Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 18, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

5:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 5: the government confirms it is scrapping a key part of the high speed hs2 rail link between the east midlands and leeds. business and political leaders in the north are furious but the government promises faster journeys up to ten years earlier than planned. i think this is a fantastic and monumental programme for rail investment for commuters and passengers in the east midlands, west midlands, the whole of the north of the country. the proposals would leave — north of the country. the proposals would leave our _ north of the country. the proposals would leave our economies - north of the country. the proposals would leave our economies and - would leave our economies and residents— would leave our economies and residents and country less balanced and our— residents and country less balanced and our planet worse off. it's not living _ and our planet worse off. it's not living up. — and our planet worse off. it's not living up. it— and our planet worse off. it's not living up, it is holding us down.
5:01 pm
former cricketer former yorkshire cricketer azeem rafiq has apologised for anti—semitic messages he sent ten years ago — just days after giving powerful testimony to mps about the racist abuse he faced himself while a professional player. where is this chinese tennis star? she disappeared after making sexual assault allegations — now there's an email saying she's safe and well, but is it genuine? a life sentence for zephaniah mcleod — the man who stabbed 8 people in birmingham in what the judge called a murderous rampage. we are happy that this dangerous and evil man has been removed from society and while we continue to grief forjacob we must ask the obvious question, why was macleod known to so many agencies allowed to be out and about? a new report reveals the mental health problems suffered by people living in blocks of flats with unsafe cladding. and the prince of wales and duchess of cornwall visit
5:02 pm
egypt's ancient and iconic giza pyramids — as part of a two—day tour of the country. the government has confirmed it is scrapping a key part of the h52 high speed rail link. the eastern leg between the east midlands and leeds won't now be built, saving tens of billions of pounds. business and political leaders in the region have reacted angrily but ministers deny they are breaking a promise to level up the country. they say their 96 billion pound integrated rail plan — unveiled today — will deliver benefits up to ten years sooner than the original plan. our business correspondent, theo leggett reports.
5:03 pm
a new £96 billion improvement plan for rail, hailed as the most ambitious in a generation, but here in bradford there is little sign of celebration. its two existing stations are run down and rail links are unreliable. a new one was meant to be built as part of the northern powerhouse rail scheme, a high—speed line linking leeds and manchester. now only half of it will be built. the rest of the ruth wilson to be upgraded and there will be no shiny the rest of the route will to be upgraded and there will be no shiny new station for bradford. the services were delayed so i feel like we could benefit from less transfers and more direct trains. they are not that bad on time, it's just their old trains, over crowded with people. they are not very good. they are quite on and off. they always get cancelled a lot of the time, and i usually go i
5:04 pm
late to college, i'm usually late every other day. - ambitions for hs2 are also being reined in. the london to birmingham section is already being built but there won't now be a dedicated high—speed link between birmingham and leeds. instead the new track will stop in the east midlands. the rest of the route will be upgraded. the government insists the changes mean it will be able to deliver major improvements much more quickly. it will offer for young people commuting in the midlands and the north the same type of confidence about their daily lives, their commute, as people have been used to for a century in the south. it's a huge investment, costing £96 billion, though not all of it is new money. it includes plans to spend £360 million on introducing contactless payment systems to help commuters and there will be price
5:05 pm
caps for trains, trams and buses. there will also be a new mass transit system for leeds but labour says promises have been broken. we set out a compressive plan for h52 and northern powerhouse rail and we stick by that. that's the big difference between us and the government. when we set out promises we stick to them. the government makes promises and then rips them up, which is what it has done today. for mps along the northern powerhouse rail route the stakes are high. if we find a better, cheaper, more deliverable way to get a better result for our constituents, isn't that a better way to go? in west yorkshire, badly affected, a very different view. it is a betrayal of the north and the people i represent in west yorkshire. only what feels like months ago the prime minister stood in front of stevenson's cannot rocket in manchester and promised a new rail line, northern powerhouse rail.
5:06 pm
no one is questioning the need for better transport links in the north of the country but the row over how to achieve that is becoming more bitter than ever. five metres lined up to conduct ? condemned the decision. steve rotheram, who's the mayor of liverpool city region and jamie driscoll, the mayor of the north of tyne, both accused borisjohnson of breaking his promise to the north of �*levelling up' their rail networks we have been promised things time and time again. in many places said we don't try to deliver a transformation on the cheap. as you just heard we have chosen not to deliver it so we were promised grand designs and that was supposed to settle for the 60 minute makeover and leaders across the north made an
5:07 pm
inarguable case so much so that the payment is to himself and the chancellor both agreed. today they have broken their promise to the people of the north. the argument that this is going _ people of the north. the argument that this is going to _ people of the north. the argument that this is going to get _ people of the north. the argument that this is going to get delivered l that this is going to get delivered sooner_ that this is going to get delivered sooner is— that this is going to get delivered sooner is a — that this is going to get delivered sooner is a three course meal and seeing _ sooner is a three course meal and seeing seeing hegel have a bag of crisps _ seeing seeing hegel have a bag of crisps instead. it makes no sense. it crisps instead. it makes no sense. it still— crisps instead. it makes no sense. it still nov— crisps instead. it makes no sense. it still my fault and reopening and electrifying it will cost 600 million _ electrifying it will cost 600 million. that's less than 1% of the cost of— million. that's less than 1% of the cost of h52— million. that's less than 1% of the cost of h52 in the south and 3% of cross _ cost of h52 in the south and 3% of cross real — cost of h52 in the south and 3% of cross real. for a government who say they are _ cross real. for a government who say they are keen— cross real. for a government who say they are keen to preserve the union and faiiing — they are keen to preserve the union and failing to connect england and scotland _ and failing to connect england and scotland and this does not limit of the northeast and itsjungles i would — the northeast and itsjungles i would transport arteries and our hign-ievei— would transport arteries and our high—level bridge has been failed by a low— high—level bridge has been failed by a low level government plan. i'm joined by andy burnham, mayor of greater manchester. how disappointed are you with this decision today? i am
5:08 pm
how disappointed are you with this decision today? i am disappointed. i first not to decision today? i am disappointed. i first got to acknowledge _ decision today? i am disappointed. i first got to acknowledge that - decision today? i am disappointed. i first got to acknowledge that there l first got to acknowledge that there are some significant benefits for manchester specifically in this plan and it would be wrong of me not to recognise that. but obviously, we are one north and if bradford is left out of the loop or if leeds does not have the connectivity it meets, that effects all of us here in manchester. if you ask other residents the single biggest issue they have when it comes to rail his connectivity across the north of england and it takes far too long and services are unreliable and whether or not it gives us the rail system we need i am afraid this plan falls quite short of that. the system we need i am afraid this plan falls quite short of that.— falls quite short of that. the main arr ument falls quite short of that. the main argument from _ falls quite short of that. the main argument from the _ falls quite short of that. the main argument from the government i falls quite short of that. the main - argument from the government seems to be we are getting the benefits and able to get benefits quicker and sooner than had been originally planned and from the governments point of view, let's give you an example according to the department for transport. improvements to their
5:09 pm
needs, manchester nine will cut the journey time from 59 to 33 minutes and they would've been 55 to 29 minutes so it's only four minutes difference and it saves £80 billion. that sounds like common sense? that's a lot ended i don't think you're quite right. while we have rented a is the nine that links into that line that you just mentioned would only be delivered by the mid—20 40s and that's much later than we were promised so it's not cricket delivery and actually the whole cost will come from that line and the northern powerhouse partnership have said it would have cost 4 billion mark to create an entirely new line via bradford and leads rather than what we've got here but she's a new nine and an upgrade so £4 billion to keep a city like bradford but that connectivity with manchester to give leeds to same and more connectivity with manchester linking all of it to our
5:10 pm
airport. that is surely an investment that could be made when you consider the amount that has been spent on hs2 in the south. so i honestly don't buy what you just said. a small amount of money actually could've delivered real good connectivity between the northern cities and the government chose not to make that investment and what the people in the north conclude about that? we've always been treated as second—class citizens when it comes to transport. this is a second—class option but we are notjust going to lie back and accepted. we will fight for a new nine and we will promise it will go on. in nine and we will promise it will go on. ., ._ on. in the interview today, the prime minister _ on. in the interview today, the prime minister said _ on. in the interview today, the prime minister said about - on. in the interview today, the prime minister said about the | on. in the interview today, the - prime minister said about the beats they are not doing. he said we will eventually do them. do you believe that promise? i eventually do them. do you believe that promise?— that promise? i don't see how because the — that promise? i don't see how because the real _ that promise? i don't see how because the real line - that promise? i don't see how because the real line i - that promise? i don't see how - because the real line i manchester to leeds was a very clear promise and now they're doing something else. i don't see how it eventually
5:11 pm
will be delivered. and it's very frustrating from our perspective because as they say he's camillus connectivity across the north is the single biggest issue. if you live in how this gives you nothing, new class of the same, sheffield is less isolated by these new plans. i know my friend in liverpool is not happy with what's being proposed. but it is £96 billion — with what's being proposed. but it is £96 billion worth _ with what's being proposed. but it is £96 billion worth of _ with what's being proposed. but it is £96 billion worth of spending, it's an awful lot of money. mat is £96 billion worth of spending, it's an awful lot of money. not all sendin: it's an awful lot of money. not all spending is _ it's an awful lot of money. not all spending is in _ it's an awful lot of money. not all spending is in the _ it's an awful lot of money. not all spending is in the north. - it's an awful lot of money. not all spending is in the north. i - it's an awful lot of money. not all spending is in the north. i have i it's an awful lot of money. not all| spending is in the north. i have to say. bear in mind, a brand—new line, east—west is about to open it on the next year. we don't begrudge people in london at brandon east west lane although they are already much better east—west connections there. why can't we have the same? why do we always have to be grateful for what we are given? you have this, be quiet, that's basically how the north of england has always been treated throughout my lifetime and to be honest i am fed up with it. if i expect that this plan and sit at
5:12 pm
the best he could hope for and basically co—signing my great grandchildren and beyond that everybody else in the north to being second—class citizens when it comes to transport for their lives as well and it was bad enough for us but i don't see why we should condemned the future generations of the north to the same treatment and that's why we've been promised to leveling up. to me that means the north should be the highest priority for investments and we have seen that has not been followed through.— followed through. good to talk to ou. followed through. good to talk to you thank _ followed through. good to talk to you- thank you — followed through. good to talk to you. thank you very _ followed through. good to talk to you. thank you very much. - alexander stafford is the conservative mp for rother valley — hejoins me now. the line would have gone through your constituency, wouldn't it? and your constituency, wouldn't it? and you are pretty please it's not happening? i you are pretty please it's not happening?— you are pretty please it's not hauienin? . . ,, , you are pretty please it's not hanneninu? . . ,, , happening? i am incredibly please. i 'ust listen happening? i am incredibly please. i just listen to — happening? i am incredibly please. i just listen to what _ happening? i am incredibly please. i just listen to what he _ happening? i am incredibly please. i just listen to what he said _ happening? i am incredibly please. i just listen to what he said and - happening? i am incredibly please. i just listen to what he said and i - just listen to what he said and i don't know what he's been listening or watching today but there are reports he met withjubilation
5:13 pm
across the valley. homes are being destroyed and had been saved and we have unlocked money and unlocks resource and we are going to get someone transport which we weren't going to do for this massive white elephants, this project which came under the labour government previously and force people of the north and destroyed homesjust previously and force people of the north and destroyed homes just to benefit a few business people. this government listened and this is great news for south yorkshire. same great news for south yorkshire. some neo . le to great news for south yorkshire. some peeple to think— great news for south yorkshire. some people to think he _ great news for south yorkshire. some people to think he would _ great news for south yorkshire. some people to think he would say this is a case of not in my backyard. he did not want it in your constituency but it would have brought huge economic benefits and has and burnham said, the decision today to effectively treat people in the north as second—class citizens including your constituents. i think there's a big difference between spending and investment. any full can spend £150 billion, it was meant to cost 30 billion, it was meant to cost 30 billion and we can spend that but no it's an investment. get something back and not have to wait until
5:14 pm
2040. get those links now. across the trans—penang realty. that's going to massively connect and go from sheffield to manchester, that's a great reduction. they're going to reduce the time by 31. truth? a great reduction. they're going to reduce the time by 31.— reduce the time by 31. why didn't boris johnson _ reduce the time by 31. why didn't boris johnson promise _ reduce the time by 31. why didn't boris johnson promise all- reduce the time by 31. why didn't boris johnson promise all of - reduce the time by 31. why didn't| boris johnson promise all of those borisjohnson promise all of those things in the first place? why did he promise something different, the whole project which is now being cut back as we have seen today. a lot of people are saying this is yet another promise from borisjohnson that he has broken. i see this as the opposite. i see this as him saying in the north, what do you actually want or need? prettily the business interests and put la their metro mayors, what the people on the ground and the majority of them need and they said they don't need hs2, what we do is targeted spending. and even the legacy project.
5:15 pm
a15—year—old project which is out of the van and somewhat out date now. maybe he should have listened to those people van if that's what you're saying he should've done. he should have to them in the first place before he made all these about hsz. place before he made all these about hs2. it’s place before he made all these about hs2. �* , ., ., , ., place before he made all these about hs2. �*, ., ., , .,, h52. it's great to listen to people and say let's _ h52. it's great to listen to people and say let's have _ h52. it's great to listen to people and say let's have a _ h52. it's great to listen to people and say let's have a conversation | and say let's have a conversation and say let's have a conversation and we are not rooting out connectivity, quite the opposite. by cutting hs2 their unlocking money and capital but also unlocking resource. for instance it's sucking everything from work to money to even concrete and he could not build anything. and as we heard today, this is just the start of what the plan to level up and what we're hearing is ace trying to pull the wool over peoples eyes. if you listen to anybody on the street and south yorkshire they will be met with thunderous applause and celebrating at the end of this into what they actually want. cara
5:16 pm
starmer says _ what they actually want. cara starmer says leveling - what they actually want. cara starmer says leveling up - what they actually want. cara starmer says leveling up has proved to be just as slow going. quite the opposite. to be just as slow going. quite the o- nosite. , .,, , to be just as slow going. quite the o- nosite. , ., , ., ., opposite. this enables rather than the shackle _ opposite. this enables rather than the shackle ourselves _ opposite. this enables rather than the shackle ourselves that - opposite. this enables rather than the shackle ourselves that this - the shackle ourselves that this legacy we will say ok, we're going to do something and help people rather than just chucking good to do something and help people rather thanjust chucking good money which clearly labour attitude and they are doing targeted investments and that is good. this is leveling up and that is good. this is leveling up 90s when exciting. we are seeing let's actually make a difference and make a difference now and the next few years rather than waiting another 19 plus years.- few years rather than waiting another 19 plus years. what the somewhere _ another 19 plus years. what the somewhere like _ another 19 plus years. what the somewhere like bradford - another 19 plus years. what the somewhere like bradford get i another 19 plus years. what the l somewhere like bradford get out another 19 plus years. what the - somewhere like bradford get out of this? ., ., ., , , .,~ somewhere like bradford get out of this? ., ., ., ,, ., ~ , this? you have to speak to the mps over there- — this? you have to speak to the mps over there. this _ this? you have to speak to the mps over there. this is _ this? you have to speak to the mps over there. this is the _ this? you have to speak to the mps over there. this is the problem - this? you have to speak to the mps over there. this is the problem and j over there. this is the problem and this is exactly what we want and the leavening up make sure we are not left behind and being listen to now and then north, south yorkshire said we don't want this and is
5:17 pm
delivering. this is one of the busiest rail stations in the uk. travellers go out across york and manchester and across the north of england and they've been repeated complaints about the reliability and connectivity of train services here and people really felt a great sense of betrayal was one of the race that was news to me about the cutting back of investment in the rail services here. one person said they are reinforcing the north, south divide by cutting back on investment into leads. they are going to get money for any transit system and that's something that's been called for but frankly a lot of people feel thatis for but frankly a lot of people feel that is far less than they deserve
5:18 pm
than what they were looking for from borisjohnson than what they were looking for from boris johnson today. the former yorkshire cricketer azeem rafiq has apologised for anti—semitic messages he sent ten years ago. rafiq has been central to a racism controversy in the past week which has engulfed yorkshire cricket club and the wider game. he has no deleted these messages. let's get more on this. he's taken to twitter to apologise and says... i was sent an image of this exchange from early 2011 today. i have gone back to check my account and it is me — i have absolutely no excuses. i am ashamed of this exchange and have now deleted it so as not to cause further offence. i was 19 at the time and i hope and believe i am a different person today. i am incredibly angry at myself
5:19 pm
and i apologise to thejewish community and everyone who is rightly offended by this. let's speak our sport presenterjane dougall. he has made so many headlines in the last few days and weeks because of what he has been saying about his time at yorkshire as a player. yes. this development _ time at yorkshire as a player. yes. this development is _ time at yorkshire as a player. is; this development is particularly significant because over the past few weeks rafiq has forced cricket to examine races and within its ranks and now he himself has been exposed for sending racial slurs. the messages are anti—semitic. we will not repeat them of course. he sent them to another cricketer back in 2011 but once he had established it was in fact him who sent the messages there were genuine and he did not hesitate to apologise as you have just read, that apology put on social media but as he set himself,
5:20 pm
raises and is not bound to. he also admitted he was not perfect during his career as a professional cricketer. but his testimony to the bc ms sent shock waves through cricket this week and he broke down on several occasions interference seeing racism had destroyed his career in the hands of questions for two hours on the treatment he received at yorkshire county cricket club saying he felt the organisation was institutionally racist and he gave examples of where he had been called racist names and when his son he had to be sappy stillborn he said he had to be sappy stillborn he said he was not given the support he said others have experienced many had experienced family bereavement. this racism scandal led to resignations from the board at yorkshire county cricket club and also withdrawal of sponsors in the some under scrutiny to the point that the date displays mr nigel has been speaking to the
5:21 pm
select committee and he said cricket could face the nuclear option of an independent regulator if the ecb does not act quickly enough to address their racism scandal that has simply engulfed the sport that now of course then yesterday that rafik himself has sent racist messages and there was not over social media that he said there was an exchange with another cricketer backin an exchange with another cricketer back in 2011 and he has apologise for this profusely and especially if he caused any offence to thejewish community. he caused any offence to the jewish community-— community. let's also talk about this with every _ community. let's also talk about this with every sports _ community. let's also talk about this with every sports writer - community. let's also talk about this with every sports writer who j this with every sports writer who joins me. thank you for being with us. how surprised are you that it has emerged that rafiq sent at anti—semitic messages, albeit ten years ago? the anti-semitic messages, albeit ten ears ao? , , , , anti-semitic messages, albeit ten earsao? , , , , .,
5:22 pm
years ago? the surprise is that he should have _ years ago? the surprise is that he should have had _ years ago? the surprise is that he should have had these _ years ago? the surprise is that he should have had these thoughts i years ago? the surprise is that he l should have had these thoughts and express them in the way he did that i think it's not a surprise that having become so prominent in talking about the races and remember, he spoke about the races and he suffered over a long period of time, people will go through and try and find what he himself has said and i suspect they will be a lot of that going on but i think what he has done which is commendable, he has immediately apologised and not pretended it wasn't his observations by things like that and that is welcome and it shows that despite the very moving, very harrowing evidence he gave the select committee he himself may have some dark secrets and more may come out. . , ., , ., some dark secrets and more may come out. . , ., ~ out. that testimony to mps a few da s ao, out. that testimony to mps a few days ago. it _ out. that testimony to mps a few days ago. it was _ out. that testimony to mps a few days ago, it was two _ out. that testimony to mps a few days ago, it was two hours, - out. that testimony to mps a few days ago, it was two hours, i - days ago, it was two hours, i watched it all, it was incredibly
5:23 pm
powerful and moving and emotional. do you think what has emerged tonight in any way undermines the message that he has been trying to get out? i message that he has been trying to et out? ., �* ~' , get out? i don't think it undermines the message _ get out? i don't think it undermines the message in _ get out? i don't think it undermines the message in this _ get out? i don't think it undermines the message in this sense, - get out? i don't think it undermines the message in this sense, it - get out? i don't think it undermines the message in this sense, it raisesj the message in this sense, it raises questions about how yorkshire is run and how english cricket is run and that sort of denial that cricket has been through and this whole business it raises and it goes much beyond what happened to rafik. it's terrible what happened to him and goes into the whole question of how is it that there is this racism and it was never brought out before and the relationship of the south asian community. there are very big part of the recreational side of the game. 30% played a game at the recreational level and yet only 4% are involved at the first class level and those questions that had been discussed now have prominence and it's above all the running of the game and the structure of the
5:24 pm
game that is being questioned. tom harrison, the chief executive of the england and wales cricket board and the body that runs cricket and you may find his own position and i think all of that is affected by the revelation of what he said. and these anti—semitic statements he made when he was 19 years old. find made when he was 19 years old. and those revelations that he made, do you think they will continue to have ramifications because of course all of that was focused on his time at yorkshire. but other counties are in the spotlight. are we going to see ripples continuing from this for quite some time and across the sport and across other sports as well? i and across other sports as well? i think we will see ripples for a long time. i think the very nature of sport and his relation to race has changed. and the fact is that a new generation of sports men and women have emerged who are no longer
5:25 pm
willing to keep silent. if you like what happened 20 years ago, 30 years ago, or even a few years ago, and the sports men and women were told if you are suffering discrimination just buried in silence, suffer in silence, just show your skills on the playing field, how you can answer. i think that her age is gone. now they're going to come out and say this is what happened to us and say this is what happened to us and what are you going to do about it? they're nothing to worry that in coming out made completely damaged their career. doubts have been cast on an email supposedly written by the chinese tennis star peng shuai, saying that she's safe and well. the two time grand slam doubles champion hasn't been seen for a fortnight — since she accused china's former vice premier zhang gaoli — of sexual assault.
5:26 pm
the email, purportedly from her, has been published by chinese state media but many in the sport doubt it's genuine. 0ur china correspondent robin brant reports from shanghai. for years, peng shuai has let her racket do the talking, and she's risen to the top, a star in a sport where there are not many chinese success stories. at 35, she is someone the ruling communist party leaders could be proud of. but an allegation about one of those senior party figures change that. in this social media posting earlier this month, peng named vice premier zhang gaoli, and claimed he for her to have sex. china proper state censors removed the posting within an hour. peng hasn't been seen in public or heard from since. few people are allowed to publicly challenge senior authorities like zhang gaoli without paying some
5:27 pm
price, and i think it would be telling if she were able to leave the country, for example, and speak freely, where she wouldn't face those kinds of repercussions. in the ensuing days, tennis stars old and new spoke out, worried about her. billiejean king and naomi 0saka were among them. then, in the middle of the night, an e—mail appeared, or at least what one arm of chinese state media says is an e—mailfrom peng shuai to the head of the women's tennis association. basically, the message is, don't worry, i'm fine, and i didn't mean what i said two weeks ago. in what looks like a screen shot, it's claimed she started out saying, hello, everyone, and went to say the allegations made two weeks ago were in fact false, and she has just been resting at home, everything is fine, she adds.
5:28 pm
prominent people do disappear in china one billionaire was not seen in public for months after criticising state regulators. see my but athletes is unusual. in a hasty response, the man to whom the e—mail was reportedly sent, wta chief steve simon, said he had a hard time believing peng a chilly wrote it. this comes as this country prepares to be at the centre of the sporting world when beijing hosts the winter olympics next february, a game is already facing the prospect of some kind of boycott over what the us says is genocide against chinese muslims in the west of the country. some breaking news coming to us from germany on the coronavirus situation there has been really bad in terms of the number of cases. thea;r there has been really bad in terms of the number of cases.— of the number of cases. they had 65,000 of the number of cases. they had 65.000 cases — of the number of cases. they had 65,000 cases was _ of the number of cases. they had 65,000 cases was the _ of the number of cases. they had 65,000 cases was the last - of the number of cases. they had 65,000 cases was the last data. | 65,000 cases was the last data. that's the highest figure they have
5:29 pm
recorded and as a result we are hearing germany is to introduce tighter curves on people who are unvaccinated or those for whatever reason not had the vaccine they will face tighter restrictions in germany as the general authorities struggle to contain covid—19 there. 65,000 new infections was the latest figure. the highest since the start of the pandemic. here meanwhile, the government has released the latest coronavirus figures for the uk. they show that(ff gfx)there were 46,807 new confirmed cases of covid—19 in the past 24 hours, and a further 199 deaths were reported within 28 days of a positive test. more then 50 million first doses of the coronavirus vaccine have been delivered across the uk — and 13.8 million people have received their booster jab. prince charles and the duchess of cornwall have visited the giza pyramids at the start of a two day tour of egypt.
5:30 pm
the royals were given a tour of the pyramids exterior and held talks with the country's president — which centred on climate change, female empowerment and efforts to preserve cultural heritage. tomorrow they will head to egypt's second largest city alexandria. now it's time for a look at the weather. so so far it has been kind to us. the weather, mid november with the temperatures in their mid teens. it's unheard of almost self way above average for this time of year in some places. parts of northeast england through this afternoon. we are all under the influence of high pressure but this weather front is pushing and across the far north and bringing some rain and some strong winds here. fairly isolated. generally with a western rim feeding
5:31 pm
a lot of cloud and it needs that cloud it will stay incredibly mild in the night. these are like daytime temperatures at this time of year. a mild start to friday and a cloudy start. a wet up from producing ringing up untilthe start. a wet up from producing ringing up until the far north as we go through the day and into the afternoon we might see eastern areas and see the cloud thing and break in and see the cloud thing and break in a few brief pinches of sunshine. if that happens the temperatures are still likely to climb into the mid teens. things are set to change as the cold front sinks its way south and the wind direction really changes to a noticeable northern dragging in cold air set to start the day on saturday dry, brightly sunshine but noticeably cooler. the weather front will move out of scotland into the north of england and the trade of sharp showers following behind. temperatures on saturday, nine to 13 degrees a click at the head of what's in store for the week ahead. it will be cooler
5:32 pm
and some of those showers turning wintry. hello, this is bbc news with me, ben brown. the headlines... the government confirms it is scrapping a key part of the high speed hs2 rail link between the east midlands and leeds. former yorkshire cricketer azeem rafiq has apologised for anti—semitic messages he sent ten years ago, just days after giving powerful testimony to mps about the racist abuse he faced himself while a professional player. where is this chinese tennis star? she disappeared after making sexual assault allegations. now there's an email saying she's safe and well, but is it genuine? a life sentence for zephaniah mcleod, the man who stabbed eight people in birmingham in what the judge called a murderous rampage.
5:33 pm
all the latest sports news for you. more on the azeem rafiq story. the former cricketer that's been the at the centre of a race set and all has to apologise. where he himself appeared to have sent anti—semitic messages to another cricketer. it's after he said racism has cost him his career. he posted an apology on social media:
5:34 pm
meanwhile, sports minister nigel huddlestone said cricket could face the "nuclear option" of an independent regulator if the ecb doesn't act quickly enough to address the racism scandal. he was speaking at the dcms select committee. mps have been asking more questions following the harrowing testimony given by azeem rafiq on tuesday. i think what we all want is for cricket to put its house in order and get its act together. if we don't see sufficient action taken, then we as a government will intervene if they don't get their act together. we have the nuclear option of legislating in order to bring in potentially an independent regulator. so, that is probably the route that if we had to we would go down. after much speculation, rangers have announced giovanni van bronckhorst as their new manager following the departure of steven gerrard.
5:35 pm
the dutchman played for rangers between 1998 and 2001, winning five trophies, including two league titles. following his confirmation, he said was excited and proud to be back at the club. van bronkhorst also played for arsenal and barcelona before moving into coaching. he led feyenoord to the dutch title for the first time in 18 years. his lastjob in management was a year with guangzhou in china. meanwhile, gerrard has been speaking to the media for the first time since being appointed aston villa head coach. he denied that he's taken the job at aston villa purely as a stepping stone to becoming manager at his old club liverpool. the former liverpool captain said he was excited to be back in the premier league and that he had no ulterior motive for taking the job. you'll never hear me saying it's a stepping — you'll never hear me saying it's a stepping for me, really honoured and proud _ stepping for me, really honoured and proud to— stepping for me, really honoured and proud to he _ stepping for me, really honoured and proud to be in this position. as i
5:36 pm
say. _ proud to be in this position. as i say. all— proud to be in this position. as i say. all in — proud to be in this position. as i say, all in. i'll give thisjob everything it needs to be a success. i'll everything it needs to be a success. ill be _ everything it needs to be a success. i'ithe100%— everything it needs to be a success. i'll be 100% committed. i don't think— i'll be 100% committed. i don't think there's anything wrong in football— think there's anything wrong in football to have aspirations, but liverpooi— football to have aspirations, but liverpool have had a world—class coach _ liverpool have had a world—class coach they're very happy with. if they— coach they're very happy with. if they signed a lifetime deal right now _ they signed a lifetime deal right now. i_ they signed a lifetime deal right now, i would they signed a lifetime deal right now, iwould be they signed a lifetime deal right now, i would be very happy for them. chelsea's women will be confident of picking up another three points when they take on servette in the women's champions league at kingsmeadow later. chelsea thrashed the swiss side away earlier this month and are top of the group with seven points after three games. they go into the match on a high, having beaten manchester city 4—0 on sunday. eddiejones has named his england side to play south africa this weekend at twickenham. courtney lawes will captain the side, as 0wen farrell is injured. newcastle hookerjamie blamire and sale prop bevan rodd both start in an inexperienced england front row. joe marchant is on the wing with manu tuilagi returning to the midfield.
5:37 pm
rory mcilroy tops the leaderboard after the opening day of the dp world tour championship. mcilroy shot six birdies and an eagle on his way to finishing on seven under. mcilroy�*s chasing a third victory of the european tour's season finale. afterwards, he said an improvement in his game was down to him having to reset after a disappointing ryder cup. there's more details on all stories on the bbc sport website. we'll have more for you in sportsday at half past six. jane, thank you very much. just to add to what you are telling us about azeem rafiq and those messages, we just had a statement from the board of deputies of britishjews. they said he has suffered terribly at the hands of racism, so they understand
5:38 pm
the hurt this will cause tojews who supported him. they have no reason to believe he is not completely sincere, so that statement in from the board of deputies of british jews. let's get more now on the government's decision to scrap the leeds leg of the hs2 high speed rail link. the eastern leg between the east midlands and leeds will no longer go ahead. the transport secretary, grant shapps, said the overhaul of plans for the rail network will result in fasterjourneys in a quicker time frame. with me is bridget roswell, a commissionerfor the independent national infrastructure commission. what do you make of this announcement today? because it's so much was promised by the prime minister on this, but not all of it has been delivered.— minister on this, but not all of it has been delivered. that's right. i think what they've _ has been delivered. that's right. i think what they've produced - has been delivered. that's right. i think what they've produced is - has been delivered. that's right. i l think what they've produced is quite a realistic plan. when we did our
5:39 pm
report on this, we offered various different funding options. if you wanted to go ahead with absolutely everything everybody wants, it was about double the amount, the 86 billion we started with. it was nearly 180 billion. we offered some options which were back from that. the government has gone from one of the lowers one, but it's their choice on how much funding they can afford, and there's limits on the fiscal constraints. we argue that the east—west links for the more important, particularly the east midlands. but equally, leeds to manchester. those are the things the government has chosen to prioritise. i would welcome that. {we government has chosen to prioritise. i would welcome that.— i would welcome that. one of the ma ors i would welcome that. one of the mayors has _ i would welcome that. one of the mayors has said _ i would welcome that. one of the mayors has said this _ i would welcome that. one of the mayors has said this is _ i would welcome that. one of the mayors has said this is a - i would welcome that. one of the mayors has said this is a 20th - mayors has said this is a 20th century a grade to 19th—century infrastructure. in other words, century a grade to 19th—century infrastructure. in otherwords, it is toying around with old
5:40 pm
infrastructure. you're not revolutionising it. it infrastructure. you're not revolutionising it.- infrastructure. you're not revolutionising it. it not all of it. revolutionising it. it not all of it- there _ revolutionising it. it not all of it. there are _ revolutionising it. it not all of it. there are about _ revolutionising it. it not all of it. there are about 100 - revolutionising it. it not all of it. there are about 100 miles| revolutionising it. it not all of - it. there are about 100 miles they will put in, so it's not completely old infrastructure. this is quite a crowded country. it's quite difficult to drive completely new infrastructure, and one of our concerns with the existing plan for the east, the northern bit, it has to cross the m1, the a1 and there's going to be considerable destruction. —— disruption. the government is thinking of putting 100 million into and still disregarding the route. that's part of what we're recommending. get on with the things you can get on with quickly. make those improvements, put on those where they're badly needed, continue to work on the things where we're not quite clear
5:41 pm
exactly what the best way is for doing it or what the costs are going to be. that i think is the right approach. it doesn't mean to say that you're just upgrading all victoria infrastructure, although with there, and you can work on it easier. , ., , , easier. the promises were we're uuoin to easier. the promises were we're going to level— easier. the promises were we're going to level up _ easier. the promises were we're going to level up and _ easier. the promises were we're going to level up and boost - easier. the promises were we're | going to level up and boost these northern towns and cities like bradford and leeds, and they are feeling betrayed.— feeling betrayed. indeed, and i completely _ feeling betrayed. indeed, and i completely accept _ feeling betrayed. indeed, and i completely accept they - feeling betrayed. indeed, and i completely accept they will. feeling betrayed. indeed, and i- completely accept they will continue to argue for what... they have every right to argue for what they want. it's for the government to decide how much funding is actually available. and also, i think the particular thing that one needs to think about is levelling up is also about speed, not of the trains, but the speed at which you do something. whereas, high—speed rail, even on
5:42 pm
the most optimistic, i wasn't going to happen until the 20 40s. people born today would be on their 20s by that time. punt; born today would be on their 20s by that time. �* , . born today would be on their 20s by that time. . , , .,, . that time. any big infrastructure -ro'ects that time. any big infrastructure projects will _ that time. any big infrastructure projects will inevitably _ that time. any big infrastructure projects will inevitably take - that time. any big infrastructure | projects will inevitably take time. absolutely. and we can see that on some things that we've been able to get on with, but i think it's important to try to get some things done quickly, and that's one of the things we are arguing for. get on with the things that can be moved forward faster, while still thinking about... you shouldn't forget about the bigger things, but time spent planning and costing is never wasted. , ., ., ., planning and costing is never wasted. , ., . ~' planning and costing is never wasted. , ., ., ,, ., wasted. very good to talk to you. thank you — wasted. very good to talk to you. thank you very — wasted. very good to talk to you. thank you very much, _ wasted. very good to talk to you. thank you very much, bridget. i more than four years after the grenfell tower fire, up to half a million people are still living in blocks of flats with flammable cladding and fire safety issues. it's left many feeling scared and trapped in their own homes.
5:43 pm
now, a new study of those caught up in the cladding crisis has found some are being treated for anxiety and depression on medication, with some even having thoughts of self—harm and suicide. sarah corker has been given exclusive access to the report. who should pay to fix britain's dangerous buildings? from london to leeds, birmingham to manchester, which bit of the building is the problem? bill which bit of the building is the -roblem? �* ., which bit of the building is the -roblem? . ., , , ., ~ problem? all of this is a cm cladding- — problem? all of this is a cm cladding. that's _ problem? all of this is a cm cladding. that's the - problem? all of this is a cm cladding. that's the same i problem? all of this is a cm - cladding. that's the same type of cladding. that's the same type of claddin is cladding. that's the same type of cladding is grenfell. _ cladding. that's the same type of cladding is grenfell. to _ cladding. that's the same type of cladding is grenfell. to remove i cladding. that's the same type of cladding is grenfell. to remove itj cladding is grenfell. to remove it could cost on her thousands. living here is taking its toll on sophie's mental health. it’s here is taking its toll on sophie's mental health.— here is taking its toll on sophie's mental health. it's like a crippling de-ression mental health. it's like a crippling depression where _ mental health. it's like a crippling depression where you _ mental health. it's like a crippling depression where you can't - mental health. it's like a crippling depression where you can't get i mental health. it's like a crippling l depression where you can't get up. i've had such bad issues with my anxiety. some days, ifeel like i can't leave the house and i have physical problems leaving the house because i feel so sick. so
5:44 pm
physical problems leaving the house because i feel so sick.— because i feel so sick. so has now been prescribed anti-anxiety - been prescribed anti—anxiety medication and her doctor was so shocked by the cladding situation, he wrote to sophie's mp imploring her to raise the issue in parliament. psychologist have sold the bbc that people living in these conditions with no end in sight will need long—term counselling and support to get through it. new research by the university of sheffield based on a series of interviews found the situation is having a catastrophic impact on mental health in some leaseholders.— impact on mental health in some leaseholders. , , �* leaseholders. feelings they couldn't uo on, leaseholders. feelings they couldn't go on. they — leaseholders. feelings they couldn't go on, they couldn't _ leaseholders. feelings they couldn't go on, they couldn't see _ leaseholders. feelings they couldn't go on, they couldn't see a _ leaseholders. feelings they couldn't go on, they couldn't see a way - leaseholders. feelings they couldn't go on, they couldn't see a way out i go on, they couldn't see a way out of this— go on, they couldn't see a way out of this crisis — go on, they couldn't see a way out of this crisis was leading to feelings— of this crisis was leading to feelings of suicide and self—harm. in feelings of suicide and self—harm. in those _ feelings of suicide and self—harm. in those situations, individuals have _ in those situations, individuals have to — in those situations, individuals have to state immediate help. it�*s have to state immediate help. it's like have to state immediate help. like having have to state immediate help. it's like having a ball chain wrapped around — like having a ball chain wrapped around her— like having a ball chain wrapped around her legs. _ like having a ball chain wrapped around her legs. iinfill— like having a ball chain wrapped around her legs.—
5:45 pm
around her legs. will is a “unior doctor. mi around her legs. will is a “unior doctor. i'm going i around her legs. will is a “unior doctor. i'm going to * around her legs. will is a junior doctor. i'm going to show- around her legs. will is a junior doctor. i'm going to show you i around her legs. will is a junior. doctor. i'm going to show you this video diary you did a year ago to see what changed for you. i’m see what changed for you. i'm 'ust. .. see what changed for you. i'm just- -- i'm _ see what changed for you. i'm just... i'mjust _ see what changed for you. i'm just... i'm just so _ see what changed for you. i'm just... i'm just so exhausted and so tired _ just... i'm just so exhausted and so tired of— just... i'm just so exhausted and so tired of this — just... i'm just so exhausted and so tired of this situation. _ just... i'm just so exhausted and so tired of this situation. it _ just... i'm just so exhausted and so tired of this situation. it is- just... i'm just so exhausted and so tired of this situation. it is so- tired of this situation. it is so consuming _ tired of this situation. it is so consuming. absolutely- tired of this situation. it is so. consuming. absolutely fantastic supporter! — consuming. absolutely fantastic su-norter! . ., . ., supporter! campaigning for change has hel-ed supporter! campaigning for change has helped him, _ supporter! campaigning for change has helped him, but— supporter! campaigning for change has helped him, but he _ supporter! campaigning for change has helped him, but he deeply - has helped him, but he deeply regrets his decision to ever buy a flat. i regrets his decision to ever buy a flat. ., , ,., regrets his decision to ever buy a flat. i was so embarrassed. i was utterly ashamed _ flat. i was so embarrassed. i was utterly ashamed that _ flat. i was so embarrassed. i was utterly ashamed that i, - flat. i was so embarrassed. i was utterly ashamed that i, a - flat. i was so embarrassed. i was| utterly ashamed that i, a sensible person. _ utterly ashamed that i, a sensible person. had — utterly ashamed that i, a sensible person, had made— utterly ashamed that i, a sensible person, had made this _ utterly ashamed that i, a sensible person, had made this colossal. person, had made this colossal mistake — person, had made this colossal mistake like _ person, had made this colossal mistake like this. _ person, had made this colossal mistake like this. this - person, had made this colossal mistake like this. this huge - person, had made this colossali mistake like this. this huge error ofiudgment _ mistake like this. this huge error ofiudgment the _ mistake like this. this huge error ofjudgment. the impact- mistake like this. this huge error ofjudgment. the impact it's - mistake like this. this huge error ofjudgment. the impact it's hadl mistake like this. this huge error. ofjudgment. the impact it's had on my mental— ofjudgment. the impact it's had on my mental health _ ofjudgment. the impact it's had on my mental health will _ ofjudgment. the impact it's had on my mental health will stay - ofjudgment. the impact it's had on my mental health will stay with - ofjudgment. the impact it's had on my mental health will stay with me | my mental health will stay with me forever _ my mental health will stay with me forever. ., , forever. the government says it allocated £5 _ forever. the government says it allocated £5 billion _ forever. the government says it allocated £5 billion to _ forever. the government says it allocated £5 billion to make - forever. the government says it allocated £5 billion to make the| allocated £5 billion to make the highest risk blocks safe. but we alwa s highest risk blocks safe. but we always have _ highest risk blocks safe. but we always have a — highest risk blocks safe. but we always have a responsibility - highest risk blocks safe. but we always have a responsibility to l always have a responsibility to relieve some of the obligations faced by leaseholders at the moment
5:46 pm
who are innocent parties of this. since we found with sophie, the developer has now agreed to pay to remove the dangerous cladding. for thousands of others, the wait for help continues. i'm nowjoined by sophie bichener, who owns a flat with cladding. she received a bill for £200,000 to make her property safe, and it's not yet clear what government support she'll be entitled to. thank you very much for talking to us. tell us a bit more about your situation. , , ., , ., situation. so, my building has all sorts of defects _ situation. so, my building has all sorts of defects from _ situation. so, my building has all sorts of defects from missing - situation. so, my building has allj sorts of defects from missing fire breaks, potential flammable insulation and a bunch of other things. injanuary, we were told the bill will be £489 things. injanuary, we were told the bill will be £48.9 billion. i've had
5:47 pm
is a demand for that money, but until we get an answer from the government, and an understanding if there's funding, we've been told not to pay that. there's funding, we've been told not to -a that. ., i. there's funding, we've been told not to pay that-— to pay that. could you pay that if ou had to pay that. could you pay that if you had to? _ to pay that. could you pay that if you had to? no, _ to pay that. could you pay that if you had to? no, not _ to pay that. could you pay that if you had to? no, not even - to pay that. could you pay that if you had to? no, not even close, | you had to? no, not even close, which makes _ you had to? no, not even close, which makes it _ you had to? no, not even close, which makes it all— you had to? no, not even close, which makes it all a _ you had to? no, not even close, which makes it all a bit - you had to? no, not even close, which makes it all a bit more . which makes it all a bit more unbelievable for me and my neighbours. that these bills are dropping are not even remotely affordable. dropping are not even remotely affordable-— dropping are not even remotely affordable. . ., , ,, , ., affordable. and how stressful is all ofthat affordable. and how stressful is all of that on you? — affordable. and how stressful is all of that on you? it's _ affordable. and how stressful is all of that on you? it's been _ of that on you? it's been really stressful- _ of that on you? it's been really stressful. it's _ of that on you? it's been really stressful. it's been _ of that on you? it's been really stressful. it's been almost - of that on you? it's been really stressful. it's been almost two| stressful. it's been almost two years now. we've known the building is potentially unsafe. living in that building as well as having these financial concerns over my head has been really, really stressful. injanuary, i had to reach out to my gp and was diagnosed with anxiety, and had to start medication for that. as mentioned in the report, my gp said we could talk about this or give you medication, but this is a trauma and it's likely it will have to take years of
5:48 pm
counselling and ptsd type symptoms, because it's been so distressing. you must be pretty angry about that because it's been four years since the grand mal —— grenfell fire and this has been rambling on and on. the problem is i own my building, i essentially don't. .. the problem is i own my building, i essentially don't... we have a free holder and a developer who knowingly didn't put fire breaks in our building and use this material, and yet because of the way that leaseholders. .. yet because of the way that leaseholders... we are left to pick up leaseholders... we are left to pick up the pieces. there doesn't seem to be anyone accountable other than the leaseholders who are renting. does an one leaseholders who are renting. does anyone talk — leaseholders who are renting. does anyone talk to _ leaseholders who are renting. does anyone talk to you? _ leaseholders who are renting. does anyone talk to you? does _ leaseholders who are renting. does anyone talk to you? does anyone try to reassure you or give you any help or support?— to reassure you or give you any help or support? we've heard quite a few times from —
5:49 pm
or support? we've heard quite a few times from the _ or support? we've heard quite a few times from the government - or support? we've heard quite a few times from the government that. or support? we've heard quite a few| times from the government that they don't think leaseholders should pay. but whenever we hear that, the reality is these bills are mounting, and even for leaseholders in buildings below 18 metres, there is no funding available. i have the hope of maybe getting funding, but there are thousands of people out there are thousands of people out there who don't have that hope. that's where the mental health i expect comes in because it'sjust crushing and it's an unending crisis. , ., ,, , ., , crushing and it's an unending crisis. , ., «i , ., , . crisis. sophie, thank you very much for sharing- — crisis. sophie, thank you very much for sharing- i _ crisis. sophie, thank you very much for sharing. i hope _ crisis. sophie, thank you very much for sharing. i hope things _ crisis. sophie, thank you very much for sharing. i hope things improve. | for sharing. i hope things improve. that's sophie bichener. thank you. thank you. that's sophie bichener. thank you. thank ou. ., ., that's sophie bichener. thank you. thank you-— thank you. how do you feel about re nuairin thank you. how do you feel about repairing your— thank you. how do you feel about repairing your own _ thank you. how do you feel about repairing your own phone - thank you. how do you feel about repairing your own phone or - repairing your own phone or computer? the czech giant apple is going to start selling spare parts. the "self—service repair" programme will begin in the united states next year before expanding to more countries. joining me now isjunaid syed, who is an apple master
5:50 pm
repairer in london. thanks very much indeed for being with us. i think you're going to be trying to repair that slightly battered phone.— trying to repair that slightly battered phone. trying to repair that slightly battered hone. , ., ., ., battered phone. yes. i got an iphone six. just explained _ battered phone. yes. i got an iphone six. just explained to _ battered phone. yes. i got an iphone six. just explained to us _ battered phone. yes. i got an iphone six. just explained to us briefly - battered phone. yes. i got an iphone six. just explained to us briefly in . six. just explained to us briefly in la man's six. just explained to us briefly in layman's terms — six. just explained to us briefly in layman's terms what _ six. just explained to us briefly in layman's terms what you're - six. just explained to us briefly in| layman's terms what you're doing because i wouldn't know where to start. because i wouldn't know where to start, ., because i wouldn't know where to start. ., , because i wouldn't know where to start, ., , , �* start. so, i have this broken... i'm 'ust start. so, i have this broken... i'm just going — start. so, i have this broken... i'm just going to _ start. so, i have this broken... i'm just going to show— start. so, i have this broken... i'm just going to show you how- start. so, i have this broken... i'm just going to show you how easy i start. so, i have this broken... i'm just going to show you how easy it| just going to show you how easy it is to repair broken skin on an iphone. you get two screws here at the bottom. you need a special screwdriver to open them. once you open the screws, just open the lid. it's a shiv where you can get access to the connectors. i
5:51 pm
it's a shiv where you can get access to the connectors.— to the connectors. i know already i couldn't do — to the connectors. i know already i couldn't do that _ to the connectors. i know already i couldn't do that even _ to the connectors. i know already i couldn't do that even if _ to the connectors. i know already i couldn't do that even if i _ to the connectors. i know already i couldn't do that even if i had - couldn't do that even if i had all the tools and all the parts that apple might give me. 0bviously, some people can do it, and if they get the tools in the parts, they'll be saving themselves a lot of money. yes. it's a great news that apple are sending their parts to customers, and now anybody can by from manufacturers. apple is very late to do this. we have parts available from samsung from suppliers. applejust available from samsung from suppliers. apple just announced they're going to do it. so it's very late they're doing it, but it's good news of. ~ , ., ~' , news of. why do you think they haven't done _ news of. why do you think they haven't done it _ news of. why do you think they haven't done it before? - news of. why do you think they haven't done it before? do - news of. why do you think they haven't done it before? do you | news of. why do you think they - haven't done it before? do you think they want people to go into their stores and get them repaired, get
5:52 pm
charged for that rather than actually being allowed to do it themselves?— actually being allowed to do it themselves? ., , ., �* themselves? yeah, you're right. i don't want — themselves? yeah, you're right. i don't want anybody _ themselves? yeah, you're right. i don't want anybody to _ themselves? yeah, you're right. i don't want anybody to fix - themselves? yeah, you're right. i don't want anybody to fix their . don't want anybody to fix their phone apart from themselves, so there are two ways to manage this. if you replace a screen, for example, if you buy the part for manufacturing, even if you replace a screen with a genuine, you get an error message that the screen is not genuine. the parts would be... when they sell their own parts, the parts are so expensive and when you buy the parts, you can buy a new phone. you're fixing a broken screen. i suppose that's one of the simpler tasks, even though it would be
5:53 pm
beyond me. but if you dropped your phonein beyond me. but if you dropped your phone in the bath or something, which i know people do quite frequently, or down the loop, those things are irreparable or do you think they can be sorted out? you can fix any — think they can be sorted out? you can fix any device. _ think they can be sorted out? gm, can fix any device. when you drop a phone, it depends on how long it's in the water. if you take it out and open the screen, that's the safest thing to do. if there's battery damage, you can replace the battery. great to talk to you. i think we've got an instant guide on how to fix your phone. good luck to anyone who's going to do that once they get the parts and the tools from apple, but you're the expert. thank you, junaid syed there. you're watching bbc news. 0ne
5:54 pm
junaid syed there. you're watching bbc news. one more story to bring you before re—bring you the weather forecast. a man has beenjailed for like after admitted to a series of knife attacks. zephaniah mcleod must serve a minimum of 21 years after pleading guilty to the manslaughter ofjacob billington, as well as three attempted murders and four counts of wounding with intent. phil mackie has the background. injust over an hour and a half, zephaniah mcleod wrought havoc on the streets of birmingham. police emergency. one guy tried to stab me on the street and he stabbed me in the neck but... you've been stabbed in the neck? he was described in court as a dangerous offender. he had been diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and had recently been released from prison. and she's still breathing? 0k, we just found out someone else has been stabbed now. _ armed with a knife, he stabbed eight people. they were serious attacks, often targeted towards people's head,
5:55 pm
neck and upper chest areas, which have left victims with some catastrophic injuries, but also, you know, the mental scarring that the victims will have. in the confusion, police didn't initially realise all the attacks were related. within 24 hours, they had identified the man responsible. the worst of the attacks was here in irving street. a group of friends from liverpool had spent the night in birmingham and were walking back to the hotel when zephaniah mcleod attacked them. he's losing a lot of blood from the neck. is he breathing and conscious? he is conscious. 0k. not really, he's losing consciousness. welcome to the vedetts garden sessions... - two of the fans were in this band, the vedetts. the lead singer is michael callaghan, the drummer, his best friend jacob billington. despite their friends' best efforts, jacob didn't make it. now his family want to know why mcleod wasn't under closer observation.
5:56 pm
he didn't appear to have been monitored in the way you would imagine he would, as somebody who was known to be dangerous and had a long previous history of being dangerous, had a known mental health condition. he is kind of a personification of the problems of the legal system and the mental health team in this country. michael callaghan survived but, like some of the other victims, he suffered life—changing injuries. the knife completely severed his ijugular vein and carotid artery. i he lost a huge amount of blood, and we don't really understand i how he even survived. michael's progress has been astonishing, but in his statement, which was read in court, he said he sometimes wishes he hadn't made it. there are still many unanswered questions about what happened last september, and whether more could have been done to stop zephaniah mcleod and prevent the attacks which left seven people wounded and one, jacob billington, dead. phil mackie, bbc news, birmingham.
5:57 pm
sophie is up next with bbc news at six after the weather forecast with louise. it's going to be chilly air and next week will be a to the system. today, we had temperatures peaking in the mid teens. we saw 16 degrees in aberdeen sure. temperatures 215—16 . where above where they should be. all courtesy of this high pressure pushing in this milder source of air. we have seen some cloud and rain and some strengthening winds. that's going to be responsible for this change as we go through the weekend. —— aberdeenshire. these temperatures akin to what we should be getting at this time of year by day. a mild start to friday morning, a rather cloudy start to friday.
5:58 pm
that weather front sitting far north of scotland with brisk winds. as we go through the afternoon, parts of eastern scotland may well see that cloud break up. those temperatures quite widely into the mid—teens. but it's all change as we move into the weekend. the weather front will gradually push its way steadily south. the wind direction changes to a northerly source, and the air all the way down from the arctic. to start the weekend, that front will be sitting there scotland, moving on through northern ireland into the north of england i had a bit. we should see some sunshine and relatively pleasant affair —— ahead of it. behind it knows noticeably cooler. the real cold air will start to push its way steadily southwards as we move through the second half of the weekend. into sunday, once that front away first clears thing on sunday morning, you'll notice a difference to the weather. frost in
5:59 pm
sheltered parts of scotland first thing on sunday morning. some sharp showers driving in off the north sea. not stiff northerly wind making it feel cooler than the temperatures suggest. it's about where they should be, but obviously it's going to feel different when you factor in the winds. we've not seen that kind of feel for a while. as we go through sunday into the early hours on monday, temperatures are going to fall away. these blue tones is addressed where we are likely to see addressed where we are likely to see a frost. first thing on monday morning, temperatures down to —2. chilly start to monday, getting colder as we go through the week. the real cold air arrives on thursday where we see some showers.
6:00 pm
at six — the government confirms it is scaling back its high—speed rail plans for england and spending billions on improvements instead. the extension of the hs2 rail line between the east midlands and leeds has been scrapped. a new trans—pennine route linking leeds and manchester won't be built in full. if hs2 is not going to be arriving in yorkshire in the way it was meant to be arriving in yorkshire, that undermines the local place and that affects businesses of every sector. but the government says its £96 billion track and rail improvements will make journey times faster, sooner. i think that this is a fantastic, this is a monumental programme for rail investment, for commuters, for passengers in the east midlands, the west midlands, the whole of the north of the country.

37 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on