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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 17, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines. borisjohnson tells a committee of mps that it was a "total mistake" to attempt to reform parliamentary standards at the same time his conservative colleague owen paterson was facing suspension for breaking lobbying rules. i think the committee will agree that i accepted that it was a mistake and that it was my mistake. we'll be looking at some of the other issues the prime minister has been facing
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at the cross—party committee of mps. also... the cost of living hits its highest level for a decade as a rise in inflation is driven by increasing costs of fuel, energy, transport and hospitality. everything's gone up, it might only be 50, 60p here but at the end it all does mount up. counter—terror police say the man behind an explosion outside liverpool women's hospital started making preparations for his attack back in april. a british f—35 fighterjet crashes into the mediterranean during a routine operation — the pilot ejected safely. and the first pictures of the queen since she missed the remembrance sunday service amid concerns about her health.
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borisjohnson says he accepts he made a mistake when he attempted the he made a mistake when he attempted prime mini questions, the prime minister is been answering questions, he says he accepts that he did make a mistake when he tried to delay a conservative colleague from being suspended from parliament and breaking two for breaking lobbying rules with the owen patterson did eventually resign. the prime minister was pressed by the chair of the committee on the issue. do you recognise that given your responsibility to uphold the ministerial cold, deep up all the rules and uphold the standards? it's really important that you should not give any impression that when there is an independent report that found on m occasions of paid lobbying that somehow you think that's ok. can you clarify, d don't think it's ok and you don't think that owen
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patterson did was right? fit 0k and you don't think that owen patterson did was right? of course i did. that patterson did was right? of course i did- that was _ patterson did was right? of course i did. that was the _ patterson did was right? of course i did. that was the first _ patterson did was right? of course i did. that was the first thing - patterson did was right? of course i did. that was the first thing i - patterson did was right? of course i did. that was the first thing i said i did. that was the first thing i said when _ did. that was the first thing i said when i began on the subject to two weeks ago — when i began on the subject to two weeks ago. frankly, i think it is extraordinary that colleagues and sometimes do behave in this way. and it is quite _ sometimes do behave in this way. and it is quite right that the commission is able to investigate and to— commission is able to investigate and to hold them to account. i always — and to hold them to account. i always sought to do, and i think the committee — always sought to do, and i think the committee would agree that i accepted that it was a mistake and that it _ accepted that it was a mistake and that it was — accepted that it was a mistake and that it was my mistake. all we wanted to— that it was my mistake. all we wanted to do was to see whether in view of— wanted to do was to see whether in view of the — wanted to do was to see whether in view of the particular and frankly, tragic— view of the particular and frankly, tragic circumstances of the case there _ tragic circumstances of the case there was— tragic circumstances of the case there was any scope for pressparty agreement on an appeals process was up agreement on an appeals process was up that's— agreement on an appeals process was up that's what we were trying to do. the prime minister also admitted he may have been mistaken in believing owen patterson had not had not had a fair appeals process.
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he was responding to the chair of the committees on standards and privileges, chris bryant, who asked mrjohnson to clarify whether he thought owen paterson was guilty of breaking the rules. i think it was a very sad case but i think— i think it was a very sad case but i think there — i think it was a very sad case but i think there is no question that he had fallen— think there is no question that he had fallen foul of the rules on paid advocacy— had fallen foul of the rules on paid advocacy as far as i can see from the report — advocacy as far as i can see from the report i_ advocacy as far as i can see from the report. ithink advocacy as far as i can see from the report. i think the question people — the report. i think the question people wanted to establish was whether— people wanted to establish was whether or not given the particularly tragic circumstances he'd had — particularly tragic circumstances he'd had a — particularly tragic circumstances he'd had a fair right to appeal. he had he'd had a fair right to appeal. hrs. had an he'd had a fair right to appeal. he: had an appeal, his appeal was heard endlessly. both by the committee. i endlessly. both by the committee. i wish to restate that informing the impression that the former member from shop _ impression that the former member from shop shire had not had a fair
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process, _ from shop shire had not had a fair process, i— from shop shire had not had a fair process, i may well have been mistaken _ process, i may well have been mistaken. but that was certainly the impression — mistaken. but that was certainly the impression that many people seem seem to have. the prime minister at the committee today. the cost of living has reached the highest rate in almost a decade — due to rising fuel and energy costs. inflation is now more than double the bank of england's target. consumer prices were 4.2% higher last month than a year ago. the costs of transport, gas and electricity bills as well as second hand cars all climbed. in september, inflation was 3.1%. the bank of england's aim is to keep inflation to around 2%. rising prices are putting new pressure on households and businesses. economists are debating how much of the surge in inflation can be blamed on the pandemic and how long it will last. coletta smith reports.
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it's lunchtime at nursery. and with 63 hungry mouths to feed the staff here have their hands full. paula has increased her hours recently to make sure she's getting enough to cover the bills at home. i'm getting more money in but then i'm paying it out forfuel, food. gas and electric has gone up again. gas and electricity. sarah has got 12—year—old twins so the weekly shop is getting to be more of a worry. where i tended to go because it offers rather than single prices because everything has gone up. it might only be 50p or 60p here, but at the end it all does mount up. today's inflation shows it shot up the highest point in decade. gas and electricity bills are the main cause of that rise along with diesel and petrol prices reaching record highs. just getting to and from work is
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eating up more of everyone's wages. i'm in a position where i can't not use the car. so it is starting to affect obviously my wallet. those are water watering _ affect obviously my wallet. those are water watering fuel _ affect obviously my wallet. those are water watering fuel because i affect obviously my wallet. those i are water watering fuel because ms. alex's having to cut on other things. we all had tesco for cheap food to eat nephew but at the moment as fuel is increasing it's just as cheap to go to the bp or the shell because it's just so astronomically expensive. if you're earning minimum wage when he tried to run the car as well lu of the family that live far away to make it a lot more difficult for you to travel to see them, especially during the christmas period. especially during the christmas eriod. , . , especially during the christmas eriod. , ., , , especially during the christmas eriod. , , ., , especially during the christmas eriod. , ., period. christmas is always an expensive _ period. christmas is always an expensive time _ period. christmas is always an expensive time of _ period. christmas is always an expensive time of year. - period. christmas is always an expensive time of year. with i period. christmas is always an i expensive time of year. with the price of essentials going up at the same time it's going to be a really difficult few weeks. the bad news is that the bank of england and businesses from hotels through two restaurants all say the biggest price increases will actually be coming in the new year. unfortunately, it doesn't look like
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it's going — unfortunately, it doesn't look like it's going to get any easier for families _ it's going to get any easier for families. really it does commit at that time — families. really it does commit at that time. lots of are seeing universai— that time. lots of are seeing universal credit payments cut by £20 a week _ universal credit payments cut by £20 a week. that means on one hand they are being _ a week. that means on one hand they are being buffeted by their income failing _ are being buffeted by their income failing at _ are being buffeted by their income falling at the same time as prices are rising — falling at the same time as prices are rising making many people really anxious— are rising making many people really anxious about how they will manage those _ anxious about how they will manage those pressures. the anxious about how they will manage those pressures.— anxious about how they will manage those pressures. the government say they announce _ those pressures. the government say they announce extra _ those pressures. the government say they announce extra money _ those pressures. the government say they announce extra money in - they announce extra money in september to help those most in need cope with rising costs this winter. most vulnerable whether they work in a not that's what the funding at a local level our councils can support directly those families they know that are most in need of that support through this inflationary time. ~ , , support through this inflationary time. , , ., ., time. with higher bills for all the essentials workers _ time. with higher bills for all the essentials workers in _ time. with higher bills for all the essentials workers in every - time. with higher bills for all the i essentials workers in every industry are making small changes just to stick to their budgets. i'm joined by dave innes, head of economics at thejoseph rowntree foundation.
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what is your take on this question that economists are debating at the moment whether this is a blip, a temporary surge in inflation or whether this kind of inflation rate is here to stay? i whether this kind of inflation rate is here to stay?— is here to stay? i think that is a really important _ is here to stay? i think that is a really important question. - is here to stay? i think that is a really important question. we i is here to stay? i think that is a i really important question. we will have to try to answer particularly those of the bank of england. i think what really matters to family at the moment is we know these price rises are here to stay for the foreseeable months and that's really the. they're looking at the moment. the decisions making at the moment is how they are going to manage the festive. forthat is how they are going to manage the festive. for that we all want to be able to buy those gifts for our loved ones and enjoy yourselves this christmas. but for a lot of families they will be feeling incredibly squeezed. and when they see the price rises going up, how they get a manager. ? find price rises going up, how they get a manager- ?— price rises going up, how they get a manauer. ?~ , ., , manager. ? and ccckkk squeeze really
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because of global _ manager. ? and ccckkk squeeze really because of global supply _ manager. ? and ccckkk squeeze really because of global supply issues, - because of global supply issues, global storages and also rising costs of energy, gas and water. there's not much that the bank of england can do about it, is there? there is really no quick fix to the inflation that we are saying. at the moment you're like, this is caused by global problems that are pushing up by global problems that are pushing up energy prices was up this really matters to households, the energy price in particular because they take up a much larger share of their budget than higher income households. so they really impact those households much more. while there is no quick fix to bring inflation down there is a lot more the government could be doing. what we really hope the government will be doing is looking at who is being affected by these price rises and thinking, i have got the right system of support in place for them and quite clearly there is more we could be doing in terms of
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strengthening the social security system for people who are being affected and getting support in place for people who need that. in place for people who need that. in the traditional weapon that the bank of england would use is to raise interest rates. it is not likely to have very much impact if they do that? ., , , ., , ., that? probably not in the short term. that? probably not in the short term- they're _ that? probably not in the short term. they're probably - that? probably not in the short term. they're probably really i that? probably not in the short i term. they're probably really isn't much the bank of england can do at the moment. one where we are really concerned about in the moment is low income families who are unable to go out and work whether that's because of disability, caring for someone in the household. and those families have seen the universal credit payments fall by £20 a week and last month. they are also seeing these energy prices go up and really, these are mounting pressures on those households that make them really anxious with them and we won't be looking to the bank of england to solve those problems, will be looking to the government. get the support they can really help
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those households. and, atjust after half past five, we will be discussing the rise in the cost of living with the shadow chancellor, rachel reeves. a british f—35jet has crashed during a routine flying operation this morning. the ministry of defence says the pilot ejected safely and has been returned to the ship. our correspondent dan johnson has more. we believe that this happened about ten o'clock these morning uk time as the aircraft carrier hms queen elizabeth was sailing through the mediterranean sea on return from an operation that has been doing out in the east. we are told by the mod that this was a routine flying operation, essentially a training mission and to keep up the pilots flying hours. when something went wrong and the pilot felt that he or she needed to eject from the aircraft of the piloted, the pilot has been recovered safely back to the aircraft carrier but it means that the jet has gone down
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into the sea, has been lost. that's inexpensive playing, the important thing ——plane is that the pilot is safe after that search and rescue mission. at it will now be an investigation to work out what caused it. it's a huge programme, they are aiming to deliver over a hundred of thesejets in time. but it's still relatively early stages. although this is been in development for almost a decade now. it's only actually been operational with the raf and the navy for the last couple of years. so to lose one relatively early in the programme, they're only about 2a of them with the british armed forces at the moment, to lose one now will be a massive concern. that's why there will be an intensive investigation to work out was as a technical problem, was as some form of human error that made of played a part in this? the mod says this was a routine flying operation, they don't believe
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any hostile engagement was involved in the loss of this jet but they will be trying to work out exactly what went wrong. because these are hugely expensive machines and this is supposed to play a major part of britain's air defences in the future. let's turn to the situation on the eu belarus border. the polish government says migrants camped on the belarus side have begun to pack up and leave after ten days of confrontations. the deputy interior minister, says belarusian authorities had sent buses to collect migrants from the border crossing near kuznica. several thousand people have been camping near the border in the hope of reaching the european union. adam easton is monitoring this from warsaw. there's been some developments this morning. more than 80,000 people stayed overnight in a makeshift camp neara stayed overnight in a makeshift camp near a closed border crossing on the border and several hundred of them for the first time actually slept indoors after the belarusian opened up indoors after the belarusian opened up a logistics centre at the closed
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checkpoint. know what the polish officials have been saying is that this morning dave seen the makeshift camp, people up and packing up and they've been leaving. and poland is deputy minister has said that buses have been sent to collect those migrants. poland border guard confirms this information as well. it they put out video of migrants being let out of the camp. what they say is they don't know where they're going to. they also said that some of the migrants were carrying lodz. we must remember that iraq is planning to send for the first time a plane to belarus to repatriate some of those migrants on thursday. just some news coming into us on the last couple of minutes. the government has this afternoon released more details on how the proposed on care because is going to
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work. the changes mean that if you are already receiving state support towards care costs under a means test, that money you receive will not count towards the £86,000. that means that poorer pensioners will have to wait longer before receiving the full level of state support which kicks in after £86,000 has been spent on your care. the shadow care administer has said it has now been revealed that the poorest pensioners will have to pay even more and says the government has failed to be straight with those who have given so much to our country and it's a total disgrace. but unsurprising. that reaction already. more on that as it comes into us. the headlines on bbc news... borisjohnson tells a committee of mps that it was a "total mistake" to try to reform parliamentary standards at the same time owen paterson faced suspension for breaking rules on lobbying the cost of living hits
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its highest level for a decade thanks to the rising prices of fuel, energy, transport and hospitality counter—terror police say the man behind an explosion outside liverpool women's hospital started making preparations for his attack back in april. the queen has held a face to face audience with general sir nick carter, the chief of the defence staff, at windsor castle — part of her first official engagements since missing the remembrance sunday service. she had to miss the cenotaph day parade because of a sprained back. palace sources said the queen was deeply disappointed to miss the service which she regards as one of the most significant engagements of the year. and this afternoon prince charles was asked about the queen's health. she is all right, thank you much, thank you. she is all right, thank
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you much, thank you. once you get to 95, you know, it's not quite as easy as it used to be. it's hard enough at 73. bad enough in your late 50s sometimes. police have revealed that the liverpool bomber had been buying components for his device since at least april. detectives say eemad al sway—lameen, who was originally from iraq, had suffered periods of mental illness. he died when the improvised device he built exploded inside a taxi on remembrance sunday. a sources told the bbc that he lived in syria and travelled to turkey before arriving in the united kingdom where he applied for asylum. mandatory vaccine passports are set to be introduced in northern ireland, after ministers at stormont voted to support the scheme. the dup opposed the plans, but the party did not deploy a cross—community voting mechanism to block the introduction of vaccine certification. our ireland correspondent, chris
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page, has the details from belfast. a number of hospitality venues are already using vaccine passports. there's a government app that people here can get on their phones. so, certainly, it's been operating on a voluntary basis, but the question ministers have been looking at is to whether or not it should be made compulsory. so, the matter went to a vote and, by six votes to four, ministers did decide to make the scheme compulsory. the parties who voted in favour were sinn fein, the nationalist sdlp, the cross community alliance party and the ulster unionist party. health minister robin swann is a member of the uup. the party against was the democratic unionist party. a number of their representatives have raised concerns about the prospect of making vaccine passports compulsory. they have said, for example, it would be against libertarian principles, that they didn't think it would make a big enough impact to justify the intrusion, as they saw it, on people's day—to—day lives.
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however, they did not, as you say, deploy the cross—community veto that they could have used in order to block the proposal, so the proposal has gone through. it's understood that from the 29th of november, businesses will be expected to ask people going to the likes of concerts and bars for proof of vaccination, but there'll be a grace period of two weeks before fixed penalty notices will be given out. in other words, businesses will have to start asking for proof of vaccination from the end of this month, but it'll really be the middle of december before the scheme is enforced. a few more details to be worked out, and it's understood that a new paper will be brought forward by the stormont department of health and ministers to consider later on in the week. the governments released the latest coronavirus data for today. it shows there were 38,000 263 new cases in there were 38,000 263 new cases in the last hour. another 201 deaths reported within 28 days of a
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positive test. more than 50,000,0015t positive test. more than 50,000,001st doses of the coronavirus vaccine have been delivered across the uk. and nearly 13 and a half million people have not received their 13 and a half million people have not received their booster 13 and a half million people have not received their boosterjob. the former yorkshire cricketer azeem rafiq has told the bbc his evidence to mps yesterday about racism in the sport was more powerful than anything he could have done on the pitch. he says he hopes it will have �*woken a lot of people up', and that both cricket and society should seize the moment as an opportunity for change. yesterday mr rafiq gave details to a commons committee about the racial slurs he'd been subjected to when he played for yorkshire. he's been talking to our sports editor, dan roan. he has gone from county cricketer to game changing whistle—blower. and a day after taking his allegations of institutional racism to westminster, the former yorkshire player told me he had been overwhelmed by the response he had received. i am incredibly relieved. it felt like a massive weight off my shoulders.
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i spoke to my dad last night. what did he say? he was just really proud of me and he said, look, all that no runs or wickets could have done what i did yesterday. and i should be really proud of myself. at times struggling to contain his emotions, rafiq's harrowing testimony to mps laid bare the racism he suffered at his former club. i'm very determined that this is going to be looked back on as the moment where not only sport, but society as a whole, went in a different direction to what it has been going. the ecb has been criticised for their handling of the crisis. chief executive tom harrison admitting to the committee that the sport he runs was facing an emergency over diversity. i feel like he probably has a few months where we need to see some tangible changes. and i think if it's not something
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that changes in the next few months than i think patience is going to run out. on a chastening day for cricket, several high—profile names including former yorkshire stars matthew hoggard and tim bresnan were dragged into one of the game's worst ever scandals. former england captain and now top pundit michael vaughan had already denied rafiq's claim that he made a racist remark to a group of asian players in 2009. so what does the whistle—blower think should happen to his old yorkshire team—mate? people who apologise, they deserve a second chance. people in denial, unfortunately, i think there has to be a level of accountability there. and it is for their employers to send out a message whether they are going to give the green light to racism or they are going to stamp it out. since this crisis engulfed yorkshire there has been a host of further allegations at other counties. the game's authorities now braced for many more whistle—blowers to come forward. what would your message be to anyone
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who has stayed silent? yeah, i'm sure it is going to be floodgates. i've spoken to a few people even since yesterday and all i would say is you've got to be honest and you've got to come forward. and get it off your chest. you are going to be heard. and whether anyone else stands by you or not, i will stand by you. many hope this episode proves a wake—up call for the game's authorities. but regaining trust will not be easy. dan roan, bbc news. hundreds of female judges in afghanistan have been forced into hiding, fearing revenge from convicts who they had jailed but who have since been released under the taliban takeover. after receiving death threats, some of the judges have fled to the uk as part of a british government rescue mission.
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sima kotecha has been talking to two of them — we are not naming them at their request. as the taliban took charge of afghanistan again, they released thousands of prisoners. almost 300 female judges and lawyers were forced into hiding, worried about those prisoners they had convicted now coming after them. the bbc has exclusively been speaking to the first two female judges to have arrived in the uk just this weekend about their experiences under taliban control. these women have decades of experience sitting asjudges in the highest courts in afghanistan. the taliban had said it would not kill any femalejudges, but human rights groups say they have been
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tortured and murdered. when you think about your female relatives and friends in afghanistan, and you think about what is happening in your country, how does it feel in your heart? do you believe that one day you will be able to go home again?
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in canada, a woman has died and several other people are missing after a violent storm caused floods and mudslides. thousands of people across british columbia have been forced to leave their homes, with officials describing it as the "worst weather storm in a century". david willis reports. after a summer of wildfires and record high temperatures has come this. more rain in a day than people here are used to in a month. it left hundreds trapped in their cars overnight, severed rail links to canada's largest port in the city
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of vancouver, and has cut power supply to thousands of homes. the rain has also brought with it mudslides, which forced the evacuation of an entire town. hundreds of people, many of them children, were loaded onto buses after being airlifted to safety from a town in british columbia. others, meanwhile, have found themselves stuck inside with the flood waters rising. we're safe, we're a little bit above where the flooding has occurred. and, yeah, again, lucky that that happened. my aunt and uncle's house is in the water. my cousin, who just finished having a baby, two days ago, their house is totally flooded, they have nowhere to go. across the border in washington state, torrential rains and high winds have also been wreaking havoc, flooding roads and again trapping people in their cars. some counted themselves lucky to have escaped.
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rolling down the windows, looking for the easiest way out. had to crawl through the passenger side because the car ended up tilting with the driver's side towards the ground, a little bit. so, crawled out the passenger side and, yeah, was able to get out, thankfully. the outskirts of vancouver have now experienced both their hottest and their wettest days on record within the space ofjust a few months. as in many other parts of the world, it has left people here wondering whether this is what constitutes the new normal. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. nothing like it is in canada, hopefully. really severe or whether they are in canada. in fact that storm system is now easing away. of course the flooding will be ongoing for several more days yet. back here it's been a very pleasant autumnal day for many of us. a lot of dry
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weather rounded temperatures still above average for this time of year with temperatures up 1a degrees or so. tomorrow bit more of the same, still very mild, mainly cloudy and a little bit of rain is forecast, mostly to the north of scotland. we got this waterfront for this evening and tonight that's ploughing at the northwest of scotland. so more rain here, quite windy conditions for the northwest of scotland for the quite cloudy for northern island, northern england with a bit of drizzle but further south and east clear skies. it's here that temperatures will fall lois, could be a touch of frost first thing. there is a bit of a cloudy day than received in general but still some sunshine particularly for eastern england and ace in scotland where we could see temperatures as high as 17 degrees. that's about 10 degrees above average. still ran across the northwest of scotland where it's also going to be windy with gusts up to about 43 to 50 mph. the mouth continues for the next couple days was up a little bit cooler on saturday but then things are going to turn significantly by sunday.
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hello, this is bbc news with ben brown. the headlines... borisjohnson tells a committee of mps that it was a "total mistake" to try to reform parliamentary standards at the same time owen paterson faced suspension for breaking rules on lobbying. i think the committee will agree that i accepted that it was a mistake and that it was my mistake. the cost of living hits its highest level for a decade thanks to the rising prices of fuel, energy, transport and hospitality. counter—terror police say the man behind an explosion outside liverpool women's hospital started making preparations for his attack back in april. a british f—35 fighterjet crashes into the mediterranean during a routine operation, the pilot ejected safely. and the first pictures of the queen since she missed
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the remembrance sunday service amid concerns about her health. those are headlines. let's get a look at all the sport with hawley. dean smith has been speaking for the first time as the new head coach of norwich city. he will need to get straight down to business as his side face without awe southampton. ifi if i thought it was a risk, i wouldn't have taken it. we've got 27 games left. we're just on the back of a win. i've seen how progress of this club has been. yes it's been difficult so far, and my and craig's
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job is to keep us in the league. that's friendly what we believe we can do. championship club reading have been deducted six points by the english football league for breaching financial rules. it's because they lost over 55 million pounds between 2017 and 2021 — the efl�*s limit is 39 million. the club have a further six—point deduction suspended until the end of next season, provided they comply with a business plan. it sees them drop from 16th to 19th in the championship. cameron norrie will make his debut at the atp finals in turin tonight as a late replacement. the british number one has been called into action after stefanos tsitsipas injured his elbow. he'll take on norway's casper ruud tonight and then world number one novak djokovic on friday. roger federer has confirmed that he won't compete at the australian open injanuary. in fact, the 20 times grand slam winner has told swiss website
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�*le matin' he would be "extremely surprised" to be able to play wimbledon next year. federer hasn't played since losing in the wimbledon quarter—finals injuly, and is continuing to recover from multiple knee surgeries. and one of britain's most decorated wheelchair tennis players, jordanne whiley, has announced her retirement. whiley won 13 grand slams, including the us open singles tournament in 2015. she's also a four—time parolympic medallist. earlier this year whiley was among six players representing the uk at the postponed 2020 paralympics in tokyo. usman khawaja has been named in australia's15—man squad for the first two ashes tests against england. he's not played test cricket since august 2019 when australia retained the ashes in england. australia have played only three test series since then — all at home — beating pakistan and new zealand before being stunned 2—1 by india injanuary, when they lost at the gabba
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in brisbane for the first time since 1988. george ford has called his decision to leave leicester tigers at the end of the season to join sale sharks, the �*most difficult of his career�*. the england fly—half has had two stints with leicester, re—joining in 2017 from bath — and has helped the side win eight from eight as they top the premiership. ford added that he�*s �*excited to play rugby in the north west for his local club�*. that�*s all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc. co. uk/sport. john watson will be here at 6.30. that�*s on sportsday at 6:30 pm. for now, by from me. have a good evening.
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health officials are warning of a "hidden pandemic" of antibiotic—resista nt infections. the uk health security agency say they should only be prescribed when really needed. one in five people who caught an infection last year had one which was resistant to antibiotic treatment. joining me now is professor matthew avison, an expert on antibiotic resistance from the school of cellular and molecular medicine at the university of bristol. thank you very much for being with us. how big is this problem? it�*s a us. how big is this problem? it's a roblem us. how big is this problem? it's a problem that's _ us. how big is this problem? it's a problem that's increasing. - us. how big is this problem? it�*s a. problem that's increasing. the problem that�*s increasing. the annual quality you�*re referring to has been published for eight years. this is an ongoing problem, and it�*s 200 pages long, so it�*s quite large. and it only really scratches the surface of some of the infections that people can catch which are resistant to antibiotics. a particularly big problem. that resistant to antibiotics. a particularly big problem. at is that it really that _ particularly big problem. at is that it really that we _ particularly big problem. at is that it really that we are _ particularly big problem. at is that it really that we are using - it really that we are using antibiotics too much? or doctors
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demanding prescribing them too often? i demanding prescribing them too often? ., �* , demanding prescribing them too often? ,, �* , demanding prescribing them too often? ,, �*, ~' often? ithink it's both. ithink antibiotics _ often? ithink it's both. ithink antibiotics have _ often? ithink it's both. ithink antibiotics have been - often? ithink it's both. ithink antibiotics have been used - antibiotics have been used historically as a bit of a plaster over minor illnesses, and what we have to remember is they�*re there to treat life—threatening infections and stop people from getting very ill. ithink and stop people from getting very ill. i think we need a slight change of perspective. that�*s been coming and there�*s been some encouraging signs in the report about a reduction in the amount of antibiotics used, particularly in gp practices. but also a slight reduction in hospitals as well. that�*s all good because the more you use antibiotics, the faster you lose them. ., , ., use antibiotics, the faster you lose them. ., , , ., use antibiotics, the faster you lose them. ., , ., them. can you 'ust explain in layman 's terms them. can you 'ust explain in layman -s terms that — them. can you just explain in layman 's terms that the _ them. can you just explain in layman 's terms that the science _ them. can you just explain in layman 's terms that the science about - �*s terms that the science about antibiotic resistance, the more you use it, the less effective?- use it, the less effective? well, it's a huge _ use it, the less effective? well, it's a huge area. _ use it, the less effective? well, it's a huge area. i've _ use it, the less effective? well, it's a huge area. i've been - it�*s a huge area. i�*ve been studying it�*s a huge area. i�*ve been studying it for 20 odd years and i don�*t know the answer, but i always think about
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taking the cost of antibiotics almost turns your body into a vacuum cleaner, and you can suck in bacteria from your environment from around you. those bacteria may not cause disease straightaway. they may just sit there waiting and it might be years later that you get an infection. it might be a urinary tract infection or something more serious like a bloodstream infection. but because you sucked in those resistant bacteria, because you took those antibiotics years before, the infection you get in the future might be resistant to those antibiotics, making it more difficult to treat you. find antibiotics, making it more difficult to treat you. and is this a problem _ difficult to treat you. and is this a problem - _ difficult to treat you. and is this a problem - very _ difficult to treat you. and is this a problem - very well— difficult to treat you. and is this a problem - very well explained difficult to treat you. and is this i a problem - very well explained - a problem — very well explained — is this a problem around the world? certainly. it�*s one of the biggest global threats we face as a species.
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basically, it�*s a problem in rich developing countries like ours, particularly associated with health care. but in lower and middle income countries where access to antibiotics is more difficult, it�*s actually much more of a problem because you get to a threshold where you can�*t buy your way out of the problem. you can�*t get the latest and greatest to secure the problem. so it�*s a huge problem and it affects all sorts of aspects of human life around the world. in human life around the world. in terms of our country, how do we deal with this? is this a question of setting new rules for doctors or is it about getting the message out to people watching you now on the television, saying please don�*t demand antibiotics all the time? i demand antibiotics all the time? i think it's a mixture of things, so i think it�*s a mixture of things, so i have the four responsibilities. there�*s the personal responsibility around the individual public member,
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actually taking the antibiotics that you�*re prescribed in the way that they�*re prescribed. use them the way they�*re prescribed. use them the way the healthcare prescription old prescribed them for you because... the second is on the health care it to use the guidance that�*s been provided accordingly. we do need a little bit of push for certain health care professionals to make that likely. the third responsibility is around health care research, to make sure the guidelines that are being used are evidence—based, and up—to—date and we�*re using the right antibiotics. finally, it�*s down to people like myself and my colleagues in research to try and understand whether we can develop new antibiotics, new diagnostics is to help health care workers, but also potentially — though it�*s very difficult — new vaccines to deal with these infections so we don�*t need to use
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antibiotics. infections so we don't need to use antibiotics— antibiotics. very good to talk to ou. antibiotics. very good to talk to you- thank _ antibiotics. very good to talk to you- thank you _ antibiotics. very good to talk to you. thank you so _ antibiotics. very good to talk to you. thank you so much - antibiotics. very good to talk to you. thank you so much for- antibiotics. very good to talk to i you. thank you so much for being with us. from the school of molecular medicine at bristol, good to see you. more now on the rising cost of living in the uk, which has risen to its highest level in a decade. the rate of inflation — as measured by the consumer prices index — went up to 4.2% last month. it�*s partly been driven by rising energy prices and the soaring cost of second—hand cars. it�*s more than double the bank�*s target of 2%. we can speak now to labour�*s rachel reeves, the shadow chancellor. thank you very much for being with us. 4.2%. how damaging is that to the economy and what can be done? it's the economy and what can be done? it�*s usually concerning for families and for pensioners. who are already struggling with rising prices of gas and electricity bills, food, filling
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up and electricity bills, food, filling up the car with petrol, and this is it likely to get better any time soon. and if you are a pensioner who is reliant on a fixed pension income, incredibly concerning going into the winter months that the prices of gas and electricity continue to rise so sharply. and the government are doing nothing to help people with these rising costs of living. they had an opportunity in the budget last month to take vat off gas and electricity bills for six months. to help people with those rising costs of heating their homes. they chose not to do that, and that is adding to the pressure faced by families and pensioners right now. faced by families and pensioners ritht now. ., ., ,, ., , , right now. inflation we know is very lartel right now. inflation we know is very largely driven _ right now. inflation we know is very largely driven by — right now. inflation we know is very largely driven by energy _ right now. inflation we know is very largely driven by energy costs - right now. inflation we know is very largely driven by energy costs at i largely driven by energy costs at the moment, by globalforces, supply forces, shortages caused by the global pandemic. there�*s not that much that the bank of england can do
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about it in terms of raising interest rates, but there aren�*t many levers by which this can be controlled. many levers by which this can be controlled-— controlled. there are global and national things _ controlled. there are global and national things pushing - controlled. there are global and national things pushing up i controlled. there are global and| national things pushing up prices controlled. there are global and i national things pushing up prices at the moment. of course there are global increases in prices, but they�*re also domestic things that government have got wrong over a number of years that are adding to those pressures. so, to get rid of the storage facilities to gas, that�*s putting additional pressure on gas prices in the uk. the delays to expanding our nuclear capacity for electricity is also putting pressure on prices today. so, this is notjust about global phenomenon, this is also about the decisions over a number of years by this conservative government that have got us into this very dire position we�*re in today. as well as failing to pay people up. we knew we would be leaving the eu since 2016, and
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yet one of the government done in that time to ensure that workers have the skills and qualifications? of course though shortages of goods and materials and all the rest of it is also putting additional pressure on prices. it�*s a mixture of global factors and also mistakes made by this government over a number of years of. this government over a number of ears of. ,, ., , years of. should there be higher wates for years of. should there be higher wages for people _ years of. should there be higher wages for people to _ years of. should there be higher wages for people to deal - years of. should there be higher wages for people to deal with i years of. should there be higher. wages for people to deal with these higher prices or what higher wages simply fuel an inflationary spiral? some people are getting pay rises, and that is welcome because we know over the last ten years, many people�*s wages haven�*t paste. but if you are a pensioner, there�*s not much you can do —— haven�*t spaces. to get your income higher. particularly worrying times for people on those fixed incomes and
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particularly pensioners. but many people and work as well aren�*t getting increases in their wages anything like the rate of inflation at the moment. and the government�*s response is failing to do anything about vat and gas and electricity bills, although that is a practical measure government can take to reduce all bills. but also, putting up reduce all bills. but also, putting up people�*s taxes at the very time they�*re seeing their income squeeze, they�*re seeing their income squeeze, the ingredients is due to come in next april to national insurance are badly times when people experience rising prices of 1t% —— the increases. the government need to think through that again because those additional costs for working people and for the businesses that employ them is the wrong tax at the wrong time going up. can i employ them is the wrong tax at the wrong time going up.— wrong time going up. can i ask you about another— wrong time going up. can i ask you about another subject, _ wrong time going up. can i ask you about another subject, standards l about another subject, standards being debated by mps today? the
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focus of a lot of people�*s attention, we have the prime minister saying today that he did make a mistake when he conflated the issue of trying to change the system in parliament with the owen patterson case. do you welcome his admission that he made a mistake on? if the prime minister is going to do a u—turn, i do urge him to do it properly because the government are saying they�*ve made mistakes, and yet this evening, it doesn�*t look like they will be voting for labour�*s motion, which would ban those second jobs apart from a few exemptions. a nurse for example. and there�*s no timetable on what the government are proposing to crackdown on this egregious abuse of second jobs and consultancies. the
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second “obs and consultancies. the prime second jobs and consultancies. the prime minister has come up with his own proposals? i�*m prime minister has come up with his own proposals?— own proposals? i'm worried the government — own proposals? i'm worried the government are _ own proposals? i'm worried the government are continuing i own proposals? i'm worried the government are continuing to l own proposals? i'm worried the i government are continuing to push this into the long grass. there is no timetable to actually crackdown on this abuse of using second jobs and consultancies to boost your income and in many cases, for an mp to be your second job and not your firstjob. the system is in bad need of reform, but what the government proposed today i�*m afraid is pushing things further into the long grass, and people want that reform now because they see these abuses and quite rightly, they won�*t stand for it. and the prime minister is doing too little, too late to address these very real issues of sleaze in our system. these very real issues of sleaze in our system-— these very real issues of sleaze in our system. the prime minister at prime minister _ our system. the prime minister at prime minister questions - our system. the prime minister at prime minister questions data i our system. the prime minister at prime minister questions data go i our system. the prime minister ati prime minister questions data go at your leader, keir starmer, for making money from the legal field during this parliament. he made a joke about misconduct because of
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talks keir starmer had with the... what did you make of what mrjohnson had to say? keir what did you make of what mrjohnson had to sa ? . ., ., had to say? keir continued to trovide had to say? keir continued to provide legal _ had to say? keir continued to provide legal advice. - had to say? keir continued to provide legal advice. he i had to say? keir continued to provide legal advice. he hasl had to say? keir continued to i provide legal advice. he has now given up his right to be a lawyer, so he�*s not able to do that and has made a conscious decision that is not the right thing to do. but why are we having this discussion today? we�*re having this debate because of the actions of owen patterson and the actions of owen patterson and the number of conservative mps who are lobbying and consulting and abusing the rules, which is very different from keir keir do you think mps different from keir keir do you think mp , ., , ., ., ., , think mps should be allowed any sort of second job? _ think mps should be allowed any sort of second job? the _ think mps should be allowed any sort of second job? the motion _ think mps should be allowed any sort of second job? the motion we - think mps should be allowed any sort of second job? the motion we put i of second “ob? the motion we put down of second job? the motion we put down today _ of second job? the motion we put down today would _ of second job? the motion we put down today would ban _ of second job? the motion we put down today would ban the - of second job? the motion we put down today would ban the second | of second job? the motion we put i down today would ban the second jobs apart from a small number of exceptional circumstances where an
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mp is qualified as a doctor or nurse or dentist and does a small number of hours in those fields, where we need all the help we can get, but it would ban all consultancies or directorships and all other forms of second jobs. directorships and all other forms of secondjobs. i directorships and all other forms of second jobs. i think after the abuses we�*ve seen in the corruption on the part of some conservative mps, is absolutely essential these reforms go through, which is why i will be voting for them this evening. will be voting for them this evenint. .,. will be voting for them this evening-— will be voting for them this evenint. .. , ., ~ will be voting for them this evenin.. .,. , ., ~' i., evening. rachel reeves, thank you very much- — evening. rachel reeves, thank you very much. thank _ evening. rachel reeves, thank you very much. thank you. _ the supermarket chain lidl is upping its minimum hourly pay in the uk by 6% in march next year. around 21,000 workers — that�*s 80% of its staff — will see their hourly pay increase from £9.50 to £10.10 an hour outside of london and up to £11.30 within the m25. lidl�*s chief hr officer, nan gibson, has been speaking to our business correspondent, emma simpson, and told her the move will make lidl the highest paying
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supermarket in the uk. we are announcing a wage increase for all of our front line colleagues who work in stores and warehouses which will take the minimum pay from £9.50 per hour to £10.10 an hour. that represents an investment of £18 million in ourfront line colleagues which is the biggest ever wage investment that we have made in the uk. how difficult is it to recruit staff right now? very difficult, i�*ll be absolutely honest with you. we are competing for talent with all the other retailers and indeed, other industries. part of the reason for the announcement is to secure our staff who are with us and retain them as much as possible but also attract anyone else would like to come and join this fantastic team in a supermarket that is expanded massively. will you be able to absorb this pay increase or will some of it be passed on to shoppers?
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we pride ourselves on being dynamic and full power to our teams. we don�*t expect to pass that on to customers in the form of price rises. what other inflationary pressures are you seeing in the business right now? raw materials are increasing in price and when you have that at the start of your supply chain that will inevitably lead to further increases down the line. tell us about hgv drivers. we know there�*s a huge problem there. how short are you at the moment? we don�*t actually employ hgv drivers ourselves, we do that through third party contractors and they like everyone contractors and they, like everyone else in the industry, have of course experienced those challenges, but our colleagues in logistics and supply chain are in constant contact with those third—party suppliers and so far, we�*re managing to battle our way through. how is christmas looking? christmas is going to be fantastic at lidl, as it always is. i think we all missed christmas last year — it was cancelled at the last minute,
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and we feel the need to get to christmas and enjoy it. our teams have been working hard to ensure that will happen. are you confident you can keep the shelves full? yes. after plans were approved to redevelop the site. the company said its requesting an urgent review of the business rates, which it says are archaic and astonishingly outdated. pop star britney spears has given a sneak—peek into how she plans to use her new—found freedom after her 13—year conservatorship was lifted last week. speaking in a video shared on instagram, the pop star spoke about the joys of the �*little things�* she�*s been able to do again, like using her own cash and car keys. she also thanked her fans for �*saving her life�*. let�*s hear more of what she said. i�*ve been in a conservatorship for 13 years.
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it�*s a really long time to be in a situation you don�*t want to be in. so, i�*mjust grateful, honestly, for each day and being able to have the keys to my car and being able to be independent and feel, like a woman. owning an atm card, seeing cash for the first time, being able to buy candles, it�*s the little things for us women, but it makes a huge difference. and i�*m gratefulfor that. it�*s nice, it�*s really nice. but i�*m not here to be a victim, i lived with victims my whole life as a child, that�*s why i got out of my house. and i work for 20 years and worked my as off. and i worked for 20 years and worked my as off. i�*m here to be an advocate for people with real disabilities and real illnesses. i�*m a very strong woman so i can only imagine what the system has done to those people. so, hopefully my little story, hopefully my story will make an impact and make some changes in the corrupt system.
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and the free britney movement, you guys rock. honestly, my voice was muted and threatened for so long and i wasn�*t able to speak up or say anything and because of you guys and the awareness of kind of knowing what was going on and delivering my news to the public for so long, you gave awareness to all of them for that and because of you i honestly think you guys saved my life, in a way, 100%. britney spears celebrating her new—found freedoms. in a in a moment, it will be time for the bbc news at six with huw edwards in belfast. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with stav. hello there. after that chilly start, it felt quite pleasant, but there was a lot of cloud particularly western scotland where it will �*s the breeze
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the. it�*s always dry the further south, closer to this area of high pressure. we got these low pushes, hence the stronger winds, thicker cloud and outbreaks of rain. perhaps some showers, and elsewhere, much of central and southern england, it�*ll be dry with clear spells. another fairly chilly night, but milder further north and west. here�*s the pressure chart, high pressure to the south. the key to thursday and friday�*s weather will be the mild air coming in from the southwest. it's air coming in from the southwest. it�*s going to be mild with any brightness. we could start off with sunshine. shelter here from the south—westerly breeze, but it will be cloudier further west with outbreaks of rain, windy again across northern scotland. could see
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gusts of 50 mile—per—hour. further south, a breezy day. mid teens for many, could see 16 or 17 across the far northeast. giving some brightness and the further affect from the south—westerly when. as we head through friday, similar set up. high pressure to the south, low pressure to the north, could see more in the way of cloud for friday for many of us. again across sheltered and eastern parts of the uk, the north and northwest, thicker cloud here with outbreaks of rain. temperatures well above the seasonal norm, 11t—15 degrees. we start to see this cold front advance southwards as high pressure pulls into the atlantic, and that will open the floodgates to an arctic northerly, and those blue colours racing down the country by sunday and all areas will be in that arctic air mass. so it is turning colder this weekend
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and we return to some widespread overnight cross.
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today at six, we�*re in belfast at a critical time in the history of northern ireland. we talk to local firms about the state of the economy, as inflation across the uk reaches levels not seen for a decade. i�*ve been in this business 29 years and i�*ve never experienced this, not the sustained price increases. i don�*t see any end to it at the moment. the cost of living is rising due to higherfuel and energy prices, the cost of second—hand cars, and eating out. we�*ll be asking whether rising inflation is likely to lead to a jump in interest rates. also today... another u—turn, prime minister? borisjohnson says he made errors in handling the tory lobbying scandal, but he doesn�*t apologise.

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