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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 19, 2021 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm rebecca jones. the headlines at nine. new accusations of racism in english cricket as batsman alex hales apologises for painting his face black at a party after a photo emerges from 2009. australia's men's cricket captain resigns — after admiting he sent sexually explicit text messages to a female co—worker. two children and two women are killed in a house fire in south east london, the fire brigade describes the incident as "truly terrible." plans for tougher laws to prosecute drivers using their phone behind the wheel — with a ban on playing games and scrolling through playlists. parents and guardians of school
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pupils in england must be allowed to buy some uniform from high street shops, according to new government rules. how much are you paying for your kids�* school uniform? do you think this move is a good one? get in touch with me this morning via twitter, i'm @rebeccajonesbbc. or you can use #bbcyourquestions. we'll be speaking to the child poverty action group in around 45 minutes. also today... # mew, mew, mew. and the duchess of sussex as you've never seen her before, as she plays a prank on unsuspecting members of the public during a us television interview about family life.
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welcome to bbc news. english cricket is facing fresh accusations of racism, after it emerged that a player wore black make—up at a fancy dress party in 2009. a photograph of alex hales, who plays for nottinghamshire, has been published by the sun newspaper. he responded by saying he was dressed as his musical hero, the rapper tupac shakur, and he deplored discrimination in all its forms. the england and wales cricket board is to investigate the matter. it will also meet today to discuss allegations of racism made by the former yorkshire player azeem rafiq, who has apologised for making anti—semitic comments online. let's talk to andy nash who was a non executive director of the ecb between 2004 and 2018. good morning. it feels like there's a lot to discuss. i suppose i would like to turn the clock back to when
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you were involved with the ecb. did this lack of representation of black and ethnic minority players ever come up at board meetings? was it discussed? , , . �* , discussed? yes, very much so. it's been an issue _ discussed? yes, very much so. it's been an issue for _ discussed? yes, very much so. it's been an issue for the _ discussed? yes, very much so. it's been an issue for the game - discussed? yes, very much so. it's been an issue for the game for - discussed? yes, very much so. it's been an issue for the game for a l been an issue for the game for a long while. as we know, the south asian community have a lot of natural talent when it comes to cricket and they for many years have been underrepresented and quite a lot of work has already been done to try and rectify that. but clearly, the game has now been overtaken by events and we see that we've come to the sorry passed we are today. i just want to make the point that a year ago the ecb did set up the independent commission for equality independent commission for equality in cricket, headed up by cindy box who has excellent credentials in the area. they are under way and they area. they are under way and they
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are looking at the charge that english cricket is institutionally racist. this was a year ago, it's up and running and i think now that must be allowed to run its course. the problem with things like the alex hales story today is it is just sensationalising the issue, which it shouldn't because it's a terribly serious issue. it needs to be looked at properly, thoroughly and investigated by real professionals and people of independence. which is going on. i've nothing really to add to the alex hales story, because i don't think we should be given the oxygen of publicity. to don't think we should be given the oxygen of publicity.— oxygen of publicity. to pick up on somethin: oxygen of publicity. to pick up on something you — oxygen of publicity. to pick up on something you just _ oxygen of publicity. to pick up on something you just said, - oxygen of publicity. to pick up on something you just said, is - oxygen of publicity. to pick up on | something you just said, is english cricket institutionally racist? and an extension of that question, is the ecb fit for purpose to deal with the ecb fit for purpose to deal with the issue? it the ecb fit for purpose to deal with the issue? ., , �* ., ., ,
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the issue? it doesn't matter what my view is because _ the issue? it doesn't matter what my view is because i'm _ the issue? it doesn't matter what my view is because i'm not _ the issue? it doesn't matter what my view is because i'm not privy - the issue? it doesn't matter what my view is because i'm not privy to - the issue? it doesn't matter what my view is because i'm not privy to all. view is because i'm not privy to all of the evidence. the independent commission has been set up specifically to address that question. they will answer the question. they will answer the question. it does need answering. and when it comes back, whatever the answer is, the ecb or whatever is running english cricket by then will clearly have to come up with some serious plans to address whatever failings and conclusions are highlighted. i failings and conclusions are highlighted-— failings and conclusions are highlighted. failings and conclusions are hiuuhlihted. , ., �* highlighted. i suppose what you're su: caestin , highlighted. i suppose what you're suggesting, though, _ highlighted. i suppose what you're suggesting, though, some - highlighted. i suppose what you're suggesting, though, some people| suggesting, though, some people might say these are more long—term solutions and clearly given everything we've seen and heard this week, the situation needs addressing in a much more pressing way, doesn't it? ratherthanjust in a much more pressing way, doesn't it? rather than just institutional change. it? rather than 'ust institutional chance. , ., , ., it? rather than 'ust institutional chance. , ., , ., . change. yes, it does. you asked me a minute ago — change. yes, it does. you asked me a minute ago about _ change. yes, it does. you asked me a minute ago about the _ change. yes, it does. you asked me a minute ago about the ecb _ change. yes, it does. you asked me a minute ago about the ecb itself- change. yes, it does. you asked me a minute ago about the ecb itself and i minute ago about the ecb itself and there is a growing feeling that the ecb is no longerfit for there is a growing feeling that the ecb is no longer fit for purpose. that's my view too and has been for
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a while. from what has been trailed in national media already, there is clearly a growing body of opinion thatis clearly a growing body of opinion that is of that point of view. we are going to see meaningful change and i think it will be one of the elephants in the room at the meeting today and what i think will happen quite quickly is that the ecb will probably be dismantled and we'll see three boards replace it, which will become part of the national governing body. 0ne become part of the national governing body. one will look after the professional game, won the international game and the england teams, and the other will look after the grassroots and amateur game. i think we should expect to see a strategic board which will do the governing of the game, which will leave the three independent boards to get on with the promoting of the game and making sure that it's sufficiently well—financed. and?
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sufficiently well-financed. andy nash, we have _ sufficiently well-financed. andy nash, we have to _ sufficiently well-financed. andy nash, we have to leave - sufficiently well-financed. andy nash, we have to leave it - sufficiently well—financed. andy nash, we have to leave it there. really good to have tea with us. thank you. —— to have you with us. let's talk to the human rights campaigner, sir geoff palmer. he's also chancellor of heriot—watt university. there's a lot to talk about. perhaps we should start with this picture which has emerged today of alex hales. i wondered what your reaction was. mi; hales. i wondered what your reaction was. g ., ., ., , ., was. my reaction to that is that this is an _ was. my reaction to that is that this is an individual _ was. my reaction to that is that this is an individual who - was. my reaction to that is that this is an individual who did - this is an individual who did something who felt at the time but there were no consequences. and that it was acceptable, and nobody would call him out on it. what is very sad, i've listened to what was said before and what was said was frightening, that the person you
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just spoke to said, this has been going on for a long time. and i think that it is rather sad that it has taken the death of floyd for him to realise that something needs to be done if you have people being abused because of race. i'd alex hales said he was dressing up as his hero this wrapper and has deplored discrimination. seam hero this wrapper and has deplored discrimination.— discrimination. am i right that you used to play _ discrimination. am i right that you used to play cricket? _ discrimination. am i right that you used to play cricket? --rapper. i l used to play cricket? ——rapper. i arrived in this country as an immigrant in 1955 and i went to school in london. i was rejected and designated educationally subnormal by one school and the other school technique and one of the teachers took me for a trial —— the other
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school took me. they said you're playing for the london boys cricket team. the local grammar school found out and insisted i was transferred. so, cricket got me my education. what i've always learnt about cricket in jamaica what i've always learnt about cricket injamaica and when i was playing in london for the london school boys cricket team and played at university is that if you're doing something which is unacceptable, it is not cricket. and thus the cricket morality is of such that this should not be happening in that this should not be happening in that game or any game. what that this should not be happening in that game or any game. what would our that game or any game. what would your suggestions — that game or any game. what would your suggestions be _ that game or any game. what would your suggestions be to _ that game or any game. what would your suggestions be to improve - that game or any game. what would your suggestions be to improve the | your suggestions be to improve the situation? as i was speaking to andy nash, he was talking about root and branch reform perhaps of the way the game is run. there will be people listening, young boys perhaps even who want to play cricket, who want to know that actually i'm going to get a fair crack at the whip at this. , ~ ., , , .,
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this. yes. i think that it is up to the system _ this. yes. i think that it is up to the system to _ this. yes. i think that it is up to the system to put _ this. yes. i think that it is up to the system to put things - this. yes. i think that it is up to the system to put things right l this. yes. i think that it is up to i the system to put things right and for the previous speaker to say this has been going on for a long time, i think that is totally unacceptable, especially for young people and the parents of young people listening to that. the fact he set up an investigation, the point is that they're investigating racism, what he did not say, what was the outcome of the board? what are they planning to do to change this attitude about cricket and race? and ifind that institutions must set outcomes, because you cannot in fact control what you can't measure. and therefore, they must set up outcomes in terms of what they expect, in
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terms of how people should behave. and that is what will encourage young people to come into the game. understood. sir geoff palmer, i ought tojust say understood. sir geoff palmer, i ought to just say andy nash who we spoke to before he was a nonexecutive director at the ecb between 2004 and 2018 and actually resigned over issues of corporate governance. very good to have you with us. ., ~ , ., governance. very good to have you with us. ., ~' , ., , governance. very good to have you with us. ., ~ ,, , . governance. very good to have you with us-_ he i governance. very good to have you | with us-_ he is with us. thank you very much. he is a statement — with us. thank you very much. he is a statement from _ with us. thank you very much. he is a statement from the _ with us. thank you very much. he is a statement from the ecb, - with us. thank you very much. he is a statement from the ecb, the - a statement from the ecb, the national governing body of cricket in england and wales. the australian cricket captain tim paine has stepped down because of lewd text messages he exchanged with a woman four years ago.
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his decision not to lead the side comes only weeks before the ashes series against england begins. shaimaa khalil gave us the latest from sydney. the timing of this couldn't have been worse or more crucial for the australian squad. as you say, this is weeks before the ashes series against england is due to begin and tim paine came out and said he was stepping down as captain. these allegations of the lewd text messages to a former female employee in cricket tasmania came to light originally in 2018. at the time, as they were investigated, tim paine said he participated fully. at the time he was exonerated. cricket australia found he didn't violate the code of conduct of cricket australia. but then he said he was recently made aware that these texts were going to become public, and this is when he decided that he was going to step down as captain of the australian men's squad. this was a brief but
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tearful statement. he said that he deeply regretted his behaviour at the time and he still regrets it now. again, apologised to his family. he also said that stepping down was a very difficult decision but it was the right decision for his family and for cricket. he said that being the captain of australia's cricket team was the biggest privilege of his life. he addressed cricket fans and apologised. he said, i'm deeply sorry that my past behaviour has impacted our game on the eve of the ashes and the disappointment i've caused them and the whole cricket community, my heart breaks. this is really at the heart of it, the fact that he came out, made that announcement, apologised for the behaviour. but also, to step down at a time when the cricket squad is to get into the ashes series in a few weeks to face england. the impact of that, of course, is what everybody is now concerned about.
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australian cricket fans, but of course ultimately cricket australia, who is going to lead what impact this is going to have on the team. breaking news. a —year—old boy is in a critical condition after being shotin a critical condition after being shot in the back in this incident happened last night. —— a 13—year—old boy. the attack happened just before 7pm in the hockley circus area. a13—year—old boy is in a critical condition after being shotin a critical condition after being shot in the in birmingham last night just before seven pn shot in the in birmingham last night just before seven pm in the hockley circus area. west midlands police is
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appealing for any witnesses. we will bring you more details on that as we get it. two women and two children have been killed in a fire at a house in bexleyheath in south—east london. a man managed to get out of the building and has been taken to hospital. the cause of the fire is under investigation. 0ur reporter tim muffett is there. good morning. what more can you tell us? , ., ., ., good morning. what more can you tell us? h, ., ., good morning. what more can you tell us? ., ,, ., , us? good morning. some desperately sad news from — us? good morning. some desperately sad news from bexleyheath _ us? good morning. some desperately sad news from bexleyheath in - us? good morning. some desperately sad news from bexleyheath in south l sad news from bexleyheath in south london this morning. the london fire brigade said they first received calls at 8:30pm. they sent six fire engines and around 40 firefighters to the scene. they managed to take four people out of the building, two women and two children but sadly they all died. 0ne women and two children but sadly they all died. one man who managed to get out of the building before the fire brigade arrived has been taken to hospital. around the area, there is a sense of enormous shock and grief, as you can imagine. i've
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been speaking to local residents. well, ijust saw blue lights flashing and looked out the window, see police, ambulance, fire brigades. and then that's it, went to the bedroom window and see a commotion round there. and see them resuscitating somebody, that's about it. i was shocked, so shocked, - because it's the first time for me to see a fire just happen ten metres away from my house. _ so, i don't know. but ijust want to know- that the police can find out what caused the fire, - that's the important thing. in the last few minutes the mayor of london sadiq khan said he is heartbroken by what has happened and heartbroken by what has happened and he sends his deepest condolences, and stop the head of the london fire brigade. as to the cause, we simply don't know. the investigation is under way.
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don't know. the investigation is underway. desperately don't know. the investigation is under way. desperately sad news, four people have died in a fire in bexleyheath in south—east london. thank you. talks continue in brussels today to try to ease the row between the uk and the european union, about customs arrangements in northern ireland. the uk is warning that it could unilaterally suspend parts of the northern ireland deal, unless major changes are made. nick eardley is our political correspondent in westminster. 0n the one hand it seems we have a ratcheting up of tension but on the other hand it feels like possibly improving mood music? yes. other hand it feels like possibly improving mood music?- other hand it feels like possibly improving mood music? yes, i think there's two — improving mood music? yes, i think there's two contradictory _ improving mood music? yes, i think there's two contradictory sounding l there's two contradictory sounding terms aren't actually that far off the mark. the uk government has been talking for the last few weeks about triggering article 16, basically suspending parts of the brexit deal
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because ministers in london and some politicians in northern ireland are really worried about the number of checks between great britain and northern ireland on some good skimming across the irish sea. those talks have been going on for a while and at the same time with had negotiations between brussels and london about ways to potentially solve those problems, to tweak the brexit deal to try and find a solution. those talks are continuing today. lord frost is meeting with his eu counterparts in brussels. we've also been hearing from ireland's taoiseach who has been talking about whether there is room for compromise, about whether there is a way the sides could agree on something that would stop the uk taking that unilateral action which could really ratchet up tension between the uk and eu. have a listen to what michael martin said. there's not an abundance of checks.
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and it can get resolved, with goodwill on all sides. and what's very clear to me as well is that the vast majority from all persuasions in northern ireland, and all political leaders, want this resolved through negotiated agreement. we obviously had that big announcement on trains yesterday. would it be fair to say that a number of conservative mps are perhaps unhappy with the government approach? i perhaps unhappy with the government a- roach? ~ , approach? i think there is nervousness _ approach? i think there is nervousness in _ approach? i think there is nervousness in certain - approach? i think there is i nervousness in certain parts approach? i think there is - nervousness in certain parts of the conservative party about how this looks, because there are big parts of the initial rail plan for outside london that aren't going ahead. so, the h52 london that aren't going ahead. so, the hs2 link between east midlands and leeds isn't going ahead as promised. the northern powerhouse rail new in high speed between leeds and manchester that would have gone
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through bradford, that's not happening in the way that was envisaged either. the government would say we're spending a lot of money, almost 100 billion and that is going to lead to vastly improved journey times for many people in the north of england and the midlands as well. but there are tory mps who are really worried that this undermines levelling up, it looks like the government has gone back on some really big promises and there are northern leaders as well who are saying that this is a betrayal, this isn't what was promised and it's going to mean that the region is left behind by some of the economic improvements that are happening elsewhere in the country. the transport secretary grant shapps has been on the airwaves this morning coming out quite strongly to try and back to this plan, to say it's a lot of money and it's going to do a lot to improve rail infrastructure in england. to improve rail infrastructure in encland. ., to improve rail infrastructure in
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encland. . ., to improve rail infrastructure in encland. . . , england. what we are delivering is massively faster _ england. what we are delivering is massively faster journey _ england. what we are delivering is massively fasterjourney times, i england. what we are delivering is i massively fasterjourney times, much quicker, _ massively fasterjourney times, much quicker, with— massively fasterjourney times, much quicker, with much bigger capacity for the _ quicker, with much bigger capacity for the north and for the midlands. to sit_ for the north and for the midlands. to sit here — for the north and for the midlands. to sit here in manchester, the city thabs— to sit here in manchester, the city that's probably benefits most, or maybe _ that's probably benefits most, or maybe that's birmingham and talk about— maybe that's birmingham and talk about this — maybe that's birmingham and talk about this not delivering for you is bizarre _ about this not delivering for you is bizarre we — about this not delivering for you is bizarre. we are delivering one hour and a _ bizarre. we are delivering one hour and a quarterjourneys from london to where _ and a quarterjourneys from london to where we — and a quarterjourneys from london to where we are set right now in manchester. to where we are set right now in manchester-— to where we are set right now in manchester. . , ., �* , manchester. that is the government's - itch. manchester. that is the government's nitch. it manchester. that is the government's itch. it is manchester. that is the government's pitch. it is interesting _ manchester. that is the government's pitch. it is interesting because - manchester. that is the government's pitch. it is interesting because it - pitch. it is interesting because it kind of feeds into one of the things i've heard a lot in parliament recently which is that borisjohnson promises quite a lot, you hear this term boosterism around boris johnson, he's an optimist. but when it comes to the finer detail of some of those things it can often be quite hard to deliver and with the integrated rail plan, if you're in
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bradford, leeds, or other parts of the north, or yorkshire, there are many who don't think they've got everything they were promised by the prime minister, and that makes many conservatives are very nervous indeed. ., ~ conservatives are very nervous indeed. ., ,, , ., the national audit office has accused the government of being under—prepared for a pandemic like covid—19. in a new report, the spending watchdog says ministers and officials had anticipated a flu pandemic, or a highly infectious disease such as ebola — but not for a virus like covid, where some of those infected don't show symptoms. the department of health said there would be a full public inquiry next year. let's speak to the head of the national audit 0ffice gareth davies. good morning. give us a bit more detail, tell us what else you said in the report.
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detail, tell us what else you said in the report-— in the report. this is our 24th re ort in the report. this is our 24th report on _ in the report. this is our 24th report on the _ in the report. this is our 24th report on the government - in the report. this is our 24th - report on the government response to the pandemic. and so we've looked at the pandemic. and so we've looked at the furlough skin, how education coped, and so on —— furlough scheme. a very common finding has been that there was no plan, that the departments in those cases refuse to deal with the situation that was unfolding. we flicked back to the pandemic to the preparations and risk planning done for pandemics in general to understand why we had no plan for school closures and furlough and so on. the government in many cases reacted fast to place things in place but that speed came with a price. preparation for anything like this again is a big priority. another key finding from our work is that the exercises that were done in the run—up to 2020, and there were many of them over the years preceding the pandemic, they
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were partially implementing the findings of those exercises but they weren't all implemented. a key recommendation for us is government needs more systematic and thorough approach to checking that all of the recommendations from exercises and simulations are implemented in full across the whole of government. share across the whole of government. are ou sa in: across the whole of government. are you saying the government ignored the warning signs? trio. you saying the government ignored the warning signs?— the warning signs? no, this is obviously _ the warning signs? no, this is obviously with _ the warning signs? no, this is obviously with the _ the warning signs? no, this is obviously with the benefit - the warning signs? no, this is obviously with the benefit of l obviously with the benefit of hindsight but of course, whilst it would be wrong to expect everybody to have this perfect hindsight at the time it would also be wrong not to learn the lessons from an experience like this. so, ourfocus is on how could the risk assessment and planning approach be improved to maximise the chances of spotting the need for something like this? i think the key point is it's not so much about guessing which disease is
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going to be a big problem next, it's more about having a fuller range of tools to deal with the consequences of the disease. that's what has hit us this time. we are by far from the only country with this problem. nobody anticipated the scale of shutdown across the economy that was required, the disruption to education and the knock—on impact on people's lives and their ability to do theirjobs. now we've seen this, clearly getting back to the planning process to better anticipate the scale of the impact of different risks, and the world is becoming more interconnected and supply chains are much tighter and the knock—on effects of problems are that much more severe. in a different example, the impact on c02 production of increases in the gas price which immediately hit the food supply chain. there are lots of examples across the economy which
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the government needs to plan better for. ., ., , for. the government has said there will be a full _ for. the government has said there will be a full public _ for. the government has said there will be a full public inquiry - for. the government has said there will be a full public inquiry into - will be a full public inquiry into all of this next year. gareth davies, thank you. in a surprise u—turn, the indian prime minister narendra modi has decided to repeal agricultural reform laws that have sparked a year of protests by hundreds of thousands of farmers. in an address to the nation, mr modi admitted he'd been unable to explain the benefits of the three laws. small farmers said the changes, which were introduced in september last year opening farming up to the private sector would destroy their livelihoods. the bbc�*s salman ravi is in delhi and has been getting reaction from farmers at a the protest site in the capital to this unexpected news. it's a big day for the farmers in india, as the prime minister narendra modi announced this morning to repeal the three farm laws that were enacted by the indian parliament. the farmers are protesting these
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laws, saying that these laws will pave the way for the corporate sector into agriculture. and that is why the protests continued. it was a long stalemate because several rounds of dialogues between farmer organisations and the government, they practically failed to reach to any conclusion. and today, being the anniversary of sikh guru, guru nanak, the 552nd anniversary, it's a big gift from the government, as the farmers say. how are you feeling? it's a great, auspicious day for us as a farmer. i'm really happy. and from this, from all farmers, see the happiness on their faces. it's a really good day. it has been a long time since you've been protesting. yeah. around about one year we are protesting for our rights. so today, we are just going to hope that our demands are going to be fulfilled. so now there's a hope for the farmers that their demands
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are going to be fulfilled now, since the farm laws are being repealed. and as you know, in the political circles, there are murmurs since the elections in two important states. and that is the reason that has compelled the government to actually bow down before the farmers. salman ravi, bbc news, delhi. laws to prosecute drivers who use their mobile phone are to be strengthened across the uk. at the moment motorists are banned only from texting or making calls. but from next year it will also be illegal to take photos, play games or scroll through playlists while driving. joining me now is nick freeman — author, commentator and criminal defence lawyer known as mr loophole. i'm not sure if you like that nickname, do you? it i'm not sure if you like that nickname, do you?- i'm not sure if you like that nickname, do you? i'm not sure if you like that nickname, do ou? . , ., nickname, do you? it was the media who called it — nickname, do you? it was the media who called it to _ nickname, do you? it was the media who called it to me _ nickname, do you? it was the media who called it to me so _ nickname, do you? it was the media who called it to me so i _ nickname, do you? it was the media who called it to me so i didn't - nickname, do you? it was the media who called it to me so i didn't have i who called it to me so i didn't have much choice about it.—
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much choice about it. laughter it's worth explaining _ much choice about it. laughter it's worth explaining a _ much choice about it. laughter it's worth explaining a bit - much choice about it. laughter it's worth explaining a bit more i much choice about it. laughterl it's worth explaining a bit more to our viewers exactly how the current law works first of all. the our viewers exactly how the current law works first of all.— law works first of all. the current law works first of all. the current law in relation _ law works first of all. the current law in relation to _ law works first of all. the current law in relation to the _ law works first of all. the current law in relation to the specific - law in relation to the specific piece of legislation, the crown has to prove that the defendant was using the phone or hand—held for an interactive communication. so there are a whole host of activities, for example the case ofjimmy carr in 2009, he was recording a joke. that wasn't interactive and didn't infringe the legislation. the intention in 2003 when this legislation was introduced was to stop people using fines. but of course, phones have become much more sophisticated and are now used for a whole plethora of different things and people have a very cavalier disregard to the law because there are very few police about. what the
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government is saying is any form of use of a hand—held phone will be outlawed and it will have six points and there will be a financial penalty attached. because it's proving too hard to prove this interactive communication. the reason is there are too few police on the streets and unless you get an admission from somebody or you actually record the conversation, it's a high burden for the crown to prove and they are failing on many occasions. so, that's the difficulty. this legislation is going to outlaw all types of hand—held use, irrespective of the purpose. so if you're using it for anything whether interactive or not, you will fall foul of this legislation. we wa nt we want to be careful about using our phone for any purpose. we shouldn't labour under misapprehension that if you use your phone hands—free at the moment then that's all right. because even using your phone hands—free, the level of
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distraction is the same as drink—driving. 0ccasionally people are involved in an accident because they are using their phone in what they are using their phone in what they perceive to be a legal basis and they then have the full force of law upon them and they face very heavy consequences. so i think the public are being slightly misled at the moment, not intentionally cut because they think they are using their phone or satnav, it is perfectly permissible. it is as long as there isn't an incident but if there is the level of destruction will result in serious criminal charges depending on the consequences of your driving. the idea is to make it much easierfor prosecutors, in view, because there are too few police on the roads and an increase in the sentence because six points is not enough. we need a sentence that polices itself and there should be parity between drink—driving and using a mobile phone, a 12 month minimum disqualification and i think that will ease the problem. that'll be the extra piece of the jigsaw that
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the extra piece of the jigsaw that the government might consider putting in place to make roads much safer. ,., ., putting in place to make roads much safer. ., . ~' putting in place to make roads much safer. ., ., ,, ., ., ,, safer. good to talk to you, thank ou. now it's time for a look at the weather. i write i need to get out my gloves and scarf? you might do from sunday onwards. but not today, a very mild day for mid—november. sunny breaks in central and eastern parts. a fine november day for some. the rain confined across parts of northern scotland, shetland on the other side of the rain band in the sunshine but very windy here at the moment but they will ease down through the day. foremost, the south—west winds are lifting temperatures into the mid teens. 16 or 17 is not out of the question. this evening and overnight, heavy rain in the north of scotland, inching further southwards will stop many other areas are staying dry, the odd spot of light rain or drizzle particularly in the west. not as mild as last night but still with temperatures well above where we
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expect at this stage in november on saturday morning. saturday brings plenty of cloud for england and wales, a few sunny breaks, isolated showers in the south. a northerly wind will kick in a temperatures dropping furtherfor all wind will kick in a temperatures dropping further for all of us into sunday. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... new accusations of racism in english cricket as batsman alex hales apologises for painting his face black at a party after a photo emerges from 2009. it comes as english cricketing authorities meet to discuss allegations of racism made by the former yorkshire player azeem rafiq. australia's men's cricket captain resigns — after admiting he sent sexually explicit text messages to a female co—worker.
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two children and two women are killed in a house fire in south—east london. the fire brigade describes the incident as "truly terrible". plans for tougher laws to prosecute drivers using their phone behind the wheel, with a ban on playing games and scrolling through playlists. parents and guardians of school pupils in england must be allowed to buy some uniform from high street shops, according to new government rules. there we go, a big build—up for mike busheu there we go, a big build—up for mike bushell at the sports centre. good morning. all eyes and ears will be on the oval today, where the top figures in english cricket will meet, to discuss diversity and inclusion
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in the wake of the racism accusations engulfing the sport. it follows that powerful testimony from azeem rafiq on to mps on tuesday, in which he described english cricket as institutionally rascist. members of the england and wales cricket board will be joined at the oval, alongside representatives from all, 18 first—class counties and the players�* union with the pressure on to come up with a plan of action, that goes far enough, or they face the threat of government intervention, and potentially an independent regulator set up to over see them. meanwhile, aseem rafiq has said he's incredibly angry at himself, after a social media exchange was revealed, in which he posted anti—sem—itic, comments. (00v)after all his accounts of the racial abuse he suffered at yorkshire, during two spells at the club, he has now apologised for comments he posted when he was 19. the board of deputies of britishjews said rafiq will well understand the hurt this exchange will cause to jews who have supported him, but added the apology seems heartfelt. nottinghamshire cricket club
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have just said they've have extended the scope of their investigation into the historic conduct of alex hales following the publication of a photo taken in 2009. the former england batsman has admitted he painted his face black for a new years eve party. a picture of which is in the sun today. and has today released a statement, saying the theme of the party was musicians and he went as his hero, tupac shakhur. he said on social media, "i obviously realise that this is incredibly disrespectful and i want to apologise for all the offence this has no doubt caused, and he deplores, all forms of racism and discrimination." with the ashes just weeks away, tim paine has resigned as australia captain after an investigation into sexually explicit text messages sent to a female colleague surfaced. paine decided to stand down when he became aware that details of the incident in 2017 were about to be made public. he said the cricked australia investigation had exonerated him, but he "deeply" regretted his actions at the time and to this day.
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he said resigning was the right thing to do for him, his family and cricket. the first test starts on december the 8th in brisbane. to australian cricket fans i'm deeply sorry that my past behaviour has impacted our game on the eve of the ashes. for the disappointment i have caused to fans and the entire cricket community, i apologise. i've been blessed with a wonderful, loving and supportive family and it breaks my heart to know how much i have let them down. the scottish champions rangers have a new manager. theirformer player, giovanni van bronckhorst, is taking over from steven gerrard, who left for aston villa last week. van bronckhorst won the champions league with barcelona and played in a world cup final with the netherlands during his playing career. gerrard's job now is to revive the fortunes of villa, who are just two points off the premier league relegation zone going into tomorrow's game against brighton.
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gerrard has been speaking for the first time since taking over — and he paid an emotional tribute to his former manager gerard houllier, who gave him his debut as a player, and also went on to manage at villa. houllier passed away last december, and gerrard said he was honoured to take up the same role as his old friend. he went out of his way to really change me as a person, both on and off the pitch. he put his arm around me at the right times. he shouted at me at the right times. we had a bond and a relationship that was very strong, so when we lost him it was a real sad day, an emotional day. i used to lean on him for advice a lot. and i remember the words he used to say to me all the time, "go and be the best version of yourself and you won't go far wrong" so i'm sure he'll be looking down today very proud. a fitting tribute from the new aston villa manager. that's all the sport for now. the new culture secretary has told the bbc that left—wing campaigners have "highjacked" social media
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and made people "afraid" to say what they think — but insists she doesn't want to start a culture war. nadine dorries has today announced another £107 million to help venues in england recover from the pandemic has been speaking exclusively to the bbc�*s culture editor, katie razzall. katiejoins me now from salford. wright good morning. nadine dorries has been in thejobjust wright good morning. nadine dorries has been in the job just a few weeks. this is herfirst broadcast interview. why now, do you think? it is. i would say there is a sense that she wants to show us a different face to the public one we know her. she has this reputation as being someone who picks fights online, who shoots from the hip, is outspoken and instead she wanted to talk a bit about her upbringing in a deprived part of liverpool and why that drives her on this mission she told me about, that she wants to
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widen access to the arts, to the cultural arena and sporting places so people from the kind of background she came from feel they can create work and get involved in those places. she also wanted to talk about how much she cares about culture. the reason she did the interview, they are handing out more money today, the culture recovery fund, more than 900 cultural organisations, leeds grand theatre, an art club in wigan, exeter cathedral. it is the third instalment of this fund, which has been a lifeline to the sector with around £2 billion of support given so far. ., ., , ., ., so far. you mentioned her reputation and she is outspoken. _ so far. you mentioned her reputation and she is outspoken. her _ and she is outspoken. her appointment to this post, it was seen as a bit surprising. it appointment to this post, it was seen as a bit surprising.- seen as a bit surprising. it was. even she _ seen as a bit surprising. it was. even she said _ seen as a bit surprising. it was. even she said she _ seen as a bit surprising. it was. even she said she was - seen as a bit surprising. it was. | even she said she was surprised seen as a bit surprising. it was. i even she said she was surprised to get the call and many said it was a reward for her loyalty to boris johnson. she told me the reaction in some creative industries to her appointment was snobbish and sexist because some people were highly
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critical of her appointment, seeing her as an attack dog for the prime minister, not least for tweets like the one she put up about, criticising what she called left—wing snowflakes who she said were killing comedy. she has been dubbed the ministerfor were killing comedy. she has been dubbed the minister for culture wars and she told me she doesn't want to engage in culture wars but she does have views on freedom of speech. yes, i hear this all the time, so, yes, people are. but i think freedom of expression is a really important principle of our democracy. and sometimes i think we just need to kind of like tone down the condemnation and the judgment. and that's what's important to protecting freedom of speech, that people do listen and people do understand, an actually that people are just kind and listening to other people's views. there's this kind of image that's been painted of me that i'm going to go out on some kind of... charge out some kind of culture war battle. itjust isn't true.
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but then talking about left—wing snowflakes and their woke agenda is quite aggressive. well, there are some people who politicise that and that's what i'm talking about when i do that. campaigners who kind of hijack the space that other people would like to occupy to talk about some serious issues, some on the left have hijacked that space and that's who my comments are targeted at. that will raise some eyebrows because she is not famous as someone who is kind on social media or who listens to opposing views. she got into hot water over a tweet yesterday over our political editor laura kuenssberg in which she criticised her reporting. nadine dorries said should be had been misinterpreted and laura was the best in the business, but many people will say it smacks of hypocrisy, what she has said today. she is giving out some money today, one of the reason she was talking to you, but how has the arts world reacted to her appointment? it is fair to say with some trepidation in
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some places, but they would. there are thin . s some places, but they would. there are things they _ some places, but they would. there are things they can _ some places, but they would. there are things they can agree _ some places, but they would. there are things they can agree on. i some places, but they would. turf are things they can agree on. they would all probably accept and agree with her stated mission which is museums, theatres and galleries, they need to be widened, access needs to be widened. that's something they can agree on. she is also handing out the money and they really need it. yes, museums, galleries and theatres have reopened but the footfall just isn't there the way it was before the pandemic. the cultural recovery fund has saved people from going bust but their finances are still precarious so she needs to champion them and i think she would point to having already done that. in the recently she got money for 100 regional museums and libraries and also got £2 million for the new beatles museum that we build boat on that liverpool waterfront. ? make that will be built. there is the sense that the industry wants to give her the benefit of the doubt and see where she takes them.
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austria will become the first country in western europe to reimpose a full covid—19 lockdown this autumn to tackle a new wave of infections, and order its whole population to get vaccinated as of february 1st. its government said on friday. the lockdown will last 10 days initially, and 20 days atmost, that's according to the chancellor who told a news conference this morning, adding that the obligation to get vaccinated would be introduced on february one. we will have more on that as we get it. around 150 british army engineers will be sent to help re—inforce poland's border with belarus. defence secretary ben wallace made the announcement during a trip to poland, saying he wants to show
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solidarity with a nato ally — and warn the belarussian government against using migrants to destabilise its neighbours. 0ur defence correspondent jonathan beale sent this report from poland. tensions on the border between poland and belarus might seem to be easing for now but britain wants to help make sure this doesn't happen again. these are the first images of british army engineers visiting the border. the new front line of a new kind of war. and they are just the advance party. on a visit to poland, the defence secretary said he would soon be sending more than 100 army engineers to bolster poland's frontier. we are going to be deploying some engineers to already augment the 150 soldiers that have been here already for a good few months, because again, our defensive strength is that solidarity, and standing side by side with the poles saying, look, we know what's going on. this is a hybrid warfare, this is the use of people being trafficked across the border
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by a sponsoring government, effectively, and we are not going to allow that to happen. this latest deployment of british troops will not be for combat. but nato forces are already in poland in case that happens. part of the alliance's response to russia, the key player in this region. concerns that russia might be preparing another assault on ukrainian territory have intensified, with moscow once again massing forces on its border. another reason why the uk wants to display solidarity with its eastern european allies. britain already has 150 troops based here in poland, part of a larger nato force to reassure an ally. now the uk has signed an agreement with poland to provide it with air defence missiles. all designed to send a clear message to russia against any aggression. but russia too accuses
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the west of sabre rattling close to its borders. and the question is not whether, but where will these tensions flare up again? jonathan beale, bbc news, north—east poland. the new school year started well over two months ago but many families will still be feeling the cost of kitting out children in uniforms. but from next autumn, schools in england will be legally required to keep prices down. let's hear how that idea's gone down with parents. the uniform shops, i've never actually bought from, because they are just too overpriced. on one occasion i was quoted £17 for a pair of sports socks. to me that was just a phenomenal waste of money, which, you know, i set up a recycling service for parents with uniforms and we just swap uniforms amongst ourselves now. i think by the time you factor in things like the school socks, shoes, obviously trousers, vest,
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polo shirt and jumper, then you are definitely looking £50, £60, i would say. and that's if you're savvy, i suppose, with where you're getting the uniform from. i i'm really fortunate in the factl that the polo shirts and jumpers that my girls can wear, i i can actually buy them off the website of a local supermarket and they do the embroidery, - which saves a little bit of money. not having prescribed pe kit definitely would - save a lot of money. i think i'm quite lucky, our school are quite flexible. but i think having logos emblazoned on t—shirts that they are wearing underneath jumpers, which are never seen, is completely unnecessary. you know, you can get a pack of three white polo shirts from a supermarket for £5, £6. there's no need to then make that into £15 a pop just for having a logo on. some reviews from parents.
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i'm nowjoined by kate anstey, who leads the cost of the school day project at the child poverty action group. good morning. how many families, in yourview, good morning. how many families, in your view, are struggling with the cost of uniforms?— your view, are struggling with the cost of uniforms? from our research at the child — cost of uniforms? from our research at the child poverty _ cost of uniforms? from our research at the child poverty action _ cost of uniforms? from our research at the child poverty action group, i at the child poverty action group, we go into schools and speak to parents and children about this. uniform time and time again comes up as a highly significant cost for families so this is a really widespread problem we are talking about. families across the country are facing great difficulties at the moment, particularly low income families, are facing great difficulties at the moment and uniform costs add to that. as some of those parents suggested, there are things schools can do and are doing to reduce some of those costs. the problem is, that hasn't been standardised at the moment so there are lots of schools with inconsistencies around how much a uniform can cost. the inconsistencies around how much a uniform can cost.— inconsistencies around how much a uniform can cost. the new guidelines will iron out —
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uniform can cost. the new guidelines will iron out some _ uniform can cost. the new guidelines will iron out some of _ uniform can cost. the new guidelines will iron out some of these _ will iron out some of these inconsistencies, and i right? i presume you welcome it. we certainly welcome the — presume you welcome it. we certainly welcome the guidance. _ presume you welcome it. we certainly welcome the guidance. we _ presume you welcome it. we certainly welcome the guidance. we and - presume you welcome it. we certainly welcome the guidance. we and othersj welcome the guidance. we and others have been calling on it for a long time. what the guidance does is put on a legal requirement on schools to consider uniform costs when they are developing uniform policies and thinking about things such as branded items, who their suppliers are, how long their list of compulsory items are. these are all things schools will now have to consider and i suppose it is now on the schools to take this guidance forward and implement it and make sure they are doing as much as they can for those struggling families to reduce costs. the can for those struggling families to reduce costs-— reduce costs. the department for education says — reduce costs. the department for education says it _ reduce costs. the department for education says it is _ reduce costs. the department for education says it is part _ reduce costs. the department for education says it is part of- reduce costs. the department for education says it is part of an i education says it is part of an effort to help families level up. in terms of poverty and what you see and hear, what difference do you think this will make? brute and hear, what difference do you think this will make?— think this will make? we know that child poverty _ think this will make? we know that child poverty is _ think this will make? we know that child poverty is rising _ think this will make? we know that child poverty is rising year- think this will make? we know that child poverty is rising year on i child poverty is rising year on year. the latest stats show us 4.3
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million children still live in poverty across the uk. at this time in particular, going into winter, low income families are struggling with the cost of living and we have just seen a cut to universal credit by £20. | just seen a cut to universal credit by £20. i would say families are really struggling and this doesn't go far enough to level things up for those families but it would be a big help to parents. the parents who spoke earlier described the many costs they face, that's at the beginning of the year but we also hear from beginning of the year but we also hearfrom parents having to replace items and having to pay those costs throughout the year as well so it will be a big help to families but more needs to be done to support low income families at this time. you sa it will income families at this time. you say it will be _ income families at this time. you say it will be a — income families at this time. you say it will be a big _ income families at this time. you say it will be a big help to parents and families. i want a final thought, on the child. i remember being at school. you don't want to being at school. you don't want to be different because if you are different you get picked on. is there a danger that some kids will
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have the right, in inverted commas, school uniform and others will not and be self—conscious about it? i think hopefully this guidance will help with that. from the research we carry out in the schools there are lots of examples of children feeling different because of the clothing they wear. there are examples of children being sanctioned or given detention and not able to participate in certain activities, things like pe or art activities because they don't have the right kit. it can be very obvious if a child is living on a low income and doesn't have what they need but i would say this guidance, in terms of reducing some of those costs, the aim is to make sure that uniform costs are not a barrier to education. although i would say that i think the government needs to go a step further on this. as things currently stand in the other uk nations there is nationalfunding for low—income parents to help with the cost of school in those other
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nations. we don't have that in england. while the guidance is a good start we need to see that additional government financial support for families so they can afford those costs because at the moment there will still be costs attached to uniform even if that is produced by the guidance. from the child poverty _ produced by the guidance. from the child poverty action _ produced by the guidance. from the child poverty action group, - produced by the guidance. from the child poverty action group, thank. child poverty action group, thank you forjoining us. we're going to show you something truly extraordinary now. it's a testament to what can be achieved when someone has a dream and really puts their mind to it. in this case, that someone is felix klieser who plays the french horn with bournemouth symphony orchestra, despite being born without arms. andrew plant went to meet him. ready? yeah. to be a world famous french horn player, you need good lungs. what you don't need, though, are fingers.
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felix klieser warming up with an instrument he fell in love with when he was just three years old. the thing i can remember, really, is that i wanted to play exactly this instrument and nothing else. where i've seen it and how i get the first time in contact with this instrument, yeah, i can't remember. 27 years later, he's now artist in residence with bournemouth symphony orchestra. a growing reputation worldwide and a technique almost unique among top musicians. everyone thinks, oh, it should be so difficult to do with your feet, and the funny thing about this is i'm thinking the same as you. so because i'm seeing yourfingers and the fingers are quite long and i can't really understand how you can hold a pencil with these long fingers because, you know,
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the coordination is so difficult. so people are asking you, is it difficult to play the french horn with the feet? and i'm always answering i don't know, i never played with hands, so i can't compare maybe. this, felix's debut on the stage in poole this week. fantastic. the expectation was great when he came on the stage with his horn on the stands. and then you could just see the audience just loving the music. theyjust loved the music. and the reaction from the audience but also from kirill karabits, our chief conductor, from every member of the orchestra wasjust, oh, wow. there were, he says, many times he was told to find an easier hobby. his answer was always to practise even harder. even if people around you are saying this is not possible, it is difficult, but sometimes it could be a wonderful result to go your own way and to live your dreams and to do what you think,
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which makes you happy. he'll be with the bournemouth symphony orchestra for two years, playing, touring and teaching the next generation to never give up. andrew plant, bbc news, the lighthouse in poole. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt. morning. it's another mild day out there again today. temperatures this afternoon are well above the seasonal average. at this time in november you usually see temperatures of 8—10. but 14—16 quite widely this afternoon because
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of a south—westerly wind. a few changes this weekend. first, wind surging to a more northerly direction by sunday, temperatures dropping markedly, only a couple of degrees below average but with a noticeable wind chill. temperatures are rising for a time midweek, we will see some rain around at this stage next week we will be looking at something much more chilly, only four orfive across much at something much more chilly, only four or five across much of the country and with it there will be some snow flurries. there are other changes ahead, certainly compared to what we have at the moment, which because of the high pressure to the south of us is bringing warm air from the mid—atlantic. to the far north we have weather fronts tangled in across the north of mainland scotland, bringing outbreaks of rain at the moment. the rain will be heavy at times. check them sitting to the north, strong wind slowly starting to ease down. the breeze is light the further south you go to stop cloud in the north and west, breaks to the east where you are sheltered from the south—westerly wind. it's where we see some highs
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in the temperatures. 16 or 17 possible, may be higher than yesterday given there is more sunshine around. as we go in this evening and overnight, much of the country staying dry, as you were, plenty of cloud coming and going, the odd spot of drizzle possible. heavy rain across northern scotland inching south as we go towards dawn tomorrow morning. a few clear breaks tomorrow morning. a few clear breaks to start the night, not as mild as it was last night but a mild enough start to saturday morning. bit of for england and wales. sunny breaks here and there. drizzle in the south. scotland and northern ireland, outbreaks of rain in the morning, clearing to sunshine and scattered showers in the afternoon. rain pushing into northern england. temperatures only around seven or eight to the north and it will feel colder out there. frost possible as we going to sunday morning. they were the front with outbreaks of rain on saturday into sunday were clear from the south coast and we are then into the northerly wind so sunday is looking much chillier. a frost to begin with in mid wales and
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the midlands. in the north, a cold day overall but not a bad day for getting out with plenty of sunshine for the majority. showers around the periphery of the country, wintry over the hills and lower levels. temperatures in single figures with an added wind—chill.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. new accusations of racism in english cricket as batsman alex hales apologises for painting his face black at a party after a photo emerges from 2009. it comes as the english cricketing authorities meet to discuss allegations of racism made by the former yorkshire player azeem rafiq. meanwhile, australia's men's cricket captain resigns — after admiting he sent sexually explicit text messages to a female co—worker. some breaking news — austria will become the first european country to make coronavirus vaccines mandatory by law and will impose a full lockdown for all from monday.

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