that point, the game could either under- process fully. to that point, the game could either under react l process fully. to that point, the | game could either under react or overreact — game could either under react or overreact at _ game could either under react or overreact at the _ game could either under react or overreact at the moment - game could either under react orl overreact at the moment because there's— overreact at the moment because there's treen— overreact at the moment because there's been several— overreact at the moment because there's been several thousand - there's been several thousand enquiries _ there's been several thousand enquiries and _ there's been several thousand enquiries and that _ there's been several thousand enquiries and that is - there's been several thousand enquiries and that is only - there's been several thousandi enquiries and that is only going there's been several thousand - enquiries and that is only going up. at this _ enquiries and that is only going up. at this stage. — enquiries and that is only going up. at this stage, we _ enquiries and that is only going up. at this stage, we have _ enquiries and that is only going up. at this stage, we have to _ enquiries and that is only going up. i at this stage, we have to understand what the _ at this stage, we have to understand what the scale — at this stage, we have to understand what the scale of _ at this stage, we have to understand what the scale of the _ at this stage, we have to understand what the scale of the problem - at this stage, we have to understand what the scale of the problem is - at this stage, we have to understand what the scale of the problem is and| what the scale of the problem is and then when— what the scale of the problem is and then when the — what the scale of the problem is and then when the game _ what the scale of the problem is and then when the game understands i what the scale of the problem is and i then when the game understands that, it can deat— then when the game understands that, it can deal with — then when the game understands that, it can deal with it _ then when the game understands that, it can deal with it but _ then when the game understands that, it can deal with it but it— then when the game understands that, it can deal with it but it has— then when the game understands that, it can deal with it but it has to - then when the game understands that, it can deal with it but it has to do - it can deal with it but it has to do a tot— it can deal with it but it has to do a tot right — it can deal with it but it has to do a tot right now— it can deal with it but it has to do a lot right now but may- it can deal with it but it has to do a lot right now but may have - it can deal with it but it has to do a lot right now but may have to l a lot right now but may have to go even _ a lot right now but may have to go even further _ a lot right now but may have to go even further. any _ a lot right now but may have to go even further. any kneejerk-
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even further. any kneejerk reaction now even further. any kneejerk reaction how could — even further. any kneejerk reaction now could backfire. _ even further. any kneejerk reaction now could backfire. it _ even further. any kneejerk reaction now could backfire. it is— even further. any kneejerk reaction now could backfire. it is importanti now could backfire. it is important to focus _ now could backfire. it is important to focus on— now could backfire. it is important to focus on the _ now could backfire. it is important to focus on the problems - now could backfire. it is important to focus on the problems today. now could backfire. it is importanti to focus on the problems today and deal with— to focus on the problems today and deal with them. _ to focus on the problems today and deal with them. as _ to azeem rafiq because my family, he needs— to azeem rafiq because my family, he needs to _ to azeem rafiq because my family, he needs to know— to azeem rafiq because my family, he needs to know we _ to azeem rafiq because my family, he needs to know we are _ to azeem rafiq because my family, he needs to know we are sorry. _ to azeem rafiq because my family, he needs to know we are sorry. i’m“ - to azeem rafiq because my family, he needs to know we are sorry.— needs to know we are sorry. i'm very sor for needs to know we are sorry. i'm very sorry for what _ needs to know we are sorry. i'm very sorry for what azeem _ needs to know we are sorry. i'm very sorry for what azeem went _ needs to know we are sorry. i'm very sorry for what azeem went through. | needs to know we are sorry. i'm very| sorry for what azeem went through. i don't think there a person in that room today, a huge amount of emotion as we were discussing the events of the past few days and indeed azeem's testimony. the game is making sure that the unity and goodwill we have todayis that the unity and goodwill we have today is turned into action and that is what we are announcing this afternoon. is what we are announcing this afternoon-—
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this is bbc news. i'm ben boulos. the headlines: cricket chiefs apologise to former cricketer azeem rafiq about the racism he experienced in the game. after a crisis meeting they say they've committed to tangible action and will publish more details next week. racism and discrimination is a blight on our game. to azeem and all of those who have suffered or experienced any form of discrimination in our sport, we are truly sorry. austria is to go into a full nationwide lockdown because of record covid cases — and everyone will have to get vaccinated. here, two children and two women have died in a fire at a house in south east london. a 13—year—old boy is in a critical condition after being shot in the back in birmingham last night. police believe his injuries are life—changing.
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and drivers will be banned from scrolling, filming or searching playlists on their mobile phones from next year. good afternoon. in the past few minutes the chief executive of the england and wales cricket board has said �*racism and discrimination is a blight�* on the game. tom harrison's comments came after an emergency meeting to discuss racism, after shocking testimony earlier this week from ex—yorkshire player azeem rafiq about the racism he faced. mr harrison said the ecb is committed to taking wide—ranging action to tackle discrimination and promote inclusion and diversity at all levels. details of how that will happen will be announced in the coming weeks.
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let's hear that statement in full. the ecb, the mcc, the mca, the end of the ca and first—class recreation and county code could said the following: azeem rafiq has shone a light on our game that has shocked, shamed and saddened us all. racism and discrimination is a blight on our game. to azeem and all those who have suffered or experienced any form of discrimination in our sport, we are truly sorry. our sport did not welcome you, our game did not accept you as we should have done. we apologise unreservedly for the suffering you have faced. we stand together against discrimination at all levels and in all its forms, and we are united as a sport to do whatever it takes to eradicate this
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scourge from our game. we will continue to listen, to make swift and positive change to the culture of the game, we will embrace and celebrate differences everywhere, knowing that with diversity we are stronger. today is a game we discussed a series of tangible commitment to make cricket a sport where everyone feels safe and everyone is included. we will now finalise the detail and publish these actions next week. our game must win back your trust. tam must win back your trust. tom harris, chief _ must win back your trust. tom harris, chief executive - must win back your trust. tom harris, chief executive of - must win back your trust. tom harris, chief executive of the england and wales cricket board, speaking within the last few minutes. we will get some analysis, so stay with us for that. four members of the same family have died in a house fire in south east london. two women, a young boy and a girl were rescued from the home
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in bexleyheath last night, but died a short time later. a man who managed to leave the building was taken to hospital. tolu adeoye reports. how did two women, a girl and boy come to die as a result of a fire at this house in bexleyheath? the question on so many minds today as a family grieves. i saw the blue lights flashing and looked out of the window to see police, ambulance, fire brigade and that's it, out the bedroom window i see a commotion round there. it was at around 8:30pm last night when the london fire brigade rescued the group from the first floor of this house on hamilton road, but all four were pronounced dead at the scene. a man who escaped before firefighters arrived is being treated in hospitalfor leg injuries. his condition is not life threatening. we currently have specialist investigating officers from our fire investigation teams on scene. we are working closely with the metropolitan police service and local specialist investigators to try and understand the causation of this incident.
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it is believed the family were of sri lankan heritage. some relatives arrived at the scene earlier, distressed, asking why. local people are shaken. it's crazy, they had two kids. it's very upsetting. i've got kids myself, - that would be a dreadful thing to happen to my kids. and you knew them, did you? i didn't personally know them but i used to speak to them l when we used to walk past. the met police has said, at this early stage they do not believe the cause of the fire to be suspicious but inquiries are ongoing. condolences have been coming in, including from the mayor of london, sadiq khan, who said he is heartbroken and his heart goes out to their loved ones and the community at this awful time. family members are receiving specialist support as the investigation continues into this terrible incident that has cut four lives short so suddenly. tolu adeoye, bbc london.
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a 13—year—old boy is in a critical condition after being shot as he was walking down a street in birmingham last night. the teenager is said to have �*life changing injuries�* in the attack in the hockley circus area. phil mackie spoke to me from the scene a short time ago. they have been carrying out a lot of investigations, a lot of activity going on here since this incident happened last night. right up until ten minutes ago, this underpass was cordoned off. they have just removed the tape from there and beneath the flyover. we think it is in this underpass that whatever happened happened. it was around 7pm last night. this 13—year—old was shot in the back as he was walking around. he is in a critical condition still, that hasn�*t changed, but west midlands police say he may well have suffered life—changing injuries as a result of the shooting. west midlands ambulance service said
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they sent a merit team, referring it to being a high—level team that involves a specialist trauma doctor and a specialist paramedic because he was so seriously injured. i�*ve been speaking to an eyewitness, a shopkeeper, who said that he heard the shot and somebody came into the shop seeking shelter last night. the police activity is winding down here. it is an ongoing investigation, they say. the tragedy is that here is another teenager whose life has been severely affected by violent crime, and that keeps happening here in birmingham. it was only at the beginning of the year that a 14—year—old was shot dead outside his house about a mile from here, keon lincoln. he is obviously ok, although in a critical condition in hospital. life—changing injuries. we don�*t know quite what that means at the moment, but we will hopefully get updates both on his condition and on the investigation as the day progresses and the weekend goes on.
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austria is to become the first european union country to reimpose a nationwide coronavirus lockdown, as it tries to slow a record surge in infections. the austrian chancellor, alexander schallenberg, told a press conference that the measure would begin on monday, and last a maximum of twenty days. he also announced austria would make it a legal requirement to get vaccinated from february next year. translation: our goal was to vaccinate the - unvaccinated rather than lock down the vaccinated. despite campaigns and discussions in the media we haven�*t managed to persuade enough people to get vaccinated. the measures we have introduced over the past few weeks have helped increase the numbers of the vaccinated, but not by enough. for a long time it was the political consensus that we didn�*t want a vaccine mandate, but now we have to look at the reality. joining me now from vienna
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is our correspondent bethany bell. bethany, there was already a partial lockdown, wasn�*t there, for those who were unvaccinated? them taking this further step suggests the situation must be really serious for them to do that. the situation must be really serious for them to do that.— them to do that. the numbers in austria are _ them to do that. the numbers in austria are grim. _ them to do that. the numbers in austria are grim. they _ them to do that. the numbers in austria are grim. they are - them to do that. the numbers in austria are grim. they are the i austria are grim. they are the highest that they have had since the pandemic began, and theyjust keep going up and up in recent days, so the government has taken what it says was a painful decision to impose this lockdown on everyone, notjust impose this lockdown on everyone, not just the unvaccinated. impose this lockdown on everyone, notjust the unvaccinated. and the chancellor said he hoped it would be as short as possible, a maximum of 20 days. it will be reassessed after ten days, and it should be said as well that the infection rates are different in different parts of the country. but, for now, austrians are bracing themselves for 20 days at least, it seems, 20 days of
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lockdown, not leaving their homes except for essential reasons like work, shopping for food and exercise. work, shopping for food and exercise-— work, shopping for food and exercise. ., ., , exercise. the other element to this which is very _ exercise. the other element to this which is very interesting _ exercise. the other element to this which is very interesting is - exercise. the other element to this which is very interesting is the - which is very interesting is the mandatory vaccination for everyone from february next year. how was that being received among people there? it�*s that being received among people there? �* , , . . , there? it's being received in many different ways. _ there? it's being received in many different ways. it's _ there? it's being received in many different ways. it's a _ there? it's being received in many different ways. it's a controversian different ways. it�*s a controversial step here. austria has, at the moment, about two thirds of its population fully vaccinated, and that�*s one of the lowest rates of vaccination in western europe. the far right freedom party has campaigned on a platform of vaccine scepticism. it�*s an opposition party but it�*s the third largest party in austria. it has said this move is unconstitutional, it has called for protests against it, and the leader of that party, who is himself currently suffering from covid, has
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accused austria, the government, of going off in the direction of dictatorship. now, the government says, the chancellor says, that it is legal to have a vexing mandate in austria. he said you can do that during a pandemic and that austria has had it before, with vaccinations such as the one for smallpox, but this is likely to be something that a number of people here will object to. there are other opposition parties in austria who say that the government should have taken action much earlier than this, it shouldn�*t have come to this point where they have come to this point where they have had so many new infections and that they need to take such drastic action as a mandate for vaccination and a lockdown.— action as a mandate for vaccination and a lockdown. bethany, they have been uuite and a lockdown. bethany, they have been quite clear— and a lockdown. bethany, they have been quite clear that _ and a lockdown. bethany, they have been quite clear that this _ and a lockdown. bethany, they have been quite clear that this is - and a lockdown. bethany, they have been quite clear that this is for - and a lockdown. bethany, they have been quite clear that this is for a - been quite clear that this is for a maximum, this lockdown, of 20 days. have they given any indication what happens if at the end of those 20 days they are still concerned about
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numbers? what do they do next and where do they go from there? what where do they go from there? what the chancellor _ where do they go from there? what the chancellor said _ where do they go from there? tarrisgt the chancellor said today is where do they go from there? his"isgt the chancellor said today is that after the 20 days, they would then still continue to be a lockdown for the unvaccinated but the vaccinated code delete that could go about their business as they have done. you would need to show a vaccination certificate in order to go to a restaurant or cafe. at the moment, i think you will find many austrians a little sceptical that this will only last for days. they say, look, the government said we wouldn�*t have another lockdown, certainly not for the vaccinated, and now look where we are. i think there is a real sense here of people bracing themselves for problems, for more restrictions for some time to come. but what the chancellor today said is, we are trying to save christmas. 0k, is, we are trying to save christmas. ok, bethany, thank you very much for that. the coronavirus figures for
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the uk have just that. the coronavirus figures for the uk havejust been published. the uk recorded 44,242 cases in the latest 24—hour period. that is down slightly from 46,807 the previous day, so the latest period, 44,242 cases. as far as deaths are concerned, the uk recorded 157 covid deaths in the latest 24—hour period, down slightly from 199 the previous day. the latest 24—hour period, 157 deaths. that is deaths for any reason within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. we will do the usual number crunching and see what that means for their weekly averages and we will bring that to you a little later. the headlines on bbc news: cricket chiefs apologise to former cricketer, azeem rafiq about the racism
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he experienced in the game. after a crisis meeting they say they�*ve committed to tangible action and will publish more details next week. it comes as batsman alex hales apologises for painting his face black at a fancy dress party after a photo emerges from 2009. austria is to go into a full nationwide lockdown because of record covid cases — and everyone will have to get vaccinated. the bomb used in the explosion outside liverpool women�*s hospital on sunday could have caused �*significant injury or death�* if it had gone off as the bomber intended. police said the device had ball bearings attached to it which could have acted as shrapnel. counter—terrorism officers still don�*t know why the device exploded when it did, killing the bomber but say it could have been triggered by the movement of the taxi he was travelling in. the brexit minister lord frost says
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significant gaps remain with the european union about customs arrangements in northern ireland after talks with his eu counterpart in brussels. the uk is warning that it could unilaterally suspend parts of the northern ireland deal unless major changes are made. jess sargeant is from the think—tank the institute for government. she explained what the eu and the uk were trying to resolve. fundamentally, the northern ireland protocol creates special arrangements for northern ireland that allows it to maintain frictionless access to the eu market and prevents the need for a hard border on the island of ireland. the consequence of that is, it makes it harder for businesses in great britain to send goods to northern ireland, and there are lots of concerns about the impact this might have on the ability of northern ireland supermarkets to stock their shelves. there are concerns about the ability of medicines to be sent between great britain and northern ireland, and the result of this kind of principled
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disagreement between the uk and the eu about the fact that eu law continues to apply in northern ireland, despite the fact that it�*s no longer formerly part of the eu. now, there have been several rounds of discussion on this, and it looks like there are proposals on the table to try and ease the level of checks, to remove some of the challenges that have been created on sending goods between great britain and northern ireland, but there also a political dimension to this that perhaps is making agreement quite difficult. so, this is something that has an impact and in effect beyond northern ireland itself. this is affecting companies, exporters, manufacturers throughout the rest of the uk. i think one of the things that businesses are particularly struggling with is some of the uncertainty around their arrangements, because it�*s not clear what the future of the northern ireland protocol will be. they don�*t know what kind of scheme they will need to adhere to, what requirements they�*ll need to meet in order to be
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able to send goods to northern ireland, but i think the main impact is really being felt in northern ireland. we are seeing businesses in great britain in some cases deciding it�*s just too difficult to serve the northern ireland market, so there is a risk that they will withdraw from that market if there isn�*t some kind of agreement and stability forward. but were they not aware that this point was going to come sooner or later? because that arrangement was temporary, wasn�*t it? it was never going to be an open—ended thing. this day was going to come at some point. the northern ireland protocol that was negotiated by this current government, by boris johnson, is different from the arrangements that theresa may negotiated, in that it is intended to be permanent. part of the problem here comes in slightly different expectations from the uk at the eu about what exactly implementing the northern ireland protocol would look like in practice.
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the uk said it was expecting a degree of flexibility from the eu that would seek to try and minimise the sort of checks and controls that might need to take place on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland. the eu argues it was always exactly clear what this would look like, and therefore it doesn�*t necessarily agree with the uk position that there should be changes now. it has now come around to the position that perhaps additional flexibility is needed because of particular political circumstances in northern ireland itself, and some concerns that have been raised by business groups, but i think this is one of the kind of recurring questions, whether what has happened is what should have been expected and therefore what the argument is to reopen the arrangements. and from the statement issued by the brexit minister, lord frost, it said significant gaps remain across most issues, but it concludes by saying, we agreed discussion should proceed next week, and the european commission vice president and i will meet again on the 26th
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of november in london. it sounds like what these talks have agreed is to talk a little more, but that in itself is an achievement, given there was perhaps a hint of ripping up the deal altogether. i think in the last week or so we have seen a more optimistic tone from the uk government, that has been very much welcomed by the eu. as it said in lord frost�*s statement, there has been progress on medicines, but there are outstanding issues on customs and some of the checks on certain food products like meat and such like going from great britain to northern ireland. the other thing is, there are some issues that the uk once that aren�*t even being discussed at the moment. i think the most important one there is european court ofjustice that currently has a role in deciding whether eu law is being applied correctly and northern ireland. this is something that the uk wants to see end, and i don�*t think the eu at the moment is particularly receptive to
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renegotiating that aspect of the arrangement, so even if we get progress on the issues that are currently under discussion, there is still going to be further political compromises necessary in order to actually reach agreement on this. more now on the breaking news in the past half hour — the england and wales cricket board has offered an "unreserved apology" to the former yorkshire cricketer azeem rafiq for the racism he suffered in the game. let�*s speak to jane dougall. it was an unreserved apology. it was laying out all the problems that have been highlighted, and looking ahead, they said they will take action, but we won�*t get details until next week. yes, this is unprecedented. we knew top figures
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in english cricket would meet to discuss this diversity and inclusion following these explosive accusations from azeem rafiq. representatives from all 18 first—class counties were assembled to come together for this meeting at the oval. in order to come up with a plan of action that goes far enough to put procedures in place following these claims of racism. there was a great deal of pressure on them to do so, firstly because of the emotional testimony from the former yorkshire cricketer azeem rafiq which was given to mp so publicly in the dcms select committee on tuesday, in which he described english cricket is institutionally racist. they needed to be seen to be acting quickly, but also because the sports minister, nigel huddleston, said the government would intervene if enough wasn�*t done to rectify this, and potentially an independent regulator would be employed to oversee the ecb. that is not something they would like to have happen. yes,
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following this meeting, tom harrison, the chair of the ecb, said there would be swift and positive change. so, acknowledging that things will need to move quickly, which isn�*t always the way in such a large organisation. significantly, he said there would be tangible commitments, something we can actually see. that is significant because up until now many had felt there was merely lip service being paid to stopping racism in the game, particularly azeem rafiq, and we will find out specifically what they will find out specifically what they will be next week. that is certainly how azeem rafiq saw it. tom harrison said rafiq had shone a light on our game which has shocked, shamed and shad and —— saddened us all. rafiq said that when his son died in childbirth, he wasn�*t given the support he should have been. you broke down on many occasions when answering questions at the select committee. in an unexpected twist,
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rafiq had to apologise himself after an exchange was revealed in which he posted anti—semitic comments. after all his accounts of the racist abuse he suffered at yorkshire, he has now apologised for those comments that were posted when he was 19. tom harrison, the chair of the ecb, offering an unreserved apology to azeem rafiq for the racism that he suffered and the treatment that he experienced when he was at yorkshire, and significantly saying that there will be tangible commitments to change within cricket. , . ., ., . ,, cricket. jane, for the moment, thank ou ve cricket. jane, for the moment, thank you very much- _ deforestation in brazil�*s amazon rainforest has hit its highest level in over 15 years. a report by the country�*s space research agency found that deforestation increased by 22% ina year. brazil was among a number of nations who promised to end deforestation by 2030 during the cop26 climate summit. earlier, i spoke to dr erika berenguer, senior
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research associate at oxford university�*s ecosystems lab. i started by asking her, in light of this report, how realistic that pledge at cop really is. it just doesn�*t. unfortunately, the evidence shows that the pledge was lip service to the international community. there are no milestones to be hit, no mechanism to end deforestation by 2030, and more importantly, these data have been available since before cop26 started. the document released by the brazilian state agency was signed on the 27th of october, and the deal was signed on the 2nd of november, so brazil withheld that information, knowing it would probably damage its image and also compromise the pledge. just explain what is the cause of this. is this sanctioned, is it official deforestation, or is this illegal
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activity that is not being tackled? 99% of deforestation in the brazilian amazon, according to data, is illegal. while there is basically illegal deforestation, and the reason why it is soaring is because since the beginning of the current administration, we have seen a systematic dismantling of the environmental agency. there are budget cuts. to give you an idea, in his first day in office, he completely extinguished the climate change secretary. we have seen a government that has been doing this, decreasing the amount of protection of the rainforest. it is natural that deforestation rates will go up. what can be done about it? is it a case of trying to replace the trees that have been lost, or is that just not feasible?
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that�*s not feasible. the greatest way to combat climate change in the case of the amazon is to preserve forests. if we just plant trees, we are not replacing the amazing diversity of the amazon holds. in one hectare, one football pitch of the amazon rainforest, we have more tree species than the whole of western europe. that�*s how diverse it is. to plant some trees, we willjust have trees but not an amazon forest. what we need to do is combat illegal deforestation, and it is something brazil did successfully from 2004—12, when the deforestation rate decreased by 80%. the palestinian organisation hamas has been outlawed in its entirety in the uk. it�*s military wing is already banned, but the home secretary priti
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patel now says the whole group, which includes its political wing, should be proscribed. hamas controls the gaza strip and calls for the establishment of a palestinian state under sharia law. as part of his annual medical checkup, presidentjoe biden will transfer power to vice president kamala harris later on friday for the period during which he will be under anesthesia. the white house says mr biden is having a routine colonoscopy — a procedure undergone by previous presidents. with vice president kamala harris taking over, it will make her technically speaking the first woman to hold presidential power in the united states. andrew marr has announced he is leaving the bbc after 21 yea rs. the journalist and broadcaster has presented the bbc�*s political programme the andrew marr show on sunday mornings for the past 16 years. he said from the new year, he�*ll be moving to global �*to write
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and present political and cultural shows and to write for newspapers�*. now it�*s time for a look at the weather. we canjoin we can join helen willetts. good afternoon. a cloudy day for the majority, but some big breaks in the cloud for north wales, parts of eastern england as well. east of scotland, where we have seen 17 celsius today. the average is around eight or nine in aberdeen, so very mild. not unusual in november, but it will be in stark contrast to what is coming later this weekend. to the north of that, we have this resident front giving wetter weather, and that will continue through this evening and overnight.
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that is the story really for tomorrow, but we will see breaks ahead of a weather front. it is progressing south quite quickly, clearing northern ireland through the afternoon. temperatures then start to tumble away. just sixes and sevens. still relatively mild. further south, we might see the odd 13 celsius. come sunday, a much colder picture. temperature is about seven or eight celsius for most of us. more on that later. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... cricket chiefs apologise to former cricketer, azeem rafiq about the racism he experienced in the game. after a crisis meeting they say they�*ve committed to tangible action and will publish more details next week.
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racism and discrimination is a blight on our game. to azeem and all those who have suffered or experienced any form of discrimination in our sport, we are truly sorry. it comes as batsman alex hales apologises for painting his face black at a fancy dress party after a photo emerges from 2009. austria is to go into a full nationwide lockdown because of record covid cases — and everyone will have to get vaccinated. here, two children and two women have died in a fire at a house in south east london. a 13—year—old boy is in a critical condition after being shot in the back in birmingham last night. police believe his injuries are life—changing. and drivers will be banned from scrolling, filming or searching playlists on their mobile phones from next year...
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sports time now. let�*s rejoinjane. away from the racism scandal that�*s tainted english cricket, australia are undergoing their own crisis. their captain tim paine has had to step down just weeks away from the ashes after it emerged he had sent sexually explicit text messages to a female colleague four years ago. paine decided to resign as captain when he became aware that details of the incident in 2017 were about to be made public. he said the cricket australia investigation australia investigation the following year had exonerated him, but he "deeply" regretted his actions at the time and to this day. he said standing down was the right thing to do for him, his family and for cricket. the first test starts on december the 8th in brisbane. to australian cricket fans, i�*m deeply sorry that my past behaviour has impacted our game on the eve of the ashes. for the disappointment
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i have caused to fans and the entire cricket community, i apologise. i�*ve been blessed with a wonderful, loving and supportive family and it breaks my heart to know how much i have let them down. there is more on that story on the bbc sport website. the chair of the women�*s tennis association has said there will be no wta events in china next year without proof that peng shuai is safe. concerns are growing for the missing chinese player who hasn�*t been heard from since alleging she was sexually assaulted by a high profile former chinese politician. the authenticity of an email allegedly sent from peng to the women�*s tennis associaison has been called into question by the chair, steve simon. he told the bbc�*s tennis correspondent russell fuller that no amount of money would prevent them from pulling out of china if their conditions are not met. this is not about the money, this is about doing what is right
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and making sure peng shuai is safe and free. and everything that comes with it based upon the allegations. we want to find out if the allegations are true and if they are, what is the result of that? just to be clear, if you don�*t get this independent and verifiable proof that peng shuai is safe and there is not a full and transparent investigation, then there will be no wta tournaments in china next year? that would be my position, yes. to football now. ahead of manchester city�*s game against everton on sunday, the club has confirmed that kevin de bruyne won�*t be involved after testing positive for coronavirus. manager pep guardiola said de bruyne had tested positive after returning from international duty with belgium. he�*ll isolate for ten days and, as well as sunday�*s premier league match against everton, he�*ll also miss wednesday�*s champions league game with psg and the following weekend�*s home game against west ham. to formula 1 where second practice
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has finished in qatar ahead of this weekends grand prix. valteri bottas quickest in the mercedes, piere gasly second, max verstappen third but hamilton could only manage fourth. there was another disappointment for mercedes who have been denied a review of an incident in brazil where verstappen was said to have pushed hamilton off the track. mercedes were hoping for a time penalty for red bull. significantly, hamilton was wearing a special helmet with the rainbow flag on it. human rights remain a contentious issue in qatar, especially lgbt rights, so hamilton sending a strong message there. there are just 14 points between the two drivers in the standings going into this weekend. rory mcilroy is still in contension after his second round of the dp world tour championship in dubai. he�*s a shot behind the leaders. that is because he made a mistake at the 18th, putting the ball in the water. he recovered, however, to double bogey the hole. that put him at nine
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under for the tournament. two underfor the two under for the day. unfortunate for mcilroy who�*d led after a great first day. he�*s won this event twice before, in 2012 and 2015. that�*s all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that is it from me. thank you. laws to prosecute drivers who use their mobile phone are to be strengthened. at the moment motorists are banned only from texting or making calls. but from next year it will also be illegal to take photos, play games or scroll through playlists while driving. our consumer affairs correspondent, colletta smith, reports. # happy birthday to you... # joe cairns was 14 years old when he was killed. at the point of the last few months of his life, he was spectacular. hurray! i couldn�*t be more proud
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of him, i couldn�*t. you know, he was always going to deal with different things. but... he was shining. he was. two years ago, joe cairns was sitting in the back of a minibus on the way to his special school when a lorry ploughed straight into the back of them. it was a 45 minute journey until the collision and for 45 minutes, that man was on his phone. on various applications — text messages, phone calls, but also he was on sky sports, he was on his facebook, and he was playing a game. the driver was convicted, he got eight years for dangerous driving, but changing the law will close a loophole making it easier for police to stop and fine anyone holding their phone and using it for any reason when they are behind the wheel.
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but you will still be able to use your phone in hands—free mode. if you get caught now, you're going to get a £200 fine and six points on your licence. that is quite significant. the police will be able to enforce the laws much more strongly and actually, there is some quite interesting technology coming out as to other ways we can spot people using their phone. for example, putting cameras in fake hgvs. so be careful on the roads. steph, how do you feel when you see people in their cars using their phones, looking down at their phones? he had a life, a whole beautiful life to lead. and he hasn�*t got it any more. you are missing a part of you, your heart, i gave birth to that boy and i gave him life. and through somebody�*s choice that day, they took his life away. and he is no more. and it has to be out there, it has to be, how dangerous
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it is to use your phone whilst you are driving. colletta smith, bbc news, in radcliffe. belarus�* long—time authoritarian leader alexander lukashenko, has told the bbc it�*s "possible" that his border guards might be helping migrants reach poland. thousands of migrants, mainly from the middle east, have been trying to cross into the european union at the frontier between poland and belarus in recent weeks — and the eu accuses mr lukashenko of masterminding this, in revenge for sanctions. in an exclusive sit—down interview with our russia correspondent, steve rosenberg, mr lukashenko said he has no intention to stop people from reaching the eu. translation: our guys are helping the migrants — translation: our guys are helping the migrants get _ translation: our guys are helping the migrants get into _ translation: our guys are helping the migrants get into the _ translation: our guys are helping the migrants get into the polish - the migrants get into the polish territory? it is perfectly possible. i think that is absolutely possible. maybe someone helped them. i won�*t
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even look into this. maybe someone helped them. iwon't even look into this.— even look into this. migrants must catch them — even look into this. migrants must catch them themselves. _ even look into this. migrants must catch them themselves. the - even look into this. migrants must. catch them themselves. the migrants told us they took that to mean belarus is open to them. i told us they took that to mean belarus is open to them. i told the eu i am belarus is open to them. i told the eu i am not _ belarus is open to them. i told the eu i am not going _ belarus is open to them. i told the eu i am not going to _ belarus is open to them. i told the eu i am not going to detain - belarus is open to them. i told the l eu i am not going to detain migrants on the border, hold them at the border, and if they keep coming from now on, i still won�*t stop them because they are not coming to my country, they are going to yours. the west stop talking to us and working with us. if you don�*t want to, then fine. sort this out ourselves as best we can. taste to, then fine. sort this out ourselves as best we can. we saw protesters — ourselves as best we can. we saw protesters being _ ourselves as best we can. we saw protesters being beaten _ ourselves as best we can. we saw protesters being beaten and - ourselves as best we can. we saw protesters being beaten and we . ourselves as best we can. we saw. protesters being beaten and we saw young people coming out of detention centres with injuries on their bodies. centres with in'uries on their bodies. . you bodies. 0k, ok, i admit it. you admit it? _ bodies. 0k, ok, i admit it. you admit it? people _ bodies. 0k, ok, i admit it. you admit it? people were - bodies. 0k, ok, i admit it. you admit it? people were beaten l bodies. 0k, ok, | admit it. youl admit it? people were beaten at bodies. 0k, ok, i admit it. you - admit it? people were beaten at the detention centre _ admit it? people were beaten at the detention centre but _ admit it? people were beaten at the detention centre but there _ admit it? people were beaten at the detention centre but there were - detention centre but there were police beating up too and you didn�*t show this.
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police beating up too and you didn't show this. ,, . , , :: police beating up too and you didn't show this. ,, . g , :: , , . show this. since july, 270 ngos have been struck — show this. since july, 270 ngos have been struck down _ show this. since july, 270 ngos have been struck down in _ show this. since july, 270 ngos have been struck down in belarus. - show this. since july, 270 ngos have been struck down in belarus. i - show this. since july, 270 ngos have been struck down in belarus. i will. been struck down in belarus. i will answer your— been struck down in belarus. i will answer your question _ been struck down in belarus. iii-sis ii. answer your question with no bobber to bother. we will mask a all that mess you have paid for. i�*m to bother. we will mask a all that mess you have paid for. i'm “oined now by ou— mess you have paid for. i'm “oined now by mi mess you have paid for. i'm “oined now by our bbc russian _ mess you have paid for. i'mjoined now by our bbc russian reporter. | now by our bbc russian reporter. this is really interesting because the eu has long accused lukashenko of aiding the eu has long accused lukashenko ofaiding migrants the eu has long accused lukashenko of aiding migrants to get to that border and here we have him in an interview with the bbc saying that actually has border guards might have been doing just that. have been doing 'ust that. hello, aood have been doing 'ust that. hello, good afternoon. — have been doing just that. hello, good afternoon. yes, _ have been doing just that. hello, good afternoon. yes, what - have been doing just that. hello, good afternoon. yes, what mr i good afternoon. yes, what mr lukashenko has said in this interview is within his rhetoric ever since the migrant crisis started in the belarus border with the eu in some of this year. lukashenko has said that he is no
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longer going to stop migrants crossing through belarus into the eu because of the sanctions the eu has imposed. what he has also said in his interview, he said that he has not invited these migrants personally and he has not facilitated theirjourneys into belarus. however, eu states have a very different take on this. for example, france and a number of other eu countries have accused lukashenko and his family of human trafficking thousands of migrants into belarus. we have numerous reports in the different media which showed that there were tourist agencies in the middle eastern countries, in istanbul, which helped migrants to come to belarus which issued them visa and which promise them that through belarus they will be able to cross to the eu. and of course, this kind of tourism has to be sanctioned at the very top level.
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it is also very interesting that throughout this migration crisis, lukashenko has accused the west, the eu in particular, of staring at this crisis. he has also accused polish border control, polish police of brutal crackdown on migrants. belarus state media every day shows us the video footage of how migrants are suffering at the border. however, lukashenko himself has never accepted any asylum application from the migrants. we know now that a few people came to minsk from the middle east and they have asked please help us and help us to get refuge in minsk, however they were very quickly kicked out of they were very quickly kicked out of the country so mr lukashenko doesn�*t help with this at all. interestingly, mr lukashenko this week has had two phone calls with angela merkel and according to his
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press secretary, belarus leader has suggested the eu should take 2000 migrants who wish to go to germany, this is a number of migrants the belarus side confirm are at the border, and the remaining 5000 migrants which are spread out in belarus, lukashenko has suggested they should go back to their countries. there is currently very little help from belarus itself to the migrants. on a final note, migrants have ended up in the very tough situation. belarus forces are pushing them in the hands of polish police and the polish guards are pushing them back and none of the country accepts them, so we are yet to see what is going to happen to this large group of migrants which are currently at the belarus polish border. . ., are currently at the belarus polish border. . «s , ., are currently at the belarus polish border. . ~s , ., , are currently at the belarus polish border. . «s , ., , . border. 0k, thank you very much indeed. thank you. reminder of the
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headlines... _ cricket chiefs apologise to former cricketer, azeem rafiq about the racism he experienced in the game. after a crisis meeting, they say they�*ve committed to tangible action and will publish more details next week. it comes as batsman alex hales apologises for painting his face black at a fancy dress party after a photo emerges from 2009. austria is to go into a full nationwide lockdown because of record covid cases and everyone will have to get vaccinated. india�*s prime minister narendra modi has announced a repeal of three farm laws, which prompted nearly a year of protest from hundreds of thousands of farmers. mr modi made the u—turn in a speech to the nation, to mark the birthday of the founder of the sikh religion. farm leaders have welcomed the announcement, as our south asia correspondent rajini vaidyanathan reports from delhi.
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victory for india�*s farmers in a stand—off that lasted close to a year. relief and celebration, an unexpected win which tasted especially sweet against a prime minister who rarely backs down. addressing the nation on the birth anniversary of guru nanak, the founder of the sikh faith, narendra modi surprised many when he said he would scrap his controversial farm reforms. translation: today i have come to tell you, the whole country, - that we have decided to withdraw and repeal all three agricultural laws. in the parliament session starting later this month, we will complete the constitutional process to repeal these three agricultural laws. through many seasons, the cold winter, a devastating
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covid wave, tens of thousands of farmers camped on the outskirts of the indian capital. they created a community, a mass protest against laws they felt would drive them out of business. the government said it wanted to modernise india�*s age—old agriculture sector, allowing farmers to sell directly to big businesses but farmers were worried they would lose the minimum price guarantees they get for certain crops and, in the end, everything they had worked for. now they are smiling but they are also sceptical. many don�*t trust the government�*s word and say they won�*t go home until the laws are formally repealed in parliament. translation: we have taken a lot of pain. - we are not happy yet because these laws still need to be repealed in parliament. translation: it is a small step | towards the long march of victory. we are on the right path. as they chant for victory, winning in state elections next year is the reason many say
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the government backed down. with upcoming votes in north indian states of punjab and uttar pradesh, the prime minister needed to keep farmers onside. but will today�*s move be enough to win them over? rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news, delhi. female education — or the lack of it — has been seen as one of the biggest obstacles to the taliban being officially recognised as afghanistan�*s new government. but what is the true picture? have they really banned all teenage girls going to school — or is there something more complicated going on? the bbc�*s world affairs editor, john simpson, travelled to the historic town of bamiyan to investigate. early morning in the stunning landscape on the edge of the hindu kush mountains. children are heading for school. the outside world believes that the taliban forbid the education of girls, they certainly did with a great deal of brutality the last time they were in power,
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but this time around, no one has told the people at taiboti high school that girls aren�*t allowed to come. you can see that some of the elder girls in particular are nervous about being here. even so, the overall turnout is impressive. "peace be upon mohammed," they chant. it is a standard school prayer. here in bamiyan and many parts of afghanistan, the taliban aren�*t forbidding girls to go to school, they are just not saying anything at all about it so the girls don�*t know whether they are allowed to come or not. the girl in the red scarf seems like the class rebel. only here it is not the teachers she is rebelling against, it is any attempt to prevent her from being here. translation: i come to school because i don't want to waste i 11 years of studying.
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i want to be educated and don�*t want to stop it. i call on the other girls to come to school and continue their education. the teacher has been going through a hard time. her husband died recently, she has got two young children to bring up and her salary hasn�*t been paid since the taliban came to power in august. why do you keep on coming in day after day to teach these children? translation: i'm concerned | for the future of the students. i don't want their dreams to be destroyed. i want to motivate them and keep their morales high. clamping down brutally on girls�* education has always been one of the main telephone trademarks, so why the total ——of the main taliban trademarks, so why the total silence about it now? perhaps because it is the one big concession they will have to make in order to get international help. if so, that would be a huge
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victory for the courage of the girls at taiboti high school and their teachers. john simpson, bbc news, bamiyan. a life—changing drug that can improve mobility in children and adults with spinal muscular atrophy is to be made available on the nhs. it could be used to treat hundreds of patients a year with this rare and often fatal genetic disease that causes paralysis, muscle weakness and progressive loss of movement. our medical editor fergus walsh met two patients with the condition. i�*m still an incredibly positive person, but i can�*t deny the effects that this condition has had on me physically in the last couple of years. good, good. right in my chest. chris has a masters in sports management and is a coach. remember, a push off your index finger. he also has spinal muscular atrophy, which causes progressive muscle weakness. in the last two years, he�*s lost the ability to walk.
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he should be eligible for a new treatment, risdiplam, shown to improve movement and stability. it�*d be huge, just to have the certainty that it�*s not going to get any worse. i may not get back my ability to walk — that�*s fine. i�*m still happy in the skin that i live in, i�*m still happy with my lot in life. risdiplam is the first oral medicine for sma, but each bottle has a list price of £8,000 and may last patients just a couple of weeks, although the nhs has negotiated a confidential discount. having it as a syrup, that really makes a difference, doesn�*t it? oh, yes. doctors say the drug works by boosting the levels of a protein crucial for keeping nerve cells healthy. it really alters the outlook for these people. ten years ago, we had no treatments available for sma,
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and things have moved on now to having three available treatments. hello, everyone. i am melville. three years ago, i was the first child in england to test- a new medicine that helps with my sma~ _ nine—year—old melville takes risdiplam once a day after breakfast, as part of a medical trial. his parents hope he may never need a wheelchair because he�*s now so much stronger. yes! basically, he has now more stamina, he�*s able to endure stairs better. i have a lot of hope and i'm very happy that it's now available for other families. on a day—to—day basis, it�*s great to see melville improving a little bit every day. there is no cure yet for sma, but the outlook for melville — and hundreds of other patients — looks much brighter. fergus walsh, bbc news.
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it�*s children in need tonight and for the first time in its more than 40 year history, the telethon is being held in the north, at mediacity in salford. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson is there and one he�*s been speaking to one this evening�*s presenters mel giedroyc in her dressing room, as she was having her make—up done. here we are in your dressing room. hello, welcome. for here we are in your dressing room. hello. welcome-— hello, welcome. for time doing children in _ hello, welcome. for time doing children in need, _ hello, welcome. for time doing children in need, what- hello, welcome. for time doing children in need, what keeps. children in need, what keeps bringing you back? is children in need, what keeps bringing you back?— children in need, what keeps bringing you back? is my favourite niuht bringing you back? is my favourite ni . ht of bringing you back? is my favourite night of the _ bringing you back? is my favourite night of the year. _ bringing you back? is my favourite night of the year. it's _ bringing you back? is my favourite night of the year. it's almost - bringing you back? is my favourite night of the year. it's almost as i night of the year. it�*s almost as good as christmas. you would agree, would you? good as christmas. you would agree, would ou? , , good as christmas. you would agree, would you?_ good - good as christmas. you would agree, would you?_ good girl. - would you? definitely. good girl. there is this _ would you? definitely. good girl. there is this spirit, _ would you? definitely. good girl. there is this spirit, this - would you? definitely. good girl. there is this spirit, this great - there is this spirit, this great vibe, everyone puts everything else aside. things are weird at the moment on they? times are tough, but even so ijust love moment on they? times are tough, but even so i just love the fact that still the great british public.
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gatherfor still the great british public. gather for this still the great british public. gatherfor this night. there is something very special about it. we are not thinking about anything but just the young ones.— just the young ones. slightly different format _ just the young ones. slightly different format this - just the young ones. slightly different format this year. i just the young ones. slightly l different format this year. we just the young ones. slightly - different format this year. we are not going into the wee small hours, seven p m to 10pm. that not going into the wee small hours, seven p m to 10pm.— not going into the wee small hours, seven p m to 10pm. that suits me. to be honest. — seven p m to 10pm. that suits me. to be honest. i — seven p m to 10pm. that suits me. to be honest. i was _ seven p m to 10pm. that suits me. to be honest, i was never— seven p m to 10pm. that suits me. to be honest, i was never on _ seven p m to 10pm. that suits me. to be honest, i was never on the - seven p m to 10pm. that suits me. to be honest, i was never on the late - be honest, i was never on the late shift, i was always mid—evening. i�*m 53 now so that suits me down to the ground. 53 now so that suits me down to the round. ~ , ., ,, ~s 53 now so that suits me down to the round. ~ , ., ,, ground. why do you think it has been condensed? — ground. why do you think it has been condensed? i— ground. why do you think it has been condensed? i think— ground. why do you think it has been condensed? i think for _ ground. why do you think it has been condensed? i think for various - condensed? i think for various reasons- _ condensed? i think for various reasons. covid _ condensed? i think for various reasons. covid has _ condensed? i think for various reasons. covid has played - condensed? i think for various reasons. covid has played a i condensed? i think for various l reasons. covid has played a part condensed? i think for various - reasons. covid has played a part in that, putting on any live television at the moment is challenging. it is better than it was last year, we didn�*t have an audience last year in the studio, i�*m so excited tonight, in salford for the first time, we�*ve got some actual folk. i�*ve seen some people outside of the excitement is. i can feel the adrenaline, it is going. the excitement is of the scale. ., . scale. one of the real highlights toniuht, scale. one of the real highlights tonight. what — scale. one of the real highlights tonight, what you're _ scale. one of the real highlights tonight, what you're forward - scale. one of the real highlights|
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tonight, what you're forward to? scale. one of the real highlights - tonight, what you're forward to? ed tonight, what you're forward to? ielc sheeran is tonight, what you're forward to? eh sheeran is in the building. i think we have some of the country was my favourite puppets in the building. i have seen muffin the mule, not a lot people can say that. all of them singing an amazing song. at the heart of it, there are amazing stories and amazing projects helping young people facing unimaginably tough challenges and that is why we are here. i�*m going! that is ridiculous. are here. i'm going! that is ridiculous.— are here. i'm going! that is ridiculous. ., . ridiculous. you can't have your first cry- _ ridiculous. you can't have your first cry- i'm — ridiculous. you can't have your first cry. i'm going. _ ridiculous. you can't have your first cry. i'm going. it - ridiculous. you can't have your first cry. i'm going. it is - ridiculous. you can't have your first cry. i'm going. it is a - first cry. i'm going. it is a perimenopause, - first cry. i'm going. it is a perimenopause, pretty i first cry. i'm going. it is a . perimenopause, pretty much first cry. i'm going. it is a _ perimenopause, pretty much anything sets me off. just seeing your shirt, thatis sets me off. just seeing your shirt, that is setting me off. it sets me off. just seeing your shirt, that is setting me off.— that is setting me off. it often has that is setting me off. it often has that effect- _ that is setting me off. it often has that effect. lord _ that is setting me off. it often has that effect. lord help _ that is setting me off. it often has that effect. lord help me, we - that is setting me off. it often has that effect. lord help me, we are | that effect. lord help me, we are auoin live that effect. lord help me, we are going live very. — that effect. lord help me, we are going live very. very _ that effect. lord help me, we are going live very, very soon. -
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lets find out what the weather will be doing this evening for children in need and throughout the weekend. helen has the answers. for the children in need of events, if outside this evening, probably the best evening of the weekend because it will be mild, although i do still think you will need your thick coat. i�*ve been in my thick coat for at least a month despite having 16 degrees in aberdeenshire and 17 today. it is going to get colder as we had to the weekend. if you haven�*t heard yet, get your winter woollies out because we will have our first stained cold spell. not unusual in late november but seven and eight celsius and a chilly northerly wind, we will notice the difference, a shock to the system. at the moment we are bathed in a mild atlantic air, not that one out and about because it is november. we have had lovely sunshine despite it being a predominantly cloudy picture. you can see that rain and it really is quite heavy rain and
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that will continue for the north of scotland, in fact it will spread as we go through the day. this is where we go through the day. this is where we had the best of the sunshine across eastern areas and north wales, little bits elsewhere. through the night, those holes will tend to fill in. whilst we have had the 15, 16, 17 celsius today, it won�*t drop much overnight because the cloud acts as a blanket and stops the fall in temperature. but we have got rain to come, quite heavy rain to come through the night, as you can see, across scotland and approaching northern ireland by morning. further south, if there are some holes that possess, we could see temperatures getting down to or seven celsius but they are more likely to be misty and murky. we have this band of rain through tomorrow, our transition day tomorrow. behind it are brighter, colder air, temperatures dropping during the day despite the sunshine. the sun comes out further south, as today, 11, 12, 13 celsius. it is all
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change and it is because of a cold weather front, change and it is because of a cold weatherfront, true change and it is because of a cold weather front, true to change and it is because of a cold weatherfront, true to its name, introducing this cold air. again, through monday and tuesday, we get cut off from that air a little bit. the sunday, looking pretty chilly. you can see the wind coming down. we start the day on sunday with quite a widespread frost across the northern part of the country. add in the south because we have the cold front close by. this cold wind will blow showers into southern and eastern areas, eastern parts of scotland and england, down to the irish sea and across ben —— pembrokeshire. if you are sheltered from the wind, eight to 10 celsius won�*t feel that bad but a shock to the system, particularly where we have near gale force winds blowing through the channel in the east. holding out across the board as we go into monday morning. look at the temperatures as we get to the end of the week, it is colder still. we will keep you updated on that.
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today at five... "we are sorry" — england cricket chiefs apologise �*unreservedly�* to former player azeem rafiq after he exposed �*institutional racism�* in the sport. they also pledge to win back trust in the game. racism and discrimination is a blight on our game. to azeem and all of those who have suffered or experienced any form of discrimination in our sport, we are truly sorry. it comes as another cricketer, alex hales, apologises for wearing blackface makeup at a fancy dress party in 2009. my 20s was full of mistakes like that — you know, reckless mistakes off the field that cost me... let down family, let down team—mates, let down friends. austria is to go back into a full nationwide lockdown
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because of record covid cases, and everyone will have

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