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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 18, 2021 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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hello this is bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire. here are the headlines: a £96 billion rail plan for the midlands and north of england, not all of it new money, and there's anger as the high—speed hs2 line from the east midlands to leeds is expected to be scrapped. those high—speed lines would have collected the east midlands and parts of northern england but there is anger and disappointment and frustration here this morning that those plans are now in doubt. if you're wathcing in nottingham, sheffield, leeds, bradford or macnehster — what do you thinnk about the likely scrapping of h52 from nottingham to leeds?
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and what do you think about the likely scrapping of a fast train line between leeds and macnhester which had been promised by the pm? you can contact me @vicderbyshire or email victoria@bbc.co.uk. where is one of china's top tennis starss? she hasn't been heard from since she accused a chinese official of sexually assaulting her. alec baldwin faces a new lawsuit over a fatal shooting on a film set. lawyers are calling the actor reckless. the nhs can now offer people living with hiv the first "long—acting injectable" treatment to keep the virus at bay. and coming up this hour.... we'll speak to fabrice muamba and the person who saved his life about a new campaign to ensure more people know how to help people having a cardiac arrest.
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good morning. the government is preparing to publish its plans for the rail network, insisting that changes from the original proposals will mean improvements happen faster in the midlands and northern england. borisjohnson has indicated that the leg of h52 running from nottingham to leeds will be scrapped. the group representing business and council leaders in the north, the so—called northern powerhouse, said dropping some projects was unforgivably short—sighted. let's go live to ben thompson who is at leeds station. a lot of you are absolutely right. a lot of people are pretty cross this morning?— a lot of people are pretty cross this morning? you're absolutely riuht. we this morning? you're absolutely right. we have _ this morning? you're absolutely right. we have been _ this morning? you're absolutely right. we have been speaking i this morning? you're absolutely| right. we have been speaking to people here and they are telling us they are very cross about this. we don't have the actual details yet they will come out later today in they will come out later today in the commons. but lots of leaks and speculation as you have said about
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the eastern legacy high—speed to railway line will be scrapped. and also what has been come to an as a northern powerhouse rail, something that would connect here to manchester across the pennines and many other towns across the way. there is that anger that once again big promises made by government but very little in the way of action. the government says it has come up with a plan to deliver some of those roots more quickly and more cheaply by doing shorter rates that are high—speed and then upgrading existing lines to make them a bit better and a bit faster but once again betrayal is the word that is being used a lot in the station this morning. they feel let down by the government that promised but seems may not deliver. my colleague dan johnson has been taking a look at the detail before that announcement. it's been described as the biggest ever public investment in our rail network, modernising routes more quickly and levelling up cities and regions,
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the government says. but the integrated rail plan focuses on improving existing lines instead of building new ones. hs2 will connect london with birmingham and manchester, but it now looks like the planned eastern leg will stop in the east midlands rather than reaching yorkshire. and it's expected that there will be no new trans—pennine route between manchester, bradford and leeds. the government says upgrades to the current lines can deliver similar improvements to journey times and capacity years earlier. but it will leave many in the north disappointed. my real concern is that our victorian infrastructure is creaking in the north of england. we have already tried to upgrade the existing line between leeds and manchester and it's taken ten years. we've onlyjust started to see shovels in the ground. i don't believe that upgrading infrastructure will be faster in delivering results than building new lines. these were the front pages of many regional papers this week, calling for the government to stand by earlier promises. this was borisjohnson�*s
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pledge two years ago. i want to be the prime minister who does with northern powerhouse rail what we did for crossrail in london. and today, i am going to deliver on my commitment to that vision with a pledge to fund the leeds to manchester route. this is a £96 billion investment plan, though it's not all new money. it includes 360 million to roll out london—style contactless ticketing across commuter networks. that will also feature price caps applying across trains, trams and buses. but new rail routes were more than 20 years away, and the government says upgrading the existing network will mean similarjourney times ten years sooner. the full details will be published later. dan johnson, bbc news. as you heard there the full details we will hear about what is exactly to be planned across this part of the country a little later. i was
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talking to the mayor of west yorkshire in the last hour and she tells me that they are frustrated that once again those promises have not been kept. she says that is holding back, notjust the transport into the capital, that very valuable fast route to the capital but it is about connecting people in regional cities here, so sheffield and nottingham and leeds and liverpool and manchester and being able to bring those closer together with quicker journey bring those closer together with quickerjourney times and more reliable services and crucially cheaper prices. that is what they are calling out for, they have been calling for it for a very long time mate is something that was promised but we are led to believe it is something that will now not be delivered even though there will be a £96 billion investment in railways outside of london. they say it is very scant on detail and what they are asking for it will not be delivered.—
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are asking for it will not be delivered. . ~' , ., , . �* i'm joined now by miriam cates, conservative mp for penistone and stockbridge who has changed her mind about the need for hs2 in her constituency. she won her seat from labour. why are you betraying the north? we not betra in: are you betraying the north? we not betraying the — are you betraying the north? we not betraying the north. _ are you betraying the north? we not betraying the north. if— are you betraying the north? we not betraying the north. if you _ are you betraying the north? we not betraying the north. if you tell- betraying the north. if you tell people they are being betrayed and promises are being broken then it is not surprising when read those headlines and are fed that narrative that they are upset. i’m headlines and are fed that narrative that they are upset.— that they are upset. i'm going to sto ou that they are upset. i'm going to step you there- _ that they are upset. i'm going to stop you there. it _ that they are upset. i'm going to stop you there. it is _ that they are upset. i'm going to stop you there. it is not - that they are upset. i'm going to stop you there. it is not a - stop you there. it is not a narrative stop it is a fact that the prime minister has promised certain things in terms of the rail infrastructure for the north of england and it is a fact that he is now scrapping them.— england and it is a fact that he is now scrapping them. let's look at the facts. firstly _ now scrapping them. let's look at the facts. firstly the _ now scrapping them. let's look at i the facts. firstly the announcement hasn't been made yet. i don't know any more than you, i have read the papers. what we do know is that this
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is the biggest transport investment programme in a century. no town or village or city will be less behind —— will be left behind and it will be faster. for my constituents who can't get to where they want to get now, it is important now. we don't know the detail but what is important is we have deliverability, fast transport get that in the best way. fast transport get that in the best wa . ~ , , ~ fast transport get that in the best wa . ~ , , . ., �* ., fast transport get that in the best wa. ., ., way. with respect, wouldn't vote to sa that way. with respect, wouldn't vote to say that actually — way. with respect, wouldn't vote to say that actually what _ way. with respect, wouldn't vote to say that actually what is _ way. with respect, wouldn't vote to say that actually what is important. say that actually what is important is a prime minister keeping his promises?— is a prime minister keeping his romises? , ., , ., , ., promises? the promise was to level u -. promises? the promise was to level u. no promises? the promise was to level up- no excuse _ promises? the promise was to level up- no excuse me. _ promises? the promise was to level up. no excuse me, let's— promises? the promise was to level up. no excuse me, let's be - promises? the promise was to level| up. no excuse me, let's be accurate, the promise — up. no excuse me, let's be accurate, the promise was _ up. no excuse me, let's be accurate, the promise was to _ up. no excuse me, let's be accurate, the promise was to build _ up. no excuse me, let's be accurate, the promise was to build a _ the promise was to build a high—speed rail line between nottingham and leeds which is now not happening. that other prime ministers own words. [30 not happening. that other prime ministers own words.— not happening. that other prime ministers own words. do you think that hs2 is — ministers own words. do you think that hs2 is the _ ministers own words. do you think that h52 is the best _ ministers own words. do you think that h52 is the best option - ministers own words. do you think that h52 is the best option for - ministers own words. do you think that h52 is the best option for my| that hs2 is the best option for my constituents? it that h52 is the best option for my constituents?— that h52 is the best option for my constituents? ., , �* ., .,
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constituents? it doesn't matter what i think. constituents? it doesn't matter what ithink. i'm constituents? it doesn't matter what i think. i'm talking _ constituents? it doesn't matter what i think. i'm talking about _ constituents? it doesn't matter what i think. i'm talking about your - i think. i'm talking about your prime minister's promises which he keeps on breaking. i prime minister's promises which he keeps on breaking.— keeps on breaking. i don't accept that. keeps on breaking. i don't accept that- sorry. _ keeps on breaking. i don't accept that- sorry. i'm _ keeps on breaking. i don't accept that. sorry, i'm going _ keeps on breaking. i don't accept that. sorry, i'm going to - keeps on breaking. i don't accept that. sorry, i'm going to give - keeps on breaking. i don't accept that. sorry, i'm going to give you his exact words, _ that. sorry, i'm going to give you his exact words, if _ that. sorry, i'm going to give you his exact words, if i _ that. sorry, i'm going to give you his exact words, if i make - that. sorry, i'm going to give you his exact words, if i make "i - that. sorry, i'm going to give youj his exact words, if i make "i want to be the prime minister who does with northern powerhouse rail what we did for crossrail in london and today i'm going to deliver on that commitment to that vision with a pledge to fund the leads to manchester route." he is about to get back on that fast line between leeds and manchester. let get back on that fast line between leeds and manchester.— get back on that fast line between leeds and manchester. let me put this to you- -- _ leeds and manchester. let me put this to you... just _ leeds and manchester. let me put this to you... just answer - leeds and manchester. let me put this to you... just answer the - this to you... just answer the question- _ this to you... just answer the question- is _ this to you... just answer the question. is that _ this to you... just answer the question. is that a _ this to you... just answer the question. is that a breaking l this to you... just answer the | question. is that a breaking of this to you... just answer the i question. is that a breaking of a promise or not? i question. is that a breaking of a promise or not?— question. is that a breaking of a promise or not? i do not know what is in the announcement _ promise or not? i do not know what is in the announcement so - promise or not? i do not know what is in the announcement so how- promise or not? i do not know what is in the announcement so how can | promise or not? i do not know what| is in the announcement so how can i say that? let me put this to you, let's say you want a new kitchen and you save up for a kitchen but then someone tells you you can get that kitchen for less money and you can get it quicker, why wouldn't you change your mind about how you deliver that? this is what this is
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about. hs2 has not been without its critics, especially from the bbc, in terms of cost and environmental sustainability. look at sheffield, i personally said i don't think the eastern leg of hs2 is the right way to deliver for sheffield. eastern leg of h52 is the right way to deliver for sheffield.— to deliver for sheffield. when did ou to deliver for sheffield. when did you change _ to deliver for sheffield. when did you change your _ to deliver for sheffield. when did you change your mind? _ to deliver for sheffield. when did you change your mind? in - to deliver for sheffield. when did you change your mind? in the - to deliver for sheffield. when did l you change your mind? in the early summer and _ you change your mind? in the early summer and i _ you change your mind? in the early summer and i published _ you change your mind? in the early summer and i published an - you change your mind? in the early summer and i published an article | you change your mind? in the early| summer and i published an article a few weeks ago about why. i think people's travel patterns have changed. i don't think routes such as sheffield to london are as important as they used to be. the key connections, penning centre barnsley, sheffield to leeds, these are the roots that people desperately need to have the same quality of transporter people have in london. waiting until 2040 isn't
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good enough so i want to see plans changed to recognise that people's lives of change and get a better result for my constituents. the eo - le result for my constituents. the people who — result for my constituents. the people who voted _ result for my constituents. the people who voted for you in 2019, the cg one from the labour party, might now be finding it increasingly difficult to trust a word that comes out of the prime minister's mouth. we are going to hopefully see the reopening of a passenger line between sheffield and stockbridge that has been closed for 40 years. that will bring down the journey time forjobs and opportunities. that to me is levelling up. rip to be able to get to huddersfield and nottingham in half thatis that is levelling up. occasionally we go to london but quite frankly we have a really good line at the moment that needs improvements but goes to where you want it to go. mar;
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goes to where you want it to go. may i ask ou goes to where you want it to go. may i ask you to focus _ goes to where you want it to go. may i ask you to focus on the broader issue of trust? your voters might be finding it increasingly difficult to believe a word that comes out of the prime minister's mouth. every time he breaks a promise to words coming out of his mouth become more meaningless. do you accept that? you are tellin: meaningless. do you accept that? you are telling us — meaningless. do you accept that? ym. are telling us that the prime minister today will break lots of promises. we don't know that. it is in the yorkshire _ promises. we don't know that. it is in the yorkshire post, we have all read it. he is indicating that the high—speed line between nottingham and leeds will be scrapped. if rare and leeds will be scrapped. if we find a better. _ and leeds will be scrapped. if we find a better, cheaper— and leeds will be scrapped. if we find a better, cheaper and - and leeds will be scrapped. if fine: find a better, cheaper and more deliverable way to get a better result for our constituents, isn't that the right way to go? i don't think my constituents are going to say to me that they wanted this
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particular answer to the problem even though it is not as good when we deliver something that is better and quicker. that isjust we deliver something that is better and quicker. that is just not how life works. i am sure that my constituents understand that if we have better links between sheffield and leeds and stockbridge that is what people want and that is transformational. if we can deliver it ten years faster then what is not to like? that is not going back on a promise that is recognising that situations change, people's lives change and we need the best way of delivering at the right time. how that i don't see how that narrative fits betrayal.- how that i don't see how that narrative fits betrayal. well, we will see if it _ narrative fits betrayal. well, we will see if it comes _ narrative fits betrayal. well, we will see if it comes on _ narrative fits betrayal. well, we will see if it comes on stream . narrative fits betrayal. well, we - will see if it comes on stream much faster and cheaper. what is the point in making promises in the party manifesto which you did in the prime minister did in the last general election and then breaking them. you said you wouldn't put up taxes and national insurance is
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going up. he said the pension triple lock would stay and it is not. you pledged to continue spending 0.7% of our gross national income on foreign aid and you ditch that promises well. why should voters believe anything you say the next conservative manifesto at the next general election? i conservative manifesto at the next general election?— general election? i think most eo - le general election? i think most people recognise _ general election? i think most people recognise that - general election? i think most people recognise that an - people recognise that an international pandemic that causes our hospitals to shut —— that causes our hospitals to shut —— that causes our hospitals to have extreme pressure, schools to shut down, actually legally last year we didn't have to raise pensions because wages dropped so much. now pragmatically looking at economics it is right to make sure that wage growth is spread equally over the population. you can give it the narrative of broken promises or you can give it the
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narrative of a government responding to completely unprecedented and unpredictable events. i believe that despite that most people understand that. i think you will see that from the budget and what we are going to see today the government is doing everything we can to get back on track to deliver those promises, maybe not in the same way that if you don't respond to changing circumstances and changing information that is not the best way to run a country. i think people are much more understanding then you might believe. much more understanding then you might believe-— much more understanding then you might believe. thank you very much for talkin: might believe. thank you very much for talking to _ might believe. thank you very much for talking to me _ might believe. thank you very much for talking to me today. _ the head of the women's tennis association has said he finds it hard to believe that an email released by chinese state media and attributed to the tennis star
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peng shuai is authentic. the former wimbledon and french open doubles champion has not been heard from since she made sexual assault allegations against a former ——against top chinese official. part of the email reads... sophie richardson is the china director at human rights watch and joins us from washington. this e—mail in a supposedly written by peng shuai, do you believe it is written by her? i by peng shuai, do you believe it is written by her?— written by her? i have a lot of scepticism- — written by her? i have a lot of scepticism. this _ written by her? i have a lot of scepticism. this whole - written by her? i have a lot of scepticism. this whole case i written by her? i have a lot ofj scepticism. this whole case is written by her? i have a lot of l scepticism. this whole case is a reminder of the chinese government two tenancy to silence critics, whether tennis stars, nobel
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laureates or uighur minorities. we believe she should be given a platform to speak freely. haifa believe she should be given a platform to speak freely. how do you know she is — platform to speak freely. how do you know she is being _ platform to speak freely. how do you know she is being kept _ platform to speak freely. how do you know she is being kept against - platform to speak freely. how do you know she is being kept against her. know she is being kept against her will? it know she is being kept against her will? , , ., ., , ., , will? it is very hard to prove but if recent history _ will? it is very hard to prove but if recent history is _ will? it is very hard to prove but if recent history is anything - will? it is very hard to prove but if recent history is anything to l if recent history is anything to go by then few people are allowed to publicly challenge senior authorities without zhang gaoli without paying some kind of price for it. if you are able to leave the country for example and speak freely where she wouldn't be able to face the kind of repercussions that the chinese governments can pose if she were still inside the country. what were still inside the country. what is it about that _ were still inside the country. what is it about that e-mail _ were still inside the country. what is it about that e-mail that - were still inside the country. what is it about that e—mail that makes you think that it is not written by her? it you think that it is not written by her? , ., ~ �* . you think that it is not written by her? , ., . ~ . , her? it is to the wta which is a little bit of _ her? it is to the wta which is a little bit of an _ her? it is to the wta which is a little bit of an odd _ her? it is to the wta which is a little bit of an odd choice. - her? it is to the wta which is a little bit of an odd choice. it. her? it is to the wta which is a little bit of an odd choice. it is| little bit of an odd choice. it is in english. it sounds like messages
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that have been sent by other people in those same circumstances. they have been lengthy reports published about the chinese government two recent views and i mean in the last couple of years about forced confessions which are then broadcast and published domestically and then make their way into the international media. and it is a very effective way to try and undercut if someone is or isn't guilty about something. she isn't able to make it clear that she if she is able to speak freely she would have to do so from outside the country. that is really for many people inside china who have made allegations against party officials. if you believe she is being held against against a well, what else can you do? i
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against against a well, what else can you do?— against against a well, what else can you do? i think the diplomatic bo cott of can you do? i think the diplomatic boycott of the _ beijing games legitimacy. . party when they —— the government does once when it wants regardless of international commitments.
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let's talk to our correspondent in shanghai, robin brandt. what other theories about where peng shuai is? that what other theories about where peng shuai is? . , , , what other theories about where peng shuaiis? ., , , , , , ., shuai is? that is pretty simple to answer. shuai is? that is pretty simple to answer- we _ shuai is? that is pretty simple to answer. we just _ shuai is? that is pretty simple to answer. we just don't _ shuai is? that is pretty simple to answer. we just don't know. - shuai is? that is pretty simple to answer. we just don't know. she| shuai is? that is pretty simple to - answer. we just don't know. she has answer. wejust don't know. she has answer. wejust don't know. she has a home apparently in a major city on the east coast several hundred miles from where i am talking to you from at the moment. she is originally from a province west of here but we just don't know. all we have is that posting on her social media accounts two weeks ago, a lengthy posting making those startling allegations and since then we haven't seen her and since then we haven't seen her and we haven't heard from her in public. before that this e—mail appeared overnight. this question is now, aside up from the technical analysis, that you have been discussing with your previous contributor about the image put on the social media accounts of cgtm which is one arm of state—controlled media here, wejust don't know
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media here, we just don't know where she is. we haven't heard from an agent any family members, a representative, we haven't seen or heard from her. now the wta is calling authorities here to show the world that she is safe and unharmed and more importantly to look into those original allegations in two weeks ago because it was no sign at all that they are being investigated.- all that they are being investiuated. �* ., , , investigated. and the e-mail she is su - osed investigated. and the e-mail she is supposed to _ investigated. and the e-mail she is supposed to have _ investigated. and the e-mail she is supposed to have written _ investigated. and the e-mail she is supposed to have written to - investigated. and the e-mail she is supposed to have written to the - investigated. and the e-mail she is l supposed to have written to the head of the professional women because my game in this country, he doesn't believe that she has written it. who has written it if it's not her? firstly, i think it is important to acknowledge that it is quite unusual for a global sporting organisation to respond so quickly and be so upfront and blunt in its questioning. that in itself is noteworthy. there are so many issues about the note. we see it in what appears to be a screen grab from,
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there is a curse in one of the lines halfway down. the language is fairly flippant. "everything is fine, i'm resting at home." it was meant to have been sent to steve simon and he implies in statements he did receive it but it starts with the word, "hello, everyone" which is very strange. no other domestic media here has picked it up other than cgtm, that in itself is also noteworthy. the prime minister has admitted to conservative backbenchers that he, as he put it, "crashed the car" in his handling of the row about the former conservative mp owen paterson. he spent much of yesterday under pressure about his attitude to parliamentary standards, but in the end the commons did back his proposal to limit paid political consultancy work. let's speak to our chief political correspondent adam fleming.
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just to be clear about what has been agreed. just to be clear about what has been aareed. , ., just to be clear about what has been aareed. , ~ ,., ,, ., ., agreed. yesterday mps approved a government _ agreed. yesterday mps approved a government amendment _ agreed. yesterday mps approved a government amendment to - agreed. yesterday mps approved a government amendment to a - agreed. yesterday mps approved a i government amendment to a labour motion which will start the process into looking at the rules that will address mp's outside interest. it is now handed over to the standards committee made up of mps and a few lay members from outside and they will have to come up with proposals on the idea is that those proposals are presented to parliament before the end of january next year and then there will be a vote. so it is kick—starting a process rather than ending one. of course, with this process, which is controversial amongst mps and there are lots of opinions, the issue of outside earnings, what some people might call sleaze, is going to be with us for a little while yet. i've got total faith. the prime minister has successfully dealt with getting us through brexit. he clearly won an unprecedented majority.
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he has led the way with the vaccine roll—out which has been a huge success both within europe but also globally. and of course he is as restless as i am and the rest of the parliamentary party are to get on with focusing on the bread—and—butter quality—of—life issues that people care about, and we're starting today with this massive investment in rail infrastructure in the north which is going to be so important for the businesses and quality—of—life for those in the midlands, the north, and indeed the whole country. i wasn't expecting that clip of dominic raab to pop up there but what he was doing was responding to allegations made off the record by conservative mps last night after they saw the prime minister were they saw the prime minister were they called into question the practicalities of what he is proposing, his politicaljudgment in responding to something that labour was putting. and also hisjudgment on a whole owen paterson saga overall. but dominic raab saying
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that the pro—minister has got a grip. he has also got a very bad cold! is sounding dreadful at the moment. we cold! is sounding dreadful at the moment. ~ ., ., ., ., cold! is sounding dreadful at the moment. ., ., ., ., ., moment. we also have heard that a conservative _ moment. we also have heard that a conservative backbencher, - moment. we also have heard that a conservative backbencher, we - moment. we also have heard that a conservative backbencher, we don't know who, said that he could have done with a lemsip last night. what was the other reaction from embers of his party to him saying that he crashed a car in the ditch.- of his party to him saying that he crashed a car in the ditch. some say that what he — crashed a car in the ditch. some say that what he is _ crashed a car in the ditch. some say that what he is saying _ crashed a car in the ditch. some say that what he is saying is _ crashed a car in the ditch. some say that what he is saying is totally - that what he is saying is totally proportional to something that has started as a parliamentary issue and has exploded into public consciousness. at one end of the spectrum you get people saying, "calm down, this is all going to be fine, they should have been addressed ages ago, don't worry about how we got there the problem is being sold." at the other end of the spectrum you have conservative mps who are incredibly grumpy about the prospects of them losing their outside earnings, incredibly grumpy that they have been made to look corrupt in the eyes of the public and that the prime minister has
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bought into that narrative. then you have some people who have been supporters of borisjohnson in the past as a result of this anti handling of it is the straw that broke the camels back and now thinking that perhaps they backed the wrong camel and some people becoming very disillusioned by boris johnson's leadership overall. i wonder if actually when we look back at this episode in six months or a year or a couple of years time but rather than the substantive issue about how much mps earn in addition to their role in parliament, the thing we would really pinpoint as a big turning point might be what borisjohnson's and side think of him as a leader. the nhs is to start offering people with hiv injections every two months to keep the virus at bay. 13,000 people will be eligible for the treatment, which'll replace daily pills.
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joining me now is garry brough, who is an hiv advocate and has been living with hiv for 30 years. what do you make of this? it is fantastic news. _ what do you make of this? it is fantastic news. i— what do you make of this? it is fantastic news. i have - what do you make of this? it 3 fantastic news. i have been living with hiv for 30 years and taking daily treatment for 25 years. for many people the prospect of a lifetime of daily treatment is a real challenge. so to be able to go to the clinic every couple of months ago and get an injection is an astonishing leap forward. in terms of our astonishing leap forward. in terms of your daily _ astonishing leap forward. in terms of your daily life, _ astonishing leap forward. in terms of your daily life, how _ astonishing leap forward. in terms of your daily life, how much - astonishing leap forward. in terms of your daily life, how much of - astonishing leap forward. in terms of your daily life, how much of a i of your daily life, how much of a difference will this make? for of your daily life, how much of a difference will this make? for me it wouldn't make _ difference will this make? for me it wouldn't make that _ difference will this make? for me it wouldn't make that much _ difference will this make? for me it wouldn't make that much of - difference will this make? for me it wouldn't make that much of a - wouldn't make that much of a difference. i don't have some of the problems because i'm in a incredibly privileged position as someone who works in hiv support and open about my status but for many people they haveissues my status but for many people they have issues around complex lifestyles, travel schedules, the fact they live in shared accommodation and tank six months
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worth of medication might be a problem and for many people the daily reminder of an hiv diagnosis is a challenge. so i am very lucky that i don't have any of those challenges but to be able to remove that daily reminder is an astonishing change. we are already at a stage where the virus is undetectable meaning we can't pass it on but that daily reminder still is a challenge for a lot of people. you were diagnosed with hiv in 1991, is that correct?— you were diagnosed with hiv in 1991, is that correct? yes. how much acid treatment and _ is that correct? yes. how much acid treatment and care _ is that correct? yes how much acid treatment and care to people like yourself changed in decades? —— how much has the treatment and care to people like yourself changed in those decades? in people like yourself changed in those decades?— people like yourself changed in those decades? in 1991! was given not very much _ those decades? in 1991! was given not very much time _ those decades? in 1991! was given not very much time to _ those decades? in 1991! was given not very much time to live, - those decades? in 1991! was given not very much time to live, i - not very much time to live, i started treatment at the age of 30 in 1997 and at that point ice was
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taking pills five times a day, and incredibly complex regime. by the early 2000 that was down to two pills a day. these are the two pills i currently take, they are not small but they have managed my hiv perfectly, i have an undetectable viral load for 25 years now. it is in other —— another transformation really, the leap forward we had in the late 80s and then in the 2000, this is another leap forward. horse this is another leap forward. how would ou this is another leap forward. how would you feel _ this is another leap forward. how would you feel about getting a diagnosis saying you wouldn't live beyond your 30s and you are now 54, although you don't look at! ientirely beyond your 30s and you are now 54, although you don't look at!— although you don't look at! when i started treatment _ although you don't look at! when i started treatment at _ although you don't look at! when i started treatment at the _ although you don't look at! when i started treatment at the age - although you don't look at! when i started treatment at the age of. although you don't look at! when i started treatment at the age of 30 it was a new life that was given to me. i started
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it was a new life that was given to me. istarted hiv it was a new life that was given to me. i started hiv support so that people who experience of the challenges i had in the 90s have people to talk to because that is one the major issues. the challenges around hiv are less medical now and more in relation to the stigma still attached to the condition, the anxiety and lack of information that people have around hiv. making sure that there is good support available is crucial. . ~ that there is good support available is crucial. ., ,, , ., that there is good support available is crucial. . ~' , ., , . that there is good support available is crucial. ., ,, , ., , . ., is crucial. thank you very much for talkin: to is crucial. thank you very much for talking to us- _ good morning everyone. a mud stuck to the day for most of us. a fair bit of cloud around. cold in the south—east but the cloud will continue to thin out. we've got some rain on and off across the north and west of scotland and the northern england, northern ireland and scotland it will be quite a windy day. look at those temperatures. we
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could even see 17 across aberdeenshire. through this evening and overnight, a lot of cloud, still thick enough for some drizzle in the west with some rain in the north and west and still windy. it's not going to be cold. these are our overnight lows. they are more representative of what we would expect as our maximum temperatures at this time of year. tomorrow, still cloud but more brightness than today. still rain across the far north of scotland, not as breezy as today and these are our temperatures. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. a £96 billion rail plan for the midlands and north of england — not all of it new money — but there's anger as the high speed hs2 line from the east midlands
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to leeds is expected to be scrapped. where is one of china's top tennis stars? peng shuai hasn't been heard from since she accused a chinese official of sexually assaulting her. alec baldwin faces a new lawsuit over a fatal shooting on a film set. lawyers are calling the actor reckless. the nhs can now offer people living with hiv the first "long—acting injectable" treatment to keep the virus at bay. and coming up this hour, we'll speak to fabrice muamba and the person who saved his life about a new campaign to ensure more people know how to help people having a cardiac arrest. sport, and for a full—round up from the bbc sport centre, here's mike bushell. good morning. as the fall—out from azeem rafiq's powerful testimony to mps continues, his former team—mate at yorkshire, the west indian bowler tino best, says a yorkshire coach told him that he "would be put, on the next plane back to barbados" during his spell at the club.
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best said although he "loved" his time at yorkshire, he now considered that to be a racist statement. the bbc has contacted yorkshire for a response to best's claims. the bowler also referred to the drinking culture in cricket, which rafiq spoke about in his testimony, and which best thinks creates divisions in dressing rooms. you've got to stop bullying people into doing what they don't want to do. if i don't want to drink, just let him but still give him be equal opportunity as you would give a guy who was going to be drinking. that's what rafiq was getting at, if you're not part of the boys club you won't get the opportunities in cricket. that is something that is hampering people of colour and that asian ethnicity, i think that is a thing. there's a really worrying story developing in women's tennis relating to one of china's biggest stars peng shuai. she hasn't been heard
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from since she made sexual assault allegations against a top chinese official. an email released by chinese state media attributed to the tennis player herself said miss peng is not missing or unsafe, adding, "i've just been resting at home and everything is fine." but now the head of the women's tennis association steve simon has cast doubt on this, saying he had a "hard time believing" the email was written by ms peng or on her behalf. what a last 24 hours it's been for cameron norrie. at lunchtime he was brought into the end of year tennis finals in italy as a replacement for the injured stefanos tsitsipas. hours later norrie, the british number one, was on court against casper ruud. but he lost in three sets and can't now qualify for the semifinals, but he does face world number one novak djokovic next in the group stages. arsenal are on the verge of reaching the knock—out stage in the women's champions league after a 3—0 victory over danish side hb kerrg. vivianne miedema was on target with arsenal's third — the gunners are second in their group behind leaders barcelona,
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and the top two go through. another championship club have been hit with a points deduction. reading have now been punished for breaching financial rules, and have been docked six points. it follows the further points deduction handed out to derby this week. this latest punishment leaves reading 19th in the table, but still four clear of the relegation zone. there was a special night in the fa cup last night for non—league stockport county. eight goals, extra time and a joyous pitch invasion. non—league stockport came from behind to upset their league one opponents with a 5—3 win in extra time. the fifth goal prompted a mini—pitch invasion at an excited edgeley park. stockport are through to the second round. after being out of a job in the premier league for onlyjust over a week, dean smith has been talking about joining norwich city. smith was sacked by aston villa after their defeat to southampton less than a fortnight ago. he'll start his norwich career with a match against —
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believe it or not — southampton at the weekend and smith is delighted to be back in a dug out. i'v e i've only been out of work for four months since i was 16 years old, and i didn't enjoy it. my wife had a bit more planned for me than obviously what she's got. obviously, losing the job one week and then being re—employed in the premier league the following week, so, a very good week in the end. that's all the sport for now. thank you for your messages. reaction to the fact that the high—speed line between nottingham and leeds isn't going to go ahead, they are going to upgrade the existing line. the government will announce their rail plans later. susan says, i'm beyond angry boris johnson is about to break his
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promise on rail improvements between manchester and leeds. michael says, everyone knows the project was a complete waste of money and upgrading the original lines was a better option for the taxpayer. this e—mail says, better option for the taxpayer. this e—mailsays, i better option for the taxpayer. this e—mail says, i live in sheffield, the fourth biggest city in the uk, and it wasn't even included properly in the original plan. it's a joke. to those in government even know what the main cities in the north are? i commute to work in manchester, sometimes trains arrive on time but it takes a ridiculous amount of time to get anywhere. mike making the same point, it's no coincidence the hs2 line was started at the london end. if borisjohnson had been serious about levelling up, he would have started construction in the north. the government is expected to confirm later today that it's to scrap the eastern leg of hs2 from the midlands to leeds, as well as a planned high speed rail link between leeds and manchester.
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instead it says it'll spend nearly £100 billion upgrading existing services and building new, but shorter, stretches of high speed track. ben thompson reports from leeds. bradford, one city two stations and they are at the heart of northern england's train troubles. there are direct services to manchester and leeds, but the journey is slow and expensive. getting from here to leeds, just ten miles, takes nearly half an hour. it's a journey that passengers want speeding up. i'sre passengers want speeding up. i've had to take _ passengers want speeding up. ie had to take an uber passengers want speeding up. i�*we had to take an uber to manchester to get to an important meeting because the services were delayed. i think we can benefit from less chance there is and more direct trains. to be fair, they�*re not that bad on time _ be fair, they�*re not that bad on time but — be fair, they�*re not that bad on time but the trains are all disgusting, their overcrowded. they're — disgusting, their overcrowded. they�*re not very good. they�*re quite on and — they�*re not very good. they�*re quite on and off. — they�*re not very good. they�*re quite on and off. they— they�*re not very good. they�*re quite on and off. they always _ they�*re not very good. they�*re quite on and off. they always get - on and off. they always get cancelled _ on and off. they always get cancelled a _ on and off. they always get cancelled a lot _ on and off. they always get cancelled a lot of— on and off. they always get cancelled a lot of the - on and off. they always get cancelled a lot of the time. | on and off. they always get - cancelled a lot of the time. usually on the _ cancelled a lot of the time. usually on the way— cancelled a lot of the time. usually on the way to— cancelled a lot of the time. usually on the way to college _ cancelled a lot of the time. usually on the way to college every- cancelled a lot of the time. usually on the way to college every other i on the way to college every other day. on the way to college every other da . , ., . . ., on the way to college every other
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da . , ., . .., ., on the way to college every other da. ., ., day. research carried out for the council found _ day. research carried out for the council found that _ day. research carried out for the council found that bradford - day. research carried out for the council found that bradford has i day. research carried out for the i council found that bradford has the worst rail connections of any major british city and most experts know why. british city and most experts know wh . �* . . british city and most experts know wh . �* , , ., , ., . why. there's been a historic underinvestment _ why. there's been a historic underinvestment in - why. there's been a historic underinvestment in the - why. there's been a historic. underinvestment in the north why. there's been a historic - underinvestment in the north of england's transport network and its railways within that. much of the north's railway infrastructure is still using victorian infrastructure, and despite many governments making promises to put that right through northern powerhouse or levelling up, we fail to see that rhetoric of investment actually turn into reality. 50. to see that rhetoric of investment actually turn into reality.- actually turn into reality. so, a lanned actually turn into reality. so, a planned east-west _ actually turn into reality. so, a planned east-west line - actually turn into reality. so, a planned east-west line across| actually turn into reality. so, a i planned east-west line across the planned east—west line across the pennines linking manchester and leeds via bradford, the so—called northern powerhouse rail, was welcomed with open arms. in 2019, borisjohnson backed the project and this market was earmarked as a site to build a brand—new station. it was hoped the new station and its place on the northern powerhouse line could boost the local economy by £30
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billion over the next decade. and create 100,000 newjobs. all of that is now under threat. brute create 100,000 new “obs. all of that is now under threat.— is now under threat. we as businesses, _ is now under threat. we as businesses, we _ is now under threat. we as businesses, we all - is now under threat. we as businesses, we all need i is now under threat. we as - businesses, we all need youngsters or people generally to come into our factories. not having that three railway station and not having great transport links per se, really limits us as a company. and by the way, businesses will also take a decision about where do i locate manufactory that i'm looking for? i need to locate it somewhere with good transport links and i'm afraid to say that bradford may well be way down the mist. to be honest, ifeel betrayed. ifeel the city down the mist. to be honest, ifeel betrayed. i feel the city and its people have been betrayed. the government _ people have been betrayed. the government says scrapping some plans will speed up construction and cut the cost of other much needed infrastructure. for passengers here, delays and cancellations are nothing new but usually it's just one train not the whole railway. ben thompson, bbc news, bradford.
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housing and consumer experts have told the bbc that shared ownership schemes — designed to help people on low incomes get on to the property ladder — must be reformed in light of the cladding crisis. concerns about building safety were triggered by the grenfell tower fire in 2017, and its estimated more than half a million people still live in homes covered in dangerous materials. sarah corker reports. who should pay to fix britain's dangerous buildings? from london to leeds, birmingham to manchester, more than half a million people are stuck living in unsafe, unsellable homes. what work needs doing? if you look at all the timber cladding that you see, that all has to come down. in south london, single mum emma has outgrown this one—bed flat. this is the living room, and... this doubles as your bedroom? yeah, in the evening it's like changing rooms. and in here is my bed. it was 12 months ago when we first met.
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residents had just been told the building was so unsafe it needed round—the—clock fire wardens. i'm angry, i'm actually furious at it. this is ruining people's lives. a year on, emma's share of the bill to remove the cladding and fix other fire safety faults could be up to £30,000. and the building doesn't qualify for any government funding, because it's under 18 metres. i'm on universal credit, every penny literally counts. we're still facing high, huge, out of this universe type bills. and emma only actually owns 50% of the flat. she bought through an affordable housing scheme, but terms of the lease mean she's liable for 100% of the costs. what has the reality of shared ownership been for you? i don't think shared ownership is fit for purpose. it's to help people like me who couldn't afford to get, i guess, a full mortgage on a property,
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so it's really done me a disservice. i wouldn't recommend anybody to go on a shared ownership. under shared ownership, you pay rent to a housing association on the part you don't own. housing experts say the cladding crisis has exposed it's a flawed system and needs urgent reform. i think the scheme does have a sort of fundamental unfairness. there are potential liabilities which are so great that people are potentially going to go bankrupt or lose their homes. any scheme which purports to be affordable housing, and which can leave people in that situation, is not doing itsjob. housing associations are now coming under greater scrutiny. i've spoken to shared owners from across the country who are deeply unhappy with the way their housing associations are dealing with this. poor communication, a lack of transparency over cost and a refusal to share fire safety assessments and surveys are common complaints.
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this is one of the worst affected. the conservative mp for stevenage says leaseholders should not have to pay these huge bills, but warns housing associations are facing a tough choice between building safety and building new homes. some of the ones in london have said they're going to build 300,000 fewer homes over the next few years as a result of it. so, not only is it really damaging the shared ownership market, it's also damaging the supply of affordable homes going forward. emma's housing association optivo said safety is its number one priority and its continuing to call for government funding to help cover costs on low and mid—rise blocks. the government told us it's unacceptable leaseholders are facing these excessive bills, and further proposals to help will be set out soon. but until then, emma and thousands of others are stuck living in homes they can't afford. sarah corker, bbc news,
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in south london. the headlines on bbc news. a 96 billion pound rail plan for the midlands and north of england — not all of it new money — but there's anger as the high speed hs2 line from the east midlands to leeds is expected to be scrapped. where is one of china's top tennis stars? peng shuai hasn't been heard from since she accused a chinese official of sexually assaulting her. the nhs can now offer people living with hiv the first �*long—acting injectable' treatment to keep the virus at bay. a couple who were metres away from a bomb that exploded in a taxi outside liverpool women's hospital say they have been left in shock by the attack. liam spencer and stephanie stitt were in their car at the time, and mr spencer tried to pull the bomberfrom the burning wreckage of the taxi. our special correspondent ed thomas has this report.
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the explosions just went off and it shook the hospital building. then i go closer to the car, i can smell the smoke and i could see the man in the smoke and i could see the man in the back. the the smoke and i could see the man in the back. ., , ., ., the back. the moments liam and stehanie the back. the moments liam and stephanie would _ the back. the moments liam and stephanie would never— the back. the moments liam and stephanie would never forget. i the back. the moments liam and stephanie would never forget. as stephanie would neverforget. as david perry's taxi rolls in, they were metres away. 50. david perry's taxi rolls in, they were metres away.— david perry's taxi rolls in, they were metres away. david perry's taxi rolls in, they were metres awa . ., �*, , were metres away. so, that's my card there. were metres away. so, that's my card there- then — were metres away. so, that's my card there. then the _ were metres away. so, that's my card there. then the explosion _ were metres away. so, that's my card there. then the explosion happens. i there. then the explosion happens. you'll see stef gets out the car, i grab her and pressure to the side, so she goes to reception where she is safe. ~ . . so she goes to reception where she is safe. ~ ., ., i. ., ., , is safe. what are your emotions in those moments? _ is safe. what are your emotions in those moments? i _ is safe. what are your emotions in those moments? i was _ is safe. what are your emotions in those moments? i wasjust- is safe. what are your emotions in those moments? i wasjust on - is safe. what are your emotions in . those moments? i wasjust on pure those moments? i was 'ust on pure adrenaline. — those moments? i was 'ust on pure adrenaline. myh those moments? i was 'ust on pure adrenaline. my biggest_ those moments? i wasjust on pure adrenaline. my biggest fear - those moments? i wasjust on pure adrenaline. my biggest fear was - those moments? i wasjust on pure| adrenaline. my biggest fear was her getting hurt. adrenaline. my biggest fear was her getting hurt-— getting hurt. everyone was like, oh m god, getting hurt. everyone was like, oh my god. is — getting hurt. everyone was like, oh my god, is there _ getting hurt. everyone was like, oh my god, is there a _ getting hurt. everyone was like, oh my god, is there a baby _ getting hurt. everyone was like, oh my god, is there a baby on - getting hurt. everyone was like, oh my god, is there a baby on the - getting hurt. everyone was like, oh i my god, is there a baby on the back? that's_ my god, is there a baby on the back? that's why— my god, is there a baby on the back? that's why i _ my god, is there a baby on the back? that�*s why i came running out and i was like. _ that�*s why i came running out and i was like. is — that�*s why i came running out and i was like, is there a baby on the back? _ was like, is there a baby on the back? everyone screaming. liam runs
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back? everyone screaming. liam runs back towards — back? everyone screaming. liam runs back towards the _ back? everyone screaming. liam runs back towards the car. _ back? everyone screaming. liam runs back towards the car. he _ back? everyone screaming. liam runs back towards the car. he sees - back? everyone screaming. liam runs back towards the car. he sees the - back towards the car. he sees the driver david perry is out and safe. he pauses before returning to try and save the life of the bomber emad al swealmeen. and save the life of the bomber emad al swealmeen— al swealmeen. then i go closer to the car, i smell— al swealmeen. then i go closer to the car, i smell the _ al swealmeen. then i go closer to the car, i smell the smoke - al swealmeen. then i go closer to the car, i smell the smoke and - al swealmeen. then i go closer to the car, i smell the smoke and i i al swealmeen. then i go closer to i the car, i smell the smoke and i can see the man in the back. iatrni�*hat the car, i smell the smoke and i can see the man in the back.— the car, i smell the smoke and i can see the man in the back. what do you sa to see the man in the back. what do you say to him? — see the man in the back. what do you say to him? i — see the man in the back. what do you say to him? i didn't _ see the man in the back. what do you say to him? i didn't say _ see the man in the back. what do you say to him? i didn't say much, - see the man in the back. what do you say to him? i didn't say much, i - say to him? i didn't say much, i 'ust saw say to him? i didn't say much, i just saw there _ say to him? i didn't say much, i just saw there was _ say to him? i didn't say much, i just saw there was someone - say to him? i didn't say much, i. just saw there was someone there. say to him? i didn't say much, i - just saw there was someone there. i didn't say anything, i was just thinking of ways to try and get him out. i couldn't tell if he was in the back of the front because of the flames and smoke, it was hard to make out what was going on so i was just trying to find the best way to pull him out. and i couldn't reach hold of him without setting myself on fire. i think by that point we had done all we could.- on fire. i think by that point we i had done all we could.- stef on fire. i think by that point we had done all we could. yeah. stef is 20, liam 21. — had done all we could. yeah. stef is 20, liam 21. both _ had done all we could. yeah. stef is 20, liam 21. both are _
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had done all we could. yeah. stef is 20, liam 21. both are finding - had done all we could. yeah. stef is 20, liam 21. both are finding it difficult to cope. i�*m 20, liam 21. both are finding it difficult to cope.— difficult to cope. i'm struggling with my sleep- _ difficult to cope. i'm struggling with my sleep. i— difficult to cope. i'm struggling with my sleep. i think - difficult to cope. i'm struggling with my sleep. i think about i difficult to cope. i'm struggling| with my sleep. i think about the whole situation and it's like the adrenaline kicks in again, and then it's like i'm reliving the moment. it's not as mentally scarring for me but it does cause me to feel sick and my head hurts when i think about it and the adrenaline, just because i'm losing that sleep. it�*s i'm losing that sleep. it's obviously _ i'm losing that sleep. it's obviously just _ i�*m losing that sleep. it�*s obviouslyjust replaying in your mind, — obviouslyjust replaying in your mind, the _ obviouslyjust replaying in your mind, the whole situation. when you finally— mind, the whole situation. when you finally get _ mind, the whole situation. when you finally get to sleep, it�*s in your dreams— finally get to sleep, it�*s in your dreams and you can�*t really escape, in a sense — dreams and you can�*t really escape, in a sense. my dreams and you can't really escape, in a sense-— dreams and you can't really escape, in a sense. g ., ., .., ., in a sense. my mum and dad came to the hospital. — in a sense. my mum and dad came to the hospital, and _ in a sense. my mum and dad came to the hospital, and seeing _ in a sense. my mum and dad came to the hospital, and seeing my - in a sense. my mum and dad came to the hospital, and seeing my mum - in a sense. my mum and dad came to the hospital, and seeing my mum in. the hospital, and seeing my mum in that state and then seeing stef play's mum in that state, it broke my heart. i never want to put any family through that. the my heart. i never want to put any family through that.— family through that. the man responsible, _ family through that. the man responsible, emad _ family through that. the man responsible, emad al - family through that. the man - responsible, emad al swealmeen, planned the attacks since april and police also say he rented a property here is a base to build the bomb. during seven years in the uk, his
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repeated asylum applications have been refused, and in that time he had suffered periods of mental illness. once you found out this was now a terrorism investigation, what was your reaction to that? you wouldn't think— was your reaction to that? you wouldn�*t think anyone would ever want _ wouldn�*t think anyone would ever want to— wouldn�*t think anyone would ever want to harm particularly babies and children— want to harm particularly babies and children more than anything. it�*s children more than anything. it's the most children more than anything. it�*s the most innocent place on earth. i've been to concerts where i've thought in the back of my mind, what if this does happen tonight? when you're out in public places. but you just never think of a hospital or a babies hospital, you just don't think, i wasjust in babies hospital, you just don't think, i was just in disbelief. it�*s think, iwas 'ust in disbelief. it's remarkable — think, i wasjust in disbelief. it�*s remarkable that in that moment, the panic he thought for other people, your partner and the person who is suspected of making this explosive device. ., ., �* ., ., ., ,, device. you don't go around thinking the worst of— device. you don't go around thinking the worst of people. _ device. you don't go around thinking the worst of people. i _ device. you don't go around thinking the worst of people. i just _ device. you don't go around thinking the worst of people. i just thought, . the worst of people. ijust thought, regardless, i didn't know the situation at the time, but there was just an innocent man in that car.
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i'd hope if i was ever in that situation, god forbid, oranyone was, that someone would help. bend was, that someone would help. and ou want was, that someone would help. and you want to — was, that someone would help. and you want to thank the doctors and nurses who came to you afterwards. just the little things they did to help us— just the little things they did to help us was amazing. and just the little things they did to help us was amazing.— just the little things they did to help us was amazing. and the guards and the people _ help us was amazing. and the guards and the people at _ help us was amazing. and the guards and the people at reception - help us was amazing. and the guards and the people at reception at - help us was amazing. and the guards and the people at reception at the . and the people at reception at the women's hospital, i can't thank them enough for how they were and how they helped us after it. just the comfort they gave us, i can't think them enough. comfort they gave us, i can't think them enough-— comfort they gave us, i can't think them enough. and you feel lucky to be alive? very _ them enough. and you feel lucky to be alive? very lucky _ them enough. and you feel lucky to be alive? very lucky to _ them enough. and you feel lucky to be alive? very lucky to be - them enough. and you feel lucky to be alive? very lucky to be alive. - be alive? very lucky to be alive. it's be alive? very lucky to be alive. it's scary _ be alive? very lucky to be alive. it's scary to _ be alive? very lucky to be alive. it's scary to think _ be alive? very lucky to be alive. it's scary to think how— be alive? very lucky to be alive. it's scary to think how things - be alive? very lucky to be alive. i it's scary to think how things could it�*s scary to think how things could have _ it�*s scary to think how things could have been— it�*s scary to think how things could have been different. you do struggle with, have been different. you do struggle with. and _ have been different. you do struggle with. and i_ have been different. you do struggle with, and i have are going to get over— with, and i have are going to get over this? — with, and i have are going to get over this? i_ with, and i have are going to get overthis? i said with, and i have are going to get over this? i said to myself and my family. _ over this? i said to myself and my family. it's— over this? i said to myself and my family, it�*s not going to have a hold _ family, it�*s not going to have a hold on— family, it�*s not going to have a hold on me or my life. family, it's not going to have a hold on me or my life.- family, it's not going to have a hold on me or my life. there was definitely someone _ hold on me or my life. there was definitely someone watching - hold on me or my life. there was| definitely someone watching over both of us that day. but definitely someone watching over both of us that day.— both of us that day. but i do feel very lucky- _ both of us that day. but i do feel very lucky- very _ both of us that day. but i do feel very lucky. very lucky _ both of us that day. but i do feel very lucky. very lucky to - both of us that day. but i do feel very lucky. very lucky to be - both of us that day. but i do feel| very lucky. very lucky to be alive. the tech giant, apple, is to start selling spare parts and tools — so that customers can carry
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out their own repairs on iphones and macs. the "self—service repair" programme will begin in the united states next year before expanding to more countries. two men found guilty of the murder of the us civil rights leader, malcolm x, are to have their convictions quashed. the shooting in new york in 1965 was among a series of political assassinations in america in that decade. prosecutors said the two men didn't get the justice that they deserved. aru na iyengar reports. the fire hit the window and it woke up my second oldest baby. malcolm x, the charismatic advocate of black empowerment. he was 39 when he was killed, shot dead in a new york city ballroom in front of his family. he was the public face of the nation of islam. unlike his contemporary martin luther king, malolm x didn't want to see full racial integration. he believed in his early days that black separatism was the answer. muhammad aziz and khalil islam, along with a third man, thomas hagan, were convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison.
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islam died in 2009. now, prosecutor cyrus vance says the fbi and police withheld information that could have led to the acquittal of aziz and islam. the netflix documentary series who killed malcolm x? brought to light some of this evidence. this evidence was hiding in plain sight all these years, for decades. much of what we reveal in the documentary was known. much of it was published in biographies written about malcolm, particularly the manning marable biography, life of reinvention. even the autobiography of malcolm x had kernels of evidence. and the fbi had a treasure trove of documents that we were able to uncover through the freedom of information act that led us down this path. prosecutor vance has also tweeted that more information is likely to be revealed. he's apologised on behalf of the law enforcement agencies to the families of aziz and islam. earlier this year, malcolm x's daughters added their voices
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to calls to reopen the investigation in the light of new evidence. it's a cause malcolm x himself might have strongly argued for. aruna iyengar, bbc news. the skies above wales are some of the darkest and clearest in the world, and november is said to be the best time to go stargazing there. but as well as looking up to the skies, imagine getting a first—hand account of life amongst the stars from astronaut tim peake. he spent an evening with a group of young explorers — and our wales correspondent tomos morgan was there too. a night under the stars with someone that knows a thing or two about them. then a telescope is very, very good. children in the gower meeting and quizzing british astronaut tim peake about the diamonds in our skies. do you think we are going to see a lot of stars tonight? i think we're going to see loads of stars, amelia, yes. and hoping to spot some up above in the autumn sky. oh, wow. i�*ve learned a lot.
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if it wasn�*t for tim, then i probably wouldn�*t have learned about space. but, yeah, it�*s wonderful to learn about space. i�*ve learned about like, - how stars, like, they compress together in a way. it�*s just very fascinating and interesting. - from anglesey to the elan valley, to swansea bay, wales has some of the best places to go stargazing. that's because it has the highest proportion of protected dark skies in the world, crucially needed to spot the twinkling up above. the dark sky reserve is an area that's really been protected in order to preserve it against light pollution, because if you are in a city area, for example, with lots of light pollution and you look up, you're simply not going to see an abundance of stars. it's a bit like looking up when there is a full moon. the light from the moon will obscure light from the stars. it's a similar effect when you are living in a bright area. so, by coming to a dark area, that's where you can really
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appreciate what the night sky should look like. november is one of the best times of the year to go stargazing, as our skies are darker due to a lower level of water vapour, haze, dust and pollen in the air. unfortunately, on this evening the clouds shadowed the stars above. has it made you more interested in it? yeah. has it influenced you at all and what you'd like to be when you grow up? eh, no. no, it hasn't. what is it you would like to do when you grow up, play for swansea, is it? footballer. yeah, play for swansea city, is it? yeah. of course it is. so, what would you like to do when you grow up? em, it depends, actually. baker or scientist, something to do. baker or scientist? yeah. well, yeah. very similar. baking is a science, isn't it? yeah. yeah, yeah. like, how you mix stuff together. it's called proxima centauri. and it's the star closest to the sun.
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no doubt a night to remember for these first—time stargazers in a country full of sparkly night wonders. tomos morgan, bbc news, in the gower. now it's time for a look at the weather. good morning. it's been a very mild start to the data in many parts of the uk. in aberdeen this morning it was 15 degrees at 6am. whereas in kent it was two degrees and that's because we had clear skies in the south—east. today is going to be mild and breezy and also dry for many. but not everywhere. you can see this big area of cloud. this is a weather front and it's bringing see this big area of cloud. this is a weatherfront and it's bringing in some rain. that rain will be on and off through the day across the north and west of scotland. the early brightness and sunshine in the far south—east and east anglia, filling
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up south—east and east anglia, filling up with more cloud through the day. that cloud sticking up in the west to be producing drizzle. it's a breezy day as well across northern england, northern ireland and scotland and especially so with exposure in the north and west. temperatures today are high. 11 in lerwick to highs of 14 widely. we could see 16 across the north—east of england and 17 in aberdeenshire. through the evening and overnight, we carry on with the rain on and off in northern scotland. still breezy conditions with a lot of cloud, that cloud thick enough in the case sand hills. once again, a mild night. these temperatures are more like what we'd expect during the course of the afternoon rather than the overnight lows. so, into tomorrow, we still have some rain across the north and west of the country. we also still have cloud. there will be more breaks in the cloud tomorrow, so we'll see some brighter skies
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across parts of england, wales and northern ireland. our temperatures are still high for the time of year. we are looking at ten — 16. this weather front we are looking at ten — 16. this weatherfront bringing we are looking at ten — 16. this weather front bringing the rain across north—west scotland is salient, it's a cold front and as it sinks southwards, during the course of saturday, you'll find it's going to bring some colder air in behind it. while we are used to a milder wind direction, we'll see more of a north—westerly. on saturday, i dry and largely bright start with some sunshine. the weather front sinking southwards. behind it, a rash of showers, some of those wintry on the hills and look at the temperatures. still mild as we push down towards the south—east.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. where is one of china's top tennis stars? peng shuai hasn't been heard from since she accused a chinese official of sexually assaulting her. human rights campaigners are concerned. it is notjust a question of proof of life, it is a question of proof of freedom, and that is really not an offer to many people inside china, particularly those who have levelled allegations at senior party members. a £96 billion rail plan for parts of england — not all of it new money — but there's anger as parts of the high—speed hs2 line in the north is expected to be scrapped. german chancellor angela merkel calls for tighter covid restrictions — as federal and regional leaders meet to discuss new measures.
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alec baldwin faces a new lawsuit over a fatal

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