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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 18, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and mega munchetty. our headlines today. a £96 billion rail plan for the midlands and north of england — but there's anger that the h52 line from the east midlands to leeds is set to be scrapped. those high—speed plans across the east midlands and the north of england were welcomed with open arms here, but there is frustration and anger this morning as passengers find out they could be waiting even longer. they own 25% of their property, but have to pay 100% of the cladding repair bill. we hear from the tenants facing financial ruin. new legal action against actor alec baldwin, who is accused of playing russian roulette
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when he fired a gun on set, killing a colleague. more than 1,000 people have already come forward to contact the inquiry into racism in cricket, following azeem rafiq's emotional testimony about his own experiences at yorkshire. good morning. todayis today is going to be fairly cloudy for most of us, also rather breezy. rain in the north and west, some brightness across central and eastern areas, but it's going to be very mild for the time of the year. details coming up. good morning. it's thursday, the 18th of november. our main story. the government is planning to publish a £96 billion plan for the rail network in the midlands and north of england. but there's anger that the section of high speed 2, stretching to leeds, is now expected to be scrapped. and instead of building a brand
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new line between manchester and leeds, there are reports the existing track will just be upgraded. ministers insist their changes will mean improvements happen up to a decade earlier. dan johnson reports. it's been described as the biggest ever public investment in our rail network, modernising routes more quickly and levelling up cities and regions, the government says. but the integrated rail plan focuses on improving existing lines instead of building new ones. hs2 will connect london with birmingham and manchester, but it now looks like the planned eastern leg will stop in the east midlands rather than reaching yorkshire. and it's expected that there will be no new trans—pennine route between manchester, bradford and leeds. the government says upgrades to the current lines can deliver similar improvements to journey times and capacity years earlier. but it will leave many in the north disappointed. my real concern is that our victorian infrastructure is creaking in the north of england.
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we have already tried to upgrade the existing line between leeds and manchester and it's taken ten years. we've onlyjust started to see shovels in the ground. i don't believe that upgrading infrastructure will be faster in delivering results than building new lines. these were the front pages of many regional papers this week, calling for the government to stand by earlier promises. this was borisjohnson�*s pledge two years ago. i want to be the prime minister who does with northern powerhouse rail what we did for crossrail in london. and today, i am going to deliver on my commitment to that vision with a pledge to fund the leeds to manchester route. this is a £96 billion investment plan, though it's not all new money. it includes 360 million to roll out london—style contactless ticketing across commuter networks. that will also feature price caps applying across trains, trams and buses. but new rail routes were more
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than 20 years away, and the government says upgrading the existing network will mean similarjourney times ten years sooner. the full details will be published later. dan johnson, bbc news. mps have backed the government's proposals to ban them from taking on certain roles outside parliament, and rejected a labour plan to ban almost all second jobs. the votes came at the end of another stormy day, dominated by the row over sleaze. let's speak now to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. good morning. to say it was a stormy day, i think that is a bit of an understatement, don't you? yeah, and we could be — understatement, don't you? yeah, and we could be in — understatement, don't you? yeah, and we could be in for— understatement, don't you? yeah, and we could be in for a _ understatement, don't you? yeah, and we could be in for a stormy _ understatement, don't you? yeah, and we could be in for a stormy process - we could be in for a stormy process because _ we could be in for a stormy process because it — we could be in for a stormy process because it has now been handed to the commons standards committee you will have _ the commons standards committee you will have to _ the commons standards committee you will have to come up with these rules, _ will have to come up with these rules, which means there are a lot of opportunities to discuss them and fall out— of opportunities to discuss them and fall out about them all over again. it did _ fall out about them all over again. it did get— fall out about them all over again. it did get very heated in the commons yesterday when leaders were discussing _ commons yesterday when leaders were discussing this. keir starmer, the
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labour— discussing this. keir starmer, the labour leader, called borisjohnson labour leader, called boris johnson a labour leader, called borisjohnson a coward _ labour leader, called borisjohnson a coward. he later had to withdraw that word — a coward. he later had to withdraw that word because you cannot make that word because you cannot make that kind _ that word because you cannot make that kind of — that word because you cannot make that kind of very personal accusation in the house of commons from the _ accusation in the house of commons from the green benches. then boris johnson _ from the green benches. then boris johnson had a go at keir starmer for his external — johnson had a go at keir starmer for his external earnings as a lawyer, which _ his external earnings as a lawyer, which earned him this quite major telling off from the speaker, lindsay _ telling off from the speaker, lindsay hoyle. we still have not heard why the honourable gentleman... 0rder, order,. emi, sit down. prime minister? _ 0rder, order,. emi, sit down. prime minister? int— 0rder, order,. emi, sit down. prime minister? i'm not— 0rder, order,. emi, sit down. prime minister? i'm not going _ 0rder, order,. emi, sit down. prime minister? i'm not going to— 0rder, order,. emi, sit down. prime minister? i'm not going to be - minister? i'm not going to be challenged _ minister? i'm not going to be challenged by— minister? i'm not going to be challenged by the _ minister? i'm not going to be challenged by the prime - minister? i'm not going to be - challenged by the prime minister of this country — challenged by the prime minister of this country in— challenged by the prime minister of this country. in this _ challenged by the prime minister of this country. in this house - challenged by the prime minister of this country. in this house i- challenged by the prime minister of this country. in this house i am - challenged by the prime minister of this country. in this house i am in l this country. in this house i am in charge _ this country. in this house i am in charae. ~ ., , charge. wow, those were very firm words, charge. wow, those were very firm words. putting _ charge. wow, those were very firm words, putting back— charge. wow, those were very firm words, putting back at _ charge. wow, those were very firm words, putting back at his - charge. wow, those were very firm words, putting back at his place. . words, putting back at his place. very rare to see these bigger lose his temper like that? it’s very rare to see these bigger lose his temper like that?— his temper like that? it's actually becomin: his temper like that? it's actually becoming a _ his temper like that? it's actually becoming a bit _ his temper like that? it's actually becoming a bit more _ his temper like that? it's actually becoming a bit more regular- his temper like that? it's actually i becoming a bit more regular though as the _ becoming a bit more regular though as the debate about the conduct of mps gets— as the debate about the conduct of mps gets more heated. that tends to be when _ mps gets more heated. that tends to be when scenes of parliament get the most heated is when mps are discussing the rules that apply to them _ discussing the rules that apply to them themselves. it is also getting
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particularly heated on the conservative backbenchers as well. there's _ conservative backbenchers as well. there's quite a lot of anger at number— there's quite a lot of anger at number 10 there's quite a lot of anger at numberio over there's quite a lot of anger at number 10 over this whole issue. you -et number 10 over this whole issue. you get conservative mps worried about the practicalities of them being assessed for how much time they spend _ assessed for how much time they spend on— assessed for how much time they spend on their outside earnings. you -et spend on their outside earnings. you get conservative mps who question the prime _ get conservative mps who question the prime minister'sjudgment for basically— the prime minister'sjudgment for basically doing something that labour— basically doing something that labour are calling for in the first place _ labour are calling for in the first place and — labour are calling for in the first place. and they also be questioned the prime — place. and they also be questioned the prime minister'sjudgment over his whole _ the prime minister'sjudgment over his whole handling of this situation, which they think is part of the _ situation, which they think is part of the government in quite a difficult _ of the government in quite a difficult position. there was a meeting _ difficult position. there was a meeting last night of backbench conservative mps. and the reviews of the prime _ conservative mps. and the reviews of the prime minister's performance from _ the prime minister's performance from tories are very mixed, to put it miidiy~ _ from tories are very mixed, to put it mildl . ., ., , from tories are very mixed, to put it mildl . ., .,, ., . ., it mildly. yeah, he was forced into that comment, _ it mildly. yeah, he was forced into that comment, and _ it mildly. yeah, he was forced into that comment, and a _ it mildly. yeah, he was forced into that comment, and a clear- it mildly. yeah, he was forced into that comment, and a clear road i l that comment, and a clear road i crashed the car into a ditch, when he was talking to mps?— crashed the car into a ditch, when he was talking to mps? yeah, it is not often you _ he was talking to mps? yeah, it is rrot often you get _ he was talking to mps? yeah, it is not often you get boris _ he was talking to mps? yeah, it is not often you get boris johnson i not often you get borisjohnson identifying mistakes he has made or
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apologising. but he is identifying this owen paterson saga is a big mistake — this owen paterson saga is a big mistake he has made and expressing his regret _ mistake he has made and expressing his regret about it quite a few times— his regret about it quite a few times in— his regret about it quite a few times in quite a few different settings _ times in quite a few different settinas. �* ., ., ,, i. times in quite a few different settinas. �* . ., ~' times in quite a few different settinus. �* ., ., ~' i., . settings. adam, thank you so much. adam fleming- _ settings. adam, thank you so much. adam fleming. at _ settings. adam, thank you so much. adam fleming. at half _ settings. adam, thank you so much. adam fleming. at half past - settings. adam, thank you so much. adam fleming. at half past seven i settings. adam, thank you so much. | adam fleming. at half past seven we are going to be talking to dominic raab, the daddy prime minister. we will address those issues, of course, by the planning of rail, hsz, course, by the planning of rail, hs2, an announcement today, and borisjohnson'sjudgment as he hs2, an announcement today, and boris johnson's judgment as he faced that rather stormy day yesterday. indeed. seven minutes past six. a couple who were metres away from a bomb that exploded in a taxi outside liverpool women's hospital, say they have been left in shock by the attack. liam spencer and stephanie stitt, who were in their car at the time, told the bbc they felt a big impact, and at first thought there had been a crash. mr spencer tried to pull the bomberfrom the burning wreckage of the taxi, but was stopped by the flames. i didn't say much. ijust seen there was someone there. and then, i didn't even say nothing.
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i was just thinking of ways to try and get him out, and i couldn't really tell if he was in the back or the front because ofjust the whole positioning and the flames and the smoke. it was hard to make out what was going on, so i wasjust trying to find the best way to pull him out. a new lawsuit against the hollywood actor, alec baldwin, has alleged the film script did not require him to fire a gun when he fatally shot the cinematographer, halyna hutchins, last month. the script supervisor for the western film rust is requesting damages for claims including assault and intentional infliction of emotional distress. david willis reports. ba rely barely a month on, and the lawsuits are growing. script supervisor mamie mitchell the latest to sue after a shot fired by alec baldwin killed a colleague just a few feet away from her. i colleague 'ust a few feet away from her. ., , ., ., colleague 'ust a few feet away from her. ., ,., ., ., her. i heard someone moaning and i turned around _ her. i heard someone moaning and i turned around and _ her. i heard someone moaning and i turned around and my _ her. i heard someone moaning and i turned around and my director- her. i heard someone moaning and i turned around and my director was l turned around and my director was falling backwards and holding his upper body. and i turned around
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toward alec and i saw halina going down toward the left of me. halyna hutchins died _ down toward the left of me. halyna hutchins died after— down toward the left of me. halyna hutchins died after being _ down toward the left of me. halyna hutchins died after being shot i down toward the left of me. halyna hutchins died after being shot in i hutchins died after being shot in the stomach by a bullet which also injured at the film's director, mamie mitchell —— mamie mitchell was the first to call 9/11. brute mamie mitchell -- mamie mitchell was the first to call 9m.— the first to call 9/11. we have two eo - le the first to call 9/11. we have two people accidentally _ the first to call 9/11. we have two people accidentally shot - the first to call 9/11. we have two people accidentally shot on i the first to call 9/11. we have two people accidentally shot on a i the first to call 9/11. we have two i people accidentally shot on a movie set by a prop gun. brute people accidentally shot on a movie set by a prop gun-— set by a prop gun. we need help immediately- — set by a prop gun. we need help immediately. her _ set by a prop gun. we need help immediately. her lawsuit - set by a prop gun. we need help| immediately. her lawsuit claimed alec baldwin should have checked the gun on himself before firing it and she is suing him and the film's produces for negligence. mr baldwin choose to play _ produces for negligence. mr baldwin choose to play russian _ produces for negligence. mr baldwin choose to play russian roulette i produces for negligence. mr baldwin | choose to play russian roulette when he fired _ choose to play russian roulette when he fired a _ choose to play russian roulette when he fired a gun without checking it and without having the armour to do so in _ and without having the armour to do so in his— and without having the armour to do so in his presence. his behaviour, and that— so in his presence. his behaviour, and that of— so in his presence. his behaviour, and that of the producers are not rust, _ and that of the producers are not rust, was— and that of the producers are not rust, was reckless. how and that of the producers are not rust, was reckless.— rust, was reckless. how live ammunition _ rust, was reckless. how live ammunition made _ rust, was reckless. how live ammunition made it - rust, was reckless. how live ammunition made it onto i rust, was reckless. how live| ammunition made it onto the rust, was reckless. how live i ammunition made it onto the film rust, was reckless. how live - ammunition made it onto the film set in the foothills of northern new mexico is at the centre of an
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investigation that's been carried by local police. the person responsible for guns on the said has claimed they were sabotaged and several crew members are known to have walked off the production only hours before the shooting, citing concerns over safety. mamie mitchell is also claiming that the scene alec baldwin was rehearsing at the time of the shooting didn't actually call for a going to be fired. and she says the resulting tragedy will live with her forever. i’iiii resulting tragedy will live with her forever. �* ., ., forever. i'll never forget what happened _ forever. i'll never forget what happened on _ forever. i'll never forget what happened on the _ forever. i'll never forget what happened on the set - forever. i'll never forget what happened on the set of- forever. i'll never forget what happened on the set of rust l forever. i'll never forget what i happened on the set of rust that day. i relive the shooting and the sound of the explosion from the gun over and over again. sound of the explosion from the gun overand overagain. i'm sound of the explosion from the gun over and over again. i'm depressed, i don't feel safe. ifeel like over and over again. i'm depressed, i don't feel safe. i feel like at any moment anything could happen to me and to those i care about that are standing close to me.- are standing close to me. mamie mitchell is _ are standing close to me. mamie mitchell is seeking _ are standing close to me. mamie mitchell is seeking undisclosed i mitchell is seeking undisclosed damages. there's been no response to the lawsuit from alec baldwin. previously he said he was
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heartbroken by the incident and was fully cooperating with the police inquiry. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. two men convicted of the murder of the american civil rights leader, malcolm x, are set to be exonerated. he was shot dead in new york in 1965 as he prepared to give a speech. the manhattan district attorney said muhammad al aziz and khalil islam did not get the justice they deserved. the conviction of a third man — thomas hagan — has not been overturned. the tech giant, apple, is to start selling spare parts and tools, so that customers can carry out their own repairs on iphones and macs. the self—service repair programme will begin in the united states next year, before expanding to more countries. i don't know what phone you have, right? and i suppose it's not really important. would you trust yourself to fix your own phone? but; important. would you trust yourself to fix your own phone?— to fix your own phone? any phone, no. no. to fix your own phone? any phone, no- no- we — to fix your own phone? any phone, no. no. we have _ to fix your own phone? any phone, no. no. we have our— to fix your own phone? any phone, no. no. we have our laptops- to fix your own phone? any phone, no. no. we have our laptops given | to fix your own phone? any phone, l no. no. we have our laptops given to
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us in the morning _ no. no. we have our laptops given to us in the morning and _ no. no. we have our laptops given to us in the morning and checked i no. no. we have our laptops given to us in the morning and checked by i no. no. we have our laptops given to us in the morning and checked by the it department and we have problems. logging on! the idea of changing the battery, taking apart... budi logging on! the idea of changing the battery, taking apart. . ._ battery, taking apart... and i think we have been _ battery, taking apart... and i think we have been programmed - battery, taking apart... and i think we have been programmed into i battery, taking apart... and i think. we have been programmed into that idea that you don't touch it, you have to pay someone to do it. it is good if we are being given the tools but i absolutely would not do it. what does that do for your insurance? i guess it must be covered if they are allowing you to do it. i’iiii covered if they are allowing you to do it. �* , ., ., ., covered if they are allowing you to do it. �* i. ., ., , do it. i'll tell you who would be able to do _ do it. i'll tell you who would be able to do it, _ do it. i'll tell you who would be able to do it, because - do it. i'll tell you who would be able to do it, because you i do it. i'll tell you who would be able to do it, because you canl do it. i'll tell you who would be l able to do it, because you can do everything. if you see carol's studio... morning, carol. i have been into your box of tricks, your studio! and there are lots of technical things around there and you are always on top of it. maybe we could bring our laptops to you. i'm hopeless with technology, especially something like that. good morning. it is a mild start to the day. to give you an example, in aberdeenshire the temperature is
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currently 1a degrees. now that the minimum temperature. at this time of the maximum temperature average is 8 degrees they are. so there is a huge difference. where we have got the cloud it is very mild, it is going to be a mild day. we do have some breaks in the cloud in central and eastern areas, and here under clear skies and temperatures are currently between five and 7 degrees. as we go through the day this early brightness will be filled in by some word cloud. the cloud taken off in the west to produce some drizzle. we have also got some rain across northern and western parts of scotland, and the country very windy today. gusty winds with exposure. lighter winds as we push further south. and these are the maximum temperatures. 11 to 17 degrees. again, favourite for the 17th somewhere in eastern scotland. the north of england could see 15 or 16 degrees. this evening and overnight it will still be windy. still some
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rain in the north and west. they will still be some drizzle coming out of the thickest cloud across the west as well. temperature wise denied still on the mild side, tens and 11. a mild start to the day tomorrow. cloudy. but not as cloudy as today. we are more likely to see sunny spells or bright spells across england, wales and northern ireland, but we have got some rain moving across northern scotland. this is what is going to herald the change, because eventually, as this comes south, colderairwill because eventually, as this comes south, colder air will filtering behind it. thanks, carol. you will like —— like this next item. thanks, carol. you will like -- like this next item.— the skies above wales are some of the darkest and clearest in the world, and night time in november is said to be the best time to go stargazing there. luckily, for a group of budding young space explorers, astronaut tim peake spent an evening with them, revealing the secrets of the skies — as tomos morgan reports.
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a night under the stars with someone that knows a thing or two about them. then a telescope is very, very good. children in the gower meeting and quizzing british astronaut tim peake about the diamonds in our skies. do you think we are going to see a lot of stars tonight? i think we're going to see loads of stars, amelia, yes. and hoping to spot some up above in the autumn sky. oh, wow. i've learned a lot. if it wasn't for tim, then i probably wouldn't have learned about space. but, yeah, it's wonderful to learn about space. i've learned about like, i how stars, like, they can compress together in a way. it's just very fascinating and interesting. - from anglesey to the elan valley, to swansea bay, wales has some of the best places to go stargazing. that's because it has the highest proportion of protected dark skies in the world, crucially needed to spot the twinkling above.
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the dark sky reserve is an area that's really been protected in order to preserve it against light pollution, because if you are in a city area, for example, with lots of light pollution and you look up, you're simply not going to see an abundance of stars. it's a bit like looking up when there is a full moon. the light from the moon will obscure light from the stars. it's a similar effect when you are living in a bright area. so, by coming to a dark area, that's where you can really appreciate what the night sky should look like. november is one of the best times of the year to go stargazing, as our skies are darker due to a lower level of water vapour, haze, dust and pollen in the air. unfortunately, on this evening the clouds shadowed the stars above. has it made you more interested in it? yeah. has it influenced you at all and what you'd like to be when you grow up? eh, no. no, it hasn't.
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what is it you would like to do when you grow up, play for swansea, is it? footballer. yeah, play for swansea city, is it? yeah. of course it is. so, what would you like to do when you grow up? em, depends, actually. baker or scientist, something to do. baker or scientist? yeah. well, yeah. very similar. baking is a science, isn't it? yeah. yeah, yeah. like, how you mix stuff together. it's called proxima centauri. and it's the star closest to the sun. no doubt a night to remember for these first—time stargazers in a country full of sparkly night wonders. tomos morgan, bbc news in the gower. your first yourfirst night your first night of stargazing and you do it with tim peake, that's pretty cool. it you do it with tim peake, that's pretty cool-— pretty cool. it doesn't get much better, pretty cool. it doesn't get much better. does — pretty cool. it doesn't get much better, does it? _ pretty cool. it doesn't get much better, does it? that— pretty cool. it doesn't get much better, does it? that is- pretty cool. it doesn't get much better, does it? that is a i pretty cool. it doesn't get much better, does it? that is a story| pretty cool. it doesn't get much i better, does it? that is a story you would tell for the rest of your life. . , ,., y would tell for the rest of your life. . , 17 would tell for the rest of your life._ 17 minutes i would tell for the rest of your i life._ 17 minutes past life. absolutely. 17 minutes past six. let's take a look at today's papers.
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first up we have the yorkshire post, which leads with the cancellation of the the birmingham to leeds branch of hs2. it says the prime minister — who has written in today's issue of the paper — has broken his own pledge on rail infrastructure for the region. meanwhile, the times carries borisjohnson's admission to backbench conservative mps that he "crashed the car into a ditch" in his handling of sleaze allegations against the party. "back on duty" is the headline on the telegraph. its front page carries an image of the queen meeting with the outgoing army boss, general sir nick carter. it is the first time we have seen her carry out an in—person engagement for nearly a month. really good to see her.- really good to see her. really, really good _ really good to see her. really, really good to _ really good to see her. really, really good to see. _ really good to see her. really, really good to see. we - really good to see her. really, really good to see. we were i really good to see her. really, i really good to see. we were talking about the prime minister talking about the prime minister talking about how he crashed the car into a ditch. but this is what we want to show you, really? dash—mac. red
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crabs on a beach in australia. well, and roads, actually. this is the most watched video on the bbc news page. and finally, the most watched video on the bbc online homepage features tens of millions of red crabs, which have covered roads on australia's christmas island during their yearly migration. we can take a look. the crabs are travelling from the forest to the coast to spawn, and the migration begins shortly after the first rainfall of the wet season. stand back! stand back! they have got a mason. the migration begins after the first rainfall. this is the power of nature. nature at work. i'm sorry, flip flops, a million crabs? , ., ., , crabs? they are not interested in details, they _ crabs? they are not interested in details, they are _ crabs? they are not interested in details, they are interested i crabs? they are not interested in details, they are interested in i details, they are interested in spawning. details, they are interested in spawning-— details, they are interested in s-uawnin. ., ., , ., , " spawning. not on my bare toes. 19 minutes past _ spawning. not on my bare toes. 19 minutes past six. _ spawning. not on my bare toes. 19 minutes past six. that _ spawning. not on my bare toes. 19 minutes past six. that is _ spawning. not on my bare toes. 19 minutes past six. that is a - spawning. not on my bare toes. 19 minutes past six. that is a weird i minutes past six. that is a weird imaue. minutes past six. that is a weird image- that _ minutes past six. that is a weird image- that is — minutes past six. that is a weird image. that is a weird _ minutes past six. that is a weird image. that is a weird image! i minutes past six. that is a weird i image. that is a weird image! what have we got on the inside? i image. that is a weird image! what have we got on the inside?- have we got on the inside? i don't know. have we got on the inside? i don't know- let's _ have we got on the inside? i don't know. let's have _ have we got on the inside? i don't know. let's have a _ have we got on the inside? i don't know. let's have a look. - have we got on the inside? i don't know. let's have a look. we i have we got on the inside? i don't
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know. let's have a look. we are i have we got on the inside? i don't i know. let's have a look. we are not used to hugging. we would hug every morning at the old days. we haven't done it for ages. there is a piece in the times today which says it is time for britons to embrace the hug. the power of a cuddle. giving us information about how we should do it and how long we should do it. there is a lovely piece from people who don't like it and find it awkward. amber rudd used to pretend she had a cold when do foreign trips so she avoided getting enveloped in a bear hugs. so she avoided getting enveloped in a bear hugs-— a bear hugs. such a good strategy. if ou a bear hugs. such a good strategy. if you don't — a bear hugs. such a good strategy. if you don't like _ a bear hugs. such a good strategy. if you don't like hugging. - a bear hugs. such a good strategy. if you don't like hugging. amber i if you don't like hugging. amber rudd, if you don't like hugging. amber rudd. she's _ if you don't like hugging. amber rudd, she's always _ if you don't like hugging. amber rudd, she's always got - if you don't like hugging. amber rudd, she's always got a - if you don't like hugging. amber rudd, she's always got a cold. i if you don't like hugging. amber i rudd, she's always got a cold. get her some cough medicine for christmas. i will tell you who may not be welcoming a hug, or might be difficult to hug. this isjoanna page, and she showed a picture of herself. she is expecting herfourth child. she's got a big bump there.
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she's got a big bump. the paper so it looks more like she is having quads. but anyway, it looks more like she is having quads. butanyway, good it looks more like she is having quads. but anyway, good luck to her. sympathy to all of those. when you are a dad, when a woman is at this stage of pregnancy, it's not easy, is it? �* , ., stage of pregnancy, it's not easy, isit? �*, ., ., stage of pregnancy, it's not easy, isit? �*, ., �*, stage of pregnancy, it's not easy, isit? �*, ., , is it? it's not easy and it's pretty horrible. everybody _ is it? it's not easy and it's pretty horrible. everybody feels - is it? it's not easy and it's pretty horrible. everybody feels they i is it? it's not easy and it's pretty. horrible. everybody feels they can comment on your bump and the size of it. , comment on your bump and the size of it. y ., . , ., , comment on your bump and the size of it. they touch it. christmas coming u -. it. they touch it. christmas coming up- christmas _ it. they touch it. christmas coming up. christmas chocolates _ it. they touch it. christmas coming up. christmas chocolates coming i it. they touch it. christmas coming i up. christmas chocolates coming up. this is the kind of science we need. they have done some research on the sun today about the psychology between the content of different brands of chocolate are tense. they say it is all very deliberate and that these companies tend to put limited numbers of your favourites, or the popular ones, so you run out of those i want to buy another one, but also, they deliberately put the unpopular ones in so the box lingers on your coffee table for longer, so you can see it. so you are
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constantly reminded of the branding. and it fitting into your home. i like the ones that no one else likes. ., ., , ., like the ones that no one else likes. ., ., , , , likes. that does not surprise me. you are so _ likes. that does not surprise me. you are so contrary. _ likes. that does not surprise me. you are so contrary. what's i likes. that does not surprise me. you are so contrary. what's your| you are so contrary. what's your favourite? — you are so contrary. what's your favourite? coffee. _ you are so contrary. what's your favourite? coffee. really, i you are so contrary. what's yourj favourite? coffee. really, coffee creams? i— favourite? coffee. really, coffee creams? i like _ favourite? coffee. really, coffee creams? i like the _ favourite? coffee. really, coffee creams? i like the dark- favourite? coffee. really, coffee| creams? i like the dark chocolate favourite? coffee. really, coffee i creams? i like the dark chocolate i like the crunchy ones. i don't like toffee. because they stick in your teeth. ., ., ., ., , �*, teeth. you are an advertiser's nightmare- — teeth. you are an advertiser's nightmare. and _ teeth. you are an advertiser's nightmare. and i— teeth. you are an advertiser's nightmare. and i don't - teeth. you are an advertiser's nightmare. and i don't like i teeth. you are an advertiser's| nightmare. and i don't like the --urle nightmare. and i don't like the purple one- — nightmare. and i don't like the purple one. don't _ nightmare. and i don't like the purple one. don't you? - nightmare. and i don't like the purple one. don't you? no. i nightmare. and i don't like the i purple one. don't you? no. there nightmare. and i don't like the - purple one. don't you? no. there you to. there are warnings that a generation of homeowners are facing financial ruin through no fault of their own. they bought a flat in a building with external cladding, which has now been deemed unsafe and unsellable. many people on low incomes used affordable housing schemes like shared ownership to get on the property ladder.
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there are calls for some of those games to be reformed and updated because of additional costs. sarah corker reports. who should pay to fix britain's dangerous buildings? from london to leeds, birmingham to manchester, more than half a million people are still living in unsafe, unsellable homes. what work need doing? if you look at all the timber cladding that you see, that all has to come down. in south london, single mum emma has outgrown this one—bed flat. this is the living room and... this doubles as your bedroom? yeah, in the evening it's like changing rooms. and in here is my bed. it was 12 months ago when we first met. residents had just been told the building was so unsafe it needed round—the—clock fire wardens. i'm angry, i'm actually furious at it. this is ruining people's lives. a year on, emma's share of the bill
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to remove the cladding and fix other fire safety faults could be up to £30,000. and the building doesn't qualify for any government funding because it is under 18 metres. i'm on universal credit. every penny literally counts. we're still facing higher, huge, out of this universe type bills. and emma only actually owns 50% of the flat. she bought through an affordable housing scheme, but the terms of the lease means she is liable for 100% of the costs. what has the reality of shared ownership been for you? i don't think shared ownership is fit for purpose. it's to help people like me who couldn't afford to get, i guess, a full mortgage on the property, so it's really done me a disservice. i wouldn't recommend anybody to go on a shared ownership. under shared ownership, you pay rent to a housing association on the part
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you don't own. housing experts say the cladding crisis has exposed its a flawed system and needs urgent reform. i think the scheme does have a sort of fundamental unfairness. there are potential liabilities which are so great that people are potentially going to go bankrupt and lose their homes. any scheme which purports to be affordable housing, and which can leave people in that situation, is not doing itsjob. housing associations are now coming under greater scrutiny. i've spoken to shared owners from across the country who are deeply unhappy with the way their housing associations are dealing with this. poor communication, a lack of transparency over cost and a refusal to share fire safety assessment and surveys are common complaints. this is one of the worst affected. the conservative mp for stevenage says leaseholders should not have to pay these huge bills, but warns housing associations are facing a tough choice between building safety and building new homes.
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some of the ones in london have said they're going to build a 300,000 fewer homes over the next few years as a result of it. so not only is it really damaging the shared ownership market, it's also damaging the supply of affordable homes going forward. emma's housing association 0ptivo says safety is its number one priority and its continuing to call for government funding to help cover costs on low and mid rise blocks. how has the way you feel about your home changed through all of this? my mum died when i was 19. so the deposit for my flat essentially was inheritance. i actually was quite sensible and thought, yeah, i am actually going to invest it and do something for my life and for my future. fast forward to this now, ifeel like it's probably been the worst thing that i've ever done is sign on the dotted line to get this property. the government told us it is unacceptable leaseholders
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are facing these excessive bills, and further proposals to help will be set out soon. but until then, emma and thousands of others are stuck living in homes they can't afford. sarah corker, bbc news in south london. sarah will be here to talk more about that story at ten past eight. her documentary is on the bbc iplayer. if you've been affected by the cladding issue, we'd like to hear from you too. so many people have been. they are desperate, they are in limbo in many cases. and financially terrified. you can get in touch with us at bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk. sarah has been at the forefront of that, notjust for this documentary but she has been read across it. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london. transport for london has warned about significant cuts to bus and tube services in london, because of growing gaps in its funding. tfl says the slow recovery in passenger income from its services and inflationary pressures following the pandemic, means it may need to cut bus services by a fifth, and cut tube funding by almost 10 percent. a new finance committee report describes a "managed decline" scenario. it will be discussed later today. a london nightclub has started offering urine and drinks testing after an increase nationally in reports of women being spiked by injection. clubbers at xoy0 near old street can access the tests through a medic who is based on site each night. so far the service has been used once and that individual test returned a negative result. the closure of two children's centres in hackney has been paused
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after local parents mounted a campaign to keep them open. they've been protesting to save fernbank and hillside centres in north hackney from closure. the council said it will now hold a wider review of its provision for early years children next year. a new plaque in memory of colin townsley, a firefighter who died in the 1987 kings cross fire will be unveiled at the station today. the fire is one of the worst in recent british history, with 31 people losing their lives and more than 100 people being badly injured. colin townsley was among the first group of firefighters on the scene to the fire. well if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning apart from the northern line which is part suspended between camden town and kennington, southbound via charing cross and severe delays between edgware and camden town, southbound only, due to a late finish of engineering work.
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0nto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is feeling quite chilly, at least first thing this morning but milder air is on the way. the high pressure is in charge and there is a warm front overnight to the north of the uk which is dragging in a milderair, so for us it meansa dragging in a milderair, so for us it means a warmer day today with temperatures above average for the middle of november. we might get a bit of hazy sunshine first thing this morning ahead of the milder air arriving but with the mild air comes moisture and the cloud is going to increase and thicken. temperatures today, a mild 1a celsius. we will hang onto these conditions overnight, still with the milder air so temperatures not dropping too far and still with the cloud you could get some missed by dawn tomorrow. the minimum temperature between nine and 11 celsius, so much milder than recently. we still have mild air for friday and as we head into saturday but you will notice for sunday that plunge of colder air coming from the
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north, a cold front sweeping south that will bring a northerly flow and a northerly breeze for sunday and also much chillier air and the chilly air will stay with us through the end of sunday and into next week. i'm back with the latest in half an hour. more on the website at the usual address. we will see you soon. good morning and welcome to breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. coming up on breakfast this morning. his seven marathons in seven days raised millions for motor neurone disease research. now rugby league legend kevin sinfield is just days away from an even bigger challenge. we'll catch up with him as he prepares to run 101 miles injust21i hours. my my goodness. it's 30 years to the day
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since terry waite was released by kidnappers in beirut. we'll talk to him about his years spent in captivity, and how the experience has shaped his life since. there! a metal muncher. definitely a class five. and spookily good or terrifyingly bad? we'll hear how the new ghostbusters sequel compares to the 1984 classic. back to our top story now and the government is expected to confirm later today that it's to scrap the eastern leg of hs2 from the midlands to leeds, as well as a planned high speed rail link between leeds and manchester. instead it says it'll spend nearly £100 billion upgrading existing services and building new, but shorter, stretches of high speed track. ben is in leeds for us.
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good morning. already lots of frustration in places like this about— frustration in places like this about those changes in the plans. as you said. _ about those changes in the plans. as you said, some plans being scrapped and replaced by others and the people — and replaced by others and the people i've spoken to this morning say they— people i've spoken to this morning say they have heard all of this before — say they have heard all of this before. lots of promises, but very little _ before. lots of promises, but very little action~ — before. lots of promises, but very little action. here at leeds station this morning there is growing anger that the _ this morning there is growing anger that the government may decide to change _ that the government may decide to change those plans, which were welcomed with open arms. this all forms— welcomed with open arms. this all forms part — welcomed with open arms. this all forms part of the integrated rail plan and — forms part of the integrated rail plan and we will hear from the transport _ plan and we will hear from the transport secretary, grant shapps, later today. _ transport secretary, grant shapps, latertoday. let transport secretary, grant shapps, later today. let me run you through what _ later today. let me run you through what we _ later today. let me run you through what we expect him to say. it says 96 billion — what we expect him to say. it says 96 billion will be spelt on the railways _ 96 billion will be spelt on the railways outside of london but the devil is _ railways outside of london but the devil is in — railways outside of london but the devil is in the detail and the headlines are that the eastern edge
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of h52, _ headlines are that the eastern edge of h52, already the planned to come from london to birmingham but then there was— from london to birmingham but then there was an eastern spur that would connect _ there was an eastern spur that would connect to— there was an eastern spur that would connect to the west midlands, nottingham, derby, sheffield and leeds— nottingham, derby, sheffield and leeds and we understand that will not go _ leeds and we understand that will not go ahead and will be replaced by shorter— not go ahead and will be replaced by shorter lines that are high speed and then— shorter lines that are high speed and then upgrading the existing track, _ and then upgrading the existing track, the track that is already there — track, the track that is already there and _ track, the track that is already there. and the other big disappointment here is that scrapping of the east west main line, _ scrapping of the east west main line. a _ scrapping of the east west main line, a route that would connect leeds, — line, a route that would connect leeds, manchester, speeding up times across— leeds, manchester, speeding up times across the _ leeds, manchester, speeding up times across the pennines and we were told that will— across the pennines and we were told that will not _ across the pennines and we were told that will not go ahead either, the so-caiied — that will not go ahead either, the so—called northern powerhouse rail, so—called northern powerhouse rail, so tots _ so—called northern powerhouse rail, so lots of— so—called northern powerhouse rail, so lots of frustration. particularly in the _ so lots of frustration. particularly in the places along the route that would _ in the places along the route that would stand to benefit. and one of those _ would stand to benefit. and one of those places is bradford. we've been looking _ those places is bradford. we've been looking at— those places is bradford. we've been looking at what the scrapping of that plan — looking at what the scrapping of that plan could mean for cities like that plan could mean for cities like that and _ that plan could mean for cities like that and the people who live there. bradford — one city, two stations, and they are at the heart of northern england's train troubles. there are direct services to manchester and leeds, but the journey is slow
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and expensive. getting from here to leeds, just a ten—mile trip, takes nearly half an hour and it's a journey that passengers want speeding up. i've had to take an uber all the way to manchester to get to an important meeting because the services were delayed, so i feel like we could benefit from less transfers and more direct trains. to be fair, they are not that bad, on time, but they are old trains and they are over crowded with people and it's always the same. they are not very good. they are quite on and off. like, they always get i cancelled a lot of the time, so usually late to college every other day. - it's notjust their opinion. research carried out by the council found that bradford has the worst rail connections of any major british city, and most experts know why. there's been an historic underinvestment in the north of england's transport network and its railways and within that much of the north's railway infrastructure is using old victorian infrastructure and despite many governments making
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promises to put that right through the northern powerhouse or levelling up, we really fail to see that rhetoric of investment actually turn into reality. so a planned east—west line across the pennines linking manchester and leeds via bradford, the so—called northern powerhouse rail, was welcomed with open arms. in 2019, borisjohnson backed the project, and this market was earmarked as a site to build a brand—new station. it was hoped that the new station and its place on the northern powerhouse line could boost the local economy by £30 billion over the next decade and create 100,000 newjobs. all of that is now under threat. we, as businesses, we all need youngsters or people generally to come to our factories now, so not having that through railway station and not having great transport links per se really limits us as a company.
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and by the way, businesses will also take a decision about where do i locate my new factory that i am looking for. you know, i need to locate it somewhere where we've got those good transport links, and i'm afraid to say that bradford may well be way down the list. to be honest with you, i feel betrayed. i feel the city and its people have been betrayed. the government says scrapping some plans will speed up construction and cut the cost of other much needed infrastructure. for passengers here, delays and cancellations are nothing new, but usually it's just one train, not the whole railway. so let's talk about some of the implications with one business owner and the passenger here. let me introduce you to james. nice to see you. we've been talking about these plans, the potential scrapping of some of the key parts of that rail plan. how would you describe how you
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feel this morning? i’m plan. how would you describe how you feel this morning?— feel this morning? i'm absolutely devastated- _ feel this morning? i'm absolutely devastated. we _ feel this morning? i'm absolutely devastated. we have _ feel this morning? i'm absolutely devastated. we have constant i devastated. we have constant announcement every couple of years of investments in the north, and another review and then it is scrapped. i'm sick to the back teeth of it. we need investment in the north and it's not happening and i will not take anything for granted until we see boots on the ground, until we see boots on the ground, until we see the diggers getting to work. we keep having these announcements and it is devastating for us. ., ., ~' announcements and it is devastating for us. ., ., ,, ., ., , for us. looking round at leeds station, for us. looking round at leeds station. the — for us. looking round at leeds station, the trains _ for us. looking round at leeds station, the trains are - for us. looking round at leeds| station, the trains are running, they are new trains and i wonder what the scrapping of those plans, if indeed they are scrapped, what do they stop you doing? what can you not do if they are not delivered? brute not do if they are not delivered? we want to not do if they are not delivered? - want to encourage other businesses to move up from london up to leeds and get people moving around and coming into the city centre. 0ur city centres have been devastated by covid and we need to rebuild and better connectivity by transport will help us do that. find better connectivity by transport will help us do that.— better connectivity by transport will help us do that. and of course ou run a will help us do that. and of course you run a business _ will help us do that. and of course you run a business here _ will help us do that. and of course you run a business here and i i you run a business here and i imagine you have got to get around for meetings and things like that. how frustrating is it when you see what is happening in the capital? and you are trying to run a business here and you are frustrated you
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cannot get around. for here and you are frustrated you cannot get around.— here and you are frustrated you cannot get around. for sure. i've not the cannot get around. for sure. i've got the investment _ cannot get around. for sure. i've got the investment ready - cannot get around. for sure. i've got the investment ready to i cannot get around. for sure. i've i got the investment ready to expand and i would love to go and do it in manchester but i can't feasibly do it because it's so far away and it's really tough and it is stopping businesses from expanding because we cannot move around so easily. in london they get crossrail, they get it, it happens. they need tube improvements, it happensjust it, it happens. they need tube improvements, it happens just like that, but in the north it doesn't happen and decisions are made in whitehall by people who don't live here or care or listen to what happens to us in the cities are my messages, let the decisions be made up messages, let the decisions be made up north. listen to us and make things happen. the up north. listen to us and make things happen-— up north. listen to us and make thins haen. ., things happen. the government says it will prioritise _ things happen. the government says it will prioritise projects _ things happen. the government says it will prioritise projects it _ things happen. the government says it will prioritise projects it can - it will prioritise projects it can deliver more quickly and cheaply and it has looked at key routes. is that not enough? i’m it has looked at key routes. is that rrot enough?— it has looked at key routes. is that not enou:h? �* ., ., , not enough? i'm no transport expert. i want to not enough? i'm no transport expert. i want to see _ not enough? i'm no transport expert. i want to see better _ not enough? i'm no transport expert. i want to see better trains, _ not enough? i'm no transport expert. i want to see better trains, buses, i i want to see better trains, buses, better connectivity but the real worry for me is that the trains from liverpool, manchester, the cross pennine route, that is critical and if that gets scrapped today all hell will break loose because we are fed up will break loose because we are fed up with it. i will break loose because we are fed u- with it. ., ., ., up with it. i wanted to ask you. what is the _
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up with it. i wanted to ask you. what is the thing _ up with it. i wanted to ask you. what is the thing that - up with it. i wanted to ask you. what is the thing that is - up with it. i wanted to ask you. what is the thing that is most i what is the thing that is most important for you? what is the one thing that would make a big difference living here because mark just what i said.— just what i said. trains to manchester, _ just what i said. trains to manchester, as - just what i said. trains to manchester, as the i just what i said. trains to manchester, as the crow| just what i said. trains to i manchester, as the crow flies, just what i said. trains to - manchester, as the crow flies, the distance is not very far at all, but it can take you over an hour to get to manchester or sheffield but you can go to leeds in two and a half hours and it must be six or seven times the distance. it's really frustrating. it wouldn't happen in the south, but it does for us. james, really good to talk to you and good luck with the business. i know lots of frustration here this morning. we will talk about that all morning, because as i said, lots of anger and frustration and we don't have all the details yet stop grant shapps will stand up later to deliver the integrated rail plan. much touted, talking about £96 billion of investment, but for people like james, the devil is in the detail and where will the money be spent and what will it be spent on and will it allow passengers, businesses to get around in this part of the country, in the north of england and also the east midlands, very key lines. that is why people
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are frustrated at waiting so long. thank you very much indeed and we will be back later and speak to the politicians on both sides about this in the next hour. i politicians on both sides about this in the next hour.— in the next hour. i calm myself? help myself. _ in the next hour. i calm myself? help myself. you _ in the next hour. i calm myself? help myself, you are _ in the next hour. i calm myself? help myself, you are two - in the next hour. i calm myself? | help myself, you are two seconds away and you have to wait. accuracy is key. unsurprisingly, the fallout, the reverberation from the testimony of azeem rafiq regarding yorkshire cricket club and the wider game continues. he cricket club and the wider game continues. ,., cricket club and the wider game continues-— cricket club and the wider game continues. ,., ., , , continues. he said it was 'ust the start. he wants i continues. he said it was 'ust the start. he wants to i continues. he said it was just the start. he wants to empower i continues. he said it was just the start. he wants to empower a i continues. he said it wasjust the i start. he wants to empower a whole generation— start. he wants to empower a whole generation and for people to be able to come _ generation and for people to be able to come forward, as we heard, a watershed — to come forward, as we heard, a watershed moment and is proving to be the _ watershed moment and is proving to be the case — azeem rafiq says he expects the floodgates to open and more than 1000 people have now contacted the inquiry into discrimination in cricket following, his damning and powerful testimony to mps on tuesday,
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the independent commission for equity in cricket ,said the response to his comments about experiencing racism at yorkshire showed cricket had to "change now". rafiq told the bbc, he would stand by anyone who came forward to share their story. all i would say is you've got to be honest and you've got to come forward and get it off your chest. hopefully after yesterday, people will be believed and heard a lot more and people can take confidence from that, and like i said, i know was left on my own from every angle possible. i will make sure that whoever comes forward, i am there with them. one of rafiq's teammates at yorkshire, the west indian bowler tino best says a yorkshire coach told him that he "would be put on the next plane back to barbados, during his spell at the club. best said although he "loved" his time at yorkshire he now considered that to be a racist statement. the bbc has contacted yorkshire for a response to best's claims. the
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barbados—born bowler also said he could see there were problems for rafiq and other players at the county. i always saw the guys, adil rashid, ajmal shazad, rafiq, they were always together. me being a personal scholar as well, i would always be with them as well and i would always hear about them complaining. literally they would complain every day about what they went through in the youth academy, and i would be like, wow. there's a really worrying story developing in women's tennis relating to one of china's biggest stars, peng shuai. she hasn't been heard from, since she made sexual assault allegations against a top chinese official. an email, released by chinese state media, attributed to the tennis player herself, said miss peng is not missing or unsafe, adding: "i'vejust been resting at home and everything is fine." but now the head of the women's tennis association steve simon, has cast doubt on this saying he had a "hard time believing" the email was written by ms peng
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or on her behalf. cameron norrie had a whirlwind day at the atp tour finals in turin. he was called into the tournament at lunchtime as a replacement for the injured stefanos tsitsipas. hours later norrie, the british number one, was on court against casper ruud. but he lost in three sets, and can't now qualify for the semi finals and faces world number one novak djokovic next in the group stages. after 13 grand slam tennis titles and four paralympic medals, jordanne whiley has retired from the sport. the wheelchair tennis star won the wimbledon doubles title this summer. jordanne says she now wants to spend more time with her son and hopes her career has persuaded others to try the sport. i hope that even if i've inspired just one girl to take up sport — it doesn't have to be tennis, although i would love it to be tennis. but tennis has brought me such joy in my life and so many life skills that i've learned along the way and so many amazing experiences
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and i would want that for more young girls. arsenal's fine form in europe, continued last night with a 3—0 win over danish side hb kerr, in the women's champions league. vivianne miedema, was on target with arsenal's third — the gunners are second in their group, three points behind leaders barcelona. another day, another points deduction in the championship. this time reading have been docked six points for breaching financial rules. yesterday we told you how derby had been docked nine points. this punishment leaves reading 19th in the table. and finally, taking off from the edge of a mountain on a motorbike doesn't sound the wisest of moves but that didn't bother french motocross rider tom pages. take a look at this. this is going through a french alpine city, of the ramp, into the air, and wow. but luckily he has a parachute. he
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air, and wow. but luckily he has a parachute-— air, and wow. but luckily he has a arachute. , , ., ., ., parachute. he uses one hand. one for him and one — parachute. he uses one hand. one for him and one for— parachute. he uses one hand. one for him and one for the _ parachute. he uses one hand. one for him and one for the bike, _ parachute. he uses one hand. one for him and one for the bike, of _ parachute. he uses one hand. one for him and one for the bike, of course. i him and one for the bike, of course. another— him and one for the bike, of course. another iook— him and one for the bike, of course. another look from this angle. it is mind—boggling. it is another look from this angle. it is mind-boggling— another look from this angle. it is mind-boggling. it is like a computer tame. mind-boggling. it is like a computer name. i mind-boggling. it is like a computer game- i did — mind-boggling. it is like a computer game. i did have _ mind-boggling. it is like a computer game. i did have to _ mind-boggling. it is like a computer game. i did have to double - mind-boggling. it is like a computer game. i did have to double take i mind-boggling. it is like a computer game. i did have to double take on | game. i did have to double take on it. that is game. i did have to double take on it- that is so _ game. i did have to double take on it. that is so dangerous. _ game. i did have to double take on it. that is so dangerous. obviously| it. that is so dangerous. obviously he's used to _ it. that is so dangerous. obviously he's used to it. _ it. that is so dangerous. obviously he's used to it. just _ it. that is so dangerous. obviously he's used to it. just the _ it. that is so dangerous. obviously he's used to it. just the whole i he's used to it. just the whole thin. he's used to it. just the whole thin ._ it he's used to it. just the whole thing. it does _ he's used to it. just the whole thing. it does look— he's used to it. just the whole thing. it does look like - he's used to it. just the whole thing. it does look like a i he's used to it. just the whole - thing. it does look like a computer name. thing. it does look like a computer game- just — thing. it does look like a computer game- just being _ thing. it does look like a computer game. just being able _ thing. it does look like a computer game. just being able to _ thing. it does look like a computer game. just being able to control . thing. it does look like a computer| game. just being able to control it. we've seen — game. just being able to control it. we've seen various _ game. just being able to control it. we've seen various arenas - game. just being able to control it. we've seen various arenas around | game. just being able to control it. i we've seen various arenas around the country— we've seen various arenas around the country with _ we've seen various arenas around the country with the somersaults off ramps. — country with the somersaults off ramps, but not 150 feet in the air over_ ramps, but not 150 feet in the air overa— ramps, but not 150 feet in the air over a mountainside. ramps, but not 150 feet in the air overa mountainside. he has the parachute — overa mountainside. he has the parachute there. hundred and 50 metres. — parachute there. hundred and 50 metres, sorry. it�*s parachute there. hundred and 50 metres. sorry-— parachute there. hundred and 50 metres, sorry. it's the fact he goes over, and pulling _ metres, sorry. it's the fact he goes over, and pulling the _ metres, sorry. it's the fact he goes over, and pulling the cord - metres, sorry. it's the fact he goes over, and pulling the cord for - metres, sorry. it's the fact he goes over, and pulling the cord for the l over, and pulling the cord for the shoot. ., ., , ~ ., shoot. one hand on the bike, and ullin: shoot. one hand on the bike, and pulling the _ shoot. one hand on the bike, and pulling the parachute _ shoot. one hand on the bike, and pulling the parachute at _ shoot. one hand on the bike, and pulling the parachute at the - shoot. one hand on the bike, and pulling the parachute at the right| pulling the parachute at the right time and — pulling the parachute at the right time and one for the bike beneath him? _ time and one for the bike beneath him? and — time and one for the bike beneath him? and having the awareness in the air to _ him? and having the awareness in the air to upright— him? and having the awareness in the airto upright the him? and having the awareness in the air to upright the bike so he can land— air to upright the bike so he can land on— air to upright the bike so he can land onthe— air to upright the bike so he can land on the wheels.— air to upright the bike so he can land on the wheels. mike, thank you, we need to move _ land on the wheels. mike, thank you, we need to move from _ land on the wheels. mike, thank you, we need to move from motorbikes i land on the wheels. mike, thank you, we need to move from motorbikes to| we need to move from motorbikes to railways. it's all about the travel.
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as we've been hearing, the government is expected to announce a 96—billion—pound rail plan for england later today — but there's anger that key routes in the north of the country look set to be scrapped. it's thought part of the eastern leg of hs2 could be under threat, as well as the fast link between mancheter and leeds. the shadow transport secretary, jim mcmahon, joins us from westminster. good morning to you. obviously you are going to accuse the government of breaking promises and make political capital out of this, but borisjohnson, political capital out of this, but boris johnson, writing political capital out of this, but borisjohnson, writing in the yorkshire post this morning says that what this will mean for commuters is more trains to more places and happening sooner. i’m places and happening sooner. i'm afraid borisjohnson can't have it afraid borisjohnson can't have it both— afraid borisjohnson can't have it both ways. — afraid borisjohnson can't have it both ways, and within a month of him becoming _ both ways, and within a month of him becoming prime minister he promised that northern powerhouse rail and hst would be delivered in full and since _ hst would be delivered in full and since that— hst would be delivered in full and since that date we have had 60 further — since that date we have had 60 further announcements promising it would _ further announcements promising it would come and i'm afraid this comes down _ would come and i'm afraid this comes down to— would come and i'm afraid this comes down to trust in the end but you can't _ down to trust in the end but you can't make _ down to trust in the end but you can't make a promise that you then break_ can't make a promise that you then break in _
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can't make a promise that you then break in such a brutal way that nteens— break in such a brutal way that means the _ break in such a brutal way that means the north of england isn't going _ means the north of england isn't going to — means the north of england isn't going to get the investment promised. he going to get the investment promised-— going to get the investment romised. , ., , promised. he says the new plans will deliver trains _ promised. he says the new plans will deliver trains on _ promised. he says the new plans will deliver trains on tracks _ promised. he says the new plans will deliver trains on tracks more - deliver trains on tracks more quickly and this will speed things up quickly and this will speed things up and he says passengers have waited long enough, you've been waiting on platforms for too long and that by avoiding hs2 in some of these routes and using existing tracks, it might not be quite as quick, but passengers will notice a big difference much more quickly. in big difference much more quickly. in a sense he is reflecting 11 lost years — a sense he is reflecting 11 lost years of— a sense he is reflecting 11 lost years of a _ a sense he is reflecting 11 lost years of a conservative government that hasn't — years of a conservative government that hasn't invested properly in the north— that hasn't invested properly in the north of— that hasn't invested properly in the north of england. had the north of england _ north of england. had the north of england had the same investment in the last— england had the same investment in the last decade as london and the south—east, it would have seen an additional— south—east, it would have seen an additional £66 billion of investment and that— additional £66 billion of investment and that has been denied the north of england so the idea now that we were promised the full scheme in the way that— were promised the full scheme in the way that was outlined and we go to cash the _ way that was outlined and we go to cash the cheque, only for it to bounce. — cash the cheque, only for it to bounce, that is not good enough. we've _ bounce, that is not good enough. we've been hearing from commuters in leeds this morning on the platform
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talking about their massive frustrations that they already feel about the rail network and saying what you are saying, that we need action and to see changes, i totally get that, but those passengers under the new plans, the prime minister would say, will get faster trains sooner. ijust keep coming back to the point. it might not be the ideal or what exactly promised that his argument is that it would deliver poor people much more quickly. we are talking maybe in ten years rather than in 20 or 30, may be longer. i rather than in 20 or 30, may be loner. , ., ,, , ,., longer. i will 'ust make this point. the capital — longer. i willjust make this point. the capital didn't _ longer. i willjust make this point. the capital didn't have _ longer. i willjust make this point. the capital didn't have to - longer. i willjust make this point. the capital didn't have to choose l the capital didn't have to choose between — the capital didn't have to choose between hsz coming out of euston towards _ between hsz coming out of euston towards crewe and crossrail. it didn't — towards crewe and crossrail. it didn't have to make the choice. it -ot didn't have to make the choice. it got both— didn't have to make the choice. it got both investments because both were seen— got both investments because both were seen to be critical for that economy— were seen to be critical for that economy to thrive, so why should the north— economy to thrive, so why should the north of— economy to thrive, so why should the north of england and midlands be denied _ north of england and midlands be denied the investment that allows us to reach— denied the investment that allows us to reach our— denied the investment that allows us to reach our full potential? we've been _ to reach our full potential? we've been held — to reach our full potential? we've been held back for too long and people — been held back for too long and people are getting the jobs they deserve — people are getting the jobs they deserve and generation after generation is being let down and in the same _ generation is being let down and in the same period, railfares generation is being let down and in the same period, rail fares have gone _ the same period, rail fares have gone through the roof and have doubled — gone through the roof and have doubled in the last decade so for
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the commuters that you talk to on the commuters that you talk to on the platform in leeds, they are playing — the platform in leeds, they are playing through the nose for a service — playing through the nose for a service not fit for purpose and its not the _ service not fit for purpose and its not the case we should sacrifice national — not the case we should sacrifice national connectivity with regional connectivity. we need both. is there an argument — connectivity. we need both. is there an argument that _ connectivity. we need both. is there an argument that post-pandemic, . connectivity. we need both. is there - an argument that post-pandemic, when an argument that post—pandemic, when we are so overspent as a country, that we just have to cut our cloth to match the new reality and that it would be foolish to spend billions and billions more now that we could save a bit of money and still deliver something close, that we have to be a bit more realistic and economical? i have to be a bit more realistic and economical?— economical? i would say the counterargument _ economical? i would say the counterargument is - economical? i would say the counterargument is the - economical? i would say the | counterargument is the case. economical? i would say the i counterargument is the case. if economical? i would say the - counterargument is the case. if we fail to— counterargument is the case. if we fail to invest now in critical infrastructure, that israel, other forms— infrastructure, that israel, other forms of— infrastructure, that israel, other forms of transport, broadband, energy. — forms of transport, broadband, energy. if— forms of transport, broadband, energy, if we fail to invest today we will _ energy, if we fail to invest today we will not — energy, if we fail to invest today we will not meet the climate change objectives _ we will not meet the climate change objectives and not build the economy of the _ objectives and not build the economy of the future and not bring forward skilled _ of the future and not bring forward skilled working—class jobs for our regions — skilled working—class jobs for our regions. but skilled working-class 'obs for our reuions. �* , ., skilled working-class 'obs for our reuions. �* , . skilled working-class 'obs for our reuions. �* ., , regions. but they are saying nearly £100 billion _ regions. but they are saying nearly £100 billion of — regions. but they are saying nearly £100 billion of investment. - regions. but they are saying nearly £100 billion of investment. let's . £100 billion of investment. let's bear in mind _
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£100 billion of investment. let's bear in mind of— £100 billion of investment. let's bear in mind of the _ £100 billion of investment. let's bear in mind of the £96 - £100 billion of investment. let's hear in mind of the £96 billion an bear in mind of the £96 billion an ounce. _ bear in mind of the £96 billion an ounce. 40 — bear in mind of the £96 billion an ounce, 40 billion is already spent an hour— ounce, 40 billion is already spent an hour from london to crewe. that's not investment in the north of england. — not investment in the north of england, that is money already baked into the _ england, that is money already baked into the additional scheme and what the eastern leg would have provided was national connectivity that would have got _ was national connectivity that would have got freight off the rails and provided — have got freight off the rails and provided more commuter services and far more _ provided more commuter services and far more efficient services rather than _ far more efficient services rather than people waiting for a train that doesn't _ than people waiting for a train that doesn't turn up or a train that is so expensive that it means it's cheaper— so expensive that it means it's cheaper to— so expensive that it means it's cheaper to go by car. these are huge issues _ cheaper to go by car. these are huge issues the _ cheaper to go by car. these are huge issues the government needs to plan for and _ issues the government needs to plan for and it— issues the government needs to plan for and it transcends this parliament. the decisions being taken _ parliament. the decisions being taken today are generational responsibilities and if the government do not do what they say they will— government do not do what they say they will do, generations will be letdown — they will do, generations will be letdown. to they will do, generations will be let down. ., , . ., ., let down. to be clear, for the labour party. _ let down. to be clear, for the labour party, if— let down. to be clear, for the labour party, if you - let down. to be clear, for the labour party, if you were - let down. to be clear, for the labour party, if you were in l let down. to be clear, for the - labour party, if you were in power, would you be committing to this regardless? and the bill can go up and it can cost a lot more than planned budget would spend the money and do it regardless and commit completely forever?— completely forever? trust in olitics completely forever? trust in politics is — completely forever? trust in politics is really _ completely forever? trust in politics is really important i completely forever? trust in i politics is really important and when — politics is really important and when you _ politics is really important and when you make a promise you have to stick to— when you make a promise you have to stick to it _ when you make a promise you have to stick to it and — when you make a promise you have to stick to it and it's the same for boris _ stick to it and it's the same for borisjohnson. in 2019 stick to it and it's the same for boris johnson. in 2019 when he
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stick to it and it's the same for borisjohnson. in 2019 when he made the promise _ borisjohnson. in 2019 when he made the promise for hsz, northern powerhouse rail he also made a promise — powerhouse rail he also made a promise for 4000 new zero emission buses— promise for 4000 new zero emission buses and _ promise for 4000 new zero emission buses and how many are on the road? not a _ buses and how many are on the road? not a zero _ buses and how many are on the road? not a zero 7 _ buses and how many are on the road? not a zero ? single one. british bus manufacturers have not had a single order— manufacturers have not had a single order and _ manufacturers have not had a single order and that is the difference, when _ order and that is the difference, when the — order and that is the difference, when the labour party says we will do something, we will do it. jim mcmahon. _ do something, we will do it. j “n mcmahon, thanks forjoining us on breakfast. after raising millions of pounds for motor neurone disease by running seven marathons in seven days, the rugby league legend kevin sinfield is nowjust days away from his toughest challenge yet. it's ridiculous to think about. on monday, kevin will run 101 miles in just 24 hours. he's doing it once again to help his friend and former teammate, rob burrow, who was diagnosed with mnd in 2019. graham satchell has been to see how the final preparations are going.
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this could be the biggest challenge that he will ever have to do. this isjust extraordinary, isn't it? i mean, 101 miles in 24 hours. it's beyond belief. i know it's going to be horrific. and it's going to be really, really tough. but it's supposed to be. leeds beckett university, and final medical checks before next week's extraordinary challenge. kevin sinfield is planning to run 101 miles in 24 hours. four marathons back—to—back
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with no sleep. it's good to know i'm alive. for a start off. it's great when you get to tap into some real. expertise and the support, - it's really important for all of us. the medical team are checking lactate and glucose levels under the watchful eye of professor ben jones. running through the night, sleep—deprived, glycogen—depleted, fatigued, we've got to make sure that actually he doesn't injure or hurt himself. so we've estimated his calorie expenditure to be around 13,000 calories. we are going to feed him around 900 calories every two hours. it'll be wraps, paninis, pizzas, foods he enjoys eating. what's the verdict? he is a very fit - a specimen of a man. he motivates us to do things we don't think we can do that, and he does that by leading by example and by doing things that nobody should be able to do.
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this was kev�*s last challenge, running seven marathons in seven days. he raised millions of pounds for the motor neurone disease association. he's running for his team—mate and best friend, rob burrow, diagnosed with mnd in 2019. together with other high—profile sports stars, they have campaigned for more funding for mnd. this week, the government pledged £50 million. i think he's absolutely extraordinary. he's been a beacon of hope and inspiration for our community, and that's why that £50 million is so important. we've never been closer to some successful treatments for motor neurone disease and one day, a cure, of course. time for one final surprise. welcome aboard. thank you. nice to meet you. nice, this. very kind of you. this is chris smith. he saw kev�*s new challenge on this programme and decided
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he wanted to help. when i realised it was going to be several stops along the way, - i thought, we need a support vehicle for this challenge. _ it's really kind of you. thank you. lovely. great have you on board n' all. having run four marathons, - not one after the other, myself, i can understand exactly how much effort he is putting _ putting into fundraising. there's so many unknowns in this, there's so many uncertainties. but people with mnd don't have a choice and we won't have a choice when we start on monday. that's the reason we're running. he isa he is a powerful man, isn't he? and he is driven. he
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he is a powerful man, isn't he? and he is driven-— he is driven. he is a powerful talk as well in that _ he is driven. he is a powerful talk as well in that quiet, _ he is driven. he is a powerful talk as well in that quiet, understated j as well in that quiet, understated way. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. transport for london has warned about significant cuts to bus and tube services in london, because of growing gaps in its funding. tfl says the slow recovery in passenger income from its services and inflationary pressures following the pandemic, means it may need to cut bus services by a fifth, and cut tube funding by almost 10 percent. a new finance committee report describes a "managed decline" scenario. it will be discussed later today. a london nightclub has started offering urine and drinks testing after an increase nationally in reports of women being spiked by injection. clubbers at xoyo near old street can
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access the tests through a medic who is based on site each night. so far the service has been used once and that individual test returned a negative result. the closure of two children's centres in hackney has been paused after local parents mounted a campaign to keep them open. they've been protesting to save fernbank and hillside centres in north hackney from closure. the council said it will now hold a wider review of its provision for early years children next year. a new plaque in memory of colin townsley, a firefighter who died in the 1987 kings cross fire will be unveiled at the station today. the fire is one of the worst in recent british history, with 31 people losing their lives and more than 100 people being badly injured. colin townsley was among the first group of firefighters on the scene to the fire. well if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking
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right now. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is feeling quite chilly, at least first thing this morning, but milder air is on the way. high pressure is in charge and there is a warm front overnight to the north of the uk which is dragging in a milderair, so for us it means a warmer day today with temperatures above average for the middle of november. we might get a bit of hazy sunshine first thing this morning, ahead of the milder air arriving but with the mild air comes moisture and the cloud is going to increase and thicken. temperatures today, a mild 14 celsius. we will hang onto these conditions overnight, still with the milder air, so temperatures not dropping too far and still with the cloud you could get some missed by dawn tomorrow. the minimum temperature
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between nine and 11 celsius, so much milder than recently. we still have mild air for friday and as we head into saturday but you will notice for sunday that plunge of colder air coming from the north, a cold front sweeping south that will bring a northerly flow and a northerly breeze for sunday and also much chillier air and the chilly air will stay with us through the end of sunday and into next week. i'm back with the latest in half an hour. we will see you soon. good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. our headlines today. a £96 billion rail plan for the midlands and north of england — but there's anger that the hs2 line from the east midlands to leeds is set to be scrapped. a witness to the liverpool terror attack — who was just metres
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away from the blast — tells the bbc about the moment he tried to pull the bomber from the burning taxi. i was thinking of ways to try and get him out. i couldn't really tell if he was in the back or the front because ofjust the whole positioning and the flames and the smoke. new legal action against actor alec baldwin, who is accused of playing russian roulette when he fired a gun on set, killing a colleague. more than a thousand people have already come forward to contact the inquiry into racism in cricket, following azeem rafiq's emotional testimony about his own experiences at yorkshire. good morning. there is a big difference in temperatures to date north to south. clear skies in the south. today is going to be very cloudy for most. a breezy or windy in the north. rain to look out for as well. details coming up. good morning. it's thursday, the 18th of november. our main story. it's thursday, the 18th of november.
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the government is planning to publish a £96 billion plan for the rail network in the midlands and the north of england. but there's anger that the section of high speed 2, stretching from the east midlands to leeds, is now expected to be scrapped. instead of building a brand new line between manchester and leeds, there are reports the existing track will be upgraded. ministers insist their changes will mean improvements happen up to a decade earlier. dan johnson reports. it's been described as the biggest ever public investment in our rail network, modernising routes more quickly and levelling up cities and regions, the government says. but the integrated rail plan focuses on improving existing lines instead of building new ones. hs2 will connect london with birmingham and manchester, but it now looks like the planned eastern leg will stop in the east midlands rather than reaching yorkshire. and it's expected that there will be no new trans—pennine route between manchester, bradford and leeds.
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the government says upgrades to the current lines can deliver similar improvements to journey times and capacity years earlier. but it will leave many in the north disappointed. my real concern is that our victorian infrastructure is creaking in the north of england. we have already tried to upgrade the existing line between leeds and manchester and it's taken ten years. we've onlyjust started to see shovels in the ground. i don't believe that upgrading infrastructure will be faster in delivering results than building new lines. these were the front pages of many regional papers this week, calling for the government to stand by earlier promises. this was borisjohnson's pledge two years ago. i want to be the prime minister who does with northern powerhouse rail what we did for crossrail in london. and today, i am going to deliver on my commitment to that vision with a pledge to fund the leeds to manchester route. this is a £96 billion investment plan, though it's not all new money.
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it includes 360 million to roll out london—style contactless ticketing across commuter networks. that will also feature price caps applying across trains, trams and buses. but new rail routes were more than 20 years away, and the government says upgrading the existing network will mean similarjourney times ten years sooner. the full details will be published later. dan johnson, bbc news. we'll be talking to the deputy prime minister dominic raab about that story at just after 7:30 this morning. mps have backed the government's proposals to ban them from taking on certain roles outside parliament, and rejected a labour plan to ban almost all second jobs. the votes came at the end of another stormy day, dominated by the row over sleaze. let's speak now to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. good morning. lots to talk about, really. a difficult day. the prime
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minister had a prime minister's questions row. then he was giving evidence to a parliamentary select committee. then he had to meet his own mps, who were not very happy. yes, there were quite a lot of conservative mps are unhappy for various— conservative mps are unhappy for various reasons for how this whole situation _ various reasons for how this whole situation has been handled. some of them _ situation has been handled. some of them think— situation has been handled. some of them think this new proposal, which is still— them think this new proposal, which is still a _ them think this new proposal, which is still a proposal, hasn't happened yet. is still a proposal, hasn't happened vet mps— is still a proposal, hasn't happened yet. mps are assessed for how much time they— yet. mps are assessed for how much time they spend on outside interests, they believe that is impractical. some believe he is bowing — impractical. some believe he is bowing to— impractical. some believe he is bowing to pressure from labour which is bad _ bowing to pressure from labour which is bad politics as far as they are concerned _ is bad politics as far as they are concerned. and you get some conservative mps who say his handling _ conservative mps who say his handling of this whole fiasco shows that maybe he just doesn't have quite _ that maybe he just doesn't have quite as— that maybe he just doesn't have quite as much warmth as they thought he did _ quite as much warmth as they thought he did 0r— quite as much warmth as they thought he did. orthat quite as much warmth as they thought he did. or that hisjudgment is lacking — he did. or that hisjudgment is lacking. he was at a meeting last night _ lacking. he was at a meeting last night with— lacking. he was at a meeting last night with his backbenchers where they came out with mixed reviews. indeed _ they came out with mixed reviews. indeed. and also, there was that phrase, he admitted actually, said, we are sorry, he said he was driving
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the car into the ditch on a clear road. it was about how he was leading his party over these issues? yes, and it was notable that for a prime _ yes, and it was notable that for a prime minister who doesn't apologise very often— prime minister who doesn't apologise very often or admit mistakes very often, _ very often or admit mistakes very often, he — very often or admit mistakes very often, he is — very often or admit mistakes very often, he is clearly admitting he -ot often, he is clearly admitting he got it— often, he is clearly admitting he got it wrong when it came to the case _ got it wrong when it came to the case against owen paterson, the former— case against owen paterson, the former conservative mp and cabinet minister. _ former conservative mp and cabinet minister, that sparked all of this. wherever— minister, that sparked all of this. wherever he is going he is as divided — wherever he is going he is as divided and he is putting his hands up divided and he is putting his hands up and _ divided and he is putting his hands up and saying he got it wrong. it is not quite _ up and saying he got it wrong. it is not quite the same as saying sorry, but he _ not quite the same as saying sorry, but he is _ not quite the same as saying sorry, but he is definitely feeling a bit regretful. i would but he is definitely feeling a bit regretful. iwould imagine he is regretful— regretful. iwould imagine he is regretful that some of his backers regretful that some of his hackers and supporters are getting pretty angry— and supporters are getting pretty angry with him about this. adam, thank you- _ angry with him about this. adam, thank you. those _ angry with him about this. adam, thank you. those issues - angry with him about this. adam, thank you. those issues we - angry with him about this. adam, thank you. those issues we will l angry with him about this. adam, l thank you. those issues we will be discussing with deputy prime minister dominic raab. there are concerns over the chinese tennis player, peng shuai, who has not been heard from since making sexual assault allegations against a prominent politician.
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an email — which is said to have come from her — has been published on chinese state media, but there are doubts about its authenticity. the head of the women's tennis association has cast doubts about its authenticity. let's speak to our correspondent robin brant in shanghai. this is a concerning story, a really odd story. what can you tell us? morning. it is bordering on the sinister — morning. it is bordering on the sinister. peng shuai, she is 35, she is known _ sinister. peng shuai, she is 35, she is known in — sinister. peng shuai, she is 35, she is known in this country as a tennis star in— is known in this country as a tennis star in this — is known in this country as a tennis star in this country. she has not been _ star in this country. she has not been heard _ star in this country. she has not been heard of for the last two weeks after she _ been heard of for the last two weeks after she made allegations against a senior— after she made allegations against a senior politician, a man she said she was— senior politician, a man she said she was forced to have sex with and then a _ she was forced to have sex with and then a consensual sexual relationship between the two of them followed _ relationship between the two of them followed. an e—mail has popped up today— followed. an e—mail has popped up today picked up by an arm of chinese state media, in which she reportedly says state media, in which she reportedly savs those _
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state media, in which she reportedly says those allegations are false. she says — says those allegations are false. she says everything is fine and she is resting _ she says everything is fine and she is resting at home. this e—mail, apparently— is resting at home. this e—mail, apparently —— sent to the head of the wta, — apparently —— sent to the head of the wta, starts with the phrase, hello, _ the wta, starts with the phrase, hello, everyone. there is also apparently an image used. all of this leading to suspicion and doubt about— this leading to suspicion and doubt about the — this leading to suspicion and doubt about the authenticity and adding concern _ about the authenticity and adding concern about her well— being and about the authenticity and adding concern about her well—being and her whereabouts. quite a startling statement from the wta following on from this _ statement from the wta following on from this. steve simon finds it hard to believe _ from this. steve simon finds it hard to believe that the e—mail was written — to believe that the e—mail was written by her, calling on the authorities to further investigate where _ authorities to further investigate where she is, find out if she is ok, but also, _ where she is, find out if she is ok, but also, go — where she is, find out if she is ok, but also, go back to her original allegations. for- allegations. for now, robin brant, thank allegations. — for now, robin brant, thank you. a new lawsuit against the hollywood actor, alec baldwin, has alleged the film script did not require him to fire a gun when he fatally shot the cinematographer, halyna hutchins, last month. the script supervisor for the western film rust is requesting damages for claims including assault and emotional distress. david willis reports.
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barely a month on, and the lawsuits are growing. script supervisor mamie mitchell the latest to sue after a shot fired by alec baldwin killed a colleague just a few feet away from her. i heard someone moaning and i turned around and my director was falling backwards and holding his upper body. and i turned around toward alec and i saw halyna going down toward the left of me. halyna hutchins died after being shot in the stomach by a bullet which also injured the film's director. mamie mitchell was the first to call 9/11. we have two people accidentally shot on a movie set by a prop gun. we need help immediately. her lawsuit claimed alec baldwin should have checked the gun himself before firing it, and she is suing him and the film's produces for negligence.
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mr baldwin chose to play russian roulette when he fired a gun without checking it, and without having the armour to do so in his presence. his behaviour, and that of the producers on rust, was reckless. how live ammunition made it onto the film set in the foothills of northern new mexico is at the centre of an investigation that's been carried by local police. the person responsible for guns on the set has claimed they were sabotaged, and several crew members are known to have walked off the production only hours before the shooting, citing concerns over safety. mamie mitchell is also claiming that the scene alec baldwin was rehearsing at the time of the shooting didn't actually call for a gun to be fired. and she says the resulting tragedy will live with her forever. i'll never forget what happened on the set of rust that day.
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i relive the shooting and the sound of the explosion from the gun over and over again. i'm depressed, i don't feel safe. i feel like at any moment anything could happen to me, and to those i care about that are standing close to me. mamie mitchell is seeking undisclosed damages. there's been no response to the lawsuit from alec baldwin. previously he said he was heartbroken by the incident and was fully cooperating with the police inquiry. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. 11 minutes past seven. how would you feel about taking your laptop or your phone a party to repair it yourself? would you do it? would you dare? ., the tech giant, apple, is to start selling spare parts and tools — so that customers can carry out their own repairs on iphones and macs. the "self—service repair" programme will begin
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in the united states next year before expanding to more countries. i suppose this also is in response to criticisms that you are constantly being told to update your phone, update your laptop, your macbook, whatever. and it's being seen as apple saying, we want you to spend more money. this way it is more sustainable.— spend more money. this way it is more sustainable. you've got to be brave though _ more sustainable. you've got to be brave though to _ more sustainable. you've got to be brave though to give _ more sustainable. you've got to be brave though to give it _ more sustainable. you've got to be brave though to give it a _ more sustainable. you've got to be brave though to give it a go. - more sustainable. you've got to be brave though to give it a go. caroll brave though to give it a go. carol would do it- _ brave though to give it a go. carol would do it. she _ brave though to give it a go. carol would do it. she has— brave though to give it a go. carol would do it. she has enough - brave though to give it a go. carol would do it. she has enough to i brave though to give it a go. carol l would do it. she has enough to deal with with that _ would do it. she has enough to deal with with that little _ would do it. she has enough to deal with with that little thing _ would do it. she has enough to deal with with that little thing she - with with that little thing she clicks in her hand. absolutely right. when this goes wrong, it is devastating. good morning. depending on where you are waking up this morning, it is a mild start to the day. let me show you some of the temperatures. only 2 degrees in findon in the south. you have got a clear skies. but under all the cloud temperatures are much higher. 15 degrees in aberdeen at the moment. we have also got some cloud and some rain in the north and
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west of the country. a lot of cloud coming and producing drizzle across parts of wales, the south west, especially in the hills and coast. after early brightness were central, southern and eastern part of the uk, that cloud will build through the day. it is the south that will have the lightest winds today for northern ireland, northern ireland and scotland, it windy day. particularly gusty across the north and the west. but these are the temperatures. ranging from 11 to about 17 degrees across parts of eastern scotland. but even parts of north—east england could hit 16 degrees. this is down to... this evening and overnight a fair bit of cloud, still thick enough for some drizzle. rain in the north and west. wendy in the north. it is going to be mild again tonight. temperatures are not really falling away too much. again, tend to about 13 degrees. pretty good maximum temperatures at this stage of
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november. into friday, a fair bit of cloud. not as much as today. we are more likely to see more breaks in it across england, wales and northern ireland. where we have got a thick as cloud in parts of scotland we could see some drizzle and we still have this rain across the north. this rain is quite salient. it is quite salient. as it sinks southwards over the weekend, getting to the far south by southwards over the weekend, getting to the far south by sunday, southwards over the weekend, getting to the far south by sunday, colder air will come our way. carol, thank you. what do you actually call that little thing? its, actually call that little thing? a clicker. is that its official name? yes. are you sure? i am positive. thank you, carol. 14 minutes past seven. thank you, carol. 14 minutes past seven- mike _ thank you, carol. 14 minutes past seven. mike will— thank you, carol. 14 minutes past seven. mike will have _ thank you, carol. 14 minutes past seven. mike will have the - thank you, carol. 14 minutes past seven. mike will have the sport i seven. mike will have the sport later in this hour. and at half past seven we will be talking to dominic raab. �* , ., ,
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seven we will be talking to dominic raab. . , ., , ., ., raab. and update this morning on the sto from raab. and update this morning on the story from the — raab. and update this morning on the story from the weekend, _ raab. and update this morning on the story from the weekend, that - raab. and update this morning on the story from the weekend, that blast i story from the weekend, that blast in liverpool. a couple who were metres away from a bomb that exploded in a taxi outside liverpool women's hospital, say they have been left in shock by the attack. liam spencer and stephanie stitt were in their car at the time, and mr spencer tried to pull the bomberfrom the burning wreckage of the taxi. our special correspondent ed thomas has this report. the explosion just went off and it shook the hospital building. and then i got closer to the car and i could smell the smoke. i could see the man in the back. the could smell the smoke. i could see the man in the back.— could smell the smoke. i could see the man in the back. the moment liam and stephanie — the man in the back. the moment liam and stephanie will— the man in the back. the moment liam and stephanie will never— the man in the back. the moment liam and stephanie will never forget. - the man in the back. the moment liam and stephanie will never forget. as - and stephanie will neverforget. as david perry's taxi rolls in, they werejust david perry's taxi rolls in, they were just metres away. so david perry's taxi rolls in, they were just metres away. were 'ust metres away. so that's my car were just metres away. so that's my car there, were just metres away. so that's my car there. with _ were just metres away. so that's my car there, with my _ were just metres away. so that's my car there, with my girlfriend - car there, with my girlfriend inside. and the explosion happens. steph gets out of the car. i grab
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her. i push her to the side, so is her. i push her to the side, so is he goes to reception where she is safe. ~ ., ., he goes to reception where she is safe. ~ . ., i. he goes to reception where she is safe. . ., ., ., , he goes to reception where she is safe. . ., ., ., , safe. what are your emotions at this moment? i — safe. what are your emotions at this moment? i was _ safe. what are your emotions at this moment? i wasjust _ safe. what are your emotions at this moment? i wasjust on _ safe. what are your emotions at this moment? i wasjust on pure - moment? i was 'ust on pure adrenaline. _ moment? i was 'ust on pure adrenaline. my _ moment? i wasjust on pure adrenaline. my biggest - moment? i wasjust on pure adrenaline. my biggest fear| moment? i wasjust on pure - adrenaline. my biggest fear was her getting hurt. adrenaline. my biggest fear was her getting hurt-— getting hurt. everyone was like, oh m god, getting hurt. everyone was like, oh my god. is — getting hurt. everyone was like, oh my god, is there _ getting hurt. everyone was like, oh my god, is there a _ getting hurt. everyone was like, oh my god, is there a baby _ getting hurt. everyone was like, oh my god, is there a baby in - getting hurt. everyone was like, oh my god, is there a baby in the - getting hurt. everyone was like, oh i my god, is there a baby in the back? ithink— my god, is there a baby in the back? i think that _ my god, is there a baby in the back? i think that is — my god, is there a baby in the back? i think that is why i came running back— i think that is why i came running back out — i think that is why i came running back out i— i think that is why i came running back out. i was like, is there a baby— back out. i was like, is there a baby in— back out. i was like, is there a baby in the _ back out. i was like, is there a baby in the back? we find that it was a _ baby in the back? we find that it was a passenger. everyone was screaming. 999. there was a passenger. screaming. 999. there was a passenger-— screaming. 999. there was a ttassener. . , ., ., , passenger. liam runs back towards the car. passenger. liam runs back towards the car- he — passenger. liam runs back towards the car. he sees _ passenger. liam runs back towards the car. he sees the _ passenger. liam runs back towards the car. he sees the driver, - passenger. liam runs back towards the car. he sees the driver, david i the car. he sees the driver, david perry, is out and say. he pauses. before returning to try and save the life of the bomber, emad al swealmeen. i life of the bomber, emad al swealmeen.— life of the bomber, emad al swealmeen. .., , , swealmeen. i could smell the smoke. i could see the _ swealmeen. i could smell the smoke. i could see the man _ swealmeen. i could smell the smoke. i could see the man in _ swealmeen. i could smell the smoke. i could see the man in the _ swealmeen. i could smell the smoke. i could see the man in the back. - i could see the man in the back. what did you say to him? i didn't say much- _ what did you say to him? i didn't say much- i— what did you say to him? i didn't say much- liust _ what did you say to him? i didn't say much. ijust seen _ what did you say to him? i didn't say much. ijust seen there - what did you say to him? i didn't say much. i just seen there was i say much. ijust seen there was someone there. i didn't even say nothing, i wasjust someone there. i didn't even say nothing, i was just thinking someone there. i didn't even say nothing, i wasjust thinking of someone there. i didn't even say nothing, i was just thinking of ways to try to get him out. i couldn't really tell if he was in the back or the front because of the whole
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positioning of the flames and the smoke. it was hard to make out what was going on. i wasjust smoke. it was hard to make out what was going on. i was just trying to find the best way to pull him out. i couldn't reach a hold of him without setting myself on fire. i think by that point we'd already done all we could. ., that point we'd already done all we could-- steph _ that point we'd already done all we could.- steph is _ that point we'd already done all we could.- steph is 20. - that point we'd already done all we could. yeah. steph is 20. liam 21. both are finding _ could. yeah. steph is 20. liam 21. both are finding it _ could. yeah. steph is 20. liam 21. both are finding it difficult - could. yeah. steph is 20. liam 21. both are finding it difficult to - both are finding it difficult to cope. both are finding it difficult to co e. �* , , both are finding it difficult to coe. �* , , , , cope. i'm struggling with my sleep. i think about _ cope. i'm struggling with my sleep. i think about the _ cope. i'm struggling with my sleep. i think about the whole _ cope. i'm struggling with my sleep. i think about the whole situation i i think about the whole situation and then the adrenaline kicks in again. then it'sjust like i'm reliving the moment. it is not as mentally scarring for me, but it does cause me to feel sick and my head hurts when i think about it, just because i'm losing that sleep. it is replayed in your mind, the whole — it is replayed in your mind, the whole situation. when you finally -et whole situation. when you finally get to _ whole situation. when you finally get to sleep it is in your dreams, so you _ get to sleep it is in your dreams, so you can't— get to sleep it is in your dreams, so you can't really escape it in a sense — so you can't really escape it in a sense. ~ , ., so you can't really escape it in a sense. ~ , . ., .., so you can't really escape it in a sense. ~ , . ., .. ., sense. my mum and dad came to the hosital. sense. my mum and dad came to the hospital- seeing _ sense. my mum and dad came to the hospital. seeing my—
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sense. my mum and dad came to the hospital. seeing my mum _ sense. my mum and dad came to the hospital. seeing my mum and - sense. my mum and dad came to the| hospital. seeing my mum and staying —— mag seeing steph's mum in that state, broke my heart. i never want to put any family through that. the man responsible, emad al swealmeen, planned this attack since april. police also say he rented a property here as a base to build the bomb. during seven years in the uk, his repeated asylum applications had been refused and at that time he had suffered periods of mental illness. once you find out this was a terrorism investigation, what was your reaction to that? you wouldn't think anyone _ your reaction to that? you wouldn't think anyone would _ your reaction to that? you wouldn't think anyone would ever— your reaction to that? you wouldn't think anyone would ever want - your reaction to that? you wouldn't think anyone would ever want to i your reaction to that? you wouldn't i think anyone would ever want to harm tingly— think anyone would ever want to harm tingly babies and children more than anythinq _ tingly babies and children more than anything. it�*s tingly babies and children more than an hint, �*, , , tingly babies and children more than an hint. �*, anything. it's probably the most innocent place _ anything. it's probably the most innocent place on _ anything. it's probably the most innocent place on earth. - anything. it's probably the most innocent place on earth. i've - anything. it's probably the most l innocent place on earth. i've been to concerts where i thought, you know, what if this does happen tonight? or out in public, where you are in public places. but you never think of all the hospitals, a baby is's hospital, really. you just
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don't think that. i is's hospital, really. you 'ust don't think thati don't think that. i was in disbelief. _ don't think that. i was in disbelief. it _ don't think that. i was in disbelief. it is _ don't think that. i was in i disbelief. it is remarkable, don't think that. i was in - disbelief. it is remarkable, liam, that in that moment, the panicky felt for other people, your partner and the person who is suspected of making this explosive device? don’t making this explosive device? don't to around making this explosive device? don't go around -- _ making this explosive device? don't go around -- l _ making this explosive device? don't go around -- i don't _ making this explosive device? don't go around -- i don't go _ making this explosive device? dm�*t go around —— i don't go around thinking he was the people. i didn't know the situation at the time. there was just a man in that car. i hope if i was ever in that situation god forbid, or if steph was, or anyone was, somebody would help. find anyone was, somebody would help. and ou want anyone was, somebody would help. and you want to thank the doctors and nurses who came to you afterwards? just the little things they did to help us— just the little things they did to help us was amazing. find just the little things they did to help us was amazing.— just the little things they did to help us was amazing. and the guards and the people _ help us was amazing. and the guards and the people at _ help us was amazing. and the guards and the people at reception - help us was amazing. and the guards and the people at reception at - help us was amazing. and the guards and the people at reception at the i and the people at reception at the women's hospital i worked with for years, i can't thank them enough for how they were and how they helped us afterwards, even the comfort they gave us, i can't thank people enough. very lucky to be alive. it’s enough. very lucky to be alive. it's sca 'ust enough. very lucky to be alive. it's scaryjust to think about how things could _ scaryjust to think about how things could have — scaryjust to think about how things could have been different, to be honest — could have been different, to be honest. you do struggle with, is it
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ever going — honest. you do struggle with, is it ever going to happen again? am i going— ever going to happen again? am i going to— ever going to happen again? am i going to get over this? obviously i have set— going to get over this? obviously i have set myself and my family, i'm not going _ have set myself and my family, i'm not going to let it affect me, it is not going to let it affect me, it is not going — not going to let it affect me, it is not going to let it affect me, it is not going to have a hold of my life. there _ not going to have a hold of my life. there is _ not going to have a hold of my life. there is deftly summary watching over both of us. i do there is deftly summary watching over both of us.— over both of us. i do feel very luc . over both of us. i do feel very lucky- yeah. _ over both of us. i do feel very lucky. yeah, looking - over both of us. i do feel very lucky. yeah, looking to - over both of us. i do feel very lucky. yeah, looking to be i over both of us. i do feel very i lucky. yeah, looking to be alive. understandable. _ 20 minutes past seven. amazon says uk customers will not be able to pay for goods using a visa credit card from january, blaming the high cost of payments. the online retailer emailed customers yesterday, to confirm the move would take effect from the 19th of january, but said that no other credit cards, or visa debit cards, would be included in the ban. let's get more detail on this from the consumer affairs journalist felicity hannah. good morning. ok, whatare good morning. ok, what are these fees that amazon is so upset about?
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you often hear about certain credit card brands not being accepted by smaller retailers, but you would think amazon, you would think... you would think amazon, you would think. .. you would think— think amazon, you would think... you would think they have the cloud and could _ would think they have the cloud and could afford any credit card. the when _ could afford any credit card. the when you — could afford any credit card. the when you most about is american express — when you most about is american express a— when you most about is american express. a lot of retailers don't accept — express. a lot of retailers don't accept that. amazon will continue accepting — accept that. amazon will continue accepting that. it isjust visa credit— accepting that. it isjust visa credit cards they have complained about _ credit cards they have complained about it — credit cards they have complained about. it simply says the fees are much _ about. it simply says the fees are much too — about. it simply says the fees are much too high. it says that the technology is improving, the fees should _ technology is improving, the fees should be — technology is improving, the fees should be coming down. they are seeing _ should be coming down. they are seeing fees potentially increasing. the british retail consortium complained about fees last year, they said — complained about fees last year, they said they had more than doubled in the _ they said they had more than doubled in the past _ they said they had more than doubled in the past two years across all credit — in the past two years across all credit card _ in the past two years across all credit card companies. this is something a lot of retailers have hadm _ something a lot of retailers have had... , . ., , something a lot of retailers have had... , .. ,., ., ., had... these claims on average it receives less _ had... these claims on average it receives less than _ had... these claims on average it receives less than 0.196 _ had... these claims on average it receives less than 0.196 of - had... these claims on average it receives less than 0.196 of the - had... these claims on average it i receives less than 0.196 of the value receives less than 0.1% of the value of a purchase. ok, receives less than 0.1% of the value ofa purchase. ok, in receives less than 0.1% of the value of a purchase. ok, in terms of competition it doesn't want to say what it is getting, but that doesn't seem a lot? i what it is getting, but that doesn't seem a lot?— what it is getting, but that doesn't seem a lot? i know that amazon is not the only _ seem a lot? i know that amazon is not the only organisation -
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seem a lot? i know that amazon is not the only organisation to - not the only organisation to complain about this. the small business — complain about this. the small business federation says there is a lot of— business federation says there is a lot of pressure on small company is as well _ lot of pressure on small company is as well i_ lot of pressure on small company is as well. i think that over a series of transactions, over a as well. i think that over a series of transactions, overa number of transactions, it really add up. when you are _ transactions, it really add up. when you are an— transactions, it really add up. when you are an online giant like amazon, you are an online giant like amazon, you are _ you are an online giant like amazon, you are making so many transactions, drives— you are making so many transactions, drives for— you are making so many transactions, drives for efficiency all the time. that is— drives for efficiency all the time. that is one — drives for efficiency all the time. that is one of the reasons it is so profitable — that is one of the reasons it is so profitable. it tries to make everything as quick as possible, simple — everything as quick as possible, simple as— everything as quick as possible, simple as possible, as cheap as possible — simple as possible, as cheap as possible. over the many, simple as possible, as cheap as possible. overthe many, many transactions that happen through its website, _ transactions that happen through its website, it— transactions that happen through its website, it probably add up to a substantial amount. the website, it probably add up to a substantial amount.— website, it probably add up to a substantial amount. the online giant that is amazon, _ substantial amount. the online giant that is amazon, are _ substantial amount. the online giant that is amazon, are they _ substantial amount. the online giant that is amazon, are they flexing - substantial amount. the online giant that is amazon, are they flexing a i that is amazon, are they flexing a bit here? do they intend to see it through, or is this posturing? this is a really good — through, or is this posturing? this is a really good question. is it a bluff? _ is a really good question. is it a bluff? i— is a really good question. is it a bluff? ithink is a really good question. is it a bluff? i think probably only a handful— bluff? i think probably only a handful of people know. it is throwing _ handful of people know. it is throwing a lot of weight behind this _ throwing a lot of weight behind this it — throwing a lot of weight behind this it is — throwing a lot of weight behind this. it is making the announcement in the _ this. it is making the announcement in the run-up— this. it is making the announcement in the run—up to christmas. that is when _ in the run—up to christmas. that is when a _ in the run—up to christmas. that is when a lot— in the run—up to christmas. that is when a lot of— in the run—up to christmas. that is when a lot of people are really focused — when a lot of people are really focused on online shopping, using their credit — focused on online shopping, using their credit card, and getting everything in, often by amazon, before _ everything in, often by amazon, before christmas. but it has also put it _ before christmas. but it has also put it back — before christmas. but it has also put it back to the 19th ofjanuary. there _ put it back to the 19th ofjanuary. there is— put it back to the 19th ofjanuary. there is potentially time for them
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to come _ there is potentially time for them to come to — there is potentially time for them to come to some sort of agreement. these _ to come to some sort of agreement. these i— to come to some sort of agreement. these i have _ to come to some sort of agreement. these i have said they will keep talking — these i have said they will keep talking to — these i have said they will keep talking to amazon. amazon is throwing _ talking to amazon. amazon is throwing a lot of money behind this. it is offering consumers a financial incentive _ it is offering consumers a financial incentive if— it is offering consumers a financial incentive if they are affected, if they— incentive if they are affected, if they are — incentive if they are affected, if they are prime customers and they switch _ they are prime customers and they switch payment methods on the website, — switch payment methods on the website, they will get £20 off their next purchase. that is potentially quite _ next purchase. that is potentially quite a _ next purchase. that is potentially quite a good deal, something people will be _ quite a good deal, something people will be thinking about in the run—up to christmas. it is will be thinking about in the run-up to christmas-— to christmas. it is quite a risky move for— to christmas. it is quite a risky move for amazon, _ to christmas. it is quite a risky move for amazon, isn't - to christmas. it is quite a risky move for amazon, isn't it? - to christmas. it is quite a risky i move for amazon, isn't it? they to christmas. it is quite a risky - move for amazon, isn't it? they are megarich, they have a lot of power, but a lot of people use visa cards? it is the battle of the giants. who is going _ it is the battle of the giants. who is going to — it is the battle of the giants. who is going to win? or more importantly, who is going to blink first _ importantly, who is going to blink first. amazon is an organisation a lot of— first. amazon is an organisation a lot of people use by default. it was going _ lot of people use by default. it was going to _ lot of people use by default. it was going to blink first? | lot of people use by default. it was going to blink first?— going to blink first? i don't know. i think it is _ going to blink first? i don't know. i think it is interesting _ going to blink first? i don't know. i think it is interesting the - going to blink first? i don't know. i think it is interesting the words | i think it is interesting the words that have been used. amazon said this dispute is to do with pretty egregious price rises. that is pretty strong language. it is very
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stront pretty strong language. it is very strong language- _ pretty strong language. it is very strong language. i'm _ pretty strong language. it is very strong language. i'm sure - pretty strong language. it is very strong language. i'm sure these | strong language. i'm sure these tussles— strong language. i'm sure these tussles happen behind the scenes all the time _ tussles happen behind the scenes all the time but now it is happening in front— the time but now it is happening in front of— the time but now it is happening in front of everyone, lots of shouting. 0ther— front of everyone, lots of shouting. other brands happy with this. mastercard says it is important people have a choice. they talk to amazon all the time because they are two big global businesses. amazon is one of their top customers in the world. they are making hay, aren't they? it world. they are making hay, aren't the ? , , ., they? it is definitely an opportunity _ they? it is definitely an opportunity for - they? it is definitely an opportunity for other i they? it is definitely an - opportunity for other providers. they— opportunity for other providers. they have — opportunity for other providers. they have to consider, if it affects one, _ they have to consider, if it affects one. might — they have to consider, if it affects one, might it affect others? we have been talking — one, might it affect others? we have been talking this _ one, might it affect others? we have been talking this morning _ one, might it affect others? we have been talking this morning about - been talking this morning about apple letting people repair their own goods in the future bite repair kits and stuff. we were just having a word with felicity before we came to her on air. you have repaired your own kid? ii i to her on air. you have repaired your own kid?— to her on air. you have repaired your own kid? if i say i have done this, my husband _ your own kid? if i say i have done this, my husband might- your own kid? if i say i have done this, my husband might be - your own kid? if i say i have done i this, my husband might be watching and he _ this, my husband might be watching and he will— this, my husband might be watching and he will know he played a small but significant role. we fixed a screen — but significant role. we fixed a screen on _ but significant role. we fixed a screen on an ipad. we did it ourselves _ screen on an ipad. we did it ourselves. we did it well enough. we had to— ourselves. we did it well enough. we had to use _ ourselves. we did it well enough. we had to use gaffer tape to keep going and it— had to use gaffer tape to keep going and it did _ had to use gaffer tape to keep going and it did last a few more weeks after— and it did last a few more weeks after that — and it did last a few more weeks afterthat. | and it did last a few more weeks after that. ., ~ and it did last a few more weeks after that-—
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after that. i take that as a win. are ou after that. i take that as a win. are you really _ after that. i take that as a win. are you really going _ after that. i take that as a win. are you really going to - after that. i take that as a win. are you really going to take i after that. i take that as a win. i are you really going to take that after that. i take that as a win. - are you really going to take that as a win? i are you really going to take that as a win? ., are you really going to take that as a win? . ., ., ., ,, ., .,, ., a win? i am going to take that as a win. it a win? i am going to take that as a win- it was — a win? i am going to take that as a win- it was at _ a win? i am going to take that as a win. it was at the _ a win? i am going to take that as a win. it was at the end _ a win? i am going to take that as a win. it was at the end of— a win? i am going to take that as a win. it was at the end of its - a win? i am going to take that as a win. it was at the end of its life - win. it was at the end of its life and we — win. it was at the end of its life and we got _ win. it was at the end of its life and we got a few more weeks out of it. . , ., ~ , ., and we got a few more weeks out of it. _ ., 25 and we got a few more weeks out of it. . , ., ~ ,, 25 and and we got a few more weeks out of it-_ 25 and is - it. felicity, thank you. 25 and is ast it. felicity, thank you. 25 and is past seven- _ it. felicity, thank you. 25 and is past seven. good _ it. felicity, thank you. 25 and is past seven. good morning. - people forced to live with the debilitating effects of long covid often say they feel alone and anxious. but patients in blackburn, which has the highest number of recorded cases in the country, say support groups run by the council are helping a lot. abbiejones has been to one group to hear their stories. physically i look fine, but internally i don't. and sometimes i feel that people think i am a fraud. 11 months has passed and i've missed all that— 11 months has passed and i've missed all that time with my children. two young _ all that time with my children. two young children. all that time with my children. two young children-— young children. some days i can hardly get _ young children. some days i can hardly get out — young children. some days i can hardly get out of— young children. some days i can hardly get out of bed _ young children. some days i can hardly get out of bed and - young children. some days i can hardly get out of bed and that's| hardly get out of bed and that's because — hardly get out of bed and that's because i— hardly get out of bed and that's because i have _ hardly get out of bed and that's because i have been _ hardly get out of bed and that's because i have been going - hardly get out of bed and that's . because i have been going through hardly get out of bed and that's - because i have been going through a lot of— because i have been going through a lot of pain _ because i have been going through a lot of pain with — because i have been going through a lot of pain with my _ because i have been going through a lot of pain with my body. _ because i have been going through a lot of pain with my body. 'i'he'jtt - because i have been going through a lot of pain with my body.— lot of pain with my body. they live very different _ lot of pain with my body. they live very different lives _ lot of pain with my body. they live very different lives but _ lot of pain with my body. they live very different lives but are - lot of pain with my body. they live very different lives but are on - lot of pain with my body. they live very different lives but are on the | very different lives but are on the
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same difficultjourney, battling same difficult journey, battling debilitating same difficultjourney, battling debilitating health problems months after contracting covid. it leaves them feeling isolated and afraid. i felt like everything were getting on top of— felt like everything were getting on top of me — felt like everything were getting on top of me like— felt like everything were getting on top of me like a— felt like everything were getting on top of me. like a big _ felt like everything were getting on top of me. like a big heavy... - felt like everything were getting on top of me. like a big heavy... like| top of me. like a big heavy... like a big _ top of me. like a big heavy... like a big heavy— top of me. like a big heavy... like a big heavy blanket, _ top of me. like a big heavy... like a big heavy blanket, i— top of me. like a big heavy... like a big heavy blanket, i guess. - top of me. like a big heavy... like a big heavy blanket, i guess. i- top of me. like a big heavy... like a big heavy blanket, i guess. ifeltj a big heavy blanket, i guess. ifelt the point — a big heavy blanket, i guess. ifelt the point of— a big heavy blanket, i guess. ifelt the point of not _ a big heavy blanket, i guess. ifelt the point of not wanting _ a big heavy blanket, i guess. ifelt the point of not wanting to - a big heavy blanket, i guess. ifelt the point of not wanting to be - a big heavy blanket, i guess. i felt. the point of not wanting to be here, i guess— the point of not wanting to be here, i guess is— the point of not wanting to be here, i guess is the — the point of not wanting to be here, i guess is the word. _ the point of not wanting to be here, i guess is the word.— the point of not wanting to be here, i guess is the word. some days have been tuite i guess is the word. some days have been quite emotional. _ i guess is the word. some days have been quite emotional. and - i guess is the word. some days have been quite emotional. and me - been quite emotional. and me thinking, i may have are going to get back to normal? i’ee thinking, i may have are going to get back to normal? i've changed in the last 11 months. _ get back to normal? i've changed in the last 11 months. i— get back to normal? i've changed in the last 11 months. i overthink- the last 11 months. i overthink things— the last 11 months. i overthink things i— the last 11 months. i overthink things i would never have bothered me before — things i would never have bothered me before. for things i would never have bothered me before. ., ., , , things i would never have bothered me before. ., . , , me before. for the last seven weeks the have me before. for the last seven weeks they have been _ me before. for the last seven weeks they have been coming _ me before. for the last seven weeks they have been coming here - me before. for the last seven weeks they have been coming here to - me before. for the last seven weeks they have been coming here to long | they have been coming here to long covid support group in blackburn. the main thing with me at the moment is the travelling. —— tremor ring. sufferers can share their feelings, the lows and the victories, their experiences and strategies to cope
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and access help. i experiences and strategies to cope and access help.— experiences and strategies to cope and access help. i have been to the doctor today _ and access help. i have been to the doctor today and _ and access help. i have been to the doctor today and i _ and access help. i have been to the doctor today and i have _ and access help. i have been to the doctor today and i have been - doctor today and i have been referred _ doctor today and i have been referred to in urology. has this t-rou referred to in urology. has this group been _ referred to in urology. has this group been a _ referred to in urology. has this group been a lifeline? - referred to in urology. has this group been a lifeline? it - referred to in urology. has this group been a lifeline? it is - referred to in urology. has this group been a lifeline? it is like j referred to in urology. has this i group been a lifeline? it is like a weitht off group been a lifeline? it is like a weight off your— group been a lifeline? it is like a weight off your shoulder. - group been a lifeline? it is like a weight off your shoulder. oh - group been a lifeline? it is like a weight off your shoulder. oh my| weight off your shoulder. oh my goodness, there is somebody here that actually understands and knows what i am feeling, knows what i am expensive. ii i what i am feeling, knows what i am exensive. ., �* what i am feeling, knows what i am exensive. . �* expensive. if i hadn't come across this, this expensive. if i hadn't come across this. this group. _ expensive. if i hadn't come across this, this group, i _ expensive. if i hadn't come across this, this group, i suspect - expensive. if i hadn't come across this, this group, i suspect i - this, this group, i suspect i wouldn't _ this, this group, i suspect i wouldn't even _ this, this group, i suspect i wouldn't even be _ this, this group, i suspect i wouldn't even be here - this, this group, i suspect i- wouldn't even be here because i got such a _ wouldn't even be here because i got such a low— wouldn't even be here because i got such a low point _ wouldn't even be here because i got such a low point in— wouldn't even be here because i got such a low point in my— wouldn't even be here because i got such a low point in my life. - wouldn't even be here because i got such a low point in my life. [- wouldn't even be here because i got such a low point in my life. [find - such a low point in my life. i find them to be _ such a low point in my life. i find them to be trailblazers. - such a low point in my life. i find them to be trailblazers. the - them to be trailblazers. the progress _ them to be trailblazers. the progress is actually visible from the fact— progress is actually visible from the fact they are now confident to share _ the fact they are now confident to share their— the fact they are now confident to share their experiences, they are confident— share their experiences, they are confident to talk to each other about— confident to talk to each other about it — confident to talk to each other about it. �* ., ., ., , about it. but no one here has started treatment _ about it. but no one here has started treatment at - about it. but no one here has started treatment at a - about it. but no one here has started treatment at a long i about it. but no one here has- started treatment at a long covid clinic. getting help outside this group has been a struggle. there is no one source _ group has been a struggle. there is no one source of— group has been a struggle. there is no one source of support. - group has been a struggle. there is no one source of support. my - group has been a struggle. there is no one source of support. my gp i no one source of support. my gp doesn't know what the long covid clinic is doing, what the processes, what other support there might be for me. they are using me to feed into them.
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for me. they are using me to feed into them-— for me. they are using me to feed into them. ,, , ,., , , into them. the nhs, everybody needs to understand — into them. the nhs, everybody needs to understand what _ into them. the nhs, everybody needs to understand what long _ into them. the nhs, everybody needs to understand what long covid - into them. the nhs, everybody needs to understand what long covid is. - to understand what long covid is. and now — to understand what long covid is. and now kind of brush it under the carpet _ and now kind of brush it under the carpet but— and now kind of brush it under the caret. �* ., .,, ., and now kind of brush it under the caret. �* ., ., ., , carpet. but for those who have been heled carpet. but for those who have been helped here. — carpet. but for those who have been helped here, there _ carpet. but for those who have been helped here, there is _ carpet. but for those who have been helped here, there is no _ carpet. but for those who have been helped here, there is no hope - carpet. but for those who have been helped here, there is no hope for. helped here, there is no hope for the future. helped here, there is no hope for the future-— helped here, there is no hope for the future. . ., the future. light at the end of the tunnel, i guess. _ the future. light at the end of the tunnel, i guess. don't— the future. light at the end of the tunnel, i guess. don't be - the future. light at the end of the i tunnel, i guess. don't be frightened of coming _ tunnel, i guess. don't be frightened of coming forward. _ tunnel, i guess. don't be frightened of coming forward. these _ tunnel, i guess. don't be frightened of coming forward. these people i tunnel, i guess. don't be frightenedl of coming forward. these people are only here _ of coming forward. these people are only here to— of coming forward. these people are only hereto help _ of coming forward. these people are only here to help. [— of coming forward. these people are only here to help. [airi— of coming forward. these people are only here to help.— only here to help. i am emerging from this now _ only here to help. i am emerging from this now and _ only here to help. i am emerging from this now and i'm _ only here to help. i am emerging from this now and i'm still- only here to help. i am emerging from this now and i'm still a - only here to help. i am emerging from this now and i'm still a long way from — from this now and i'm still a long way from myself. but with time and by being _ way from myself. but with time and by being kind to yourself as well, there _ by being kind to yourself as well, there is— by being kind to yourself as well, there is hope and you can come out of the _ there is hope and you can come out of the other— there is hope and you can come out of the other side of it, undoubtedly. | of the other side of it, undoubtedly.- of the other side of it, undoubtedl . . ., ., ., , undoubtedly. i am not going to stop until i undoubtedly. i am not going to stop untili tet undoubtedly. i am not going to stop until i get to — undoubtedly. i am not going to stop until i get to what _ undoubtedly. i am not going to stop until i get to what i _ undoubtedly. i am not going to stop until i get to what i was _ undoubtedly. i am not going to stop until i get to what i was before. - until i get to what i was before. abryjones, bbc news, blackburn. good that people get to talk about it. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. this hello from bbc london. i'm victoria hollins. transport for london has warned about significant cuts to bus and tube services in london, because of growing gaps in its funding.
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tfl says the slow recovery in passenger income from its services and inflationary pressures following the pandemic, means it may need to cut bus services by a fifth, and cut tube funding by almost 10 percent. a new finance committee report describes a "managed decline" scenario. it will be discussed later today. plans for a big expansion of wimbledon tennis club have seen around 1000 people object to its planning application. the all england lawn tennis club wants to expand into the neighbouring wimbledon park golf club, which would see it span 67 hectares between wimbledon and wandsworth. the application did also recieve 30 letters of support. the closure of two children's centres in hackney has been paused after local parents mounted a campaign to keep them open. they've been protesting to save fernbank and hillside centres in north hackney from closure. the council said it will now hold a wider review of its provision for early years children next year. a new plaque in memory
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of colin townsley, a firefighter who died in the 1987 kings cross fire will be unveiled at the station today. the fire is one of the worst in recent british history, with 31 people losing their lives and more than 100 people being badly injured. colin townsley was among the first group of firefighters on the scene to the fire. on the tube there are severe delays on the metropolitan, hammersmith and city, circle line and northern lines. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is feeling quite chilly, at least first thing this morning, but milder air is on the way. high pressure is in charge and there is a warm front overnight to the north of the uk which is dragging in a milderair, so for us it means a warmer day today
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with temperatures above average for the middle of november. we might get a bit of hazy sunshine first thing this morning, ahead of the milder air arriving but with the mild air comes moisture and the cloud is going to increase and thicken. temperatures today, a mild 14 celsius. we will hang onto these conditions overnight, still with the milder air, so temperatures not dropping too far and still with the cloud you could get some mist by dawn tomorrow. the minimum temperature between nine and 11 celsius, so much milder than recently. we still have mild air for friday and as we head into saturday but you will notice for sunday that plunge of colder air coming from the north, a cold front sweeping south that will bring a northerly flow and a northerly breeze for sunday and also much chillier air and the chilly air will stay with us through the end of sunday and into next week. i will be back with the latest in an hour. there is always plenty more on
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the website at the usual address and we will see you soon. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. the former yorkshire cricketer azeem rafiq says that he hopes he can take his son to watch cricket at headingley in the future, when significant changes have been made to the game. it's just one of his relections on the future, since making his explosive testimony to mps earlier this week, where he accused the sport of being institutionally racist. azeem has been speaking to me about how he now feels. it was good to get it off my chest, and a burden i had been carrying on my own for a very long time, and it was important that i share it with other people and get my point across very clearly so people here know what i actually went through. i suppose in some ways, that is liberating.
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in other ways, it creates more issues for you. i've been very clear from the offset that this is something that really needs to change. we are in 2021, and we are still talking about racism and prejudice and the p—word being used so openly, i think it is time that we all did everything we could do to stamp it out. how are you going to measure that change that you want? what does the future of cricket in england look like for you? when will you know it has been worth it? i guess the measure will come from representation at all levels, and that doesn't mean just the playing staff or the coaching staff or in the boardroom, it means how many people are coming to watch the game. i think if we have facilities and we cater and welcome people in, people are going to come, but i think the game for a very long time has not cared about non—white people.
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i suppose the risk in the short term might be that this whole crisis has highlighted problems that might put some people off going to cricket going to cricket even more, off getting involved in cricket even more. i don't want my son to go anywhere near the game, but i would see it as an opportunity, and if the ecb together with the counties and the pca, if they saw it as an opportunity, they could really make a difference and show people like myself that cricket is a game for everyone and that we will be treated fairly, and then why wouldn't we come? because we love the game. you love the game. do you still love the game? well, look, right now it would be difficult for me to say that i love the game, but deep down i know i love this game. it's everything i've ever known and, look, nothing would make me more proud if we could take this game to what it should be and yes, a good, nice place for everyone.
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if the ecb came to you and said, azeem, we want to give you a formal role, come inside and try and change things from the inside would you be interested in that? i think it's really difficult. in the short term my wife and kids need me. they've sacrificed a lot, and i think a little bit of time needs to go there. i'm not sure whether inside or outside, i just want the outcomes. it if i was to take a formal role, they would have to have me as i am now, which is if there are things wrong, they will be called out. would you consider going back to yorkshire and having a role at yorkshire now under the new regime? oh, look, i think amesh has got a lot to do and i don't see this as a new regime yet. we have said to him, and he's been honest with us, we will challenge him and support him and we are watching to make sure that he delivers on his promises. you've talked about your son and not
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wanting him to go near cricket. what if he says in the future, "dad, i really want to play this game." what do you hope you will be able to say to him? i hope i can take him. i hope i can take him before he says it. but again, that is dependent on what the game does moving forward. i would rather upset him for a little while than have the mental scars that i've got, so, like i said, i think actions will show over the next weeks and months whether this isjust an outrage or whether the game is genuinely interested. how confident are you that you will be there at headingley with him, watching matches in ten years time? ten years is a long time. i'm not sure, but you know what, with everything that i've put me and my family through over the last 18 months, if in ten years time i'm not there watching him play, or him coming and watching with me, then clearly what i did wasn't enough.
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azeem rafiq, thank you so much for your time. that was former cricketer azeem rafiq speaking to me yesterday. after we'd finished prerecording, some young lads, they all wanted to go and shake his hand and thank him for what he's done over the last few days. you can tell he's exhausted, he spoken to mp5, he spoken to the media endlessly and he wants to get home to the family. it's exhausting having to relive that. it is personal and painful and he has done it and is hopefully changing things and we wish him all the best. find it and is hopefully changing things and we wish him all the best. and we wish him some _ and we wish him all the best. and we wish him some rest _ and we wish him all the best. and we wish him some rest as _ and we wish him all the best. and we wish him some rest as well. - and we wish him all the best. and we wish him some rest as well. i - and we wish him all the best. and we wish him some rest as well. i guess i wish him some rest as well. i guess he is reliving _ wish him some rest as well. i guess he is reliving all _ wish him some rest as well. i guess he is reliving all of _ wish him some rest as well. i guess he is reliving all of that, _ wish him some rest as well. i guess he is reliving all of that, having - he is reliving all of that, having to talk about it. let's get back to our top story now, and the government is preparing to publish its £96 billion plans for the rail network in the midlands and north of england. but there's anger that some key
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routes look set to be scrapped. it's thought that part of the eastern leg of hs2 could be under threat, as well as the fast link between mancheter and leeds. the deputy prime minister, dominic raab, joins us from westminster. good morning to you and thanks for joining us. shall we make what we can make clear clear. how much of the promise to bring high—speed, hsz, to the promise to bring high—speed, hs2, to the north and the northern powerhouse, the pledge that the prime minister made, how much of thatis prime minister made, how much of that is going to be kept? the secific that is going to be kept? the specific details _ that is going to be kept? the specific details on legs of rail journeys, _ specific details on legs of rail journeys, i need to because of commercial sensitivity, allow to be set out _ commercial sensitivity, allow to be set out in — commercial sensitivity, allow to be set out in detail in the house of commons _ set out in detail in the house of commons. the prime minister and the transport _ commons. the prime minister and the transport secretary will do that today _ transport secretary will do that today but what i can tell you is that e96 — today but what i can tell you is that £96 billion of rail investment is coming — that £96 billion of rail investment is coming in, notjust collecting london — is coming in, notjust collecting london and the south—east with the midlands _ london and the south—east with the midlands on the north but also focusing — midlands on the north but also focusing on the towns and villages in the _ focusing on the towns and villages in the midlands and in the north and
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the regional interconnectivity because _ the regional interconnectivity because we know that some of the best scope — because we know that some of the best scope for economic growth, for small— best scope for economic growth, for small businesses, medium—sized businesses to grow is predicated, conditioned on that kind of connectivity, so we are focused on delivering — connectivity, so we are focused on delivering the most in the swiftest timeframe for the businesses and communities in the midlands and the north— communities in the midlands and the north as _ communities in the midlands and the north as well as connecting the whole _ north as well as connecting the whole country.— north as well as connecting the whole country. north as well as connecting the whole count . ., �* ., , whole country. you can't tell me any details because _ whole country. you can't tell me any details because there _ whole country. you can't tell me any details because there is _ whole country. you can't tell me any details because there is an - whole country. you can't tell me any details because there is an official i details because there is an official announcement as the rules apply later on? why has the prime minister written in the yorkshire post today detailing some of what he is planning? why is he allowed to do that? he planning? why is he allowed to do that? ., , , ., , ., that? he has set out the limits of what we can _ that? he has set out the limits of what we can describe, _ that? he has set out the limits of what we can describe, but - that? he has set out the limits of what we can describe, but the i that? he has set out the limits of| what we can describe, but the full details _ what we can describe, but the full details of— what we can describe, but the full details of the legs of the rail journeys— details of the legs of the rail journeys and the further details will be — journeys and the further details will be set out in the house of commons, so of course we are very careful. _ commons, so of course we are very careful. for— commons, so of course we are very careful, for obvious reasons about that but _ careful, for obvious reasons about that but i— careful, for obvious reasons about that but i can tell you the thrust of it and — that but i can tell you the thrust of it and on— that but i can tell you the thrust of it and on top of the infrastructure developing there is a
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bil infrastructure developing there is a big focus— infrastructure developing there is a big focus on passengers and commuters and those who will benefit from those _ commuters and those who will benefit from those services, and to give you one example, commuters and passengers who have integrated journeys, — passengers who have integrated journeys, maybe there is a rail link. _ journeys, maybe there is a rail link. a — journeys, maybe there is a rail link. a tram _ journeys, maybe there is a rail link, a tram or bus service making sure _ link, a tram or bus service making sure that — link, a tram or bus service making sure that fares are capped and integrated in that way so we are looking — integrated in that way so we are looking at— integrated in that way so we are looking at the macroeconomic picture but also _ looking at the macroeconomic picture but also what will not just benefit businesses that the passengers using the services. is businesses that the passengers using the services. , , businesses that the passengers using the services-— the services. is the prime list of backint the services. is the prime list of backing out _ the services. is the prime list of backing out of _ the services. is the prime list of backing out of promises? - the services. is the prime list of backing out of promises? no. i | the services. is the prime list of- backing out of promises? no. i would sa this is backing out of promises? no. i would say this is unprecedented. _ backing out of promises? no. i would say this is unprecedented. i - backing out of promises? no. i would say this is unprecedented. i don't - say this is unprecedented. i don't remember— say this is unprecedented. i don't remember a say this is unprecedented. i don't remembera rail say this is unprecedented. i don't remember a rail infrastructure project — remember a rail infrastructure project of— remember a rail infrastructure project of this scale, £96 billion with all— project of this scale, £96 billion with all the to link up the whole country— with all the to link up the whole country but also with that intent ? connectivity is on an unprecedented level of— connectivity is on an unprecedented level of ambition and that is because _ level of ambition and that is because we want to level up the country— because we want to level up the country and this will create polls of economic activity and as a surrey mp in— of economic activity and as a surrey mp in the _ of economic activity and as a surrey mp in the south—east, there is less pressure _ mp in the south—east, there is less pressure on —
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mp in the south—east, there is less pressure on developments of housing in that— pressure on developments of housing in that part _ pressure on developments of housing in that part of the country and this is win-win— in that part of the country and this is win—win and good for the whole country— is win—win and good for the whole country and — is win—win and good for the whole country and there's never been a project _ country and there's never been a project like — country and there's never been a project like this, so i think we are delivering — project like this, so i think we are delivering on the level of ambition in the _ delivering on the level of ambition in the aspiration set out. as deputy prime minister _ in the aspiration set out. as deputy prime minister you _ in the aspiration set out. as deputy prime minister you will— in the aspiration set out. as deputy prime minister you will be - in the aspiration set out. as deputy prime minister you will be aware i in the aspiration set out. as deputy prime minister you will be aware of| prime minister you will be aware of the heat that the conservative party and borisjohnson is receiving. your own former northern powerhouse minister asked the prime minister yesterday whether voters are right to take him at his word. . the director of the northern powerhouse partnership and says he does not believe that upgrading infrastructure will be faster in building new lines and will not be hoodwinked into leaving the north is getting a £96 billion upgrade. trust is failing. there is a lack of trust in borisjohnson and the party for delivering what it pledges. he pledged this. delivering what it pledges. he pledged this-— delivering what it pledges. he pledged this. delivering what it pledges. he ttlededthis. ~ , . , pledged this. absolutely which is wh we pledged this. absolutely which is why we are _ pledged this. absolutely which is why we are delivering _ pledged this. absolutely which is why we are delivering on - pledged this. absolutely which is why we are delivering on that - pledged this. absolutely which is| why we are delivering on that and announcing all of the detail. you are not delivering _ announcing all of the detail. m. are not delivering on all of it. with respect, you haven't seen the full plans—
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with respect, you haven't seen the full plans set out. that is what the prime _ full plans set out. that is what the prime minister and transport secretary will do today, so the fact we are _ secretary will do today, so the fact we are announcing it, all the detail with e96— we are announcing it, all the detail with £96 billion with all of the principles i've talked about, national— principles i've talked about, national and also regional connectivity and looking after the businesses, particularly the small and medium—sized businesses in those regional— and medium—sized businesses in those regional areas that will benefit from _ regional areas that will benefit from that regional connectivity, looking — from that regional connectivity, looking after passengers and the consumer— looking after passengers and the consumer and commuter interest is absolutely— consumer and commuter interest is absolutely delivering on the ambition and aspiration and colleagues and outside groups will be able _ colleagues and outside groups will be able to scrutinise all of the detail— be able to scrutinise all of the detail today, so i think it is actually— detail today, so i think it is actually entirely delivering on the ambition— actually entirely delivering on the ambition and aspiration we have for the levelling up agenda. | ambition and aspiration we have for the levelling up agenda. i am lookint the levelling up agenda. i am looking at — the levelling up agenda. i am looking at this _ the levelling up agenda. i am looking at this yorkshire - the levelling up agenda. i -h looking at this yorkshire post article and there are implications that the hs2 leg to leeds won't go ahead. ~ ., , ., ., ahead. well, the detail is going to be set out- _ ahead. well, the detail is going to be set out. well— ahead. well, the detail is going to be set out. well why _ ahead. well, the detail is going to be set out. well why is _ ahead. well, the detail is going to be set out. well why is boris - be set out. well why is boris johnson setting _ be set out. well why is boris johnson setting out - be set out. well why is boris johnson setting out the - be set out. well why is boris| johnson setting out the detail be set out. well why is boris i johnson setting out the detail in the yorkshire post? you are telling a song, but not the rest. what is the point?—
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a song, but not the rest. what is the oint? �* , ., . ., the point? because of the commercial sensitivity on — the point? because of the commercial sensitivity on the _ the point? because of the commercial sensitivity on the detail _ the point? because of the commercial sensitivity on the detail that _ the point? because of the commercial sensitivity on the detail that will- sensitivity on the detail that will be provided. it's not like we will wait lonq — be provided. it's not like we will wait long. it will be set out in the house _ wait long. it will be set out in the house of— wait long. it will be set out in the house of commons today but what i can tell _ house of commons today but what i can tell you — house of commons today but what i can tell you is that a £96 billion investment, the detail of how that will be _ investment, the detail of how that will be spent and where it will be spent, _ will be spent and where it will be spent, the — will be spent and where it will be spent, the value added for businesses and consumers and passengers is all going to be set out today — passengers is all going to be set out today. we are absolutely delivering on the priorities that we set out _ delivering on the priorities that we set out and one of the big priorities is to make sure that this country— priorities is to make sure that this country expands on a more balanced way and _ country expands on a more balanced way and we — country expands on a more balanced way and we are not just reliant on the london — way and we are not just reliant on the london and south—east economic engine. _ the london and south—east economic engine. as— the london and south—east economic engine, as important as that is and it's good _ engine, as important as that is and it's good news for everyone, good news _ it's good news for everyone, good news to _ it's good news for everyone, good news to have a broader tax base and good _ news to have a broader tax base and good news _ news to have a broader tax base and good news for the jobs and livelihoods that depend on and good news if _ livelihoods that depend on and good news if you are in london in the south-east— news if you are in london in the south—east and wondered about overdevelopment and the planning rules which are a big issue, and good _ rules which are a big issue, and good for— rules which are a big issue, and good for us _ rules which are a big issue, and good for us because there will be broader— good for us because there will be broader economic activity and of element — broader economic activity and of element across the whole country, so the detail— element across the whole country, so the detail will be set out today but
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ithink— the detail will be set out today but i think this — the detail will be set out today but i think this is a win—win. it's never— i think this is a win—win. it's never been _ i think this is a win—win. it's never been done before. £96 billion has never— never been done before. £96 billion has never been a rail infrastructure or series _ has never been a rail infrastructure or series of— has never been a rail infrastructure or series of projects on this scale, so the _ or series of projects on this scale, so the ideam _ or series of projects on this scale, so the idea... i wasjust going to say so the idea... iwasjust going to say it— so the idea... iwasjust going to say it is— so the idea... i wasjust going to say it is clear _ so the idea... i wasjust going to say it is clear we are delivering action— say it is clear we are delivering action to — say it is clear we are delivering action to go with the words and aspirations around this. you are 'ust not aspirations around this. you are just not delivering _ aspirations around this. you are just not delivering what - aspirations around this. you are just not delivering what you - just not delivering what you promised though, are you? taste just not delivering what you promised though, are you? we are, and the detail— promised though, are you? we are, and the detail will— promised though, are you? we are, and the detail will be _ promised though, are you? we are, and the detail will be set _ promised though, are you? we are, and the detail will be set out - promised though, are you? we are, and the detail will be set out later i and the detail will be set out later today _ and the detail will be set out later toda . �* , ., ~ and the detail will be set out later toda. �*, ., ,, and the detail will be set out later toda. �*, ., today. let's talk about the proposal esterda today. let's talk about the proposal yesterday to — today. let's talk about the proposal yesterday to changes _ today. let's talk about the proposal yesterday to changes for _ today. let's talk about the proposal yesterday to changes for the - today. let's talk about the proposal yesterday to changes for the rules i yesterday to changes for the rules of mps and extra work and extra hours of work. why is this proposal not clear—cut? why is it so vague? ultimately it's always been for the house _ ultimately it's always been for the house of— ultimately it's always been for the house of commons to determine these things— house of commons to determine these things and _ house of commons to determine these things and what the prime minister has done _ things and what the prime minister has done is taken a lead and we know there _ has done is taken a lead and we know there has— has done is taken a lead and we know there has been all of this controversy and the prime minister has been _ controversy and the prime minister has been clear, and he was yesterday, that a mistake was made and we _ yesterday, that a mistake was made and we are _ yesterday, that a mistake was made and we are rectifying it on the two things— and we are rectifying it on the two things the — and we are rectifying it on the two things the government has done is introduced — things the government has done is introduced to the house of commons, which _ introduced to the house of commons, which is _ introduced to the house of commons, which is now— introduced to the house of commons,
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which is now past, is one, a ban on mps _ which is now past, is one, a ban on mps engaged in consultancy or lobbying in relation to the political sphere and the work they do as— political sphere and the work they do as mps— political sphere and the work they do as mps and secondly to deal with the broader question, the overall common— the broader question, the overall common sense limit on the amount of outside _ common sense limit on the amount of outside interest that any mp can take up— outside interest that any mp can take up so— outside interest that any mp can take up so they are focused on the 'ob take up so they are focused on the job of— take up so they are focused on the job of serving constituents. it is right— job of serving constituents. it is right that — job of serving constituents. it is right that goes to the committee on standards— right that goes to the committee on standards to work out the detail. it's not _ standards to work out the detail. it's not going into the long grass and it— it's not going into the long grass and it will— it's not going into the long grass and it will be delivered and they will report back byjanuary and i think— will report back byjanuary and i think it — will report back byjanuary and i think it shows you that, of course, after— think it shows you that, of course, after a _ think it shows you that, of course, after a difficult week or so that we are gripping the problem in dealing with these issues and also clearing the way— with these issues and also clearing the way to— with these issues and also clearing the way to get on with the things that people care about, like this massive — that people care about, like this massive infrastructure investment going _ massive infrastructure investment going into — massive infrastructure investment going into rail projects in the north — going into rail pro'ects in the north. ~ ., , ., going into rail pro'ects in the north. ~ . ., ., north. what is a reasonable amount of additional — north. what is a reasonable amount of additional work _ north. what is a reasonable amount of additional work for _ north. what is a reasonable amount of additional work for an _ north. what is a reasonable amount of additional work for an mp - north. what is a reasonable amount of additional work for an mp to - of additional work for an mp to undertake? that hasn't been made clear, how is it? ida. undertake? that hasn't been made clear, how is it?— clear, how is it? no, it hasn't. what do _ clear, how is it? no, it hasn't. what do you — clear, how is it? no, it hasn't. what do you think? _ clear, how is it? no, it hasn't. what do you think? the - clear, how is it? no, it hasn't. what do you think? the detail| clear, how is it? no, it hasn't. i what do you think? the detail of clear, how is it? no, it hasn't. -
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what do you think? the detail of the rule is for the _ what do you think? the detail of the rule is for the committee _ what do you think? the detail of the rule is for the committee to - what do you think? the detail of the rule is for the committee to set - what do you think? the detail of the rule is for the committee to set out| rule is for the committee to set out but we _ rule is for the committee to set out but we want — rule is for the committee to set out but we want to get a clear steer. the committee will want to look at two aspects, the overall amount of money— two aspects, the overall amount of money and — two aspects, the overall amount of money and that is something in which public— money and that is something in which public perception is something they will want _ public perception is something they will want to look at but more importantly, if you are asking me as an mp, _ importantly, if you are asking me as an mp. i_ importantly, if you are asking me as an mp, i would say, is the volume and hours — an mp, i would say, is the volume and hours of— an mp, i would say, is the volume and hours of work because as the resolution— and hours of work because as the resolution you pass is set forward people _ resolution you pass is set forward people want to know that their mp is focused _ people want to know that their mp is focused overwhelmingly and overriding the on their constituency business _ overriding the on their constituency business and nothing that they do outside _ business and nothing that they do outside gets in the way of that. we do think— outside gets in the way of that. we do think there is a case, and i don't — do think there is a case, and i don't think— do think there is a case, and i don't think people can argue, or the house _ don't think people can argue, or the house of— don't think people can argue, or the house of commons has not seen many argue, _ house of commons has not seen many argue, that _ house of commons has not seen many argue, that they shouldn't be allowed — argue, that they shouldn't be allowed outside interest to avoid parliament becoming cosseted and even more of a bubble. we want the doctors. _ even more of a bubble. we want the doctors, nurses, the teachers who retain _ doctors, nurses, the teachers who retain interest outside to continue to do— retain interest outside to continue to do so— retain interest outside to continue to do so and we want those with exposure — to do so and we want those with exposure to business to bring that to the _ exposure to business to bring that to the house of commons. we don't want it— to the house of commons. we don't want it to _ to the house of commons. we don't want it to become a bubble but there have to _ want it to become a bubble but there have to be _ want it to become a bubble but there have to be limits and we have passed the resolution, a government
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resolution and now the work to firm up resolution and now the work to firm up the _ resolution and now the work to firm up the detail will go forward. the prime up the detail will go forward. the: prime minister told conservative mps who he met yesterday mp that he crashed the car when it came to handling the disciplinary case of owen paterson. had you spoken to borisjohnson and discussed his handling of it? did you agree with how he was handling it up until now question mark i have discussed this with him, of course, is a close colleague. i with him, of course, is a close colleague-— with him, of course, is a close colleague. i won't die about the nature of the _ colleague. i won't die about the nature of the conversation - colleague. i won't die about the nature of the conversation we i colleague. i won't die about the i nature of the conversation we had. but i _ nature of the conversation we had. but i support him about fixing the problem — but i support him about fixing the problem 7 — but i support him about fixing the problem ? iwon't but i support him about fixing the problem ? i won't divulge. but i support him about fixing the problem ? iwon't divulge. we have collective _ problem ? iwon't divulge. we have collective responsibility in government and we stand and fall together— government and we stand and fall together and we recognise, all of us, that— together and we recognise, all of us, that is— together and we recognise, all of us, that is the quote you cited that we made _ us, that is the quote you cited that we made a — us, that is the quote you cited that we made a mistake in conflating the case of— we made a mistake in conflating the case of owen paterson with the broader— case of owen paterson with the broader crew who ? question of due process— broader crew who ? question of due process so— broader crew who ? question of due process so the system is sustainable and today— process so the system is sustainable and today we are fixing the problem with the _ and today we are fixing the problem with the principles i described, a ban on _ with the principles i described, a ban on paid lobbying in the political— ban on paid lobbying in the political realm and an overall limit on external interest so mps are
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focused — on external interest so mps are focused on constituents. do on external interest so mps are focused on constituents. do you have faith in the prime _ focused on constituents. do you have faith in the prime minister's - faith in the prime minister's judgment? there are many people, including people from your own party who believe that the prime minister'sjudgment is who believe that the prime minister's judgment is lacking. who believe that the prime minister'sjudgment is lacking. i have total faith. he is a prime minister— have total faith. he is a prime minister who has six helpfully dealt with getting us through brexit and clearly— with getting us through brexit and clearly won an unprecedented majority— clearly won an unprecedented majority and he led the way with the vaccine _ majority and he led the way with the vaccine roll—out. and that has been a huge _ vaccine roll—out. and that has been a huge success both within europe, but also _ a huge success both within europe, but also globally. and of course he is as restless as i am and the rest of the _ is as restless as i am and the rest of the parliamentary party to get on with focusing on the bread—and—butter quality of life issues — bread—and— butter quality of life issues people bread—and—butter quality of life issues people care about and we are starting _ issues people care about and we are starting today with a massive investment in infrastructure in the north— investment in infrastructure in the north which will be so important for businesses — north which will be so important for businesses and quality of life of those _ businesses and quality of life of those in — businesses and quality of life of those in the midlands and north and indeed _ those in the midlands and north and indeed the whole country. thank you for our indeed the whole country. thank you for your time — indeed the whole country. thank you for your time with _ indeed the whole country. thank you for your time with us _ indeed the whole country. thank you for your time with us on _ indeed the whole country. thank you for your time with us on bbc - for your time with us on bbc breakfast. lots of you getting in touch about
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the interview with as ian rafiq, reflecting on his commons testimony, and this has massive implications. it's horrible to think he cannot take _ it's horrible to think he cannot take his — it's horrible to think he cannot take his son to cricket. so much of what _ take his son to cricket. so much of what he _ take his son to cricket. so much of what he says — take his son to cricket. so much of what he says resonates and hopefully will empower a generation to speak out and _ will empower a generation to speak out and we — will empower a generation to speak out and we understand over 1000 people _ out and we understand over 1000 people have already contacted the enquiry _ people have already contacted the enquiry. and that will be followed up enquiry. and that will be followed up later — azeem rafiq's former teammate at yorkshire, the west indian bowler tino best, says a yorkshire coach told him that he, "would be put, on the next plane back to barbados," during his spell at the club. best said although he "loved" his time at yorkshire, he now considered that to be a racist statement. the bbc has contacted yorkshire for a response to best's claims. the bowler also referred to the drinking culture in cricket, which rafeeq spoke about in his testimony, and which best thinks creates divisions in dressing rooms.
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you've got to stop bullying people into doing what they don't want to do. if they don't want to drink, just let him, but give him the equal opportunity you will give the guy thatis opportunity you will give the guy that is drinking and that is what rafiq was trying to get at, if you're not part of the drinking culture or part of the big boys club you won't get opportunities in cricket, and that is something that is hampering people of colour, and that asian ethnicity. that is the thing. what a last 24 hours its been for cameron norrie. at lunchtime, he was brought into the end of year tennis finals, in italy as a replacement for the injured, stefanos sitsipas. he lost in three sets but cannot qualify for the semifinals but has a mouthwatering match against the world number one, novak djokovic
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nextin world number one, novak djokovic next in the group stages. after 13 grand slam tennis titles, and four paralympic medals, jordanne whiley has retired from the sport. the wheelchair tennis star won the wimbledon doubles title this summer and jordanne says she now wants to spend more time with her son and hopes her career has persuaded others to try the sport. a big blow for reading in the championship. they're the latest club to be punished for breaching financial rules and have been docked 6 points. it follows the further points deduction handed out to derby, this week. this latest punishment leaves reading 19th in the table but still 4 clear of the relegation zone. there was an fa cup tie which had everything between stockport and bolton — eight goals, extra time and a joyous pitch invasion. non—league stockport came from behind to upset their league one opponents with a 5—3 win in extra time. the fifth goal prompted a mini—pitch invasion at an excited
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edgeley park. stockport are through to the second round. and they play rotherham away next and they had a huge away following when they went to bolton in the first leg of the tie. just a reminder of what the fa cup means. it might be the first round but it's almost like the fa cup final. i love this stage. some remarkable temperatures around today. and a real contrast and carol will tell us all about it. good morning, and you are right as ever. a real stark contrast in the temperatures. in kent at the moment it is only three degrees where as in aberdeen it is 15 and in kent there are clear skies but you will find that through the day the cloud will build and we have rain in the
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northern half of the country and especially on the coasts and hills and that scenario will continue as we go through the course of the day. we are looking at a fair bit of cloud building through the course of the day with some drizzle in the west, windy and the northern half of the country across scotland, northern england and northern ireland, especially so with the exposure but in the shelter of the grampians we will see some sunshine. coming south we have drizzle in north—west england, wales and into the south—west and we could see some in northern ireland as well and more cloud across central and eastern areas than we are starting with. temperatures today are very high for the time of year. on average at this time of year we would be looking at about seven in the north to about 11 in the south but today due to something called the fern effect we could hit 17 degrees in aberdeen and if you are wondering what that is, very simply put, we have the grampians here and on one side we have wet and cooler conditions but on the other side of them, on the
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leeward side, it's warmer and the fern is a dry warm wind on the side of hills and mountains. anyway, as we go on through the middle of the night, we have a lot of cloud and rain in the north and west. still windy across the north and a swell and drizzle coming out of the cloud and drizzle coming out of the cloud and once again it will be really mild on these temperatures as you can see by night are more representative of what we would expect as we go through the course of the day at this time of year. so tomorrow, a lot of cloud around, but more breaks in it than today, especially so across england, wales and northern ireland but we have rain coming in the shape of a cold front across northern ireland and as we see through the weekend it will sink south on the air will turn much cooler. it will be chillier from saturday or sunday. saturday in the north, then sunday. saturday in the north, then sunday in the south as it whips all the way down, so a real contrast. we
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are looking at temperatures between five or 8 degrees as opposed to 30 up five or 8 degrees as opposed to 30 up to 17, so you will notice the draft, literally. latte up to 17, so you will notice the draft, literally.— draft, literally. we will. thank ou. do you know how heavy 280 kilograms is? i know, because i've read it. it's roughly the weight of a large grizzly bear or a pile of around 100 bricks. it is heavy. do you record you could lift the pile — it is heavy. do you record you could lift the pile of— it is heavy. do you record you could lift the pile of bricks? _ it is heavy. do you record you could lift the pile of bricks? with - it is heavy. do you record you could lift the pile of bricks? with one - lift the pile of bricks? with one arm? ., well, that's exactly what army veteran mark tonner has done, 11 years after he lost the use of one arm in a bomb blast while serving in afghanistan. last weekend, he won the "world's strongest disabled man" contest in iceland, breaking his own record. let's take a look at him in training for the big event. i was right handed, and now i'm left—handed. i was blown up in afghanistan in 2010.
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it's not made sense. and i don't want to look back any more. lifting is therapy for me. i tend to really hide away from any sort of speaking therapies or counselling in that way. i'd rather take it out on myself in here, get as angry as i can and lift as heavy as i can, and ifeel calmer. the days i don't train, i can tell there is a difference, and the harder the training, the calmer i am afterwards, so that's why i train like this. mark tonnerjoins us now from keflavik in iceland. it looks rather chilly, mark. good morning. it it looks rather chilly, mark. good mornint. , �*, , morning. it is so cold. it's been snowint morning. it is so cold. it's been snowing all— morning. it is so cold. it's been snowing all night. _ morning. it is so cold. it's been snowing all night. it's - morning. it is so cold. it's been snowing all night. it's freezing. | snowing all night. it's freezing. congratulations. _ snowing all night. it's freezing. congratulations. a _ snowing all night. it's freezing. congratulations. a mammoth i snowing all night. it's freezing. - congratulations. a mammoth effort and what an achievement. can we talk
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about the practicalities of this? you lost the use of one arm but you did not lose the arm itself, it was an amputated, but you are not able to use the other one. that an amputated, but you are not able to use the other one.— to use the other one. that was a decision made _ to use the other one. that was a decision made on _ to use the other one. that was a decision made on the _ to use the other one. that was a decision made on the part - to use the other one. that was a decision made on the part of - to use the other one. that was a decision made on the part of the surgeon — decision made on the part of the surgeon to— decision made on the part of the surgeon to see what they could do, and later— surgeon to see what they could do, and later on— surgeon to see what they could do, and later on an incident happened where _ and later on an incident happened where he — and later on an incident happened where he could not remove it anyway. so, where he could not remove it anyway. so. you _ where he could not remove it anyway. so. you are _ where he could not remove it anyway. so, you are left with only the use and power in the other arm, so what you are able to do with it is just phenomenal. i think we can watch you doing your big contest win. just talk us through this, the kind of effort, the exhilaration, the pain. i've got to be really careful and try to _ i've got to be really careful and try to balance my body as much as i can because, — try to balance my body as much as i can because, if i don't, i will dislocate _ can because, if i don't, i will dislocate my shoulder. or put my back— dislocate my shoulder. or put my back out, — dislocate my shoulder. or put my back out, so i really have to take
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it in from — back out, so i really have to take it in from my core and go up. it is mostly— it in from my core and go up. it is mostly legs, _ it in from my core and go up. it is mostly legs, my arm and strap are to stabilise _ mostly legs, my arm and strap are to stabilise it— mostly legs, my arm and strap are to stabilise. it is something i can do quite _ stabilise. it is something i can do quite often — stabilise. it is something i can do quite often and a lot of training i do is _ quite often and a lot of training i do isjust— quite often and a lot of training i do isjust a — quite often and a lot of training i do isjust a single arm lift and then— do isjust a single arm lift and then a — do isjust a single arm lift and then a single with a strap and different— then a single with a strap and different heights of dead list. there — different heights of dead list. there is— different heights of dead list. there is a lot of training with the deadlifts — there is a lot of training with the deadlifts. not many people like to train deadlifts because it hurt your back, _ train deadlifts because it hurt your back, but— train deadlifts because it hurt your back, but if— train deadlifts because it hurt your back, but if i hurt my back, ijust change _ back, but if i hurt my back, ijust change the — back, but if i hurt my back, ijust change the clasp so i'm not bothered. so change the clasp so i'm not bothered-— change the clasp so i'm not bothered. . , j~:: ,, ., . , bothered. so that is 280 kilograms. it's unbelievable. _ bothered. so that is 280 kilograms. it's unbelievable. how _ bothered. so that is 280 kilograms. it's unbelievable. how long - bothered. so that is 280 kilograms. it's unbelievable. how long did - bothered. so that is 280 kilograms. it's unbelievable. how long did it i it's unbelievable. how long did it take ou it's unbelievable. how long did it take you to _ it's unbelievable. how long did it take you to get _ it's unbelievable. how long did it take you to get to _ it's unbelievable. how long did it take you to get to that? - it's unbelievable. how long did it take you to get to that? to - it's unbelievable. how long did it take you to get to that? to be i it's unbelievable. how long did it i take you to get to that? to be fair, i did attempt _ take you to get to that? to be fair, i did attempt the _ take you to get to that? to be fair, i did attempt the 300 _ take you to get to that? to be fair, i did attempt the 300 on _ take you to get to that? to be fair, i did attempt the 300 on the - take you to get to that? to be fair, i did attempt the 300 on the day i take you to get to that? to be fair, i i did attempt the 300 on the day and it didn't _ i did attempt the 300 on the day and it didn't go _ i did attempt the 300 on the day and it didn't go up how i wanted it, but i set _ it didn't go up how i wanted it, but i set it— it didn't go up how i wanted it, but lset itand— it didn't go up how i wanted it, but i set it and then broke it and i would — i set it and then broke it and i would have broken it again, but next time. _ would have broken it again, but next time. i_ would have broken it again, but next time. iwill— would have broken it again, but next time, i will be doing 300 with ease,
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so i'm _ time, i will be doing 300 with ease, so i'm not— time, i will be doing 300 with ease, so i'm not too fazed. | time, i will be doing 300 with ease, so i'm not too fazed.— so i'm not too fazed. i should say, tood so i'm not too fazed. i should say, good morning. _ so i'm not too fazed. i should say, good morning, mark. _ so i'm not too fazed. i should say, good morning, mark. what- so i'm not too fazed. i should say, i good morning, mark. what motivates you? i good morning, mark. what motivates ou? . r' good morning, mark. what motivates ou? . w , good morning, mark. what motivates ou? . , , ., ., you? i get asked this question a lot, and you? i get asked this question a lot. and people _ you? i get asked this question a lot, and people don't _ you? i get asked this question a lot, and people don't really - you? i get asked this question a i lot, and people don't really expect the answer that i give them, and that is— the answer that i give them, and that is pain. mental pain, physical pain _ that is pain. mental pain, physical pain the — that is pain. mental pain, physical pain. the more i do, the less pain i have. _ pain. the more i do, the less pain i have. and _ pain. the more i do, the less pain i have, and that is the simple thing. the more — have, and that is the simple thing. the more i— have, and that is the simple thing. the more i train, the healthierl am. _ the more i train, the healthierl am, mentally. itry the more i train, the healthierl am, mentally. i try and train for as long _ am, mentally. i try and train for as long and _ am, mentally. i try and train for as long and hard as i possibly can. it's not — long and hard as i possibly can. it's not so — long and hard as i possibly can. it's not so much my body feels tight. — it's not so much my body feels tight, because i get told to be quiet — tight, because i get told to be quiet and i will crack on, so it doesn't~ _ quiet and i will crack on, so it doesn't~ i_ quiet and i will crack on, so it doesn't... i don't have to motivate myself. _ doesn't... i don't have to motivate myself. the — doesn't... i don't have to motivate myself, the pain does, so i don't really— myself, the pain does, so i don't really stop— myself, the pain does, so i don't really stop at all when it comes to anythinq — really stop at all when it comes to anythinq l— really stop at all when it comes to an hint. ~ really stop at all when it comes to an hint. ,, , anything. i think it is intriguing and i think— anything. i think it is intriguing and i think many _ anything. i think it is intriguing and i think many people - anything. i think it is intriguing - and i think many people understand this. what happening next? you are talking about going for the 300, but what is next? i
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talking about going for the 300, but what is next?— what is next? i think i'm going to have a busy _ what is next? i think i'm going to have a busy year _ what is next? i think i'm going to have a busy year next _ what is next? i think i'm going to have a busy year next year. - what is next? i think i'm going to have a busy year next year. i've i what is next? i think i'm going to i have a busy year next year. i've got all of _ have a busy year next year. i've got all of my— have a busy year next year. i've got all of my strongman competitions and also the _ all of my strongman competitions and also the highland games competition to take _ also the highland games competition to take part in as well, so i try to id to take part in as well, so i try to go to— to take part in as well, so i try to go toan— to take part in as well, so i try to go to an event every month next year and i_ go to an event every month next year and i can't — go to an event every month next year and i can't wait for it and i'm going— and i can't wait for it and i'm going to— and i can't wait for it and i'm going to set records every where and i've already _ going to set records every where and i've already got three records for the highland games, and one in the strongman. — the highland games, and one in the strongman, so i want more and that is pretty— strongman, so i want more and that is pretty much it. strongman, so i want more and that is pretty much it— is pretty much it. well, mark, congratulations. _ is pretty much it. well, mark, congratulations. the - is pretty much it. well, mark, congratulations. the worlds i congratulations. the worlds strongest disabled man, congratulations. couldn't have been a better time of year to go to iceland. you look freezing. it’s a better time of year to go to iceland. you look freezing. it's all ritht, iceland. you look freezing. it's all right. you — iceland. you look freezing. it's all right. you get _ iceland. you look freezing. it's all right, you get used _ iceland. you look freezing. it's all right, you get used to _ iceland. you look freezing. it's all right, you get used to it - iceland. you look freezing. it's all right, you get used to it after - iceland. you look freezing. it's all right, you get used to it after a i right, you get used to it after a while — right, you get used to it after a while it— right, you get used to it after a while it is— right, you get used to it after a while. it is the wind that cuts through— while. it is the wind that cuts through you. while. it is the wind that cuts through you-— while. it is the wind that cuts through you. while. it is the wind that cuts throuth ou. ., w ., through you. you take care and well done and we — through you. you take care and well done and we will _ through you. you take care and well done and we will speak— through you. you take care and well done and we will speak to _ through you. you take care and well done and we will speak to you - through you. you take care and well done and we will speak to you soon| done and we will speak to you soon as you keep going with this. i looked up the temperature where market is, three degrees, wind, 60 mph. he was not fibbing. iflat market is, three degrees, wind, 60 mph. he was not fibbing.— mph. he was not fibbing. not much colder than — mph. he was not fibbing. not much colder than fruit _ mph. he was not fibbing. not much colder than fruit and _ mph. he was not fibbing. not much colder than fruit and in _ mph. he was not fibbing. not much colder than fruit and in this - colder than fruit and in this morning. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. our headlines today. a £96 billion rail plan for the midlands and north of england — but there's anger that the hs2 line from the east midlands to leeds is set to be scrapped. good morning. the high—speed lines would have collected part of the east midlands and the north of england, but there is disappointment, frustration and anger this morning that promises have been broken once again.
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they own 25% of their property, but have to pay 100% of the cladding repair bill. we hear from the tenants facing financial ruin. he's raised millions for motor neurone disease charities, but rugby league star kevin sinfield says his next challenge is his toughest yet. we'll check in on his latest preparations. good morning. it isa it is a fairly cloudy day ahead for most of us. drizzle in the west, rein in the north and it is going to be pretty windy in the northern half of the country. very mild for all of us. details later in the programme. good morning. it's thursday the 18th of november. the government is planning to publish a £96 billion plan for the rail network in the midlands and the north of england. but there's anger that the section of high speed 2, stretching from the east midlands to leeds, is now expected to be scrapped. instead of building a brand new line between manchester and leeds, there are reports the existing track
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will be upgraded. ministers insist their changes will mean improvements happen up to a decade earlier. dan johnson reports. it's been described as the biggest ever public investment in our rail network, modernising routes more quickly and levelling up cities and regions, the government says. but the integrated rail plan focuses on improving existing lines instead of building new ones. hs2 will connect london with birmingham and manchester, but it now looks like the planned eastern leg will stop in the east midlands rather than reaching yorkshire. and it's expected that there will be no new trans—pennine route between manchester, bradford and leeds. the government says upgrades to the current lines can deliver similar improvements to journey times and capacity years earlier. but it will leave many in the north disappointed. my real concern is that our victorian infrastructure is creaking in the north of england. we have already tried to upgrade the existing line between leeds
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and manchester and it's taken ten years. we've onlyjust started to see shovels in the ground. i don't believe that upgrading infrastructure will be faster in delivering results than building new lines. these were the front pages of many regional papers this week, calling for the government to stand by earlier promises. this was borisjohnson's pledge two years ago. i want to be the prime minister who does with northern powerhouse rail what we did for crossrail in london. and today, i am going to deliver on my commitment to that vision with a pledge to fund the leeds to manchester route. this is a £96 billion investment plan, though it's not all new money. it includes 360 million to roll out london—style contactless ticketing across commuter networks. that will also feature price caps applying across trains, trams and buses. but new rail routes were more than 20 years away, and the government says upgrading the existing network
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will mean similarjourney times ten years sooner. the full details will be published later. dan johnson, bbc news. the let's speak now to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. we interviewed deputy prime minister dominic raab. we know the prime minister has written a piece in the yorkshire post today detailing some bits of what is going to happen today, but not everything. still tuestions today, but not everything. still questions about _ today, but not everything. still questions about broken promises continue? . ., ., ., ., continue? yeah, we are going to have to wait until — continue? yeah, we are going to have to wait until mid _ continue? yeah, we are going to have to wait until mid morning _ continue? yeah, we are going to have to wait until mid morning until- continue? yeah, we are going to have to wait until mid morning until we - to wait until mid morning until we -et to wait until mid morning until we get the _ to wait until mid morning until we get the details because there will be a statement of the house of commons — be a statement of the house of commons from the transport secretary, grant shapps, and a big document— secretary, grant shapps, and a big document published. the government would _ document published. the government would like _ document published. the government would like us to look at all of these — would like us to look at all of these changes in the round. ok, all these changes in the round. ok, all the headlines are a bit about hsz between — the headlines are a bit about hsz between the midlands and leeds being cancelled. _ between the midlands and leeds being cancelled, and perhaps northern powerhouse rail, the proposed high—speed rail line between manchester and leeds, high—speed rail line between manchesterand leeds, being
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manchester and leeds, being downgraded manchesterand leeds, being downgraded to some changes to existing — downgraded to some changes to existing lines and new bits of railway— existing lines and new bits of railway lines. the government would like us _ railway lines. the government would like us to— railway lines. the government would like us to look at the whole picture in the _ like us to look at the whole picture in the round, the big investment being _ in the round, the big investment being made, and the gaps in the real network— being made, and the gaps in the real network that might be patched up and failed _ network that might be patched up and failed and _ network that might be patched up and failed. and smaller projects that could _ failed. and smaller projects that could make a difference sooner. i suppose — could make a difference sooner. i suppose the best metaphor i have come _ suppose the best metaphor i have come up _ suppose the best metaphor i have come up with is, imagine you have ordered _ come up with is, imagine you have ordered a — come up with is, imagine you have ordered a big stake but instead you -ot ordered a big stake but instead you got served — ordered a big stake but instead you got served lots of tapas, is the tap is as good — got served lots of tapas, is the tap is as good as the stake might have been? _ is as good as the stake might have been? , ., ,, ., been? does it matter if you ordered a steak? well. _ been? does it matter if you ordered a steak? well, exactly. _ been? does it matter if you ordered a steak? well, exactly. how- been? does it matter if you ordered a steak? well, exactly. how do - been? does it matter if you ordered a steak? well, exactly. how do you | a steak? well, exactly. how do you tet more a steak? well, exactly. how do you get more bang _ a steak? well, exactly. how do you get more bang for— a steak? well, exactly. how do you get more bang for your _ a steak? well, exactly. how do you get more bang for your book- a steak? well, exactly. how do you | get more bang for your book sooner as the _ get more bang for your book sooner as the big _ get more bang for your book sooner as the big government mantra? the easiest— as the big government mantra? the easiest way— as the big government mantra? the easiest way to understand it is the government is cancelling a big thing that was— government is cancelling a big thing that was going to happen in the future. — that was going to happen in the future, into making some smaller investments that could have differences quicker. the problem is, we will— differences quicker. the problem is, we will not _ differences quicker. the problem is, we will not be able to judge the impact — we will not be able to judge the impact of— we will not be able to judge the impact of those investments for many years to _ impact of those investments for many years to come, so what we are left with today — years to come, so what we are left with today is the politics. and you've — with today is the politics. and you've got lots of northern politicians, including the prime
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minister's on party, saying that he has betrayed his promises and the government is having to battle that with some — government is having to battle that with some complicated details that may take _ with some complicated details that may take many years to reach fruition — may take many years to reach fruition. there are lots of other political— fruition. there are lots of other political battles at the minute as well _ political battles at the minute as well i— political battles at the minute as well. . ., ., , ., well. i am going to build on your analot . well. i am going to build on your analogy- say _ well. i am going to build on your analogy- say you _ well. i am going to build on your analogy. say you ordered - well. i am going to build on your analogy. say you ordered a - well. i am going to build on your. analogy. say you ordered a steak, you deliver to tapas, do you say sorry for not giving you the stake if you think that the tapas is just as good? because sorry, that is a word that is been barry —— bandied about the prime minister. irate word that is been barry -- bandied about the prime minister.- word that is been barry -- bandied about the prime minister. we are now discoverint about the prime minister. we are now discovering that _ about the prime minister. we are now discovering that some _ about the prime minister. we are now discovering that some metaphors - discovering that some metaphors shouldn't— discovering that some metaphors shouldn't be stretched too far! we are talking about stake at this time in the _ are talking about stake at this time in the morning. maybe we should be talking _ in the morning. maybe we should be talking about breakfast instead. he. told talking about breakfast instead. told tory talking about breakfast instead. he: told tory mps yesterday he was on a clear road and he drove the car into the ditch. . ~ clear road and he drove the car into the ditch. . ,, ., ., , ., , the ditch. talking of metaphors, es. the ditch. talking of metaphors, yes- boris _ the ditch. talking of metaphors, yes. boris johnson _ the ditch. talking of metaphors, yes. boris johnson had - the ditch. talking of metaphors, yes. boris johnson had a - the ditch. talking of metaphors, yes. boris johnson had a busy i the ditch. talking of metaphors, i yes. boris johnson had a busy day yes. borisjohnson had a busy day yesterday — yes. borisjohnson had a busy day yesterday. he was hammered at prime minister's _ yesterday. he was hammered at prime minister's questions by keir starmer for breaking promises on standards and these _ for breaking promises on standards and these rail staff in advance, then— and these rail staff in advance,
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then he — and these rail staff in advance, then he went to the liaison committee, where senior mps which chair all— committee, where senior mps which chair all the — committee, where senior mps which chair all the committees in parliament were peppering him with questions _ parliament were peppering him with questions on a whole lot of things. then— questions on a whole lot of things. then he _ questions on a whole lot of things. then he went to speak to his own backbenchers in the 1922 committee. he used _ backbenchers in the 1922 committee. he used this very vivid metaphor to hold his _ he used this very vivid metaphor to hold his hands up by the whole parliamentary standards about the last two _ parliamentary standards about the last two weeks, saying he had crashed — last two weeks, saying he had crashed the car, a reference to how he had _ crashed the car, a reference to how he had handled the case of owen paterson. — he had handled the case of owen paterson, the former conservative mp, paterson, the former conservative mp. whose — paterson, the former conservative mp, whose case sparked all of this. we have _ mp, whose case sparked all of this. we have been seeing the prime minister— we have been seeing the prime minister holding his hands up a lot about— minister holding his hands up a lot about how— minister holding his hands up a lot about how this sleaze issue has been handled _ about how this sleaze issue has been handled. he has to do that. especially in front of his own mps because — especially in front of his own mps because quite a lot of them are quite _ because quite a lot of them are quite annoyed about how he's handled it, quite annoyed about how he's handled it. but— quite annoyed about how he's handled it. but in— quite annoyed about how he's handled it. but in a _ quite annoyed about how he's handled it, but in a practical sense, in a political— it, but in a practical sense, in a political sense, and what it says about _ political sense, and what it says about his — political sense, and what it says about hisjudgment. you don't have to try— about hisjudgment. you don't have to try very— about hisjudgment. you don't have to try very hard to find conservative mps saying that boris johnson _ conservative mps saying that boris johnson lost some of his power. you never lose yours. _ johnson lost some of his power. you never lose yours. boris _ never lose yours. boris johnson, ta as never lose yours. boris johnson, tapas and _ never lose yours. boris johnson, tapas and driving _ never lose yours. boris johnson, tapas and driving the _ never lose yours. boris johnson, tapas and driving the car - never lose yours. boris johnson, tapas and driving the car at - never lose yours. boris johnson, tapas and driving the car at the i tapas and driving the car at the same time, and it is all coming
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together! eight minutes past eight. an update on that story of the weekend. . . an update on that story of the weekend. , , ., , weekend. this is when a bomb exloded weekend. this is when a bomb exploded in — weekend. this is when a bomb exploded in a _ weekend. this is when a bomb exploded in a taxi _ weekend. this is when a bomb exploded in a taxi outside - weekend. this is when a bomb - exploded in a taxi outside liverpool women's hospital. a couple who witness that have been left in shock. liam spencer and stephanie stitt, who were in their car at the time, told the bbc they felt a big impact, and at first thought there had been a crash. mr spencer tried to pull the bomberfrom the burning wreckage of the taxi, but was stopped by the flames. i didn't say much. ijust seen there was someone there. and then, i didn't even say nothing. i was just thinking of ways to try and get him out, and i couldn't really tell if he was in the back or the front because ofjust the whole positioning and the flames and the smoke. it was hard to make out what was going on, so i wasjust trying to find the best way to pull him out. there are concerns over the chinese tennis player, peng shuai, who has not been heard from since making sexual assault allegations
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against a prominent politician. an email — which is said to have come from her — has been published on chinese state media. but the head of the women's tennis association has cast doubts about its authenticity. let's speak to our correspondent robin brant in shanghai. it's a disturbing story, isn't it? it's a disturbing story, isn't it? it's an intriguing story.- it's a disturbing story, isn't it? it's an intriguing story. what is ttoin it's an intriguing story. what is going on? _ it's an intriguing story. what is going on? peng _ it's an intriguing story. what is going on? peng shuai - it's an intriguing story. what is going on? peng shuai has - it's an intriguing story. what is going on? peng shuai has not| it's an intriguing story. what is - going on? peng shuai has not been seen _ going on? peng shuai has not been seen for— going on? peng shuai has not been seen for two weeks. suddenly overnight and e—mail apparently pops up overnight and e—mail apparently pops up from _ overnight and e—mail apparently pops up from her— overnight and e—mail apparently pops up from her addressed to the man in charge _ up from her addressed to the man in charge of— up from her addressed to the man in charge of the women's tennis association. she starts by saying, hello. _ association. she starts by saying, hello, everyone, and goes on to say that she _ hello, everyone, and goes on to say that she is _ hello, everyone, and goes on to say that she is safe, everything is fine. — that she is safe, everything is fine, those are the words being attributed to her in this note. and she is— attributed to her in this note. and she is resting at home. this is the first communication if we are to
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believe — first communication if we are to believe the image put on social media — believe the image put on social media by— believe the image put on social media by state—run tv overnight from pen- media by state—run tv overnight from peng shuai _ media by state—run tv overnight from peng shuai in two weeks. two weeks a-o peng shuai in two weeks. two weeks ago she _ peng shuai in two weeks. two weeks ago she made some staggering claims about being forced to have sex with about being forced to have sex with a senior— about being forced to have sex with a senior politician in this country many— a senior politician in this country many years— a senior politician in this country many years ago, an event that she says was— many years ago, an event that she says was then followed by a consensual relationship. but there are many— consensual relationship. but there are many questions about this e-mail. — are many questions about this e—mail, about the language, about the words. — e—mail, about the language, about the words, by the fact that no one else here — the words, by the fact that no one else here in — the words, by the fact that no one else here in the domestic media has picked _ else here in the domestic media has picked it— else here in the domestic media has picked it up — else here in the domestic media has picked it up. in terms of what the wta _ picked it up. in terms of what the wta things, steve simon was quick to respond _ wta things, steve simon was quick to respond he _ wta things, steve simon was quick to respond. he said in a fairly long statement — respond. he said in a fairly long statement he finds it hard to believe — statement he finds it hard to believe the words that are being attributed to her. he is calling on the authorities are to investigate, to find _ the authorities are to investigate, to find out— the authorities are to investigate, to find out where she is, is she safe? — to find out where she is, is she safe? and _ to find out where she is, is she safe? and also, to investigate the initial— safe? and also, to investigate the initial investigations —— allegations. initial investigations -- allegations.— initial investigations -- allegations. initial investigations -- alletations. ,, , . , ., allegations. she is a huge star in china. iwonder_ allegations. she is a huge star in china. i wonder how _ allegations. she is a huge star in china. i wonder how the - allegations. she is a huge star in china. i wonder how the chinese | china. i wonder how the chinese public will react?—
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china. i wonder how the chinese public will react? well, the truth is censorship _ public will react? well, the truth is censorship continues - public will react? well, the truth is censorship continues to - public will react? well, the truth is censorship continues to be - public will react? well, the truth is censorship continues to be a l public will react? well, the truth i is censorship continues to be a big issue _ is censorship continues to be a big issue here — is censorship continues to be a big issue here in terms of social media. as i said. _ issue here in terms of social media. as i said, nobody has picked this up on the _ as i said, nobody has picked this up on the domestic side. billionaire businessmen sometimes go missing, they pop _ businessmen sometimes go missing, they pop up weeks, months, years later. _ they pop up weeks, months, years later. some — they pop up weeks, months, years later, some facing trial. sometimes politician _ later, some facing trial. sometimes politician as — later, some facing trial. sometimes politician as well. it is rare it is an athlete _ politician as well. it is rare it is an athlete. for now we don't know where _ an athlete. for now we don't know where she — an athlete. for now we don't know where she is. we don't know if this e-mail_ where she is. we don't know if this e-mail is— where she is. we don't know if this e—mail is true. is it from her, can it be _ e—mail is true. is it from her, can it be linked — e—mail is true. is it from her, can it be linked to _ e—mail is true. is it from her, can it be linked to her? all of these in the context— it be linked to her? all of these in the context of this country preparing to becoming —— become centre _ preparing to becoming —— become centre of— preparing to becoming —— become centre of the sporting world when it hosts _ centre of the sporting world when it hosts the _ centre of the sporting world when it hosts the winter olympics in beijing in these _ hosts the winter olympics in beijing in these ads unsavoury senses as china _ in these ads unsavoury senses as china prepares for that event. thank ou. you. 12 minutes past eight. we need to keep an eye out on the weather, as always. there is change afoot. but for the moment... good morning, carol. we have at enjoying a mild spell. it is really unusual because we are in the middle of november and
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it ain't too cold? no, not at all. good morning. it is unseasonably mild for the time of the year. it will continue that way for the next couple of days until we see cooler air coming in from the north on saturday. that will cross the whole of the uk during sunday. instead of having temperatures in the mid to the high teens, we will see them back down into single figures. that will be a bit of a shock to the system. but today it is going to be mild and breezy other driver many. as always, there are some exceptions. the cloud in the west is thick enough to produce some drizzle. and we have also got some rain coming across the north and west accompanied by gusty winds. the earlier sunshine across central and south—eastern parts of england being replaced by cloud through the course of the afternoon, but here we have got light winds. these black circles representing gusts of wind. it will be pretty gusty in the north and west. temperatures though, 11 in
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lerwick to possibly 17 somewhere in aberdeenshire. possibly16 lerwick to possibly 17 somewhere in aberdeenshire. possibly 16 somewhere across north—east wherever you are, they are healthy. at this time of they are healthy. at this time of the year normally we would be looking at seven to 11. rather than saying healthy i should say they are above average. this evening and overnight we still have some rain on and off across the fat north of the country. gusty winds and a lot of cloud. they can offer drizzle on the coastal hills in the west. temperature wise, these temperatures will be more like what we expect as the maximum daytime temperatures, not the overnight lows. a mild start tomorrow. they will still be a lot of cloud. more bright breaks developing across england, wales and northern ireland. it is the weather front that is going to herald the change. it is bringing in some rain. behind that is when we see the cold air starts to arrive. we will get an update on that later in the week. thank you. just we will get an update on that later in the week. thank you.— we will get an update on that later in the week. thank you. just in time for the weekend. _ in the week. thank you. just in time for the weekend. nearly _ in the week. thank you. just in time for the weekend. nearly quarter- in the week. thank you. just in time | for the weekend. nearly quarter past
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eight. the grenfell fire prompted a building safety crisis, affecting thousands of homeowners. it found that cladding on blocks of flats was a major fire risk, with many residents left facing huge repair costs through no fault of their own. many people on low incomes used affordable housing schemes like shared ownership to get on the property ladder. but now there are calls to urgently reform those deals because the cladding costs are the tenant's responsibility. sarah corker reports. who should pay to fix britain's dangerous buildings? from london to leeds, birmingham to manchester, more than half a million people are still living in unsafe, unsellable homes. what work need doing? if you look at all the timber cladding that you see, that all has to come down. in south london, single mum emma has outgrown this one—bed flat. this is the living room and... this doubles as your bedroom? yeah, in the evening it's like changing rooms.
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and in here is my bed. it was 12 months ago when we first met. residents had just been told the building was so unsafe it needed round—the—clock fire wardens. i'm angry, i'm actually furious at it. this is ruining people's lives. a year on, emma's share of the bill to remove the cladding and fix other fire safety faults could be up to £30,000. and the building doesn't qualify for any government funding because it is under 18 metres. i'm on universal credit. every penny literally counts. we're still facing higher, huge, out of this universe type bills. and emma only actually owns 50% of the flat. she bought through an affordable housing scheme, but the terms of the lease mean she is liable for 100% of the costs. what has the reality of shared ownership been for you? i don't think shared ownership is fit for purpose.
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it's to help people like me who couldn't afford to get, i guess, a full mortgage on the property, so it's really done me a disservice. i wouldn't recommend anybody to go on a shared ownership. under shared ownership, you pay rent to a housing association on the part you don't own. housing experts say the cladding crisis has exposed it's a flawed system and needs urgent reform. i think the scheme does have a sort of fundamental unfairness. there are potential liabilities which are so great that people are potentially going to go bankrupt or lose their homes. any scheme which purports to be affordable housing, and which can leave people in that situation, is not doing itsjob. housing associations are now coming under greater scrutiny. i've spoken to shared owners from across the country who are deeply unhappy with the way their housing associations are dealing with this. poor communication, a lack
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of transparency over cost and a refusal to share fire safety assessment and surveys are common complaints. this is one of the worst affected. the conservative mp for stevenage says leaseholders should not have to pay these huge bills, but warns housing associations are facing a tough choice between building safety and building new homes. some of the ones in london have said they're going to build a 300,000 fewer homes over the next few years as a result of it. so not only is it really damaging the shared ownership market, it's also damaging the supply of affordable homes going forward. emma's housing association 0ptivo says safety is its number one priority and it's continuing to call for government funding to help cover costs on low and mid rise blocks. how has the way you feel about your home changed through all of this? my mum died when i was 19. so the deposit for my flat essentially was inheritance.
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i actually was quite sensible and thought, yeah, i am actually going to invest it and do something for my life and for my future. fast forward to this now, ifeel like it's probably been the worst thing that i've ever done is sign on the dotted line to get this property. the government told us it is unacceptable leaseholders are facing these excessive bills, and further proposals to help will be set out soon. but until then, emma and thousands of others are stuck living in homes they can't afford. sarah corker, bbc news in south london. let's get more on this story. sarah joins us now. good morning. good morning. there is a stark reality- — good morning. good morning. there is a stark reality. you _ good morning. good morning. there is a stark reality. you are _ good morning. good morning. there is a stark reality. you are a _ a stark reality. you are a leaseholder, so you pay, you own 25%, for example, a quarter of your property, but you are responsible for 100% of the cladding costs. you arejust tied into
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for 100% of the cladding costs. you are just tied into the contract. this is crippling? that's right. and these _ this is crippling? that's right. and these schemes were designed to help people _ these schemes were designed to help people on— these schemes were designed to help people on lower incomes to get onto the property ladder. when it comes to shared _ the property ladder. when it comes to shared ownership, often people own a _ to shared ownership, often people own a share. but as we've heard they are, own a share. but as we've heard they are. they— own a share. but as we've heard they are. theyare— own a share. but as we've heard they are, they are liable for the full cost _ are, they are liable for the full cost of— are, they are liable for the full cost of maintenance. when it comes to cladding. — cost of maintenance. when it comes to cladding, that can be the cost of taking _ to cladding, that can be the cost of taking down an external wall, for example — taking down an external wall, for example. huge bills. emma there said it could _ example. huge bills. emma there said it could cost _ example. huge bills. emma there said it could cost her up to £30,000. this is— it could cost her up to £30,000. this is a — it could cost her up to £30,000. this is a legally binding contract. it is the — this is a legally binding contract. it is the terms of the lease that you are — it is the terms of the lease that you are responsible for these costs. but when _ you are responsible for these costs. but when people signed up to this scheme. — but when people signed up to this scheme, never in a million years did they think— scheme, never in a million years did they think they would face maintenance bills of this size. i think— maintenance bills of this size. i think that — maintenance bills of this size. i think that is what it is at the heart — think that is what it is at the heart of— think that is what it is at the heart of this crisis, the financial unfairness — heart of this crisis, the financial unfairness of it all on people who can least— unfairness of it all on people who can least afford it.— unfairness of it all on people who can least afford it. which could go on forever. _ can least afford it. which could go on forever, couldn't _ can least afford it. which could go on forever, couldn't it? _ can least afford it. which could go on forever, couldn't it? the - can least afford it. which could go on forever, couldn't it? the kind i can least afford it. which could go | on forever, couldn't it? the kind of bills we are talking about good hangover people buzz my gloves for decades. there are calls to reform the housing industry and to try to
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unpick it. but that is easier said than done, right?— than done, right? that is huge. yeah, than done, right? that is huge. yeah. the _ than done, right? that is huge. yeah, the government - than done, right? that is huge. yeah, the government are - than done, right? that is huge. i yeah, the government are doing a than done, right? that is huge. - yeah, the government are doing a lot of things _ yeah, the government are doing a lot of things. the solutions are not easy— of things. the solutions are not easy and — of things. the solutions are not easy and they are not cheap. the government have said they have set aside _ government have said they have set aside e5— government have said they have set aside £5 billion to remove cladding on the _ aside £5 billion to remove cladding on the highest risk blocks. that is over— on the highest risk blocks. that is over 18 _ on the highest risk blocks. that is over 18 metres. so far around 3000 buildings _ over 18 metres. so far around 3000 buildings have applied for that fundinq — buildings have applied for that funding. workers are started on many blogs _ funding. workers are started on many blogs across _ funding. workers are started on many blogs across the country, so that of course _ blogs across the country, so that of course is _ blogs across the country, so that of course is good news. but if you look at the _ course is good news. but if you look at the wider— course is good news. but if you look at the wider picture of all of this, mps have — at the wider picture of all of this, mps have actually estimated this is a £15 billion problem.— a £15 billion problem. there are still a lot of _ a £15 billion problem. there are still a lot of buildings _ a £15 billion problem. there are still a lot of buildings not - still a lot of buildings not included in that initial scheme? that's right. emma's building, that is not _ that's right. emma's building, that is not eligible for government fundinq _ is not eligible for government funding. she is left thinking, well, how am _ funding. she is left thinking, well, how am i— funding. she is left thinking, well, how am i going to find this money? and michael gove, the housing secretary, said last week he feels it is unacceptable and unfair that
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leaseholders are facing these astronomical bills and the government has repeatedly said that building _ government has repeatedly said that building owners, the industry, should — building owners, the industry, should take responsibility for making — should take responsibility for making their building safe. the issue _ making their building safe. the issue is— making their building safe. the issue is they are not perhaps stepping _ issue is they are not perhaps stepping up in the way that government and leaseholders want them _ government and leaseholders want them to _ government and leaseholders want them to. and at the heart of all of this is. _ them to. and at the heart of all of this is. who — them to. and at the heart of all of this is, who is responsible for these — this is, who is responsible for these faults? who should pay? and leaseholders are just stuck in the middle _ leaseholders are just stuck in the middle and say, we are stuck in this unsellable _ middle and say, we are stuck in this unsellable home. for middle and say, we are stuck in this unsellable home.— middle and say, we are stuck in this unsellable home. for a summary like emma, unsellable home. for a summary like emma. she — unsellable home. for a summary like emma. she can't _ unsellable home. for a summary like emma, she can't afford _ unsellable home. for a summary like emma, she can't afford to _ unsellable home. for a summary like emma, she can't afford to move, - unsellable home. for a summary like emma, she can't afford to move, she is trapped? == emma, she can't afford to move, she is trapped?— is trapped? -- somebody. that's ritht. is trapped? -- somebody. that's right- what _ is trapped? -- somebody. that's right. what started _ is trapped? -- somebody. that's right. what started as _ is trapped? -- somebody. that's right. what started as an - is trapped? -- somebody. that's right. what started as an issue i is trapped? -- somebody. that's i right. what started as an issue with cladding _ right. what started as an issue with cladding has become a much wider buildinq _ cladding has become a much wider building safety crisis. it is an issue — building safety crisis. it is an issue that _ building safety crisis. it is an issue that seems to be spiralling because — issue that seems to be spiralling because after grenfell, there were these _ because after grenfell, there were these safety checks another high rise blocks and they found not only problems _ rise blocks and they found not only problems with cladding, but things like defective in the —— installation, and of exposed problems with building regulations going _ problems with building regulations going back decades.
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it isa it is a massive issue. people are trying _ it is a massive issue. people are trying to— it is a massive issue. people are trying to sort it out. the housing secretary — trying to sort it out. the housing secretary has said he is looking at these _ secretary has said he is looking at these options, especially when it comes— these options, especially when it comes to — these options, especially when it comes to those blocks under 18 metres. — comes to those blocks under 18 metres, and we may hear more about those _ metres, and we may hear more about those solutions in the weeks and months — those solutions in the weeks and months ahead. find those solutions in the weeks and months ahead.— months ahead. and also, don't underestimate _ months ahead. and also, don't underestimate the _ months ahead. and also, don't underestimate the mental - months ahead. and also, don't i underestimate the mental health impact it has on these people. i know you have looked into this loads, and we have spoken about this lot as well. we need to keep talking about it. syria —— sarah has got a documentary and you can watch it on the iplayer. it goes on at 5pm today. 23 the iplayer. it goes on at 5pm toda . x: , , today. 23 minutes past eight. it seems to be — today. 23 minutes past eight. it seems to be quite _ today. 23 minutes past eight. it seems to be quite a _ today. 23 minutes past eight. it seems to be quite a bright - today. 23 minutes past eight. it - seems to be quite a bright morning in most places across the uk this morning. the skies above wales are some of the darkest and clearest in the world, and november is said to be the best time to go stargazing there. i never knew that. so if you are gazing up to the stars and wanting to find out more about it, imagine if you get to do that with someone
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who has kind of been up there? imagine if you got to do that with tim peake, the astronaut, you know? amazing. a group of young explorers managed to do that and are microwaves responded crashed the party. —— our wales correspondence. a night under the stars with someone that knows a thing or two about them. then a telescope is very, very good. children in the gower meeting and quizzing british astronaut tim peake about the diamonds in our skies. do you think we are going to see a lot of stars tonight? i think we're going to see loads of stars, amelia, yes. and hoping to spot some up above in the autumn sky. oh, wow. i've learned a lot. if it wasn't for tim, then i probably wouldn't have learned about space. but, yeah, it's wonderful to learn about space. i've learned about like, - how stars, like, they compress together in a way. it's just very fascinating and interesting. - from anglesey to the elan valley,
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to swansea bay, wales has some of the best places to go stargazing. that's because it has the highest proportion of protected dark skies in the world, crucially needed to spot the twinkling up above. the dark sky reserve is an area that's really been protected in order to preserve it against light pollution, because if you are in a city area, for example, with lots of light pollution and you look up, you're simply not going to see an abundance of stars. it's a bit like looking up when there is a full moon. the light from the moon will obscure light from the stars. it's a similar effect when you are living in a bright area. so, by coming to a dark area, that's where you can really appreciate what the night sky should look like. november is one of the best times of the year to go stargazing, as our skies are darker due to a lower level of water vapour, haze, dust and pollen in the air. unfortunately, on this evening the clouds shadowed the stars above.
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has it made you more interested in it? yeah. has it influenced you at all and what you'd like to be when you grow up? eh, no. no, it hasn't. what is it you would like to do when you grow up, play for swansea, is it? footballer. yeah, play for swansea city, is it? yeah. of course it is. so, what would you like to do when you grow up? em, it depends, actually. baker or scientist, something to do. baker or scientist? yeah. well, yeah. very similar. baking is a science, isn't it? yeah. yeah, yeah. like, how you mix stuff together. it's called proxima centauri. and it's the star closest to the sun. no doubt a night to remember for these first—time stargazers in a country full of sparkly night wonders. tomos morgan, bbc news in the gower. i'm imagining those guys going into the classroom this morning at the other kids going, xbox last night,
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playstation?— playstation? stargazing with tim peake. it playstation? stargazing with tim peake- it is _ playstation? stargazing with tim peake. it is pretty _ playstation? stargazing with tim peake. it is pretty cool. - playstation? stargazing with tim | peake. it is pretty cool. beautiful views. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello from bbc london. i'm victoria hollins. transport for london has warned about significant cuts to bus and tube services in london, because of growing gaps in its funding. tfl says the slow recovery in passenger income from its services and inflationary pressures following the pandemic, means it may need to cut bus services by a fifth, and cut tube funding by almost 10 percent. a new finance committee report describes a "managed decline" scenario. it will be discussed later today. almost half of women trust the police less since off—duty met officer wayne couzens murdered sarah everard,
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a survey has suggested. a poll of nearly 1,700 adults by yougov, on behalf of the end violence against women coalition, found 47% of women and 40% of men polled said trust in the police has decreased since the details of couzens' crimes near clapham common were made public in court. home secretary priti patel has promised a "thorough review" of police vetting. plans for a big expansion of wimbledon tennis club have seen around 1000 people object to its planning application. the all england lawn tennis club wants to expand into the neighbouring wimbledon park golf club, which would see it span 67 hectares between wimbledon and wandsworth. the application did also recieve 30 letters of support. a new plaque in memory of colin townsley, a firefighter who died in the 1987 kings cross fire, will be unveiled at the station today. the fire is one of the worst in recent british history, with 31 people losing their lives and more than 100 people being badly injured. colin townsley was among the first group of firefighters on the scene to the fire.
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on the tube of minor delays on the circle, bakerloo and all other lines 0k. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is feeling quite chilly, at least first thing this morning, but milder air is on the way. high pressure is in charge and there is a warm front overnight to the north of the uk which is dragging in a milderair, so for us it means a warmer day today with temperatures above average for the middle of november. we might get a bit of hazy sunshine first thing this morning, ahead of the milder air arriving but with the mild air comes moisture and the cloud is going to increase and thicken. temperatures today, a mild 14 celsius. we will hang onto these conditions overnight, still with the milder air, so temperatures not dropping too far and still with the cloud you could get some mist by dawn tomorrow. the minimum temperature between nine and 11 celsius, so much milder than recently. we still have mild air for friday and as we head into saturday but you will notice for sunday that plunge
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of colder air coming from the north, a cold front sweeping south that will bring a northerly flow and a northerly breeze for sunday and also much chillier air and the chilly air will stay with us through the end of sunday and into next week. i will be back with the latest in half an hour. there is always plenty more on the website at the usual address and we will see you soon. good morning and welcome to breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty.
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morning live is coming up here on bbc one straight after us this morning. here's kym and gethin to tell us more. coming up on today's morning live. more than 12 million brits have had their boosterjab and health secretary sajid javid says having it now could prevent restrictions at christmas. but there's still loads of mixed messages surrounding the third covid vaccine. dr xand's here to help clear things up. absolutely. from whether or not you can 'mix and match' the vaccines, to the rumours that we'll need to keep 'topping up' our immunity every six months, i'll be answering as many of your questions as i can. and as one in three of us admit to feeling anxious or stressed at this time of year, mental health podcaster niall breslin teaches us his technique that can help you feel less overwhelmed. plus, if you fancy getting some fresh air and giving your garden a winter makeover, wayne perrey shows us some cheap and simple tricks to jazz up your outdoor space and explains how a shower curtain could help you enjoy spending time in it, whatever the weather. also on the show, it's been bringing the local community together for 44 years. we find out how a tiny village in norfolk hosts one of the biggest
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festive shows in europe: the thursford christmas spectacular. speaking of spectacular — this duo are responsible for bringing the nations' toys back to life. we're headed over to repair shop hq where the teddy bear ladies, aka amanda and julie, explain why they felt even more pressure to preserve this precious bearfor bbc children in need. and, he's been pedalling across the country for pudsey! matt baker exclusively reveals just how much morning live viewers have raised for the rickshaw relay challenge. see you at 9:15. i was thinking about my old shower curtain. i thought it looked lovely, just here, tomorrow morning. it shows how our minds work, really. don't get people in a panic. back to our top story now and the government is expected to confirm later today that it's to scrap the eastern leg of hs2
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from the midlands to leeds, as well as a planned high speed rail link between leeds and manchester. instead it says it'll spend nearly £100 billion upgrading existing services and building new, but shorter, stretches of high speed track. we've heard from a lot of commuters who want to know what it means in reality. then is at leeds station. i bet it is the talk of the platform. yes, good morning. anger, frustration, disappointment, all words i've heard about these plans and that's before we've got the integrated rail plan that will be announced by the transport secretary later today, but it is set to scrap two of the main high—speed route from the east midlands to this part of the world but also across the pennines between leeds, manchester and liverpool and hull that was designed to make the
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journey times faster and we are expecting that they will indeed be scrapped. lots of frustration, particularly for people who would have stood to benefit along the route, including in bradford, the city that would have seen thousands of jobs city that would have seen thousands ofjobs created, and a £60 billion boost to the economy on the cards but that could now be at risk. i've been to bradford to find out what people there make up the proposal. bradford — one city, two stations, and they are at the heart of northern england's train troubles. there are direct services to manchester and leeds, but the journey is slow and expensive. getting from here to leeds, just a ten—mile trip, takes nearly half an hour and it's a journey that passengers want speeding up. i've had to take an uber all the way to manchester to get to an important meeting because the services were delayed, so i feel like we could benefit from less transfers and more direct trains. to be fair, they are not that bad, on time, but they are old trains
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, all disgusting, and they are over crowded with people and it's always the same. they are not very good. they are quite on and off. like, they always get - cancelled a lot of the time, so i'm usually late to college every other day. _ it's notjust their opinion. research carried out by the council found that bradford has the worst rail connections of any major british city, and most experts know why. there's been an historic underinvestment in the north of england's transport network and its railways and within that much of the north's railway infrastructure is using old victorian infrastructure and despite many governments making promises to put that right through the northern powerhouse or levelling up, we really fail to see that rhetoric of investment actually turn into reality. so a planned east—west line across the pennines linking manchester and leeds via bradford, the so—called northern powerhouse rail, was welcomed with open arms. in 2019, borisjohnson backed the project, and this market was earmarked as a site to build
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a brand—new station. it was hoped that the new station and its place on the northern powerhouse line could boost the local economy by £30 billion over the next decade and create 100,000 newjobs. all of that is now under threat. we, as businesses, we all need youngsters or people generally to come to our factories now, so not having that through railway station and not having great transport links per se really limits us as a company. and by the way, businesses will also take a decision about where do i locate my new factory that i am looking for. you know, i need to locate it somewhere where we've got those good transport links, and i'm afraid to say that bradford may well be way down the list. to be honest with you, i feel betrayed. i feel the city and its people have been betrayed. the government says scrapping some plans will speed up construction and cut the cost of other
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much needed infrastructure. for passengers here, delays and cancellations are nothing new, but usually it's just one train, not the whole railway. let's talk about some of the implications, and let's talk to tracy babin, the mayor of west yorkshire and we will hear from the transport secretary later, but lots of leaks and speculation. what do you make of what you heard? ii of leaks and speculation. what do you make of what you heard? if what we are hearing _ you make of what you heard? if what we are hearing is _ you make of what you heard? if what we are hearing is true, _ you make of what you heard? if what we are hearing is true, it's _ you make of what you heard? if what we are hearing is true, it's a - we are hearing is true, it's a betrayal of the north and the people i represent in west yorkshire. only months ago the prime minister stood in front of stevensons rocket in manchester and promised a new rail line, the northern powerhouse rail from manchester to leeds and what we are getting is an upgrade of trans—pennine. it is re—badgering. it's not good enough and not unlocking the potential east to west and hearing we won't get hs2 up to
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leedsis and hearing we won't get hs2 up to leeds is also heartbreaking. it's going to affect our potential and investment and opportunity and it's just not good enough. the government sa s the just not good enough. the government says the plans — just not good enough. the government says the plans they _ just not good enough. the government says the plans they are _ just not good enough. the government says the plans they are coming - just not good enough. the government says the plans they are coming up - says the plans they are coming up with will be more deliverable and they can do it more quickly and more cheaply and this region will benefit, will it not?- cheaply and this region will benefit, will it not? there will be some benefits _ benefit, will it not? there will be some benefits but _ benefit, will it not? there will be some benefits but it _ benefit, will it not? there will be some benefits but it is _ benefit, will it not? there will be some benefits but it is not - benefit, will it not? there will be some benefits but it is not what. benefit, will it not? there will be i some benefits but it is not what we were told. we were told by george osborne on the spawn that the northern powerhouse would unlock the potential of the north but this is tinkering at the edges are not what we were expecting or what i was expecting when we talked about what the prime minister would deliver and on many occasions in the house of parliament in a conference that we would get the northern powerhouse rail and it's not what we were getting. rail and it's not what we were ttettin. ~ . rail and it's not what we were ttettin_. ., ., , rail and it's not what we were ttettin.. ., ., , ., rail and it's not what we were getting. what does it hold back, what is the _ getting. what does it hold back, what is the growth _ getting. what does it hold back, what is the growth and - getting. what does it hold back, - what is the growth and development being hindered by the lack of connectivity around the region? it is about investment. when hsz is about investment. when hs2 announced it was going to birmingham
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there was a massive wave of investment in birmingham and you only have to see what it looks like now. this is about a commitment from government, from the south to the north and it's not what we are seeing and we are seeing young people choosing not their first choice of university but their second or third because the transport is not working and we are seeing businesses moving to manchester rather than bradford. bradford is the least connected city in the uk with the youngest population and an absolutely totemic example of what levelling up could look like if they did it properly and we are short—changed by this announcement. the and we are short-changed by this announcement.— and we are short-changed by this announcement. , , , announcement. the levelling up issue is something — announcement. the levelling up issue is something the _ announcement. the levelling up issue is something the government - announcement. the levelling up issue is something the government made i is something the government made such a big deal about, promising up the new wave of voters who voted conservative at the first time that they would get the things they were promised and how frustrating is it that this is not happening? it’s that this is not happening? it's deel that this is not happening? it�*s deeply frustrating and not just for me. you will have seenjake berry and prime minister's questions yesterday asking the prime minister
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the same questions i am asking. how can you trust the prime minister? tracey, nice to see you and i know you have a busy day ahead dealing with a lot of responses to this. frustration, anger, resentment, betrayal, you are hearing from tracy about those plans. we will get the detail later and a lot of it has been leaked to the press over the weekend and we have some sort of announcements about some of the things that may or may not happen. the government says it wants to deliver things more quickly and cheaply to offer smaller projects rather than the big ones planned, but from here in leeds it really seems there is a lot of frustration about not being up to get around the region and it's notjust here to london, it's about sheffield, nottingham, the east midlands, leeds, liverpooland nottingham, the east midlands, leeds, liverpool and all of the places on the routes including bradford that we heard about earlier. we will hear from the transport secretary later. ben, thank you — transport secretary later. ben, thank you very _ transport secretary later. ben, thank you very much. - transport secretary later. ben, thank you very much. it's - transport secretary later. ben, thank you very much. it's been| thank you very much. it's been interesting _ thank you very much. it's been interesting hearing _ thank you very much. it's been interesting hearing from - thank you very much. it's been interesting hearing from him i thank you very much. it's been i interesting hearing from him and those views in that part of the
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country and it would be really interesting to see how that is couched when the announcement is made later on. we will keep you up—to—date all date on the bbc. it s exactly 30 years to the day since terry waite, the archbishop of canterbury 5 envoy to the middle east, was released from captivity in beirut. he was held for almost five years after being kidnapped, and spent much of the time in solitary confinement and chained to a radiator. he was beaten and subjected to a mock execution. alice key has been looking back at his story. this is the moment terry waite returned home in 1991. the presence here today of so many people is indicative not only of your concern for western hostages, but your concern for justice, for peace and for truth throughout the world.
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after five years of being held hostage in the lebanese capital of beirut by islamic fundamentalists, he was freed on the 18th of november. the church envoy travelled to the war—torn country in 1987 to negotiate the release of several british prisoners, including journalistjohn mccarthy. but despite early success, he was eventually taken hostage himself. after years in solitary confinement, being changed to a radiator, beaten and subjected to mock executions, his captors eventually released him after 1763 long, torturous days. and in the 30 years since his release, he has devoted his life to humanitarian causes. alice key, bbc news.
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terry waite joins us now. good morning and thanks for being with us. ,., ., good morning and thanks for being with us. ., good morning and thanks for being with us-_ 30 - good morning and thanks for being with us._ 30 years, i with us. good morning. 30 years, toodness with us. good morning. 30 years, goodness me- — with us. good morning. 30 years, goodness me. how _ with us. good morning. 30 years, goodness me. how does - with us. good morning. 30 years, goodness me. how does it - with us. good morning. 30 years, goodness me. how does it feel i with us. good morning. 30 years, goodness me. how does it feel to with us. good morning. 30 years, - goodness me. how does it feel to you when you look back to that time, three decades ago? i when you look back to that time, three decades ago?— three decades ago? i can hardly believe it is _ three decades ago? i can hardly believe it is 30 _ three decades ago? i can hardly believe it is 30 years _ three decades ago? i can hardly believe it is 30 years since - three decades ago? i can hardly believe it is 30 years since i - three decades ago? i can hardly| believe it is 30 years since i was released i— believe it is 30 years since i was released. ijust heard that click, and my— released. ijust heard that click, and my mind goes back to that day which _ and my mind goes back to that day which was — and my mind goes back to that day which was a — and my mind goes back to that day which was a rainy, lowing, windy day. _ which was a rainy, lowing, windy day. and — which was a rainy, lowing, windy day. and i— which was a rainy, lowing, windy day, and i descended into that airport— day, and i descended into that airport and was greeted by hundreds of press _ airport and was greeted by hundreds of press people and i made that little _ of press people and i made that little speech, which i had actually put together on the aeroplane and that was— put together on the aeroplane and that was my signing. i said right, i will make — that was my signing. i said right, i will make one statement and then retreat _ will make one statement and then retreat for— will make one statement and then retreat for a while and i did. and it seems— retreat for a while and i did. and it seems a — retreat for a while and i did. and it seems a long time ago and the time has — it seems a long time ago and the time has gone quickly and things have _
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time has gone quickly and things have gone quickly since that day. you talk — have gone quickly since that day. you talk about coming back and the speeches and the cameras, and i bet if it happened now, it wouldn't be so public, you would be kept away from publicity for a while. they would be thinking about your mental health while and i'm sure you got support but i imagine it would be a different scenario. irate support but i imagine it would be a different scenario.— support but i imagine it would be a different scenario. we have learned a lot since those _ different scenario. we have learned a lot since those days. _ different scenario. we have learned a lot since those days. one - different scenario. we have learned a lot since those days. one of - different scenario. we have learned a lot since those days. one of the i a lot since those days. one of the things— a lot since those days. one of the things i_ a lot since those days. one of the things i have done since being released — things i have done since being released is found in organisation called _ released is found in organisation called hostage international and we work all— called hostage international and we work all over the world and we work with returning hostages and we are an independent charity and we work in close _ an independent charity and we work in close cooperation with the foreign— in close cooperation with the foreign office, but we give advice to people — foreign office, but we give advice to people and our advice is that when _ to people and our advice is that when you — to people and our advice is that when you come out, certainly make a statement _ when you come out, certainly make a statement but then get away but give yourselves time. but some people don't _
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yourselves time. but some people don't realise it does take time to readjust— don't realise it does take time to readjust from difficulties in your life. read'ust from difficulties in your life. ' , read'ust from difficulties in your life. ' , ., ., life. 1763 days you are held for, much of it _ life. 1763 days you are held for, much of it in — life. 1763 days you are held for, much of it in solitary _ much of it in solitary confinement. what kept you going, because your strength when you emerged and you went public, you looks remarkably together and well. so what kept you together? the together and well. so what kept you totether? . ., ., , together and well. so what kept you totether? _, ., , ., , together and well. so what kept you totether? _, ., , .,, ,, together? the conditions as you describe them _ together? the conditions as you describe them were _ together? the conditions as you describe them were pretty - together? the conditions as you| describe them were pretty grim. together? the conditions as you i describe them were pretty grim. i was changed to the wall for 23 hours a day— was changed to the wall for 23 hours a day and _ was changed to the wall for 23 hours a day and i_ was changed to the wall for 23 hours a day and i slept on the floor and didn't— a day and i slept on the floor and didn't have — a day and i slept on the floor and didn't have books or papers and i was in _ didn't have books or papers and i was in a — didn't have books or papers and i was in a room where metal shutters, so no _ was in a room where metal shutters, so no natural— was in a room where metal shutters, so no natural light and there was no companionship, so it was a fairly austere — companionship, so it was a fairly austere distance, and a little bit worse _ austere distance, and a little bit worse than a lot now and what you
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have _ worse than a lot now and what you have to _ worse than a lot now and what you have to do — worse than a lot now and what you have to do in a situation like that is be _ have to do in a situation like that is be able — have to do in a situation like that is be able to maintain some hope within— is be able to maintain some hope within yourself. secondly i recognised i still had life and although it was very limited, i was still able _ although it was very limited, i was still able to live as fully as possible within the day as it dawned and lived _ possible within the day as it dawned and lived one day at a time, in other— and lived one day at a time, in other words, and keep your mind alive _ other words, and keep your mind alive that— other words, and keep your mind alive. that is the critical bit. i was _ alive. that is the critical bit. i was able _ alive. that is the critical bit. i was able to— alive. that is the critical bit. i was able to write in my head and i read _ was able to write in my head and i read many— was able to write in my head and i read many stories are my first book in my— read many stories are my first book in my head — read many stories are my first book in my head during those years, which i put on _ in my head during those years, which i put on paper later on when i came outand— i put on paper later on when i came outand it— i put on paper later on when i came outand it is— i put on paper later on when i came out and it is by keeping my mind alive. _ out and it is by keeping my mind alive, keeping hope alive and there's— alive, keeping hope alive and there's a _ alive, keeping hope alive and there's a good story about that, in this dark— there's a good story about that, in this dark room it was very difficult to tell— this dark room it was very difficult to tell if— this dark room it was very difficult to tell if it— this dark room it was very difficult to tell if it was day or night, but when _ to tell if it was day or night, but when the — to tell if it was day or night, but when the sun rose there was a chink in the _ when the sun rose there was a chink in the shutter on the window and a little _ in the shutter on the window and a little beam —
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in the shutter on the window and a little beam of light came through. and gradually that light illuminated the room _ and gradually that light illuminated the room and i said don't give up, remember— the room and i said don't give up, remember light is stronger than darkness— remember light is stronger than darkness and i was able to maintain hope _ darkness and i was able to maintain hope at_ darkness and i was able to maintain ho e. �* . darkness and i was able to maintain hoe. . , ., , darkness and i was able to maintain hoe. �* , ., , ., hope. a little bit worse than lockdown — hope. a little bit worse than lockdown and _ hope. a little bit worse than lockdown and that _ hope. a little bit worse than lockdown and that puts - hope. a little bit worse than lockdown and that puts into | lockdown and that puts into perspective for all of us, goodness me. at the beginning of the week we were talking about the iranian hostage and richard radcliffe ending his hunger strike and you must be upset that there are still british citizens around the world in similar situations. . ., , ., , situations. there are many, many, i can sa , situations. there are many, many, i can say. without _ situations. there are many, many, i can say, without going _ situations. there are many, many, i can say, without going into - situations. there are many, many, i can say, without going into detail. can say, without going into detail that i_ can say, without going into detail that i am — can say, without going into detail that i am in— can say, without going into detail that i am in touch with, and she is hearing _ that i am in touch with, and she is hearing up— that i am in touch with, and she is hearing up remarkably well, although bearing up remarkably well, although lonqinq _ bearing up remarkably well, although longing to— bearing up remarkably well, although longing to be back with her family as she _ longing to be back with her family as she should be and with richard
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and her— as she should be and with richard and her daughterand we as she should be and with richard and her daughter and we are in touch with people _ and her daughter and we are in touch with people all the time. hostage international has played a remarkable role in aiding and supporting people from all over the world _ supporting people from all over the world we — supporting people from all over the world. we have a team of volunteers of former— world. we have a team of volunteers of former hostages and other helpers who work— of former hostages and other helpers who work with us and entirely rely on public— who work with us and entirely rely on public donations, one or two small— on public donations, one or two small grants, but it has been something that has really been useful— something that has really been useful and i'm very glad that this has been — useful and i'm very glad that this has been one of the positive outcomes of incarceration, along with the — outcomes of incarceration, along with the work with the homeless. what _ with the work with the homeless. what happened to me in those years is i've _ what happened to me in those years is i've always had sympathy for people — is i've always had sympathy for people who have been on the margins of life. _ people who have been on the margins of life. the _ people who have been on the margins of life, the homeless, the prisoner, the captive — of life, the homeless, the prisoner, the captive and i've always had that. _ the captive and i've always had that. for— the captive and i've always had that, for some reason or other, but during _
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that, for some reason or other, but during captivity, that sympathy was changed _ during captivity, that sympathy was changed to empathy. sympathy is to feel sorry— changed to empathy. sympathy is to feel sorry for and empathy is to know— feel sorry for and empathy is to know what it's like to have nothing to be _ know what it's like to have nothing to be kicked around and be treated as worthless, and that was one of the gifts — as worthless, and that was one of the gifts that i got from the experience.— the gifts that i got from the exerience. , ~ . ., ,, , ., experience. terry waite, thank you for 'oinint experience. terry waite, thank you forjoining us. _ experience. terry waite, thank you forjoining us, 30 _ experience. terry waite, thank you forjoining us, 30 years _ experience. terry waite, thank you forjoining us, 30 years on, - sharing your stories and positivity and we appreciate your time. thank you. and we appreciate your time. thank ou. . ~' and we appreciate your time. thank ou. . ~ , ., and we appreciate your time. thank ou. . ~ ,y and we appreciate your time. thank you-_ lovely i and we appreciate your time. thank. you-_ lovely man- you. thank you. goodbye. lovely man. eseciall you. thank you. goodbye. lovely man. especially after — you. thank you. goodbye. lovely man. especially after all _ you. thank you. goodbye. lovely man. especially after all those _ especially after all those experiences. after raising millions of pounds for motor neurone disease by running seven marathons in seven days, the rugby league legend kevin sinfield is nowjust days away from his toughest challenge yet. it sounds like it is not doable but he will do it. on monday, kevin will run 101 miles in just 24 hours. he's doing it once again
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to help his friend and former teammate, rob burrow, who was diagnosed with mnd in 2019. graham satchell has been to see how the final preparations are going. this could be the biggest challenge that he will ever have to do. this isjust extraordinary, isn't it? i mean, 101 miles in 24 hours. it's beyond belief. i know it's going to be horrific. and it's going to be really, really tough. but it's supposed to be.
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leeds beckett university, and final medical checks before next week's extraordinary challenge. kevin sinfield is planning to run 101 miles in 24 hours. four marathons back—to—back with no sleep. it's good to know i'm alive. for a start off. it's great when you get to tap into some real expertise and the support, it's really important for all of us. the medical team are checking lactate and glucose levels under the watchful eye of professor ben jones. running through the night, sleep—deprived, glycogen—depleted, fatigued, we've got to make sure that actually he doesn't injure or hurt himself. so we've estimated his calorie expenditure to be around 13,000 calories. we are going to feed him around 900 calories every two hours.
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it'll be wraps, paninis, pizzas, foods he enjoys eating. what's the verdict? he is a very fit - a specimen of a man. he motivates us to do things we don't think we can do, and he does that by leading by example and by doing things that nobody should be able to do. this was kev�*s last challenge, running seven marathons in seven days. he raised millions of pounds for the motor neurone disease association. he's running for his team—mate and best friend, rob burrow, diagnosed with mnd in 2019. together with other high—profile sports stars, they have campaigned for more funding for mnd. this week, the government pledged £50 million. i think he's absolutely extraordinary. he's been a beacon of hope and inspiration for our community, and that's why that £50 million is so important. we've never been closer to some successful treatments for motor neurone disease and one
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day, a cure, of course. time for one final surprise. welcome aboard. thank you. nice to meet you. nice, this. very kind of you. this is chris smith. he saw kev�*s new challenge on this programme and decided he wanted to help. when i realised it was going to be several stops along the way, - i thought, we need a support vehicle for this challenge. _ it's really kind of you. thank you. lovely. great have you on board n' all. having run four marathons, - not one after the other, myself, i can understand exactly how much effort he is i putting into fundraising. there's so many unknowns in this, there's so many uncertainties. but people with mnd don't have a choice and we won't have a choice when we start on monday.
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that's the reason we're running. we are joined now by darrel rogers, one of kevin's best friends, and garry holt who has mnd and will be playing a part in kevin's challenge. and you also have mnd, but it's a different form of it. and i think with all of this has been a learning process for all of us when it comes to mnd and we have learned so much. i am still learning.— i am still learning. when were you diagnosed? _ i am still learning. when were you diagnosed? l— i am still learning. when were you diagnosed? i was _ i am still learning. when were you diagnosed? i was diagnosed - i am still learning. when were you diagnosed? i was diagnosed at - i am still learning. when were you diagnosed? i was diagnosed at 30 | diagnosed? i was diagnosed at 30 ears old. diagnosed? i was diagnosed at 30 years old- how — diagnosed? i was diagnosed at 30 years old. how old _ diagnosed? i was diagnosed at 30 years old. how old are _ diagnosed? i was diagnosed at 30 years old. how old are you - diagnosed? i was diagnosed at 30 years old. how old are you now. years old. how old are you now tuestion years old. how old are you now question mark— years old. how old are you now question mark i'm _ years old. how old are you now question mark i'm 45. - years old. how old are you now question mark i'm 45. fealty i years old. how old are you now question mark i'm 45. fealty ? | years old. how old are you now. question mark i'm 45. fealty ? 15 years ago. how is your mnd different?— years ago. how is your mnd different? , ., ., , different? funnily enough i was born with it. it different? funnily enough i was born with it- it was _ different? funnily enough i was born with it. it was genetic. _ different? funnily enough i was born
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with it. it was genetic. from - different? funnily enough i was born with it. it was genetic. from my - with it. it was genetic. from my grandad and then my mum was a carrier. and it will carry on in my family if i happen to have children, so, i started having family if i happen to have children, so, istarted having problems family if i happen to have children, so, i started having problems in my late 20s, i was falling over and nobody knew what was going on. i was tired all the time etc and we went for lots of tests and i got diagnosed at 30. it’s for lots of tests and i got diagnosed at 30. it's different, isn't it? it's — diagnosed at 30. it's different, isn't it? it's a _ diagnosed at 30. it's different, isn't it? it's a different - diagnosed at 30. it's different, isn't it? it's a different form i diagnosed at 30. it's different, | isn't it? it's a different form we see. how is it different? unfortunately rob has a very aggressive case, and people like fernando rixon, the footballer, but then like stephen hawking, he managed to live to a late age, but my symptoms are getting a grab of me now. ~' . my symptoms are getting a grab of me now. ~ . i've my symptoms are getting a grab of me now— i've been _
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my symptoms are getting a grab of me now._ i've been told, - my symptoms are getting a grab of me now._ i've been told, only i now. like what? i've been told, only esterda now. like what? i've been told, only yesterday but _ now. like what? i've been told, only yesterday but i've _ now. like what? i've been told, only yesterday but i've got _ now. like what? i've been told, only yesterday but i've got to _ now. like what? i've been told, only yesterday but i've got to bank - now. like what? i've been told, only yesterday but i've got to bank my i yesterday but i've got to bank my voice, which was a big thing, and i had been choking on food and i've possibly had to go on purified foods, stuff like that and it's a bit daunting. i live alone. it's what it does to you mentally, as well, you know? but what it does to you mentally, as well, you know?— what it does to you mentally, as well, you know? but your mental strentth well, you know? but your mental strength is _ well, you know? but your mental strength is incredible, _ well, you know? but your mental strength is incredible, and - well, you know? but your mental strength is incredible, and you i well, you know? but your mental. strength is incredible, and you will know this as well, you've taken part in your own challenges to support this. i in your own challenges to support this. , . ., , this. i did, yeah. iwas in perth 'ust this. i did, yeah. iwas in perth just before _ this. i did, yeah. iwas in perth just before covid _ this. i did, yeah. iwas in perth just before covid and _ this. i did, yeah. iwas in perth just before covid and i - this. i did, yeah. iwas in perth just before covid and i found i this. i did, yeah. i was in perth. just before covid and i found out the news on sky sports about rob burrow coming through and i got really upset that it happened to this man because i'm a rugby league supporter and i knew about robin ? rob and kevin and i thought, why is it doing this and when i came back,
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i thought, i want to do something and i knew kevin was doing his challenge and i thought, i can't run, etc and i livejust round challenge and i thought, i can't run, etc and i live just round the corner from the lake and it is all flat, and... corner from the lake and it is all flat. and. - -_ flat, and... we are seeing this, this two and — flat, and... we are seeing this, this two and a _ flat, and. .. we are seeing this, this two and a half— flat, and... we are seeing this, this two and a half mile i flat, and... we are seeing this, this two and a half mile laps, i flat, and... we are seeing this, i this two and a half mile laps, and you did six of those. what i think it shows is the importance of taking part but also having support. yes. part but also having support. yes, and the importance _ part but also having support. yes, and the importance for— part but also having support. yes, and the importance for kevin is it is all— and the importance for kevin is it is all about— and the importance for kevin is it is all about raising money for research _ is all about raising money for research. so the situations, we understand a more. darryl, how is kevin _ understand a more. darryl, how is kevin doing? and he has this massive challenge _ kevin doing? and he has this massive challenge on monday and you will be there to _ challenge on monday and you will be there to support him. he is challenge on monday and you will be there to support him.— there to support him. he is amazing and we touched _ there to support him. he is amazing and we touched on _ there to support him. he is amazing and we touched on it _ there to support him. he is amazing and we touched on it before i there to support him. he is amazing and we touched on it before about i and we touched on it before about the mental— and we touched on it before about the mental toughness _ and we touched on it before about the mental toughness and - and we touched on it before about the mental toughness and i- and we touched on it before about the mental toughness and i thinki and we touched on it before about i the mental toughness and i think he has it— the mental toughness and i think he has it in— the mental toughness and i think he has it in abundance. _ the mental toughness and i think he has it in abundance. playing - the mental toughness and i think he has it in abundance. playing rugby. has it in abundance. playing rugby league _ has it in abundance. playing rugby league all— has it in abundance. playing rugby league all his _ has it in abundance. playing rugby league all his life, _ has it in abundance. playing rugby league all his life, for— has it in abundance. playing rugby league all his life, for most i has it in abundance. playing rugby league all his life, for most he's i has it in abundance. playing rugby league all his life, for most he's a | league all his life, for most he's a rugby— league all his life, for most he's a rugby player. _ league all his life, for most he's a rugby player. not— league all his life, for most he's a
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rugby player. not a _ league all his life, for most he's a rugby player, not a runner, i league all his life, for most he's a rugby player, not a runner, so- league all his life, for most he's a rugby player, not a runner, so hisj rugby player, not a runner, so his body— rugby player, not a runner, so his body is _ rugby player, not a runner, so his body is in — rugby player, not a runner, so his body is in bits— rugby player, not a runner, so his body is in hits with _ rugby player, not a runner, so his body is in hits with all _ rugby player, not a runner, so his body is in hits with all the - rugby player, not a runner, so his body is in hits with all the knocksl body is in hits with all the knocks and hangs — body is in hits with all the knocks and hangs from _ body is in hits with all the knocks and hangs from over— body is in hits with all the knocks and hangs from over the - body is in hits with all the knocks and hangs from over the year- body is in hits with all the knocksj and hangs from over the year but body is in hits with all the knocks i and hangs from over the year but one thin- and hangs from over the year but one thing he _ and hangs from over the year but one thing he has — and hangs from over the year but one thing he has is — and hangs from over the year but one thing he has is the _ and hangs from over the year but one thing he has is the mental— and hangs from over the year but one thing he has is the mental toughnessj thing he has is the mental toughness to take _ thing he has is the mental toughness to take it— thing he has is the mental toughness to take it to — thing he has is the mental toughness to take it to the — thing he has is the mental toughness to take it to the next _ thing he has is the mental toughness to take it to the next level. _ to take it to the next level. unbelievable. _ to take it to the next level. unbelievable. and - to take it to the next level. unbelievable. and we i to take it to the next level. unbelievable. and we were to take it to the next level. - unbelievable. and we were talking to terry waite, the former hostage, about— terry waite, the former hostage, about empathy and understanding of the situations and for kevin as well. — the situations and for kevin as well. he — the situations and for kevin as well, he has seen rob and heard about— well, he has seen rob and heard about gary's situation and it is that— about gary's situation and it is that drive _ about gary's situation and it is that drive and empathy that keeps him going — that drive and empathy that keeps him going through his own battle. definitely. he was sat on a sofa, with a _ definitely. he was sat on a sofa, with a lady— definitely. he was sat on a sofa, with a lady who _ definitely. he was sat on a sofa, with a lady who lost _ definitely. he was sat on a sofa, with a lady who lost both - definitely. he was sat on a sofa, with a lady who lost both her- definitely. he was sat on a sofa, i with a lady who lost both her sons, and her— with a lady who lost both her sons, and her husband _ with a lady who lost both her sons, and her husband and _ with a lady who lost both her sons, and her husband and their- with a lady who lost both her sons, and her husband and their grandadj with a lady who lost both her sons, i and her husband and their grandad as well, and her husband and their grandad as well. and _ and her husband and their grandad as well. and and — and her husband and their grandad as well, and and she _ and her husband and their grandad as well, and and she said, _ and her husband and their grandad as well, and and she said, how- and her husband and their grandad as well, and and she said, how do- and her husband and their grandad as well, and and she said, how do you i well, and and she said, how do you -et well, and and she said, how do you get on _ well, and and she said, how do you get on in _ well, and and she said, how do you get on in life — well, and and she said, how do you get on in life got— well, and and she said, how do you get on in life got a _ well, and and she said, how do you get on in life got a man _ well, and and she said, how do you get on in life got a man she - well, and and she said, how do you get on in life got a man she said, ii get on in life got a man she said, i have _ get on in life got a man she said, i have a _ get on in life got a man she said, i have a son — get on in life got a man she said, i have a son and _ get on in life got a man she said, i have a son and she _ get on in life got a man she said, i have a son and she said _ get on in life got a man she said, i have a son and she said there i get on in life got a man she said, i have a son and she said there is. get on in life got a man she said, i| have a son and she said there is no cure _ have a son and she said there is no cure. ,, t, have a son and she said there is no cure, a, a, a, a, " have a son and she said there is no cure. a, a, a, ,, ~ ,, cure. you are looking after kevin auoin cure. you are looking after kevin going through — cure. you are looking after kevin going through this _ cure. you are looking after kevin going through this on _ cure. you are looking after kevin going through this on monday, l cure. you are looking after kevin i going through this on monday, 101 miles _ going through this on monday, 101 miles. what will you do?— going through this on monday, 101 miles. what will you do? there will be a lot of ups _ miles. what will you do? there will be a lot of ups and _ miles. what will you do? there will be a lot of ups and downs - miles. what will you do? there will be a lot of ups and downs and - miles. what will you do? there will be a lot of ups and downs and with | be a lot of ups and downs and with kevin, _ be a lot of ups and downs and with kevin, he — be a lot of ups and downs and with kevin, he has _ be a lot of ups and downs and with kevin, he has a _ be a lot of ups and downs and with kevin, he has a good _ be a lot of ups and downs and with kevin, he has a good team - be a lot of ups and downs and with kevin, he has a good team around| be a lot of ups and downs and with - kevin, he has a good team around him and we _ kevin, he has a good team around him and we have _ kevin, he has a good team around him and we have fantastic— kevin, he has a good team around him and we have fantastic people - kevin, he has a good team around him and we have fantastic people with - and we have fantastic people with us, and we have fantastic people with us. support— and we have fantastic people with us, support runners _ and we have fantastic people with us, support runners and - and we have fantastic people with us, support runners and bikers i and we have fantastic people with. us, support runners and bikers and family— us, support runners and bikers and
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family and — us, support runners and bikers and family and friends _ us, support runners and bikers and family and friends and _ us, support runners and bikers and family and friends and people - us, support runners and bikers and l family and friends and people waving and the _ family and friends and people waving and the people — family and friends and people waving and the people pledging _ family and friends and people waving and the people pledging money, - family and friends and people waving and the people pledging money, if. and the people pledging money, if you think— and the people pledging money, if you think of— and the people pledging money, if you think of the _ and the people pledging money, if you think of the country, - and the people pledging money, if you think of the country, we - and the people pledging money, if you think of the country, we come| you think of the country, we come together— you think of the country, we come together with _ you think of the country, we come together with these _ you think of the country, we come together with these people - you think of the country, we come together with these people in - you think of the country, we come i together with these people in need and that— together with these people in need and that keeps— together with these people in need and that keeps on— together with these people in need and that keeps on going, _ together with these people in need and that keeps on going, but - together with these people in need and that keeps on going, but like l together with these people in need and that keeps on going, but like i| and that keeps on going, but like i said, _ and that keeps on going, but like i said. he _ and that keeps on going, but like i said. he is— and that keeps on going, but like i said. he is a — and that keeps on going, but like i said, he is a machine. _ and that keeps on going, but like i said, he is a machine. ifaith:- and that keeps on going, but like i said, he is a machine.— said, he is a machine. we will continue _ said, he is a machine. we will continue talking, _ said, he is a machine. we will continue talking, and - said, he is a machine. we will continue talking, and you - said, he is a machine. we will continue talking, and you are| continue talking, and you are watching breakfast and to those watching breakfast and to those watching on the news channel, but on bbc one we
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hello this is bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire. here are the headlines: a £96 billion rail plan for the midlands and north of england, not all of it new money, and there's anger as the high—speed hs2 line from the east midlands to leeds is expected to be scrapped. those high—speed lines would have collected the east midlands and parts of northern england but there is anger and disappointment and frustration here this morning that those plans are now in doubt. if you're wathcing in nottingham, sheffield, leeds, bradford or macnehster — what do you thinnk about the likely scrapping of hs2 from nottingham to leeds?

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