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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 17, 2021 10:00am-1:00pm GMT

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this is bbc news 7 these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. uk prime minister borisjohnson prepares to face questions in parliament over the corruption row which has engulfed westminster. the cost of living in the uk soars by more than 4%, with the price of fuel, energy, transport and hospitality all rising. amazon says it will stop accepting payments from visa credit cards in the uk from january next year. poland accuses belarus of trying to destabilise the european union as migrants attempt to force their way across the border. search teams in canada try to find people trapped in cars after violent storms caused flooding and mudslides. and the bbc discovers
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the world's most wanted cyber—crime supects are living freely in russia. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. mps in the uk will today debate proposals to tighten the rules on second jobs for mps, as the row over sleaze continues. borisjohnson has set out plans to ban mps from working as paid consultants, while labour wants a ban on all second jobs. it follows weeks of mounting political pressure after the former tory mp owen paterson was found to have broken lobbying rules as a paid consultant. our political correspondent, helen catt, reports. good morning, prime minister.
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the prime minister has a tough day of questioning ahead, as he tries to draw a line under the sleaze allegations which have dominated westminster for the last few weeks. yesterday, he announced he would support banning mps from working as paid political consultants, at the exact moment labour was holding a press conference calling for the same. labour is chalking the prime minister's move up as a win. but it would still like to see a wider ban on mps having second jobs, except if it's for a public service like nursing or working as a doctor. the government wants to focus not on what mps do, but on how long they spend doing it. borisjohnson said he would back changing the code of conduct to put a reasonable limit on mps�* outside activities, and punish those who neglect their duties. exactly what is being proposed is miles away from where the government was two weeks ago. two weeks ago, they were talking really about watering down the current system. now they're talking about not only tightening the rules, but putting that in the hands of the system as it currently exists. but it is parliament,
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not the government, which actually sets the rules for mps. so the detail would have to be worked out there if it chose to go ahead. and some conservatives are concerned the consequences are unclear. i'm very cautious on this, because i know that some of my colleagues have jobs and outside work that they do, and that means them having to give up... changing their lifestyle. we have to be careful about this. we have to realise that we're dealing with human beings who have families and responsibilities, so whilst, as i've said before, the duty, the first duty, must be to parliament, to constituency and to the work we do for our country, any changes i think should be evolutionary. they will get the chance to quiz the prime minister directly later. he is expected to address a gathering of his own backbenchers this evening. before that, he faces the liaison committee of senior mps. and before that, the labour leader at prime minister's questions. borisjohnson may
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hope the end of the sleaze row is in sight, but there will be a lot more questions to answer before he gets there. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. our chief political correspondent, adam fleming, explained what happens next. what today's vote in parliament will do, whatever the outcome, is kick—start a process where parliament will look at its own rules around second jobs for mps. so there's a lot of scope for there to be more arguments and more debate and further votes on this issue. which means it will not be disappearing. in terms of what is actually on the table today, competing motions from labour and the conservatives which will kind of do similar things. it would get the standards committee to look at the rules about outside earnings. labour are saying that they would ban paid political consultancies, and jobs that are involved in the workings of parliament. the government say they would do that but go further and also have an element looking at how many hours mps spend on their outside
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interests, with the international trade secretary anne—marie trevelyan this morning suggesting maybe 10—20 hours a week which would be a suitable amount of time that people should be spending on otherjobs. but then labour countered that by saying at the next election they would go even further and have a much wider ban on second jobs so it was onlyjobs with a kind of public spirited focus that would be allowed. but all those issues to be thrashed out in the next few months. the uk cost of living surged by 4.2% in october — the highest rate in almost a decade — due to rising fuel and energy costs. inflation is now more than double the bank of england's target. consumer prices were 4.2% higher last month than a year ago. the costs of transport, gas and electricity bills, as well as second hand cars, all climbed. in september, inflation was 3.1%. the bank of england's aim is to keep inflation to around 2%. rising prices are putting new pressure on households and businesses. economists are debating how much of the surge in inflation
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can be blamed on the pandemic, and how long it will last. this morning, the international trade secretary, anne—marie trevelyan, was asked how tough it was going to be for consumers in the run up to christmas. the chancellor raised this in his budget a few weeks ago and the forecast indeed show that inflation was likely to go up a little more. that's why for our most vulnerable constituents he has both increased the universal credit fund by up to about £1,000 a year, there is a £5 million fund for councils to tap into with the most vulnerable families and indeed we continue to support those. and the independent pay review bodies for our public sector workers will be looking in the traditional way now that we have come out of the covid crisis situation at how to support for pay increases in the year ahead. so the chancellor
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has set in play a number of tools and support systems to ensure that those most vulnerable are able to have the support they need during this inflationary time. 0ur economics correspondent, andy verity, gave us this assessment. the biggest reason, annita, is just household bills. you've heard it already, we've heard about how much the electricity bills are going up, how much the gas bills are going up. and in fact, injust a month, it's almost double digits over a year. you've got a i9% rise in electricity bills, a 28% rise in gas bills. and those are the biggest reasons why inflation has gone up. you've also had other things that we've been talking about now for months. the price of petrol was artificially lower in the pandemic, if you like, because there was artificially reduced demand owing to the lockdowns. compared to that a year ago, now it's a lot higher and you've got average prices now at their highest since 2012, round about £1.38 a litre, according to the office for national statistics.
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although i expect quite a few of our viewers will say, "i paid more than that." that's up by 25p, compared with a year ago. and then you've got things like airfares. they're up by about 15% and other things like, for example, the cost of your groceries. that's also edging up. it's mostly goods here, as opposed to services, that are shooting up fastest. and one of the biggest questions for the bank of england will be, ok, if we do raise interest rates, will this actually have any effect anyway? because a lot of the reasons why energy prices are higher, that's not due to domestic demand. that's not due to anything in the uk economy. it's global. it's the fact that the economy across the world is reopening and supply can't really meet demand. it can't catch up with the surge in demand since economies reopened. and that's why global energy prices are so high. the bank of england's hope is that that will be passing, a temporary thing, and that those prices will come down and that then eventually wages will be high enough to exceed the rise in the cost of living. but what we're looking at for the coming year
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is that actually our standards of living are going to go down because our costs are going up and our wages aren't going up as fast. i'm joined now by alfie stirling, who is the chief economist welcome to bbc news, thank you for your time. what are the key factors behind this rise in inflation? in the cost of living? primarily domestic or global? it’s the cost of living? primarily domestic or global? it's really important _ domestic or global? it's really important to _ domestic or global? it's really important to be _ domestic or global? it's really important to be clear - domestic or global? it's really important to be clear about i domestic or global? it's really i important to be clear about what this is and what this isn't. primarily it is driven by global factors. and energy prices in particular. that is feeding through into domestic prices in the uk and families and businesses in a number of ways. whether that is household bills, warming the home or the cost of transport or producing goods or moving them around the country. they are becoming more expensive as the cost of energy rises. but it isn't a domestic sustained pressure on inflation from, for example, higher
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wages and higher domestic spending. that is really important because it means that, in all likelihood, this will be a temporary transitory event where prices will come down again quite quickly. and, if you like but the medicine that the bank of england would normally use to address inflation, cutting interest rates, that could be toxic for the recovery. and could suppress what is already a very weak wage growth in this country. i already a very weak wage growth in this country-— this country. i spoke to the economist _ this country. i spoke to the economist andrew - this country. i spoke to the l economist andrew sentence, this country. i spoke to the - economist andrew sentence, former member of the bank of england's monetary policy and he thinks a rise in interest rates is likely over the next couple of months, perhaps not before christmas but early into the new year. would a modest rise be a problem as far as you are concerned? first, it is likely because the bank has essentially told us that, they told us that they expect inflation without a rate rise to be slightly different to their central forecast.
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they are expecting to raise rates over the near—term. i really worry that would be a big policy error. we only need to look back to 2012 where the european central bank was faced with a similar issue with inflation that went above target temporarily by quite a bit, for a short period of time and the central bank responded by increasing interest rates. that choked off european recovery and it is why many of european countries in recession much longer. countries like uk didn't do that. it is likely that the bank of england is considering this and we will have to see how the monetary policy committee votes. it would be a really big error. it could affect us potentially for a long time to come. in us potentially for a long time to come. , ., ., , us potentially for a long time to come. , ., .,, , .,, come. in the short term, as people look towards _ come. in the short term, as people look towards christmas _ come. in the short term, as people look towards christmas and - come. in the short term, as people l look towards christmas and expenses associated with that or other expenses, general expenses, how difficult is it going to be for people to cope with this rise in the
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cost of living? what more needs to happen to try to cushion that? we've not a real happen to try to cushion that? we've got a real issue _ happen to try to cushion that? we've got a real issue because _ happen to try to cushion that? we've got a real issue because people - happen to try to cushion that? we've got a real issue because people are l got a real issue because people are facing double pinchers, prices are rising and at the same time a lot of the support mechanisms the government have put in place to help people through the last couple of years of the pandemic have also been taken away. whether that is the furlough scheme or £20 uplift. we had the much heralded top up to universal credit in the budget where taper rates and work allowances were invested in but that has still left three quarters of people on universal credit with less money than they would have had if the £20 uplift had stayed in place. a double pinch here. part of it is policy, notjust prices. government needs to intervene. this winter could end up being incredibly painfulfor a lot of families and a lot of people. part of this is by design and the government could reverse it with the right policy. government could reverse it with the riaht oli . �* ,, ., ~ right policy. alfie sterling, thank ou for right policy. alfie sterling, thank you for your _ right policy. alfie sterling, thank you for your thoughts. _ right policy. alfie sterling, thank you for your thoughts. a - couple of comments you have been
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sending about this inflation story. sally talking about carers, family, etc, are really struggling and no increase to help with day to day rise in the cost of living. sally is concerned about that. lolly says the house of commons voted down the potential trip and not being 5% but inflation set to rise, pensioners will be getting a pension cut in april. there hasn't been one person fighting exactly the same area they are concerned about in relation to inflation. you can see how the rise inflation. you can see how the rise in the cost of living is hitting people in lots of different ways. keep your comments coming in on that or the other stories coming in today. get in contact. amazon has told customers in the uk it will stop accepting payments made using visa credit cards from next year. the company sent an email to customers saying the change will affect visa credit cards issued in the uk, from 19th january.
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it sets up a clash between two giant global corporations. in a statement, amazon said: visa responded to the announcement, saying: polish border guards have used tear gas and water cannons against a group of migrants trying to enter the country from belarus. belarus has been accused of pushing
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migrants to the border to try to destabilise the eu, a charge it denies. 0ur correspondentjenny hill sent this update from near the polish side of the border. the polish authorities don't let us get anywhere near the actual border itself, journalists and for that matter aid agencies are banned from getting close. we do know from the polish border force this morning that they say overnight there were 161 attempts by people trying to get across the border from belarus into poland. not necessarily at the border crossing that you've heard about all week, but at other parts of the border, which is protected and heavily guarded by polish troops. they also say that nine polish border guards were injured during those clashes at one particular border crossing, yesterday. the situation there has been desperate. hundreds, if not thousands, of people have been trapped there for more than a week now. they can't go backwards.
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the belarusian border force have been behind them and ahead of them, the eu, poland. but it's a heavily guarded border and poland is not budging. it is not going to let them in. there are huge concerns on this side of the border in poland, particularly among people who live in those borderlands and regularly tell us that they regularly see people who have managed to get across the fence, then trying to make their way through the dense, thick forest. that lines the border on both sides. the temperatures here at night drop down to around zero. it's extremely cold. many of the people that we speak to here are trying to help, say the people who do get across are in a terrible condition. sometimes they've been beaten by border guards, but more often than not, they are hungry, thirsty and severely hypothermic. so a very difficult situation. we know that behind the scenes, diplomatic efforts are continuing. the eu, as you know, has threatened another round of sanctions against belarus, who it suspects of driving these people to the border to put pressure on the eu to destabilize it.
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on the eu to destabilise it. angela merkel, the outgoing german chancellor, has also held talks with the belarusian leader, alexander lukashenko, in an attempt to try and ease the situation at that border. just one more update for you. we understand that last night, some of the people at that border crossing were taken to a logistics warehouse overnight. that means at least they were under a proper roof for the first time in many, many nights. jenny hill. a survey by the un population fund has found that half of all young people in bosnia and herzegovina want to leave the country. more than 50,000 people are already leaving every year. they're being driven by the lack of economic prospects and political instability. the headlines on bbc news: uk prime minister borisjohnson prepares to face questions in parliament over the corruption row which has engulfed westminster. the cost of living in the uk soars by more than 4%, with the price of fuel, energy, transport and hospitality all rising.
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amazon says it will stop accepting payments from visa credit cards in the uk, from next year. former cricketer azeem rafiq says he believes english cricket is "institutionally" racist. speaking to a digital, culture, media and sport committee of mps about yorkshire cricket club yesterday, he described his treatment as "inhuman" and said racism cost him his career. mr rafiq said racist language was "constantly" used during his time at yorkshire, and that the issues he faced there are widespread in domestic cricket. he added that he hopes by speaking out, there will be cultural change. joining me now is former professional cricketer, monty panesar. thank you very much for your time today on bbc news. yesterday, we saw what a toll it took on azeem rafiq to relive his experiences. what was
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going through your mind, as you watched? ,., ., ., ., going through your mind, as you watched? ,., ., ., . ., ~ going through your mind, as you watched? ., ., ., ~ , ., watched? good morning and thank you for havin: watched? good morning and thank you for having me — watched? good morning and thank you for having me on _ watched? good morning and thank you for having me on this _ watched? good morning and thank you for having me on this show. _ watched? good morning and thank you for having me on this show. when - watched? good morning and thank you for having me on this show. when i - for having me on this show. when i was listening to yesterday's parliamentary hearing, it was just an astonishing and eye—opening account of how deep racism may exist in cricket. and the painful experience azeem rafiq must have gone through, the struggles he was going through. it was a real eye openerfor all the fuss. going through. it was a real eye opener for all the fuss. did going through. it was a real eye opener for all the fuss.- going through. it was a real eye opener for all the fuss. did it make ou opener for all the fuss. did it make you reflect — opener for all the fuss. did it make you reflect on _ opener for all the fuss. did it make you reflect on experiences - opener for all the fuss. did it make you reflect on experiences that - opener for all the fuss. did it make j you reflect on experiences that you had gone through? == you reflect on experiences that you had gone through?— had gone through? -- for all of us. racism you — had gone through? -- for all of us. racism you had _ had gone through? -- for all of us. racism you had gone _ had gone through? -- for all of us. racism you had gone through? - had gone through? -- for all of us. l racism you had gone through? when had gone through? -- for all of us. i racism you had gone through? when i -la ed racism you had gone through? when i played cricket — racism you had gone through? when i played cricket for _ racism you had gone through? when i played cricket for england _ racism you had gone through? when i played cricket for england and - racism you had gone through? when i played cricket for england and all- played cricket for england and all of my counties, i didn't experience any form of racism. no one ever used the p word against me. but i was one of the key figures in the team, as well. i was given the responsibility to win test matches for my country. and numerous times, whenever the ball was given to me, the crowd
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would erupt. it was a different sense of feeling. i was very much sort of loved by the nation. but thatis sort of loved by the nation. but that is not the case for every british asian or cricketer in this country, especially at grass root levels. cricketers may not want to play professionally. their stories must be heard, as well. that is why i think the ecb have developed a hotline for yorkshire, as well. a thorough investigation will take place before any allegations that come forward.— place before any allegations that come forward. �* . ,. , come forward. azeem rafiq described himself as a — come forward. azeem rafiq described himself as a young _ come forward. azeem rafiq described himself as a young kid _ come forward. azeem rafiq described himself as a young kid coming - come forward. azeem rafiq described himself as a young kid coming from . himself as a young kid coming from pakistan with a dream of playing for england. and lots of people found this really striking, what a contrast to hear him say, "i don't want my son to go anywhere near cricket". how much are young would—be players missing out on the chance to play? how much is the game missing out on potential stars of the future at this time because parents are looking at all of this and saying, "i do not want my
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children to be exposed to the risk of being racially abused".- of being racially abused". look, enalish of being racially abused". look, english cricket _ of being racially abused". look, english cricket have _ of being racially abused". look, english cricket have a _ of being racially abused". look, english cricket have a serious i english cricket have a serious problem at their hand. in the 90s, we had over 33 professional black cricketers playing the game. now we only have nine players. at the amateur level with south asian communities, numerous times, we say this, i think communities, numerous times, we say this, ithink it communities, numerous times, we say this, i think it is over 40% that play but only 3% — 4% come through the system, why is that the case? there are numerous reasons but the most important one is that they may feel that they are just not being included or may not get a fair chance to play at the highest level. that is something the ecb must, you know, be accountable for. and develop pathways for more british asians to come through. boris johnson's stance on racism in this country is that england is not a racist country. so, he will be having his finger on the ecb's pulse and he would want to see swift and
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urgent action to take place. [30 and he would want to see swift and urgent action to take place.- urgent action to take place. do you think there's _ urgent action to take place. do you think there's enough _ urgent action to take place. do you think there's enough diversity - urgent action to take place. do you think there's enough diversity in i think there's enough diversity in the ecb to handle this, in the way it needs to be? mr rafik talked about a five year time frame and he hoped things would be different. and perhaps happens sooner than that —— mr rafiq. the perhaps happens sooner than that -- mr rafi. �* ., perhaps happens sooner than that -- mrrafia. �* . ,., , mr rafiq. the ecb have plans until 2024 to produce _ mr rafiq. the ecb have plans until 2024 to produce over _ mr rafiq. the ecb have plans until 2024 to produce over 200 - mr rafiq. the ecb have plans until 2024 to produce over 200 urban l 2024 to produce over 200 urban centres, over1000 2024 to produce over 200 urban centres, over 1000 turf pitches as well. that has been an issue amongst the british asian communities, that the british asian communities, that the facilities are not good enough. there are other issues with travel expenses and kit bursary and the possibility when you go through a trial, the expense you have to pay. sometimes you may not be able to afford that and it allows the game just to be focused on the middle class person. that is an issue the ecb need to look into and review
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their internal policies. it seems like some of their internal structures... they have their own independent diversity committee but thatis independent diversity committee but that is developed by the ecb. that was something that was questioned during parliamentary hearing yesterday. 50 during parliamentary hearing yesterday-— during parliamentary hearing esterda . ., ., yesterday. so you need someone who is more independent _ yesterday. so you need someone who is more independent or— yesterday. so you need someone who is more independent or a _ yesterday. so you need someone who is more independent or a group - yesterday. so you need someone who is more independent or a group of- is more independent or a group of people who are more independent to come in and oversee this process, is that what you are suggesting? absolutely. a similar thing at yorkshire, they had roger hutton a chairman but it was his law firm that was investigating all this. they need someone, like you said, completely independent to get involved. that would give much more of a fairer account where racism or any discrimination lies within cricket. we saw with the mcc, they lined up with show racism the red card. they want to know more about structural racism. microaggressions. 0ffensive structural racism. microaggressions.
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offensive language. that part of education needs to start taking place in the game.— education needs to start taking place in the game. monty panesar, thank ou place in the game. monty panesar, thank you so _ place in the game. monty panesar, thank you so much _ place in the game. monty panesar, thank you so much for— place in the game. monty panesar, thank you so much for your - place in the game. monty panesar, i thank you so much for your time, we appreciate you talking to us on bbc news. ., ~ appreciate you talking to us on bbc news. . ~ , ., appreciate you talking to us on bbc news. ., ~' , ., , appreciate you talking to us on bbc news. . ~ i. , . let's get more now on that surprise announcement from amazon which says it will stop accepting payments from visa credit cards in the uk, from next year. our correspondent megan paterson is with me now. this is all about amazon's bottom line? absolutely. a surprise from amazon that they will stop accepting visa uk credit cards. amazon say this is all about cost, they say the cost of processing transactions that we pay for an hour the uk temp on my cards are prohibitive. the company says rather than costs going down for this technology, they stay the same or getting even higher —— the transactions that we pay for on our uk visa cards. the changes will come
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into place onjanuary uk visa cards. the changes will come into place on january the 19th. christmas shopping will be fine but from january 19, no one will be able to use their uk visa credit card to pay for transactions on amazon. a disagreement between two massive companies. d0 disagreement between two massive comanies. ., ., , disagreement between two massive comanies. . ., ., companies. do we have any idea how many people — companies. do we have any idea how many people this _ companies. do we have any idea how many people this will _ companies. do we have any idea how many people this will affect? - many people this will affect? perhaps they might exclusively use the visa credit card? there are long figures, i don't know if you have the breakdown. i figures, i don't know if you have the breakdown.— the breakdown. idon't. long brushstrokes, _ the breakdown. idon't. long brushstrokes, a _ the breakdown. idon't. long brushstrokes, a lot _ the breakdown. idon't. long brushstrokes, a lot of- the breakdown. i don't. long| brushstrokes, a lot of people! the breakdown. i don't. long - brushstrokes, a lot of people! lots of people use visa credit cards. there was no suggestion that they wouldn't be able to use them on amazon, there is no background to this, it wasn't brimming and we didn't know about it. but now amazon are saying a change is coming in the middle ofjanuary. 0n the other hand, visa say they are very disappointed by this news and they have released a statement which seems to suggest they can hope they can change amazon's mind and hope they will be able to use temper my cards on the site, customers, and make reconciliations before the
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changes in january. make reconciliations before the changes injanuary. you will still be able to use your visa debit cards and non—visa credit cards. this is very much a visa issue, the cost amazon pays for those transactions. interesting to see what happens, will if they reconcile what does it mean for smaller businesses? amazon is a big business that operates globally but smaller businesses paying those transaction charges, what would it mean for them? at the moment, we don't know if it will be resolved. it moment, we don't know if it will be resolved. ., , , moment, we don't know if it will be resolved. . , , ., moment, we don't know if it will be resolved. ., ., resolved. it raises a lot of questions- _ resolved. it raises a lot of questions. thank - resolved. it raises a lot of questions. thank you - resolved. it raises a lot ofj questions. thank you very resolved. it raises a lot of - questions. thank you very much. search teams equipped with diggers and dogs have started looking for people trapped in their cars, after a violent storm caused floods and mudslides across british columbia, in canada. there are reports that one person is dead and several more are missing near vancouver. access to the city has been severely restricted and the country's two biggest railways reported serious damage to their networks. 0ur north america correspondent, david willis, has more. after a summer of wildfires and record high temperatures
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has come this. more rain in a day than people here are used to in a month. it left hundreds trapped in their cars overnight, severed rail links to canada's largest port in the city of vancouver, and has cut power supply to thousands of homes. the rain has also brought with it mudslides, which forced the evacuation of an entire town. hundreds of people, many of them children, were loaded onto buses after being airlifted to safety from a town in british columbia. 0thers, meanwhile, have found themselves stuck inside with the flood waters rising. we're safe, we're a little bit above where the flooding has occurred. and, yeah, again, lucky that that happened. my aunt and uncle's house is in the water. my cousin, who just finished having a baby, their house is totally flooded, they have nowhere to go.
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across the border in washington state, torrential rains and high winds have also been wreaking havoc, flooding roads and again trapping people in their cars. some counted themselves lucky to have escaped. rolled down the windows, looking for the easiest way out. had to crawl through the passenger side because the car ended up tilting, with the driver's side towards the ground, a little bit. so, crawled out the passenger side and was able to get out, thankfully. the outskirts of vancouver have now experienced by their hottest and their wettest days on record within the space ofjust a few months. as in many other parts of the world, it has left people here wondering this is what constitutes the new normal. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. the headlines on bbc news... uk prime minister, borisjohnson, prepares to face questions in parliament over the corruption row which has engulfed westminster. the cost of living in the uk soars by more than 4%,
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with the price of fuel, energy, transport and hospitality all rising. amazon says it will stop accepting payments from visa credit cards in the uk, from next year. poland accuses belarus of trying to destabilise the european union as migrants attempt to force their way across the border. search teams in canada try to find people trapped in cars after violent storms caused flooding and mudslides. and the bbc discovers the world's most wanted cyber—crime suspects are living freely in russia. let's get more now on the rise in the cost of living in the uk, which is being fuelled by surging global energy price rises. inflation stood at 4.2% in october — the highest rate in almost a decade. 0ur reporter colletta smith has been speaking to people in halifax to find out about the impact
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on people's daily lives. it's lunchtime at nursery. and with 63 hungry mouths to feed the staff here have their hands full. paula has increased her hours recently to make sure she's getting enough to cover the bills at home. i'm getting more money in but then i'm paying it out forfuel, food. gas and electric has gone up again. gas and electricity. sarah has got 12—year—old twins so the weekly shop is getting to be more of a worry. where i tended to go because it offers rather than single prices because everything has gone up. it might only be 50p or 60p here, but at the end it all does mount up. now it's like, well, we will wait until it has come back down or wait for the office to come on rather than yeah, you can put it in trolley. are you shopping differently at the moment? are you trying more shops? where are you going to get the deals at the moment? i know that that is cheaper at aldi so i will go and get four weeks' worth.
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so you'll get some things that some supermarkets? home bargains is another one. and b&m. you know where to shop around to get better prices. just keeping your head above water? yeah, absolutely. you'll be happy if you've got £20, £30 at the end of the month. with diesel and petrol at record highs, just getting to and from work is eating up more of everyone's wages. i'm in a position where i can't not use the car so it is starting to- affect obviously my wallet. those eye—watering fuel costs means alex is having to cut spending on other things. we all used to go to asda or - sainsbury's or tesco for our cheap fuel, but at the moment how fuel i prices are increasing it's just i as cheap just to go to bp - or the shell garages now because it's so astronomically expensive. if you are earning a minimum wage but trying to run a car as well - but you have family who live far |away, it is making it a lot more| difficult for you to be able to travel to see them, - especially during -
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the christmas period. christmas is always an expensive time of year, so with the price of essentials going up at the same time, it's going to be a really difficult few weeks. the bad news is that the bank of england and businesses from hotels through to restaurants all say that the biggest price increases will actually be coming in the new year. and it's the long—term impact on savings that danny is worried about. he gets the bus to work and even that's been getting more expensive. £5.50 a day for a return ticket which is quite expensive if you take that over five days. as a charity worker, saving enough to buy his own home feels as most impossible for danny at the moment. it's either choosing saving or, you know, not going out or not socialising for a month or so. wages haven't really gone up with inflation and when i think back to my parents' age, i think they bought their first house when they were in their early 20s and that is completely impossible for my generation, it seems like, anyway. with higher bills for all the essentials, workers in every industry are making small changes just to stick to their budgets. colletta smith, bbc
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news, in halifax. breaking news from the last few seconds, from the head of counterterrorism policing in north—west england saying that the liverpool bomber, emad al—swealmeen, was born in iraq and officers believe he had been buying parts for his home—made device since at least april. that is according the head of counterterrorism policing north west is. we have been learning the liverpool bomber was a failed asylum seeker, had been refused permission ljy seeker, had been refused permission byjudges to appeal to stay in the country. and there are lots of questions now that police have been trying to piece together, more details on his motivation and how this device, which went off in a taxi in liverpool, how it was put
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together. but emad al—swealmeen was born in iraq and officers believed he had been buying parts for his home—made device since at least april. so we are just trying to see if there is any more detail coming on that linejust now. if there is any more detail coming on that line just now. but i think thatis on that line just now. but i think that is all of the new information that is all of the new information that we have about that attack outside liverpool women's hospital. any more information, we will bring it to you. after an unprecedented year of devastating cyber—attacks, an international push is under way against hackers. cyber gangs are being arrested in multiple countries, but one place where arrests aren't happening is russia — which has historically ignored accusations of harbouring some of the worst cyber—criminals. 0ur cyber reporter, joe tidy, travelled to russia where some of the accused are living millionaire lifestyles with little chance of being arrested. cyber citadels are crumbling. from ukraine to south korea, hackers are being rounded up.
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0nline too, us intelligence services are hacking back — dismantling criminal networks and even retrieving some of the stolen riches. but there's one place where arrests aren't happening. for years, russia has brushed off accusations it's harbouring hackers. more russians have been sanctioned or indicted for hacking than any other country. 27 appear on the us cyber most wanted list. most of them are linked to the intelligence services but some are alleged criminal hackers. we're here today to identify and announce charges against a russian national. maxim jakubec and his right hand man, igor turashev are the two most wanted alleged hackers in the world. they are accused of leading evil corp, responsible for stealing more than $100 million from victims in 40 different countries. working with bbc russia's andrei zakharov, we found contact details for them. in moscow's prestigious federation tower, igor turashev runs three businesses.
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the receptionist found a mobile number for turashev�*s company. hello. hello, i'm looking to find igor turashev. whoever answered said they worked for the company and wanted to pass us onto another number until andrei told them where we're from. it's the bbc. maxim jakubec too is not keeping a low profile. his wedding was lavish and cost at least half a million dollars. after multiple attempts to contact him, we tried addresses in moscow. he wasn't in but his father was eager to talk. how do you think your son has become so rich? you seem very upset by the us and the uk's accusations.
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the us evidence againstjakubec and his crew is made up of testimony from former gang members and cyber forensics data. some of the evidence was even obtained by the russian police years ago when they were still helping the us investigate. those days seem long gone now. it's more available to enlist hackers in russia than to put them injail. one of my sources told me that he personally tried to enlist jakubec and his guys from evil corp to do some work for him. at the spring summit, president biden spoke to president putin about harbouring cyber criminals. putin denied it was a russia problem but promised to work with the us. the talks have yet to bear significant fruit. many experts say russia needs to play its part to fully turn the tide on organised crime in cyberspace. joe tidy, bbc news, in moscow.
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we asked the russian government to comment on the fact that hackers seem to operate freely in russia, but received no reply. and remember you can see the full documentary, "the russian hackers wanted by the west" this weekend across the bbc. joining me now is paul from, president and ceo of central wires industries. he is telling us about his experience of his company being hacked. what line of business are youin? hacked. what line of business are ou in? ,., ., hacked. what line of business are ou in? , ., ., ., hacked. what line of business are ou in? ., , ., . you in? good morning, we produce stainless steel _ you in? good morning, we produce stainless steel and _ you in? good morning, we produce stainless steel and nikolai - you in? good morning, we produce stainless steel and nikolai wire - you in? good morning, we produce stainless steel and nikolai wire in i stainless steel and nikolai wire in uk, in the us and ultra fine wire here in canada.— uk, in the us and ultra fine wire here in canada. ~ , ., ., , here in canada. when did you realise that our here in canada. when did you realise that your business _ here in canada. when did you realise that your business had _ here in canada. when did you realise that your business had been - here in canada. when did you realise j that your business had been hacked? it would have been the second sunday in august of 2020, actually. we have an accountant in the us he was
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working on some files and she realised some of the file extensions she was trying to retrieve from our servers looked a little bit off. she started an incident response with our it department and then shortly after that, our it department and then shortly afterthat, by our it department and then shortly after that, by about noon of sunday, i had a text message from our it department that said we have got some, what seems to be a major cyber issue going on and we need to further investigate and take some immediate action on. fast forward to monday morning when we showed up in the office and we will all together and the it had been working late into the evening. we realised we had an issue. did into the evening. we realised we had an issue. , i. . ., into the evening. we realised we had an issue. , . ., ., an issue. did you receive a ransom from the hackers? _ an issue. did you receive a ransom from the hackers? there _ an issue. did you receive a ransom from the hackers? there was - an issue. did you receive a ransom from the hackers? there was a - an issue. did you receive a ransom -
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from the hackers? there was a ransom from the hackers? there was a ransom from the hackers? there was a ransom from the hackers _ from the hackers? there was a ransom from the hackers as _ from the hackers? there was a ransom from the hackers as we _ from the hackers? there was a ransom from the hackers as we got _ from the hackers? there was a ransom from the hackers as we got to - from the hackers? there was a ransom from the hackers as we got to better i from the hackers as we got to better understand what was going on. we could see the ransom note was there. we were encrypted, so out of our 12 facilities, seven of those facilities, seven of those facilities were affected, quite dramatically, actually. the ransom note was there, we knew what they wanted. what they said they had done, as far as the encryption goes and what they had taken from the company, was not fully understood. as i learned going into this whole thing, untilwe as i learned going into this whole thing, until we perform an incident response with a professional team pretty much immediately, starting on monday afternoon, you need to get a sense of what they have actually done and what they have taken, not necessarily what they allege they have taken. but definitely, they are looking for money. their objective is to shut you down and get access to your files, they want to pay by
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cyber currency. flan to your files, they want to pay by cyber currency-— to your files, they want to pay by cyber currency. can you tell us how much money _ cyber currency. can you tell us how much money they _ cyber currency. can you tell us how much money they were _ cyber currency. can you tell us how much money they were looking - cyber currency. can you tell us howl much money they were looking for? they were looking for 1.7 million, us. as we got into this, that is what they are asking for but there is many different companies that get involved in the, let's say the negotiation of the whole thing. because at the beginning you are not really sure who these people are, where the hackers from from, it could be from china, russia, north korea. ., ., �* , ., korea. you did find out didn't you, 'ust to korea. you did find out didn't you, just to jump _ korea. you did find out didn't you, just to jump ahead _ korea. you did find out didn't you, just to jump ahead slightly - korea. you did find out didn't you, just to jump ahead slightly in - korea. you did find out didn't you, just to jump ahead slightly in the l just to jump ahead slightly in the story, you did find out, and whether they from? it story, you did find out, and whether the from? ., , story, you did find out, and whether the from? . , , , ., ., ~ they from? it was russia and we knew who it was and — they from? it was russia and we knew who it was and we _ they from? it was russia and we knew who it was and we knew _ they from? it was russia and we knew who it was and we knew the _ they from? it was russia and we knew who it was and we knew the type - they from? it was russia and we knew who it was and we knew the type of i who it was and we knew the type of attack that it was. you who it was and we knew the type of attack that it was.— attack that it was. you are up auainst attack that it was. you are up against a _ attack that it was. you are up against a really _ attack that it was. you are up against a really serious - attack that it was. you are up | against a really serious attack, attack that it was. you are up - against a really serious attack, but you didn't pay the ransom, so what happened next?—
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happened next? they didn't get everywhere _ happened next? they didn't get everywhere in _ happened next? they didn't get everywhere in the _ happened next? they didn't get everywhere in the company - happened next? they didn't get everywhere in the company and j happened next? they didn't get - everywhere in the company and they didn't encrypt all of the it that we needed to run the businesses. we were able to keep running, we where at a reduced capacity, probably by 50%, but we've weren't paralysed, weave and shut down. that is what they were hoping for, so we were able to keep on going as we could contain the issue and figure out what we needed to do next. because you need to recover from the event. 0k, you need to recover from the event. ok, so explain, i guess simple terms, with regards to the it, you didn't pay the ransom and you are figuring out what to do next, how to regain control of the areas that the hackers are taken over, so how did you do that? did you manage to regain control or did they realise you are not going to pay the ransom and fade away? what was the next
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step? and fade away? what was the next ste? , , . step? basically, everything you have not is step? basically, everything you have got is compromised _ step? basically, everything you have got is compromised and _ step? basically, everything you have got is compromised and gone - step? basically, everything you have got is compromised and gone so - step? basically, everything you have got is compromised and gone so you have to rebuild the entire system, all your servers, all your end points, everything. everything has to be considered corrupt. you have to be considered corrupt. you have to take it completely off the network, you have to bring in new servers and reconfigure them, build up servers and reconfigure them, build up your firewalls and you have to build up your proxy between the firewalls, all the rules. because what they have done when they have gotten inside of your system, they have rewritten everything. so you have rewritten everything. so you have essentially lost the keys to your kingdom and now they have it. you have to recreate all of that. and in my opinion, that is very dangerous when you are also dealing with the attack. you are not only trying to recover, you are trying to recover but you also trying to rebuild at same time. that recover but you also trying to rebuild at same time. that must have been a considerable _ rebuild at same time. that must have been a considerable cost, _ rebuild at same time. that must have
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been a considerable cost, the - been a considerable cost, the disruption to business, that must have had a considerable financial cost? it have had a considerable financial cost? , ., , , have had a considerable financial cost? , . , , ., cost? it is a big number, and question _ cost? it is a big number, and question at— cost? it is a big number, and question at all. _ cost? it is a big number, and question at all. we _ cost? it is a big number, and question at all. we are - cost? it is a big number, and question at all. we are a - cost? it is a big number, and - question at all. we are a company that does a _ question at all. we are a company that does a lot _ question at all. we are a company that does a lot of _ question at all. we are a company that does a lot of training - question at all. we are a company that does a lot of training through j that does a lot of training through the years on cyber security. it is the years on cyber security. it is not like we _ the years on cyber security. it is not like we haven't _ the years on cyber security. it 3 not like we haven't done anything, but clearly we learned a lot and we learned that we need to do more all of the time. this is never going to end. ~ , ., of the time. this is never going to end. ~ , . , ., of the time. this is never going to end. g . , ., ., of the time. this is never going to end. g . , ., ., end. my final question, do you have an idea end. my final question, do you have any idea why _ end. my final question, do you have any idea why your— end. my final question, do you have any idea why your company - end. my final question, do you have any idea why your company was - any idea why your company was targeted? going forward, how worried are you, how vulnerable do you feel if this happened once, presumably you are asking yourself, can it happen again?— you are asking yourself, can it happen again? absolutely it can ha en happen again? absolutely it can happen again. _ happen again? absolutely it can happen again. it— happen again? absolutely it can happen again, it will— happen again? absolutely it can happen again, it will happen - happen again? absolutely it can i happen again, it will happen again. i do not feel in any way like we have learned and protected. we have to expect to be attacked. you have to expect to be attacked. you have to create an environment where you can contain the attacker once they
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get in. if you can do that and you can manage it quickly, then that is your only strategy you have got. aside from things like multiple methods of authenticity from a user perspective. you know, using your smartphone and another device to make sure who is going to be in the system and getting approvals. they are going to keep coming, they will not back away. why did we get hit? i have no idea. you think they go after big companies, but as we learn, they are going after everybody. that is what they do, big, small. theyjust do it. the way they work, they write the software in russia, then they subcontract the software out to the hackers. the hackers then, if they collect the ransom, they split it with the software developer. 0n ransom, they split it with the software developer. on top of that,
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you have the regulatory issues you have to be aware of as well. we must leave it there. — have to be aware of as well. we must leave it there, but _ have to be aware of as well. we must leave it there, but it _ have to be aware of as well. we must leave it there, but it has _ have to be aware of as well. we must leave it there, but it has been - leave it there, but it has been interesting to hear how that unfolded with your company and thank you so much for sharing the story. thank you. the headlines on bbc news... uk prime minister borisjohnson prepares to face questions the headlines on bbc news... uk prime minister borisjohnson prepares to face questions in parliament over the corruption row which has engulfed westminster. the cost of living in the uk soars by more than 4%, with the price of fuel, energy, transport and hospitality all rising. amazon says it will stop accepting payments from visa credit cards in the uk, from next year. politicians across the eu are weighing up how best to tackle the spread of coronavirus, as cases continue to rise and it again becomes the epicentre of the pandemic, despite vaccination programmes.
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austria, with a vaccination rate of 73 %, has ordered unvaccinated people to stay at home except for work, food shopping or emergencies. governments elsewhere, including the republic of ireland, with a vax rate of 92 %, are extending covid passports while germany is also considering re—introducing certain rules — and debating whether vaccines alone are enough. angela merkel has just said this morning that the coronavirus situation is �*dramatic�*. mark lobel reports. the coronaviruses catching hospital staff, as well as politicians, off—guard in germany. emergency wards like this one close to munich are filling up so fast, patient was sent to italy for treatment. translation: the situation was foreseeable and could i have been avoided. the right measures that would have prevented this health system from being put in such a situation again were not taken. lower—than—expected vaccination
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rates may steal christmas from many. christmas markets that do openly only welcome the vaccinated or recently recovered. translation: we can't do anything but follow these rules. _ it is a way to protect everyone. but politicians here are in the market for much more, many are keen to unwrap restrictions for the unvaccinated on public transport, for a return to home—working and vaccine mandates for certain professions. the incoming coalition government will consult state leaders on thursday. also from thursday in ireland, pubs, restaurants and nightclubs will have to close at midnight, and people will be advised to work from home. all to combat rising covid cases, despite one of the highest vaccination rates in the world. all across europe and across our country it is increasingly clear that we are experiencing another surge of covid infection.
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in the last week alone, we have seen the second highest rate of hospital admission in all of 2021. but in holland there is political division over plans that unvaccinated people will no longer be able to go to cafes and restaurants with a negative test, with entry only for the vaccinated, or those who have just recovered from covid. with austria's lockdown for the unvaccinated in full swing, there are some questioning the wisdom of policies requiring mandatory vaccines, or locking down the unvaccinated. this raises real issues around civil liberties. around human rights, and it's something that governments should consider extremely carefully. but there are few easy solutions for europe's governments as cases surge. mark lobel, bbc news.
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health officials are warning of a "hidden pandemic" of antibiotic—resista nt infections. the uk health security agency say they should only be prescribed when really needed. with me now is our health reporter, phillipa roxby. it is by no means the first time we have heard warnings about antibiotic resistance, but why is this so important given the covid—19 pandemic. important given the covid-19 pandemic-— important given the covid-19 andemic. . ., , ., , , , pandemic. infection stopped being killed off by _ pandemic. infection stopped being killed off by these _ pandemic. infection stopped being killed off by these common - killed off by these common medicines. that is a problem because it means people cannot recover from these infections, they become more ill and end up in hospital. about 2000 people die every year from these antibiotic resistant infections. during the pandemic, the number of prescriptions have been going down and so have the number of infections. but you expect that in a pandemic because we have been mixing a lot less. health officials are
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worried that once covid is over it will change and there will be a rise in these infections.— in these infections. what is the advice for _ in these infections. what is the advice for people _ in these infections. what is the advice for people this - in these infections. what is the advice for people this winter i in these infections. what is the i advice for people this winter when traditionally we do get more coughs, sneezes and not all of these things are susceptible to antibiotics, people might think they are but not all? , ~ _, , people might think they are but not all? , ~ , all? things like colds, sore throats. — all? things like colds, sore throats, ear _ all? things like colds, sore throats, ear aches - all? things like colds, sore throats, ear aches are - all? things like colds, sore i throats, ear aches are caused all? things like colds, sore - throats, ear aches are caused by viruses usually. antibiotics are not designed to combat them so they are not needed for the things like colds and the flu, they are designed for sepsis, pneumonia or they are used after common operations to prevent infection. health officials are saying, don't be expect to be given antibiotics this winter, even though you might feel under the weather. stay at home and take the advice of your gp and pharmacist and stop mixing with other people if you can and that will stop them being spread around. , ., ~ and that will stop them being spread around. , . ~' ,, and that will stop them being spread around. , ., ~ i. , around. philippa, thank you very much. research by the refugee council suggests that a majority of migrants arriving in britain
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in small boats are fleeing persecution. that contrasts with what the home secretary priti patel has said — that 70 percent of those crossing the channel are not genuine asylum seekers but economic migrants. enver solomon, chief executive of the refugee council, explained how they came to their conclusions. home office data and data we obtained through freedom of information request and we have looked at their nationalities that people are coming from, the nations they are coming from and almost all of them, over 90% orjust from ten countries. countries such as syria, yemen, eritrea, iraq, afghanistan, you know, viewers know what's going on in afghanistan. these are countries where there is oppression, persecution, terror taking place. and when you look at these nationalities and you look at what's happened in the 18 months tojune this year around decision—making for those that come from these countries and make an application to stay in the uk as a refugee
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or under some form of protection, the data shows that more than 60% are granted protection or granted refugee status. and what that indicates is that the vast majority of those coming from these nations who were coming across the channel, taking very dangerous journeys through no fault of their own are indeed genuine refugees. if you look at some countries like syria, like iraq, iran, the likelihood of them being granted refugee status is higher than 65%, 70% in some cases. so that's a clear indication that these people do have a genuine case for protection. why do you think there is a discrepancy then between your analysis and what the home secretary is saying that 70% of those crossing the channel are not genuine asylum seekers? that is a good question and i think it's a question you will have to put to the home secretary, i can't speak on her behalf...
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you must have a view on why there is that discrepancy? i don't have access to the information that she has put to parliament about the figure that 70% are economic migrants. i know members of parliament have written to the home secretary requesting to see that evidence and i am sure when the home when the home secretary brings that evidence forward, we will be able to look at it. what i know is the analysis we've looked at is based on highly credible data, data from the home office to ascertain the nationalities, the countries that people are coming from so we can understand the likelihood of them fleeing persecution. and then we've looked at whether or not people from those countries who come here, making a legitimate claim for refugee status are likely to get it, and the vast majority are. and that's the reality of the situation.
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armenia says it has reached a ceasefire with azerbaijan after fatal clashes along their shared border earlier on tuesday. the russian defence minister brokered the ceasefire during separate talks with his counterparts from the two countries. armenia says at least 15 of its soldiers died, and two security posts were destroyed. a large—scale study in britain suggests that drinking coffee or tea may be associated with a lower risk of stroke and dementia. researchers who followed more than 360,000 participants said that those who drank several cups of tea or coffee every day had the lowest incidence of stroke or dementia. the cambridge dictionary has revealed that its word of the year is "perseverance". searches for the word on the dictionary�*s website peaked when nasa's perseverance rover made its final descent to mars in february. earlier this month, the oxford english dictionary chose "vax" because of a spike in interest
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in vaccine—related words. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick. hello. a brighter day out there for many of us, perhaps feeling a little bit cooler than it did yesterday, more of a breeze, but then again some sunny spells to compensate. there is a chance of catching a shower. we are on the hole in between weather systems at the moment but still closer to low pressure across north—western areas. that's where most of the showers are going to become a pressure keeping things largely dry to the south. we are going to see increasing cloud across western parts on through this afternoon. the showers are scattered about through northern and western scotland, northern ireland, north—west england and the odd one for wales, the west midlands and south—west england. even though cloud is increasing in the west this afternoon, it will become mainly dry away from those showers in western scotland. it is eastern areas that see the lion's share of the sunshine.
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it is breezy out there. these are average wind speeds, round the coast of northern scotland you could see gusts around 40—50 mph or so, which is 7 or 8 degrees here. whereas for the bulk of the uk a range of 10—13 celsius. into tonight, cloud continuing to thicken from the west. you may encounter some light rain and drizzle, some more persistent, heavy bursts of rain towards the north and west of scotland. clear spells continue for longest overnight across east anglia in south—east england, so this is where we are going to have the lowest temperatures, into low single figures, whereas tomorrow we start the day at 10 degrees in belfast and glasgow. we are going to get a weather front just bringing some rain for thursday and indeed for friday across parts of north and western scotland, high pressure elsewhere keeping a lot of dry weather, importing the air around it, though, from a long way to the south—west of the uk. that's a mild direction for us so it will be milder, in fact very mild in some spots, on thursday and friday. along with that flow of air, though,
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there will be plenty of cloud, the best of any sunny spells in the east. from the cloud in the west you may encounter light rain or drizzle. the most persistent rain is going to be across the north west of scotland. these are your temperatures, into the mid—teens, 17 celsius in north—east scotland. the rain continuing on friday in north—west scotland. a lot of cloud elsewhere. some sunny spells in the east and very similar temperatures. though change is under way over the weekend. we are going to see a weather front moving south across the uk, and here it is. it's going to have some outbreaks of rain on it, it is a cold front. the leading edge of colder air and that's a change over the weekend. not horribly cold for the time of year. it will just feel different than what we have had so far this autumn.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11. borisjohnson prepares to face questions in parliament over the corruption row which has engulfed westminster. the cost of living soars by more than four per cent, with the price of fuel, energy, transport and hospitality all going up. amazon says it will stop accepting payments from visa credit cards in the uk, from next year. search teams in canada try to find people trapped in cars after violent storms caused flooding and mudslides. health officials are warning of a "hidden pandemic" of antibiotic—resistant infections, if people fail to act responsibly after covid. poland accuses belarus of trying to destabilise the european union as migrants attempt to force their way across the border.
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and the bbc discovers the world's most wanted cyber—crime supects, are living freely in russia. good morning. mps will today debate proposals to tighten the rules on them having second jobs, as the row over sleaze continues. borisjohnson has set out plans to ban mps from working as paid consultants, while labour wants a ban on all second jobs. it follows weeks of mounting political pressure after the former tory mp owen paterson was found to have broken lobbying rules as a paid consultant. our political correspondent helen catt reports. good morning, prime minister. the prime minister has a tough day of questioning ahead, as he tries to draw a line under the sleaze allegations which have dominated
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westminster for the last few weeks. yesterday, he announced he would support banning mps from working as paid political consultants, at the exact moment labour was holding a press conference calling for the same. labour is chalking the prime minister's move up as a win. but it would still like to see a wider ban on mps having second jobs, except if it's for a public service like nursing or working as a doctor. the government wants to focus not on what mps do, but on how long they spend doing it. borisjohnson said he would back changing the code of conduct to put a reasonable limit on mps' outside activities, and punish those who neglect their duties. exactly what is being proposed is miles away from where the government was two weeks ago. two weeks ago, they were talking really about watering down the current system. now they're talking about not only tightening the rules, but putting that in the hands of the system as it currently exists. but it is parliament, not the government, which actually sets the rules for mps. so the detail would have to be
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worked out there if it chose to go ahead. and some conservatives are concerned the consequences are unclear. i'm very cautious on this, because i know that some of my colleagues have jobs and outside work that they do, and that means them having to give up... changing their lifestyle. we have to be careful about this. we have to realise that we're dealing with human beings who have families and responsibilities, so whilst, as i've said before, the duty, the first duty, must be to parliament, to constituency and to the work we do for our country, any changes i think should be evolutionary. they will get the chance to quiz the prime minister directly later. he is expected to address a gathering of his own backbenchers this evening. before that, he faces the liaison committee of senior mps. and before that, the labour leader at prime minister's questions. borisjohnson may hope the end of the sleaze row is in sight, but there will be a lot more questions to answer before he gets there. helen catt, bbc news, westminster.
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our political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster. so, the volt farce is hard to get heads around, is it absolutely clear what the government is proposing? ihla what the government is proposing? i457 and a lot of the details of this are still being discussed and they are going to be really important. let us remind ourselves, for two weeks borisjohnson has been under intense pressure over these allegations of sleaze and conflicts of interest in parliament. fortwo sleaze and conflicts of interest in parliament. for two weeks, sleaze and conflicts of interest in parliament. fortwo weeks, boris johnson was resisting doing anything about it and today, sorry yesterday, just as kier starmer was about to publish his own proposals, boris johnson came up with some as well. what is quite striking about the letter he wrote to the speaker is that it comes up with some sort of
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principles that mps should be focused on being an mp and any outside interests should not stop them doing that and likewise, paid political consultancy should be banned, but exactly what that means, exactly how much of a second job an mp could do or exactly what would be considered an inappropriate consultancyjob is not clear at all and what we are hearing from the government is that they want mps to come up with that, discuss it cross party and to report back early next year on what that would be. we are going to hear a lot from the prime minister today, going to hear a lot from the prime ministertoday, if going to hear a lot from the prime minister today, if that is your sort of thing, you will be spoiled hearing him being questioned over what that means. i suspect the fact he has come up with a proposal is designed in part to give him some cover at pm cues and at the lyase committee of senior mps this afternoon, but what we do not know this morning is exactly how tough a
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crackdown on second job is the government is prepared to support and all the while we have the labour party saying, this does not go far enough and actually with a very small list of exceptions of public service roles, they want the rules to go even further and crack down on almost all second jobs.— almost all second “obs. thank you very much. _ i'm joined now by alastair mccapra who's the chief executive of the chartered institute of public relations. thank you forjoining us. as the questions continue about whether mps should be allowed any paid political consultancy work and what would appropriate consultancyjob is to be, what are your thoughts? first appropriate consultancy job is to be, what are your thoughts? first of all, the be, what are your thoughts? first of all. the prime _ be, what are your thoughts? first of all, the prime minister's _ be, what are your thoughts? first of all, the prime minister's initiative i all, the prime minister's initiative yesterday is welcome although overdue. we agree that mps, serving mps should not be undertaking a political consultancy roles and if thatis political consultancy roles and if that is all that comes out of this, that is all that comes out of this, that will be a step forward. as some
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of your previous speakers indicated, the difficulty of this is in the detail and what exactly is meant by political consultancy and what is meant by a reasonable number of hours for other roles. all of that other kind of stuff, parliament needs to discuss and there is a reasonable chance that they will not be able to come to a conclusion on this and we will not make progress. speu this and we will not make progress. spell out then, this is a system that the average personnel does not understand how the dynamics work. explain what is meant by paid political consultancy, why would a company go to an mp and pay them? that is a very good question, why would they? there are two reasons, more or less, one is that some companies, it matters very much what is in the mind of the government, what is coming up and to have an understanding of when to make their
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case, how to make the case, who to make it two and the purpose of having the mp on their board or on some other role in the organisation is really to help them prepare themselves to make a perfectly legitimate case for changes or not changes to laws and regulations. fin changes to laws and regulations. on that point, do you think it is ok? i think that is ok, because that is not lobbying, that is where an mp is acting as an adviser to the organisation. it acting as an adviser to the organisation.— acting as an adviser to the organisation. acting as an adviser to the oruanisation. , ., , ., organisation. it is a company that has deeper— organisation. it is a company that has deeper pockets _ organisation. it is a company that has deeper pockets than - organisation. it is a company that has deeper pockets than others i organisation. it is a company that i has deeper pockets than others been able to get access that others cannot. �* ~ ~ , , able to get access that others cannot. ,,, able to get access that others cannot. ,, ,., able to get access that others cannot. ,, _, , cannot. access is a different thing. information. _ cannot. access is a different thing. information, knowledge. _ cannot. access is a different thing. information, knowledge. there - cannot. access is a different thing. information, knowledge. there is. cannot. access is a different thing. | information, knowledge. there is a . uestion information, knowledge. there is a question about _ information, knowledge. there is a question about whether _ information, knowledge. there is a question about whether pain - information, knowledge. there is a question about whether pain and i information, knowledge. there is a l question about whether pain and mp to fulfil this kind of role does actually give you value for money. it is something that people do from time to time, whether it is necessary or useful is a different question and as you imply there are
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otherwise of getting that information, a lot of it is public and some of it can be obtained from professional political consultants who are not mps. there are other ways of dealing with that if that is theissue ways of dealing with that if that is the issue you're concerned about. that is a different thing from turning the other way and representing that organisation by seeking to change legislation or regulations, that is different. that is clear that _ regulations, that is different. that is clear that that _ regulations, that is different. that is clear that that is _ regulations, that is different. that is clear that that is absolutely going beyond the rules. that is clear that that is absolutely going beyond the rules. that is what i think this going beyond the rules. that is what i think this is — going beyond the rules. that is what i think this is intended _ going beyond the rules. that is what i think this is intended to _ i think this is intended to cover, but it talks about, it talks about only covering parliamentary affairs, what does that mean? it only talks about paid work in their prime minister's proposal, there are mps who have other interests, they could be trustees of a charity or have connections with other organisations and if they are not being paid, it would not cover that. while it is
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welcome and i think the prime minister even recognises it is overdue, i do not think it will be sufficient on its own to restore public trust. there is a much wider range of things that mps might be doing that because the public to question whether they are really fulfilling their duties as legislators.— fulfilling their duties as leuislators. �* , . ., ~ the cost of living has reached the highest rate in almost a decade — due to rising fuel and energy costs. inflation is now more than double the bank of england's target. consumer prices were 4.2% higher last month than a year ago. the costs of transport, gas and electricity bills as well as second hand cars all climbed. in september, inflation was 3.1%. the bank of england's aim is to keep inflation to around 2%. rising prices are putting new pressure on households and businesses. economists are debating how much of the surge in inflation can be blamed on the pandemic and how long it will last.
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our business correspondent andy verity has the latest on the cost of living. we have heard about how much electricity bills and gas bills are going up and injust one month it has almost hit double digits. over a year there is a 28% rise in gas bills and those are the biggest reasons why inflation has gone up and there are other things we have been talking about for months, the price of petrol was artificially lower in the pandemic because there was artificially reduced demand owing to lockdowns. compared to that, one year ago, owing to lockdowns. compared to that, one yearago, it owing to lockdowns. compared to that, one year ago, it is higher, average prices are at their highest since 2012, about £1.38 per litre and i expect quite a few of our viewers will say i paid more than that. that is up by 25p compared with one year ago and then there are airfares up by about 15% and other things like the cost of your
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groceries, that is edging up. it is mostly goods as opposed to services shooting up fastest and one of the biggest questions for the bank of england will be, if we do raise interest rates, will this have any effect anyway, because a lot of the reasons why energy prices are higher, that is not due to domestic demand, not due to anything in the uk economy, it is global, the fact that the economy across the world is reopening and supply cannot really meet demand, you cannot catch up with the surge in demand since economies reopened and that is why global energy prices are so high. the hope is that that will be a temporary thing and that those prices will come down and eventually wages will be high enough to exceed the rising cost of living but what we are looking out for the coming year is that our standards of living will go down, because our costs are going up and our wages are not going up going up and our wages are not going up as fast. i'm joined now by lalitha try, who is a researcher at the resolution foundation.
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thank you very much forjoining us. how do you think this inflation is going to impact on the lives of people? we are not for the most part talking about discretionary spending, we are talking about having to pay a lot more for the staples of life currently. sta ples of life currently. absolutely. staples of life currently. absolutely. this is something where energy price increases are already pretty obvious, as are petrol increases, but this is absolutely something that people will be failing in their incomes, in their spending as well and in their pay, as we have seen inflation has reached 4.2% in october, which is the highest it has been in about ten years. this is a really big deal, essentially. we have also seen that underlying pay growth is at a lower level than the current level of
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inflation, which means that the pay of people is being squeezed at the moment. , . of people is being squeezed at the moment, , ., ., of people is being squeezed at the moment. , ., ., of people is being squeezed at the moment. , . ., moment. sorry, at that point, if you don't mind — moment. sorry, at that point, if you don't mind just _ moment. sorry, at that point, if you don't mindjust holding, _ moment. sorry, at that point, if you don't mind just holding, we - moment. sorry, at that point, if you don't mind just holding, we need i moment. sorry, at that point, if you don't mind just holding, we need to| don't mind just holding, we need to say goodbye to anyone watching us on bbc two. i hope you have a good afternoon, goodbye. sorry to interrupt you, butjust afternoon, goodbye. sorry to interrupt you, but just to afternoon, goodbye. sorry to interrupt you, butjust to pick up on the point you were talking about, pay not rising in the keeping pace with inflation.— with inflation. yes, pay is not risinu with inflation. yes, pay is not risin: in with inflation. yes, pay is not rising in pace _ with inflation. yes, pay is not rising in pace with _ with inflation. yes, pay is not rising in pace with inflation i with inflation. yes, pay is not i rising in pace with inflation and over the next six months their pay packets are going to feel squeezed and people will have less money to go around. 50. and people will have less money to to around. ., . go around. so, what will the impact be? i go around. so, what will the impact be? i suppose _ go around. so, what will the impact be? i suppose the _ go around. so, what will the impact be? i suppose the only _ go around. so, what will the impact be? i suppose the only answer, - go around. so, what will the impact be? i suppose the only answer, if i be? i suppose the only answer, if you have not got more money coming in but the outgoings are increasing, obviously in a way that it is not obviously in a way that it is not obvious where you can make the cuts, will people just have to use less of the basics, cut down on heating? how
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do you see it? it is the basics, cut down on heating? how do you see it?— do you see it? it is a really tough thin , do you see it? it is a really tough thing. this _ do you see it? it is a really tough thing. this is _ do you see it? it is a really tough thing, this is going _ do you see it? it is a really tough thing, this is going to _ do you see it? it is a really tough thing, this is going to be - do you see it? it is a really tough thing, this is going to be a - do you see it? it is a really tough thing, this is going to be a really| thing, this is going to be a really tough winterfor a lot thing, this is going to be a really tough winter for a lot of families, because as we have seen, people will have less money to go around. we have less money to go around. we have also seen the energy price cap increased in october which means that energy bills will be higher as well and this is going to be really tough. i guess the good news around this is that this is is ultimately something that should be temporary. it is going to be a tough six months for a lot of families, but this inflation rise is driven by the reopening of the economy after covid—19 and the supply constraints associated with that. the good news for families will be hopefully that there should be a temporary thing and inflation should fall at some point next year.— and inflation should fall at some oint next ear. ., ~ , ., , . point next year. thank you very much for “oininu point next year. thank you very much forjoining us- —
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detectives investigating the taxi blast outside liverpool women's hospital believe the man behind the attack had been buying parts for his homemade device since at least april. the head of counter terrorism policing in north—west england, russ jackson said that the bomber, emad al swaelmeen was born in iraq, and that he suffered from periods of mental illness that will "form part of the investigation'. it was revealed yesterday that mr swaelmeen was a failed asylum seeker. amazon has told customers in the uk it will stop accepting payments made using visa credit cards from next year. the company sent an email to customers saying the change will affect visa credit cards issued in the uk, from the 19th ofjanuary. it sets up a clash between two giant global corporations. in a statement, amazon said: starting 19 january 2022, we will unfortunately no longer accept visa credit cards issued in the uk, due to the high fees visa charges for processing credit card transactions. but they said customers
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would still be able to use visa debit cards. visa responded to the announcement, saying: "we are very disappointed that amazon is threatening to restrict consumer choice in the future. when consumer choice is limited, nobody wins. "we have a long—standing relationship with amazon, and we continue to work toward a resolution, so cardholders can use their preferred visa credit cards at amazon uk without amazon—imposed restrictions come january 2022." let's talk to our personal finance correspondent kevin peachey. well, this is a real battle of the titans, see who gets what they want. a row between two of the giants of their industries and it is now being played out in front of consumers, because those amazon customers receiving messages saying from january the 19th next year that those these out credit cards will not be accepted, debit card still will be and visa debit card still will be and visa debit card still will be and other credit cards will be, but clearly what is on is saying
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is that these fees, which are being charged to process transactions are an obstacle to the best prices for consumers. these are, in response, or disappointed and say that less choice means that no one wins in this row. i think it is safe to say that the timing of this is significant, because it comes ahead of the big online shopping day, black friday and the festive shopping season. it is as if amazon are certainly upping the ante and trying to offer a bit of timing as well for a compromise between these two giants. well for a compromise between these two ciants. ., ., , , .,~ well for a compromise between these twoaiants. ., , ., two giants. how does it break down? when amazon _ two giants. how does it break down? when amazon say _ two giants. how does it break down? when amazon say that _ two giants. how does it break down? when amazon say that the _ two giants. how does it break down? when amazon say that the fees - two giants. how does it break down? when amazon say that the fees are i two giants. how does it break down? | when amazon say that the fees are an obstacle to the best prices for consumers, are they being transparent on how much this is costing them as a business and how these costs are being passed on? hot these costs are being passed on? not at this these costs are being passed on? ijrrt at this stage, it is very early on and i think obviously, some of those
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fees will get passed on to consumers and retailers of all types, online and retailers of all types, online and in stores or working to very fine margins. they wanted to offer the best deals, clearly it is a very important time of year for them and they are saying, ok, from next year we are going to say no more these out credit cards and visa and mastercard, the two big players on that side of the industry will see what happens there and see who comes out on top. iloathe what happens there and see who comes out on to. ~ ., , ., , ., what happens there and see who comes outonto.~ ., , ., , ., out on top. who stands to lose the most in this? _ out on top. who stands to lose the most in this? i— out on top. who stands to lose the most in this? i am _ out on top. who stands to lose the most in this? i am assuming - out on top. who stands to lose the most in this? i am assuming it - out on top. who stands to lose the most in this? i am assuming it is i most in this? i am assuming it is visa, because presumably people will just find another way to pay with amazon because these are uses that slice of the business. it amazon because these are uses that slice of the business.— slice of the business. it looks like amazon are _ slice of the business. it looks like amazon are offering _ slice of the business. it looks like amazon are offering incentives i slice of the business. it looks like amazon are offering incentives to people who use their service to switch to a different card provider or a different way of paying, clearly lots of people have their visa credit card saved on the amazon
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service and the use it automatically. it will need a bit of automatically. it will need a bit of a shift from consumers if none of this is sorted out and the threat is carried through injanuary. there this is sorted out and the threat is carried through in january. there is a bit of time _ carried through in january. there is a bit of time presumably _ carried through in january. there is a bit of time presumably there - carried through in january. there is| a bit of time presumably there are, to get their heads together and see if they can find a way through. thea;r if they can find a way through. they are talking. — if they can find a way through. they are talking, but _ if they can find a way through. they are talking, but they _ if they can find a way through. tue: are talking, but they are if they can find a way through. tue are talking, but they are to titans and they will each have very strong opinions. and they will each have very strong oinions. ., ~ i. former cricketer azeem rafiq says he believes english cricket is "institutionally" racist. speaking to a digital, culture, media and sport committee of mps about yorkshire cricket club yesterday, he described his treatment as "inhuman" and said racism cost him his career. mr rafiq said racist language was "constantly" used during his time at yorkshire, and that the issues he faced there are widespread in domestic cricket. he added that he hopes by speaking out, there will be cultural change. joining me now is michael bankole who researches race and representation at kings college london. welcome. thank you forjoining us. do you think this is a watershed
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moment for cricket? i do you think this is a watershed moment for cricket?— do you think this is a watershed moment for cricket? i hope so. i think we should _ moment for cricket? i hope so. i think we should firstly _ moment for cricket? i hope so. i think we should firstly commend moment for cricket? i hope so. i i think we should firstly commend a for speaking out about this and his experience because often people of colour who experience racism in the workplace feel they cannot speak out because they do not feel they will because they do not feel they will be taken seriously dash—macro azeem rafiq. they have to relive the trauma and retell it, that is very traumatic and we saw azeem rafiq break down as he recalled what he had been through. it remains to be seen if this will be a watershed, we have been promised change before, but often when it comes to racism, we were promised things and delivered very little and i think the response to racism is marred by inertia and platitudes. iloath? the response to racism is marred by inertia and platitudes.— inertia and platitudes. why do you think it has _ inertia and platitudes. why do you think it has taken _ inertia and platitudes. why do you think it has taken so _ inertia and platitudes. why do you think it has taken so long - inertia and platitudes. why do you think it has taken so long for- inertia and platitudes. why do you think it has taken so long for whatj think it has taken so long for what we have been hearing to emerge? not just from him but from others and across cricket as a whole? i just from him but from others and across cricket as a whole?- across cricket as a whole? i think there is a — across cricket as a whole? i think there is a worrying _ across cricket as a whole? i think there is a worrying culture - across cricket as a whole? i think there is a worrying culture in - there is a worrying culture in
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cricket and sport in general, in sport, a big issue is often passed off as banter. i am remembering the women's footballer who was racially abused by her coach and it was passed off as banter. there is a worrying culture in some environments that means that racist abuse is not called out because it is framed as banter which somehow makes it acceptable.— is framed as banter which somehow makes it acceptable. there was that owerful makes it acceptable. there was that powerful picture _ makes it acceptable. there was that powerful picture of _ makes it acceptable. there was that powerful picture of azeem _ makes it acceptable. there was that powerful picture of azeem rafiq's i powerful picture of azeem rafiq's sun holding up a banner saying racism is not banter. how powerful is it to keep making the point? it is it to keep making the point? it is a really important point to make and i think often people of colour speak out about racism and we are told it is being perpetrated by bad apples or it is just banter, but racism is not banter, it is very traumatic and i am sure people of colour can't relate to what azeem rafiq has been through. you almost feel like you have nowhere to turn
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and i think we should commend azeem rafiq for speaking out and hopefully it can be a turning point in cricket and a turning point in wider society, a point where we realise just how bad racism is and how detrimental it can be. fine just how bad racism is and how detrimental it can be.- just how bad racism is and how detrimental it can be. one of the really interesting _ detrimental it can be. one of the really interesting areas - detrimental it can be. one of the really interesting areas explored| detrimental it can be. one of the i really interesting areas explored in the hearing yesterday, after azeem rafiq himself gave his own testimony and went on to speak to the former chair, the current chair of yorkshire county cricket club and also members of the ecb, the conversation was around how much representation there is at grass roots of south asian players and i think the statistic was something like 85% of under six teams at barnsley or of south asian descent but when it comes to representation at the county level, the statistics, the numbers are vanishingly small and they have been getting lower and you contrast that with what has been happening in football, where
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representation has been increasing, but the other part of the picture is in stadiums with football, there is sometimes more overt racism in a way that there has not been with cricket, so how do you put that picture together? i do cricket, so how do you put that picture together?— cricket, so how do you put that picture together? i do think cricket does have a _ picture together? i do think cricket does have a problem _ picture together? i do think cricket does have a problem and - picture together? i do think cricket does have a problem and when - picture together? i do think cricket does have a problem and when it i does have a problem and when it comes to recreational players in the uk, one third of them are british asians and only 4% of professional players or british asians, there clearly is a problem. i do think football has a problem around the culture of the sport and some of the things that fans do and think they can get away with and there are worrying issues when it comes to culture and cricket club certainly in terms of the banter in the dressing room. ithink in terms of the banter in the dressing room. i think it is important to speak about how this culture is endemic in wider society and not put in particular boxes. some things you see in football are representative of bigotry in society
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and some things you see in cricket in terms of representation of diversity is endemic of the lack of representation in society. michael, thank ou representation in society. michael, thank you for— representation in society. michael, thank you forjoining _ representation in society. michael, thank you forjoining us. _ health officials are warning of a "hidden pandemic" of antibiotic—resistant infections if people fail to act responsibly after covid. that's according to the uk health security agency, who say they should only be prescribed when really needed. last year one in five people with an infection had an antibiotic—resistant one, although the overall number of infections in england did fall because of the lockdown. our health reporter, philippa roxby, explains more. antibiotic resistance happens when bacteria behind all the infections is stopped being killed off by these common medicines and that is a problem because it means people can't recover from these infections, people become more ill, they end up in hospital and some die. about 2,000 people die every yearfrom these antibiotic—resista nt infections. during the pandemic, the number of prescriptions has actually been
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going down and so have the number of infections. but you'd expect that in a pandemic because we have been mixing a lot less so there have been fewer infections around. but health officials are very worried that once covid is over it's going to change and there's going to be a rise in these infections. things like coles and earaches are usually caused by viruses and antibiotics are not designed to combat them and they are really not needed for things like coles and flues, they are designed for a more serious bacterial infections like pneumonia or sepsis or they are used after common operations to prevent infection. health officials are saying do not expect to be given antibiotics this winter even though you may feel under the weather, stay—at—home, take the advice of your gp or pharmacist and stop mixing with other people if you can and that will stop them being spread around. polish border guards have used tear gas and water cannons against a group of migrants trying
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to enter the country from belarus. belarus has been accused of pushing migrants to the border to try to destabilise the eu, a charge it denies. our correspondentjenny hill sent this update from near the polish side of the border. the polish authorities don't let us get anywhere near the actual border itself, journalists and for that matter aid agencies are banned from getting close. we do know from the polish border force this morning that they say overnight there were 161 attempts by people trying to get across the border from belarus into poland. not necessarily at the border crossing that you've heard about all week, but at other parts of the border, which is protected and heavily guarded by polish troops. they also say that nine polish border guards were injured during those clashes at one particular border crossing, yesterday. the situation there has been desperate. hundreds, if not thousands, of people have been trapped there for more than a week now. they can't go backwards. the belarusian border force have been behind them and ahead of them, the eu, poland.
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but it's a heavily guarded border and poland is not budging. it is not going to let them in. there are huge concerns on this side of the border in poland, particularly among people who live in those borderlands and regularly tell us that they regularly see people who have managed to get across the fence, then trying to make their way through the dense, thick forest that lines the border on both sides. the temperatures here at night drop down to around zero. it's extremely cold. many of the people that we speak to here are trying to help, say the people who do get across are in a terrible condition. sometimes they've been beaten by border guards, but more often than not, they are hungry, thirsty and severely hypothermic. so a very difficult situation. we know that behind the scenes, diplomatic efforts are continuing. the eu, as you know, has threatened another round of sanctions against belarus, who it suspects of driving these people to the border to put pressure on the eu to destabilise it.
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angela merkel, the outgoing german chancellor, has also held talks with the belarusian leader, alexander lukashenko, in an attempt to try and ease the situation at that border. just one more update for you. we understand that last night, some of the people at that border crossing were taken to a logistics warehouse overnight. that means at least they were under a proper roof for the first time in many, many nights. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. turning colderfrom the north this weekend. until then, mild and tomorrow and friday, very mild. today, sunny spells, the chance of a shower. most of the showers in northern and western scotland, northern ireland and north west england, one or two for wales, perhaps the west midlands and south—west england. increasing cloud across western areas through the afternoon, sunny spells continuing in the east, seven or 8 degrees in northern scotland, much of the uk, 10—13, windy around the coast of northern scotland in particular. overnight, further cloud coming in from the west with light rain and drizzle, more persistent rain in northern and western scotland, clear spells for longest
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in east anglia and south—east england, with the lowest temperatures in low single figures. 10 degrees, though, to start our thursday in belfast and glasgow. further rain at times across, particularly north west scotland on thursday, the chance of a bit of light rain and drizzle elsewhere in the west, where we have a lot of cloud. best of any sunny spells in the east. despite all of the cloud, it is much milder tomorrow. hello, this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. the headlines: the cost of living soars by more than 4%, with the price of fuel, energy, transport and hospitality all going up. borisjohnson prepares to face questions in parliament over the corruption row which has engulfed westminster.
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amazon says it will stop accepting payments from visa credit cards in the uk from next year. poland accuses belarus of trying to destabilise the european union as migrants attempt to force their way across the border. search teams in canada try to find people trapped in cars after violent storms caused flooding and mudslides. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's holly. good morning. there's been a lot of reaction this morning to azeem rafiq's damning testimony to mp's yesterday. the former crickter detailed the abuse he suffered at yorkshire and said he believed english cricket is "institutionally" racist. rafiq told the digital, culture, media and sport select committee that racist language was "constantly" used during his time at yorkshire and that the issues he faced there are widespread in domestic cricket. he said he lost his career to racism and hopes by speaking out there'll be a massive change
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within five years time. so what happens next? it's clear that yorkshire have a huge amount of work to do, and here's a statement from their new chair lord patel which was made after the hearing. there is no quick fix to the clear problems which have been identified. azeem noted that this is not about individuals, but rather the structure and processes of the club and we need to tackle this. it is clear that we have good people at yorkshire county cricket club and that gives me hope that we can. i am struck by the concept of white rose values. i want to say firmly that our values at this club cannot be in any way rooted in racism, discrimination or abuse of any kind. well, earlier this morning we spoke to the former england
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batsman mark ramprakash who believes that azeem's bravery in speaking out should pave the way for other individuals who have been victims of racism to come forward. he has shown great courage and bravery and stick to his guns and to shine a light on what happened to him. but i must stress he has been at pains to say he is looking for cultural change within the game in a wider context. and he has said he's not looking to witchhunt certain individuals. now that azeem has had the courage to come forward, i think individuals must come forward if they believe that their experiences will help change organisations or county clubs for the positive. bbc asian network's ankur desai was asked what has to happen now in order for this to be a watershed moment in english cricket. better representation. you have got to look at the top level. the ecb who run the game in this country,
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but then filter down to coaching level and victor solanki is only one asiann coach at the moment. ——vikram solanki, it won't change necessarily very soon because british asian parents will not want to send their kids to have a career in cricket, they will want them to have a career in law, engineering for example, where it has been more stable. usman khawaja has been named in australia's15—man squad for the first two ashes tests against england. he's not played test cricket since august 2019 when australia retained the ashes in england. australia have played only three test series since then — all at home — beating pakistan and new zealand before being stunned 2—1 by india injanuary, when they lost at the gabba
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in brisbane for the first time since 1988. wales made the task of reaching the world cup just a little easier last night by holding belgium to a draw. wales needed a point to earn a home semifinal in the world cup play—offs in march but kevin de bruyne's early goal was a setback.w ales recovered though, kieffer moore equalising before half—time. the 1—1 result means robert page's side will be seeded in the draw, which will be made later this month. roger federer has confirmed that he won't compete at the australian open injanuary. in fact, the 20—times grand slam winner has told swiss website �*le matin' he would be "extremely surprised" to be able to play wimbledon next year. federer hasn't played since losing in the wimbledon quarterfinals injuly, and is continuing to recover from multiple knee surgeries. and in the last hour british wheelchair playerjordanne whiley has announced her retirement. whiley won 13 grand slams, including the us open singles tournament in 2015. she's also a four time
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paralympic medallist. injune 2021 whiley was among six players representing the uk at the postponed 2020 paralympics in tokyo. that's all the sport from me for now but head over to the bbc sport website for more on tonight's women's champions league ties as arsenal look to make it to the quarter finals. an inquiry into asbestos in schools is to get underway today, after a campaign group found that hundreds of teachers have died prematurely from mesothelioma. mps on the work and pensions committee will look into the risks of abestos for teachers and pupils. lucie stephens' mother, who was exposed to abestos whilst working at a school has died of the disease. let's speak to lucie now. thank you so much forjoining us. you have obviously been through very time, losing your mother and knowing
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what the background to when she was diagnosed with mesothelioma two years after retiring after spending 30 years the primary school what are you all told about the cause? brute primary school what are you all told about the cause?— primary school what are you all told about the cause? we as many people thou~ht about the cause? we as many people thought that — about the cause? we as many people thought that asbestos _ about the cause? we as many people thought that asbestos was _ about the cause? we as many people thought that asbestos was a - about the cause? we as many people thought that asbestos was a thing - about the cause? we as many people thought that asbestos was a thing of| thought that asbestos was a thing of the past and we were really shocked to discover it was so prevalent in schools, 85% of schools still contain asbestos. all of the schools she had taught and it turned out had contained asbestos and she had never been told about that so she was really angry and really worried about the children that she had taught. over her 30 years she properly taught about 1000 pupils and we subsequently discovered that for every one to each other gets a diagnosis it is expected about nine students would also be affected
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since usually concerned those children she had tried to care for had not been protected from asbestos. brute had not been protected from asbestos-— had not been protected from asbestos. . had not been protected from asbestos. ~ . ., , ., asbestos. we can office to see and hear how tough — asbestos. we can office to see and hear how tough that _ asbestos. we can office to see and hear how tough that is _ asbestos. we can office to see and hear how tough that is and - asbestos. we can office to see and hear how tough that is and it - asbestos. we can office to see and hear how tough that is and it been | hear how tough that is and it been awful for her. hear how tough that is and it been awfulfor her. she hear how tough that is and it been awful for her. she was teaching young kids in primary school. he said she honestly had that very human instincts and worries and also angen human instincts and worries and also anger. how did she channel that anger? anger. how did she channel that anuer? ~ ., anger. how did she channel that anuer? ~ . , ., ., , ., anger? mum and i started a petition usin: the anger? mum and i started a petition using the 38 — anger? mum and i started a petition using the 38 degrees _ anger? mum and i started a petition using the 38 degrees website - anger? mum and i started a petitionj using the 38 degrees website asking the government to take action. it was also action on recommendations already made by an all parliamentary group in 2014 that was asking for the phased removal of asbestos by 2028 and commitments to fund that. that petition has had over 124,000 signatures with huge numbers of people responding talking about their own experiences of losing loved ones, people who were in their
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40s exposed as pupils and people exposed while teaching and subsequently died. the thing that is most frustrating about this and that has continued to be a problem all the way through as the department for education no switch schools contain asbestos. they have carried out an annual survey three times now, the asbestos management action plan survey, and they hold a list that contains the details of every school in the country that contains asbestos and despite repeated freedom of information request they have refused to release that information. mesothelioma as a preventable disease inasmuch as you can avoid disturbing asbestos you will not contract the disease. once you are diagnosed with that it is a terminal disease and you will always die but we can protect people from disturbing asbestos by letting them know what it is that the department for education seems to have chosen a
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route what it is continuing to bury this information which mean staff working in school and parents and children just don't know where that risk is and it is a ticking time bomb. we also know asbestos when managed well can be saved to an extent although it should ultimately be removed but because funding for intending skills has been cut so much over the last ten years there are a lot of schools now not in good condition that also contain asbestos and asbestos doesn'tjust sit condition that also contain asbestos and asbestos doesn't just sit there. if the state of the building is getting worse the asbestos itself will be becoming more dangerous and as it stands there is no transparency around that asbestos is no accountability in terms of... i am assuming you would like that list to be published.— am assuming you would like that list to be published. should be published alonuside to be published. should be published alongside investment _ to be published. should be published alongside investment to _ to be published. should be published alongside investment to provide - alongside investment to provide accountability for the removal of asbestos with a time frame out with an amount of money going and and the
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amount of schools that have asbestos cleared year after year until we get rid of this problem. i might thank you so much for talking to us and so sorry for what you've been through, we really appreciate you taking the time. tougher coronavirus restrictions could be required in northern ireland before christmas, even if mandatory vaccine passports come into force, according to a paper from the department of health. today ministers at stormont are expected to discuss a proposal to make vaccine passports enforcable from 13th december. nearly 70% of the population are up—to—date with their vaccines in northern ireland. our correspondent chris page is in belfast. tell us what is happening. very important meeting of ministers and the power—sharing devolved governments coming up today. the main item on the agenda is whether vaccine passport should become mandatory in northern ireland for entry to example hospitality
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businesses, large events such as concerts, big sporting events. quite often at the moment there is a vaccine passport up that many people have downloaded to the phone —— application. pubs and concert venues are voluntarily carrying out checks to make sure people going ourfully vaccinated or have had coronavirus recently had a negative test recently had a negative test recently but the proposal from the health minister robin swan is that system should be made compulsory. an aspect of this that shows you why the system of coalition we have in northern ireland, power—sharing coalitions, there are five parties in coalition, four of them in favour of making the vaccine passport scheme mandatory, the one party who is not in favour though they say they have an open mind as the democratic unionist party, the
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biggest party. the leader, jeffrey donaldson, says he is open—minded but needs to see the details of the proposal. sammy wilson said he is very much against the idea of compulsory vaccine passport. that will be discussed by ministers in the coming hours but it is understood the paper that the health minister will bring to the stormont executive has one even if vaccine passport are a button it might bot be enough —— are brought and it might not be enough to prevent transmission of coronavirus and other measures may be brought in. search teams equipped with diggers and dogs have started looking for people trapped in their cars, after a violent storm caused floods and mudslides across british columbia, in canada. there are reports that one person is dead and several more are missing near vancouver. access to the city has been severely restricted and the country's two biggest railways reported serious damage to their networks. our north america correspondent
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david willis has more. after a summer of wildfires and record high temperatures has come this. more rain in a day than people here are used to in a month. it left hundreds trapped in their cars overnight, severed rail links to canada's largest port in the city of vancouver, and has cut power supply to thousands of homes. the rain has also brought with it mudslides, which forced the evacuation of an entire town. hundreds of people, many of them children, were loaded onto buses after being airlifted to safety from a town in british columbia. others, meanwhile, have found themselves stuck inside with the flood waters rising. we're safe, we're a little bit above where the flooding has occurred. and, yeah, again, lucky that that happened. my aunt and uncle's house is in the water. my cousin, who just finished having a baby, their house is totally flooded, they have nowhere to go.
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across the border in washington state, torrential rains and high winds have also been wreaking havoc, flooding roads and again trapping people in their cars. some counted themselves lucky to have escaped. rolling down the windows, looking for the easiest way out. had to crawl through the passenger side because the car ended up tilting, with the driver's side towards the ground, a little bit. so, crawled out the passenger side and, yeah, was able to get out, thankfully. the outskirts of vancouver have now experienced by their hottest and their wettest days on record within the space ofjust a few months. as in many other parts of the world, it has left people here wondering this is what constitutes the new normal. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. the supermarket chain lidl is upping it's minimum hourly pay in the uk by 6% in march next year. around 21,000 workers, that s 80% of its staff, will see their hourly pay increase
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from £9.50 to £10.10 an hour outside of london and up to £11.30 within the m25. lidl s chief hr officer, nan gibson, has been speaking to our business correspondent, emma simpson, and told her the move will make lidl the highest paying supermarket in the uk how difficult is it to recruit staff? very difficult. part of
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investment is to retain staff and join this fantastic team that is in a supermarket expanding massively. we pride ourselves on being efficient and dynamic and full credit to our teams. we don't expect to pass that on to customers. what other increases are you seeing? materials will lead to further— increases are you seeing? materials will lead to further increases - down the line. tell us about hgv drivers. we don't employ drivers directly ourselves. our supply chain are in constant
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contact with third party suppliers and so far we are managing to battle through. i think we all missed christmas last year and it was cancelled at the last minute and! minute and i think all of us feel the need to really get into christmas this year and enjoyed. our teams have been working very hard to ensure that will happen. pare teams have been working very hard to ensure that will happen.— ensure that will happen. are you confident you — ensure that will happen. are you confident you can _ ensure that will happen. are you confident you can keep - ensure that will happen. are you confident you can keep the - ensure that will happen. are you i confident you can keep the shelves full? yes. inflation has topped 4% consumer prices in the uk are nowing climbing at their fastest rate for almost ten years. with me is our business correspondent, alice baxter. the cost of living has reached the highest rate in almost a decade — due to rising fuel and energy costs. inflation is now more than double the bank of england's target.consumer prices were 4.2% higher last month than a year ago. the costs of transport, gas and electricity bills ——
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as well as second hand cars — all climbed. in september, inflation was 3.1%. the bank of england's aim is to keep inflation to around 2%. rising prices are putting new pressure on households and businesses. economists are debating how much of the surge in inflation can be blamed on the pandemic —— and how long it will last.2) how with me is george buckley, chief uk economist at the bank, nomura. i think we will all see inflation fall next year there are a number of things that are going to push inflation up even higher than the number today over the next few months and one will be the rise in the price gap in april next year because we have all ready seen huge increases in gas and electricity prices and that will have further
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effect on the upside inflation but i think thereafter one would expect inflation to come back down again because some of these supply constraints we are seeing adding to inflation, some of the energy price increases adding to inflation will eventually subside and eventually inflation should fall back. if inflation should fall back. if inflation does keep getting worse do you think that will force the hand of the bank of england to raise interest rates? the money policy group meets in december and if they increase them from the policy loans how high do think that will go? the bank rate how high do think that will go? tue bank rate is how high do think that will go? t'ie bank rate is currently how high do think that will go? tue bank rate is currently 1.1% has never been slow before and we have a huge amount of quantitative easing so policy is exceptionally loose and it doesn't seem right that policy should be so loose in a time when inflation is surging so it does seem reasonable to think the bank will raise interest rates and i think they probably will raise rates as soon as next month but i think that mightjust be a knot .15% increase
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just to get us back on the straight and narrow to begin with four other increases next year. i don't think we will see interest rates on the levels we saw 23 years ago ? my 20 or 30 years ago and i think we will see them peek out at about 1%, that is what the market is thinking. we talked about some of the causes for the steep rise in inflation but everyone who must�*ve paid an energy bill are filled up a car must be acutely aware of what they ons has cited as the biggest reason for the rise in inflation, energy cost. [30 rise in inflation, energy cost. do ou see rise in inflation, energy cost. do you see that rising or any relief on that front? it is very difficult for gas and energy prices but certainly one thing we can say is energy increases we are seeing right now will not affect household energy bills until april of next year so we
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do know one thing and there is further to come when we are looking at inflation rising over the coming months and i think the bank of england would be right to respond by raising interest rates, not by that much. ., , raising interest rates, not by that much. . , , ., ., raising interest rates, not by that much. ., i. ., ., ., much. the last thing you want to do to how soldiers _ much. the last thing you want to do to how soldiers kick _ much. the last thing you want to do to how soldiers kick them _ much. the last thing you want to do to how soldiers kick them when - much. the last thing you want to do | to how soldiers kick them when they are down because they are feeling the effect of all these increases in energy prices. energy is the sort of thing you can do much about, you have to buy energy and therefore what it does is it detracts from your real disposable income which means you have got less money to spend elsewhere so i think that is an important thing to bear in mind and it does mean the bank should be wary of raising interest rates to substantially. the wary of raising interest rates to substantially.— substantially. the overriding messa . e substantially. the overriding message from _ substantially. the overriding message from the _ substantially. the overriding message from the bikers - substantially. the overriding i message from the bikers don't substantially. the overriding - message from the bikers don't panic, f that arises it will be from historic loans but there will be higher inflation as we recover from covid so how much to think this is
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global issue? we covid so how much to think this is global issue?— covid so how much to think this is ulobal issue? ~ . , ., ., global issue? we have seen inflation rise in many — global issue? we have seen inflation rise in manyjurisdictions_ global issue? we have seen inflation rise in manyjurisdictions in - rise in manyjurisdictions in inflation and lead to states in october was higher—than—expected and we have seen inflation elsewhere such as in europe and the euro area roughly around the same level as that of the uk so this is not a uk issue, it is certainly something we are seeing the effect of in many places because energy prices are a global issue. they are a global issue because of the demand—side and supply—side stop the demand—side as we recoverfrom supply—side stop the demand—side as we recover from covid and the supply side with gas and many other things. many thanks. politicians across europe are weighing up how best to battle a surge in coronavirus cases as it has again become the epicentre of the pandemic. austria has already introduced restrictions for the unvaccinated.
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governments elsewhere, including the republic of ireland ,are introducing restrictions due to "another surge" of the virus. germany is also considering re—introducing certain rules in the run—up to christmas and debating whether vaccines alone are enough to stop the spread of the virus. mark lobel reports. coronaviruses is catching hospital staff, as well as politicians, off—guard in germany. emergency wards like this one close to munich are filling up so fast, patient was sent to italy for treatment. translation: the situation was foreseeable and could i have been avoided. the right measures that would have prevented this health system from being put in such a situation again were not taken. lower—than—expected vaccination rates may steal christmas from many. christmas markets that do openly only welcome the vaccinated or recently recovered.
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translation: we can't do anything but follow these rules. _ it is a way to protect everyone. but politicians here are in the market for much more, many are keen to unwrap restrictions for the unvaccinated on public transport, for a return to home—working and vaccine mandates for certain professions. the incoming coalition government will consult state leaders on thursday. also from thursday in ireland, pubs, restaurants and nightclubs will have to close at midnight, and people will be advised to work from home. all to combat rising covid cases, despite one of the highest vaccination rates in the world. all across europe and across our country it is increasingly clear that we are experiencing another surge of covid infection. in the last week alone, we have seen the second—highest rate of hospital admission
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in all of 2021. but in holland there is political division over plans that unvaccinated people will no longer be able to go to cafes and restaurants with a negative test, with entry only for the vaccinated, or those who have just recovered from covid. with austria's lockdown for the unvaccinated in full swing, there are some questioning the wisdom of policies requiring mandatory vaccines, or locking down the unvaccinated. this raises real issues around civil liberties. around human rights, and it's something that governments should consider extremely carefully. but there are few easy solutions for europe's governments as cases surge. mark lobel, bbc news. the cambridge dictionary has revealed that its word of the year is "perseverance".
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searches for the word on the dictionary�*s website peaked when nasa's perseverance rover made its final descent to mars in february. earlier this month, the oxford english dictionary chose "vax" because of a spike in interest in vaccine—related words. a self—portrait by the mexican artist frida kahlo has sold for nearly $35 million. the auction at sotheby�*s has apparently made the painting the most valuable work of latin american art ever sold. completed five years after her death in 1954, the oil painting named �*diego and i' offers a window into her turbulent marriage to the mexican muralist diego rivera. it was her husband who apparently held the previous record ofjust under 10 million for one of his own paintings there's exciting news for fans ofjk rowling's harry potter, as many of the original hogwarts actors reunite for a special 20th anniversary tv retrospective of the film franchise. daniel radcliffe, emma watson and rupert grint willjoin other cast members for the show. but there'll be a notable exception — rowling, who created harry potter in 1997,
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will not make a personal appearance. the harry potter film franchise is one of the most successful of all time, with an estimated worth of over $25 billion, and it made its three child actors into international stars. let's go back to westminster now, the prime minister is due to stand up in the house of commons in the next few minutes, our political correspondent nick eardleyjoins me now. i would expect the question to dominate the next few hours and borisjohnson orface dominate the next few hours and borisjohnson or face the labour leader keir starmer on the dispatch
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box and the issue of whether the government has been taken second jobs and lobbying it seriously enough. the prime minister is facing up enough. the prime minister is facing up to self—inflicted wounds and the government originally wanted to change the rules and give a stay of execution to owen paterson after he was found guilty. it has led to questions about mps mocking from the caribbean to questions over whether second jobs should be allowed at all so i would expect that to feature prominently over the next 45 minutes orso prominently over the next 45 minutes or so at prime minister's questions. one of the things to watch out for is whether borisjohnson is any specific answers to what the new regime he is latterly proposing. what that will look like and how it will be policed. one of the questions many people have asked this morning as when borisjohnson says there should be appropriate
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between mps being an mp and doing any outsidejobs, what between mps being an mp and doing any outside jobs, what does an appropriate balance look like? how many hours a week could someone spendin many hours a week could someone spend in a second job? i suspect borisjohnson has given himself wriggle room to say it is up for parliament but i would expect him to come under quite a bit of pressure to spell that out and quite a bit of pressure quite frankly about why this did not come forward earlier. rememberthat about why this did not come forward earlier. remember that borisjohnson earlier. remember that boris johnson basically earlier. remember that borisjohnson basically resisted this position for a fortnight. it was not something the government wanted to do two weeks ago. t the government wanted to do two weeks a . 0. ~ the government wanted to do two weeks ago-— the government wanted to do two weeksaao. ~ ~ , v weeks ago. i think prime minister's questions is _ weeks ago. i think prime minister's questions is about _ weeks ago. i think prime minister's questions is about to _ weeks ago. i think prime minister's questions is about to begin. - weeks ago. i think prime minister's questions is about to begin. we i weeks ago. i think prime minister's. questions is about to begin. we now come to prime _ questions is about to begin. we now come to prime minister's _ questions is about to begin. we now come to prime minister's questions. number— come to prime minister's questions. number one, mr speaker. i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others in addition to my duties
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in this house and i will have further such meetings later today. jonathan edwards. the further such meetings later today. jonathan edwards.— further such meetings later today. jonathan edwards. the prime minister will be aware — jonathan edwards. the prime minister will be aware of _ jonathan edwards. the prime minister will be aware of the _ jonathan edwards. the prime minister will be aware of the public _ jonathan edwards. the prime minister will be aware of the public concern - will be aware of the public concern in relation to the impression that significant political donations can help acquire a peerage. the honourable member will publish a bill later today which will prevent large party donors for being admitted to the other place for five years. will you support his efforts? mr speaker, i will study the proposals with care when the party opposite commit to stop taking funds from the unions in order to control their coffers. the from the unions in order to control their coffers-— from the unions in order to control their coffers. the rays many years. durinu a their coffers. the rays many years. during a recent _ their coffers. the rays many years. during a recent visit _ their coffers. the rays many years. during a recent visit to _ their coffers. the rays many years. during a recent visit to barnet - during a recent visit to barnet hospital i was told that a&e there is routinely seeing twice the number of people for which it was designed. thanks to the hard work of staff and
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big funding increases, the nhs is seen more patients and delivering more test treatments and operations than at any time in its history, but what is the government doing to urgently assess the nhs to tackle spiralling demand for health care and a tough winter ahead? t spiralling demand for health care and a tough winter ahead? i thank my riaht and a tough winter ahead? i thank my right honourable _ and a tough winter ahead? i thank my rigi last nourable _
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and a tough winter ahead? i thank my rigi last fortnight _ and a tough winter ahead? i thank my rigi last fortnight the _ and a tough winter ahead? i thank my rigi last fortnight the prime _ the last fortnight the prime minister has got a lot of work to do. a central plank in this government's promise to the north of england is a crossrail of the north. with at least an entirely new high—speed rail line between manchester and leeds. a crossrail for the north an entirely new in. that is the promise and it has already been made and i do not want the prime minister fobbing already been made and i do not want the prime ministerfobbing off the house until tomorrow, he can say today, will he stick by that promise, yes or no? the today, will he stick by that promise, yes or no? he should wait and see what _ promise, yes or no? he should wait and see what is _ promise, yes or no? he should wait and see what is going _ promise, yes or no? he should wait and see what is going to _ promise, yes or no? he should wait and see what is going to be - and see what is going to be announced tomorrow because we will announce, we will produce a fantastic integrated rail bill. we are... fantastic integrated rail bill. we are. . . fantastic integrated rail bill. we are... , . ., are... order. i expect the front bench to _ are... order. i expect the front bench to behave _ are... order. i expect the front bench to behave it _ are... order. i expect the front bench to behave it better - are... order. i expect the front bench to behave it better than | are... order. i expect the front l bench to behave it better than it are... order. i expect the front. bench to behave it better than it is doing _ bench to behave it better than it is doing at— bench to behave it better than it is doing at the moment. if you do not
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want _ doing at the moment. if you do not want to— doing at the moment. if you do not want to listen to the answer, let me know— want to listen to the answer, let me know now. — want to listen to the answer, let me know now. i— want to listen to the answer, let me know now, i do and i cannot hear when _ know now, i do and i cannot hear when you — know now, i do and i cannot hear when you all— know now, i do and i cannot hear when you all shout together. we want better— when you all shout together. we want better politics and i expect better politics _ better politics and i expect better politics from both sides, let us show— politics from both sides, let us show a — politics from both sides, let us show a bit _ politics from both sides, let us show a bit more decorum than we are seen at _ show a bit more decorum than we are seen at the _ show a bit more decorum than we are seen at the moment. mr show a bit more decorum than we are seen at the moment.— show a bit more decorum than we are seen at the moment. mr speaker, when we roduce seen at the moment. mr speaker, when we produce are — seen at the moment. mr speaker, when we produce are integrated _ seen at the moment. mr speaker, when we produce are integrated rail— seen at the moment. mr speaker, when we produce are integrated rail plan - we produce are integrated rail plan tomorrow, people across the house and the country will see what we are doing to cutjourney times and make life easier and better for people in the north—east, in the north—west, in the midlands, across the whole of the north of the country and with the north of the country and with the biggest programme of investment in railfor a century, mr speaker and what we are doing is we are giving people in those communities the same access to commuter type services that people in the south—east of this country have felt entitled to for more than a century and that is going to be levelling up across the whole of the uk. well, that was a — across the whole of the uk. well, that was a lot _ across the whole of the uk. well, that was a lot of _ across the whole of the uk. well, that was a lot of words. _
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across the whole of the uk. well, that was a lot of words. but - across the whole of the uk. well, that was a lot of words. but it - across the whole of the uk. well, | that was a lot of words. but it was not a yes! so, that is one important promise for the north that he will not stand by. let us look at another. in february this year, the prime minister told this house, i can certainly confirm that we are going to develop the eastern leg as well as the whole of hs2, the whole of hs2, a new high—speed line, running continuously, no gaps, between birmingham and leeds. will the prime minister confirm that he stands by that promise? t am the prime minister confirm that he stands by that promise? i am afraid the riaht stands by that promise? i am afraid the right honourable _ stands by that promise? i am afraid the right honourable gentleman - stands by that promise? i am afraid the right honourable gentleman is| stands by that promise? i am afraidl the right honourable gentleman is in danger of getting hoist on his own petard, he needs to wait and see what we announced tomorrow, because i think you will find that the people of the north—east and the north—west and the people of leeds and nottingham are the people of sheffield and the north—west and north—east will benefit massively from what we are going to announce. again, a lot of words but not a yes!
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that is too important promises to the north that he will not stand by. no wonder trust in the prime minister is at an all—time low. across the country and belatedly across this house, there is now agreement that owen paterson broke the rules, and that the government should not have tried to let him off the hook. many members opposite have apologised, the business secretary has apologised for his mistake, the leader of the houses apologised for his part, but they were following the prime minister's late. so, will he do the decent thing and just say sorry for trying to give the green light to corruption? mr sorry for trying to give the green light to corruption?— sorry for trying to give the green light to corruption? mr speaker, as i have said before, _ light to corruption? mr speaker, as i have said before, it _ light to corruption? mr speaker, as i have said before, it certainly - light to corruption? mr speaker, as i have said before, it certainly was| i have said before, it certainly was a mistake to conflate the case of an individual member, no matter how sad with the point of principle at stake
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and we do need a cross—party approach for the appeals process. we also need a cross—party approach on the way forward and that is why we have tabled the proposal is that we have tabled the proposal is that we have to take forward the report of the independent committee for standards in public life of 2018 with those two key principles that everybody in this house should focus on the job here everybody in this house should focus on thejob here in everybody in this house should focus on the job here in this everybody in this house should focus on thejob here in this house everybody in this house should focus on the job here in this house and also that no one should exploit their position in order to advance their position in order to advance the commercial interests of anyone else. that is our position and we will take forward those reforms and in the meantime perhaps he could clear up from his proposals, whether he would continue to be able to take money, as he did from other legal firms. ., ~ , firms. order, order! prime minister! as ou firms. order, order! prime minister! as you know. _ firms. order, order! prime minister! as you know. it _ firms. order, order! prime minister! as you know, it is _ firms. order, order! prime minister! as you know, it is prime _ firms. order, order! prime minister! as you know, it is prime minister's i as you know, it is prime minister's questions, — as you know, it is prime minister's questions, not questions for the
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leader— questions, not questions for the leader of— questions, not questions for the leader of the opposition! keir starmer! _ leader of the opposition! keir starmer! ., , leader of the opposition! keir starmer! . , ., ., ., ., , starmer! that is not an apology, everybody _ starmer! that is not an apology, everybody else. _ starmer! that is not an apology, everybody else, everybody - starmer! that is not an apology, everybody else, everybody else | starmer! that is not an apology, i everybody else, everybody else has apologised for him, but he will not apologised for him, but he will not apologise for himself. a coward, not apologise for himself. a coward, not a leader! weeks, wakes, wakes, defending corruption. yesterday a screeching, last—minute u—turn to avoid defeat on the labour plan to ban mps from dodgy second contracts, but waving one white flag will not be enough to restore trust. there are plenty of opposition days to come and we will not let the prime minister water down proposals or pretend that it is job done. we still have not shut the door, the revolving door, where ministers are regulating a company one minute and working for them the next. there are plenty of cases that still stain this house. there are two simple steps to sorting it out, proper
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independence and powers for the business appointments committee and banning thesejob swaps. business appointments committee and banning these job swaps. will the prime minister take those steps? mr speaker, i have called, and you have called for a cross—party approach to this. what i think we need to do is to work together on the basis of the independent report of either the committee for standards in public life, to take things forward and indeed, to address the appeals process. what i think everyone can say is that in a classic, loyal way, the right honourable gentleman is now trying to prosecute others for exactly the sort of action that he took himself. what i think the nation wants to know, who paid mishka andrea and who paid the 25,000? who is paying him for his services? ~ ,
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services? prime minister. the minister. _ services? prime minister. the minister. i — services? prime minister. the minister, i do _ services? prime minister. the minister, i do not— services? prime minister. the minister, i do not want - services? prime minister. the minister, i do not want a - services? prime minister. the minister, i do not want a full. services? prime minister. the i minister, i do not want a full out about— minister, i do not want a full out about it. — minister, i do not want a full out about it. it— minister, i do not want a full out about it. it is— minister, i do not want a full out about it, it is prime minister's questions, it is not for the opposition to answer your questions. whether— opposition to answer your questions. whether you like it or not, those are the _ whether you like it or not, those are the rules of the games and we play by— are the rules of the games and we play by the — are the rules of the games and we play by the rules, don't we? and we respect _ play by the rules, don't we? and we respect this — play by the rules, don't we? and we respect this house. let us respect the house — respect this house. let us respect the house. mr respect this house. let us respect the house-— the house. mr speaker, that new-found _ the house. mr speaker, that new-found commitment - the house. mr speaker, that new-found commitment to i the house. mr speaker, that - new-found commitment to upholding new—found commitment to upholding standards did not last long. here is the difference, when somebody in my party misbehaves, i kick them out! when somebody... party misbehaves, i kick them out! when somebody. . .— party misbehaves, i kick them out! when somebody... order! order! look, this is not good- — when somebody... order! order! look, this is not good. we _ when somebody... order! order! look, this is not good. we lost _ when somebody... order! order! look, this is not good. we lost a _ when somebody... order! order! look, this is not good. we lost a dear - this is not good. we lost a dear friend. — this is not good. we lost a dear friend. i— this is not good. we lost a dear friend, i want to show that this house — friend, i want to show that this house has _ friend, i want to show that this house has learned from it, i do not want _ house has learned from it, i do not want each — house has learned from it, i do not want each other to be shouted down. i want each other to be shouted down. i want _ want each other to be shouted down. i want questions to be respected and i want questions to be respected and i expect—
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i want questions to be respected and i expect the public to actually be able to _ i expect the public to actually be able to hear the questions and answers. — able to hear the questions and answers, because i am struggling in this chair— answers, because i am struggling in this chair and answers, because i am struggling in this chairand i need no answers, because i am struggling in this chair and i need no more. answers, because i am struggling in this chairand i need no more. mr this chair and i need no more. speaker, this chair and i need no more. tj�*i speaker, when someone in my party misbehaves, i kick them out, when somebody in his party misbehaves, he tries to get them off the hook. i laid, he covers up. let us try another issue. we know that owen paterson was paid lobbyist for ram docks and we know that he sat in on a call between ram docks and the minister responsible for handling health contracts and we know that randox has been awarded government contracts worth almost £600 million without competition or tender. against that backdrop, the public are concerned that taxpayers money may have been influenced by a paid lobbying. there is only one way to get to the bottom of this, a full transparent investigation. if he
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votes for the labour motion this afternoon, that investigation can start. will he vote for it or will he vote for another cover—up? start. will he vote for it or will he vote for another cover-up? look, i am ve he vote for another cover-up? look, i am very happy _ he vote for another cover-up? look, i am very happy to — he vote for another cover-up? look, i am very happy to publish _ he vote for another cover-up? look, i am very happy to publish all - he vote for another cover-up? look, i am very happy to publish all the i i am very happy to publish all the details of that randox contracts which have been investigated by the national audit office already. talking of cover—ups, i am sorry, but we still have not heard why the honourable gentleman... but we still have not heard why the honourable gentleman. . .— but we still have not heard why the honourable gentleman... order! prime minister, sit — honourable gentleman... order! prime minister, sit down! _ honourable gentleman... order! prime minister, sit down! i— honourable gentleman... order! prime minister, sit down! i am _ honourable gentleman... order! prime minister, sit down! i am not— honourable gentleman... order! prime minister, sit down! i am not going - minister, sit down! i am not going to be _ minister, sit down! i am not going to be challenged. in this house, i am in _ to be challenged. in this house, i am in charge! end of that. i to be challenged. in this house, i am in charge! end of that.- am in charge! end of that. i think the prime — am in charge! end of that. i think the prime minister _ am in charge! end of that. i think the prime ministerjust _ am in charge! end of that. i think the prime ministerjust said - am in charge! end of that. i think the prime ministerjust said he i am in charge! end of that. i think i the prime ministerjust said he was happy to publish all the randox papers in relation to the contract and we will take it and pursue it and we will take it and pursue it and i will remind the prime minister, when i was director of public prosecutions, i prosecuted mps who broke the rules. he has been investigated by every organisation
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he has ever been elected too, that is the difference. billions of pounds of taxpayers money, handed it to their mates and donors, tory mps getting rich by working as lobbyists, one not even bothering to turn up because he is in the caribbean advising tax havens and the prime minister somehow expects us to believe that he is the man to clean up westminster! he led his troops through the sewers of corruption and he cannot even say sorry. the truth is that beneath the bluster he still thinks it is one rule for him and another for his mates, at the same time as his government are engulfed in sleaze, they are rolling back on the promises they made to the north and it is working people who are paying the price. is it any wonder that people are beginning to think that thejoke is not funny people are beginning to think that the joke is not funny any more?
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people are beginning to think that thejoke is not funny any more? mr the joke is not funny any more? mr speaker, he is playing, listening to the right honourable gentleman, he seeks to criticise this government while refusing to explain his own position and you have ruled on that, mr speaker, and i hearyou, i hear you, but his own misconduct, mr speaker, is absolutely clear to everybody, his own misconduct is absolutely clear, and in the meantime we will get on on a cross—party basis, we will get on on a cross—party basis, with taking forward the business i have outlined and we will get on with the business of this government which is leading the country... of this government which is leading the country- - -_ the country... order, order! prime minister, i— the country... order, order! prime minister. i am _ the country... order, order! prime minister, i am struggling - the country... order, order! prime minister, i am struggling to - minister, i am struggling to hear and if— minister, i am struggling to hear and if it— minister, i am struggling to hear and if it is— minister, i am struggling to hear and if it is correct but i have said. — and if it is correct but i have said. it _ and if it is correct but i have said, it was about the leader of the opposition— said, it was about the leader of the opposition misconduct, we cannot accuse _ opposition misconduct, we cannot accuse someone of misconduct. just before _ accuse someone of misconduct. just before the _ accuse someone of misconduct. just before the leader of the house gives
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me an _ before the leader of the house gives me an answer, i cannot hear, if it was _ me an answer, i cannot hear, if it was said. — me an answer, i cannot hear, if it was said. i— me an answer, i cannot hear, if it was said, i want it withdrawn, if that— was said, i want it withdrawn, if that wasn't, _ was said, i want it withdrawn, if that wasn't, i will accept it. just a moment! _ that wasn't, i will accept it. just a moment!— that wasn't, i will accept it. just a moment! ~ , ~ a moment! prime minister. i think! referred to — a moment! prime minister. i think! referred to his _ a moment! prime minister. i think! referred to his attempt _ a moment! prime minister. i think! referred to his attempt to _ a moment! prime minister. i think! referred to his attempt to conduct, | referred to his attempt to conduct, thatis referred to his attempt to conduct, that is what he is guilty of. —— mish conduct. that is what he is guilty of. -- mish conduct.— that is what he is guilty of. -- mish conduct. ., ., ~' mish conduct. order. i do not think this is done — mish conduct. order. i do not think this is done this _ mish conduct. order. i do not think this is done this house _ mish conduct. order. i do not think this is done this house any - this is done this house any good today, _ this is done this house any good today, i— this is done this house any good today, i will be honest, this is done this house any good today, iwill be honest, i this is done this house any good today, i will be honest, i think it has been — today, i will be honest, i think it has been ill— today, i will be honest, i think it has been ill tempered, i think it shows— has been ill tempered, i think it shows the — has been ill tempered, i think it shows the public that this house has not learnt _ shows the public that this house has not learnt from the other week and i need this— not learnt from the other week and i need this house to gain respect and it starts— need this house to gain respect and it starts by— need this house to gain respect and it starts by individual showing respect — it starts by individual showing respect to each other. let's go. james _ respect to each other. let's go. james grande. respect to each other. let's go. james grande—
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respect to each other. let's go. james grande. ., ,, , ., , ., , james grande. thank you. the people of lee james grande. thank you. the people of lee have — james grande. thank you. the people of lee have never _ james grande. thank you. the people of lee have never accepted _ james grande. thank you. the people of lee have never accepted our - of lee have never accepted our forced merger with our friendly rivals of wigan back in 1973. could the prime minister tell me how we could escape the big government of big wigan by getting our own counsel back? i big wigan by getting our own counsel back? ., ~ , big wigan by getting our own counsel back? . ,, , ., ., ., , back? i thank my honourable friend and i back? i thank my honourable friend and i thank — back? i thank my honourable friend and i thank him _ back? i thank my honourable friend and i thank him for _ back? i thank my honourable friend and i thank him for his _ back? i thank my honourable friend and i thank him for his campaign i and i thank him for his campaign against local labour government overtaxing and delivering —— delivering inadequate services and the boundary commission will look at the boundary commission will look at the review and i will support him in any way that i can. brute the review and i will support him in any way that i can.— the review and i will support him in any way that i can. we now go to the leader of the — any way that i can. we now go to the leader of the snp, _ any way that i can. we now go to the leader of the snp, ian _ any way that i can. we now go to the leader of the snp, ian blackford. - leader of the snp, ian blackford. thank— leader of the snp, ian blackford. thank you — leader of the snp, ian blackford. thank you. it used to always be said that the tory mps were behind the prime minister but my goodness, look at the gaps in the third benches. their rebellion has clearly started.
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they all have second jobs! this their rebellion has clearly started. they all have second jobs! they all have second “obs! this tory sleaze scandal has — they all have second jobs! this tory sleaze scandal has now— they all have second jobs! this tory sleaze scandal has now been - they all have second jobs! this tory sleaze scandal has now been hitting the headlines for the past 14 days and yet it is pretty obvious that the prime minister spent less than ten minutes coming up with yesterday's half—hearted, half baked and already have botched proposals. these so—called reforms do not even scratch the surface, this sleaze scandal runs far, far deeper. month after month the public have witnessed scandal after scandal, peerages handed to millionaire donors, vip lanes given covid contracts, dodgy donations for luxury holidays and home renovations, the prime minister and his government have been up to their necks in sleaze. come the prime minister tell us exactly which one, which one of these scandals his proposals would have stopped? mr
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speaker, i thank the humble crofter as he refers to himself for his question and i would just say that what i think we can do is pursue a cross—party approach, based on the report of the independent committee on standards in public life, which has much of a profit in it and it says amongst other things, that it is important that this house should be augmented with outside experience of the world, it is important that members of this house would have experience of the private sector, as he does and i think that a cross—party basis, we should proceed with a couple of reforms i have indicated. with a couple of reforms i have indicated-— with a couple of reforms i have indicated. ., ,, , ., _, , indicated. thank you. of course, this is about _ indicated. thank you. of course, this is about tory _ indicated. thank you. of course, this is about tory sleaze - indicated. thank you. of course, this is about tory sleaze and - indicated. thank you. of course, | this is about tory sleaze and tory corruption. it seems to be that not one of these scandals would have been stopped by his so—called plan and perhaps we should not be
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surprised considering the prime minister has been at the rotten core of all these scandals. the trail of sleaze and scandal all leads back to the funding of the conservative party, since 2010, since 2010, the tory party has made nine, nine of its former treasurer is members of the house of lords, every single one of them has something in common, they have handed over £3 million to they have handed over £3 million to the minister's party and that is the very definition of corruption. it is the public�*s definition of corruption. will this government finally accept that this is corruption or is the prime minister the only person in the country who has the brass neck to argue that it was all one big coincidence? mr speaker, i have to say, i will not comment on the missing £600,000 from
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the snp party accounts, but i do say, in all sincerity and heeding what you have said earlier, i do think these constant attacks on the uk levels of corruption and sleaze to a massive disservice, do a massive disservice to the billions of people around the world who genuinely suffer from governments that are corrupt, who genuinely have no ability to scrutinise their mps. this is one of the cleanest democracies in the world and people should be proud of it. itriat’ith democracies in the world and people should be proud of it.— should be proud of it. with the prime minister _ should be proud of it. with the prime ministerjoin _ should be proud of it. with the prime ministerjoin me - should be proud of it. with the prime ministerjoin me in - prime ministerjoin me in celebrating the 50th anniversary this year of the formation of the 177 mile path for walkers which runs through crew at south and give his support to the rescue fund the repair and preserve this monument a nature reserve for future generations? mr
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nature reserve for future generations? nature reserve for future uenerations? ~ .«r ., generations? mr speaker, i had the aood generations? mr speaker, i had the good fortune _ generations? mr speaker, i had the good fortune to _ generations? mr speaker, i had the good fortune to walk— generations? mr speaker, i had the good fortune to walk there - generations? mr speaker, i had the good fortune to walk there recently | good fortune to walk there recently and i am delighted that english and welsh organisations are working together to protect that fantastic national monument and historic england has committed to give almost £300,000 more for that great cause. mr speaker, ambulance response times are now the worst ever. people are waiting for ambulances longer than ever and with a&e departments in crisis, patients are stuck in ambulances outside hospital longer than ever. waiting times are not statistics, they are people, people often in great pain and in danger. so, why is this government closing ambulance stations in parts of our country? why is the west midlands ambulance service closing up to ten community ambulance stations in rugby, craven arms, with a health
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crisis for our ambulance services and in our a&e departments, injured, sick and elderly people are being hit. when will the prime minister deal with this health crisis? mr speaker, i appreciate that ambulance crews and services or doing an amazing job, particularly at this time of yearand amazing job, particularly at this time of year and i thank them for what they are doing. we are supporting them with more cash another 450 million was awarded the 120 trusts to upgrade their facilities and, as he knows, we are putting another 36 billion into dealing with the backlog, which is fundamentally affecting the nhs are badly at the moment, through the way we have instituted, which i do not think he supported.— we have instituted, which i do not think he supported. domestic heating accounts... think he supported. domestic heating accounts--- |— think he supported. domestic heating accounts... i support _ think he supported. domestic heating accounts... i support the _ think he supported. domestic heating accounts... i support the governmentj accounts... i support the government incentive scheme to replace the old gas boilers with environmentally friendly alternatives. now we are building more homes than we have for many years. can we build upon the
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success of co p26 many years. can we build upon the success of cop26 and ask what is the progress being made on the standards for new—build homes to make sure that our new homes are fit the future? i that our new homes are fit the future? ., ~ , that our new homes are fit the future? . ,, , ., ., ., , future? i thank my honourable friend, future? i thank my honourable friend. he _ future? i thank my honourable friend, he is _ future? i thank my honourable friend, he is right _ future? i thank my honourable friend, he is right to _ future? i thank my honourable friend, he is right to focus - future? i thank my honourable friend, he is right to focus on i future? i thank my honourable i friend, he is right to focus on the issue of future proofing homes and making them low carbon and by 2025 our future homes standard will ensure that you homes produce at least 75% fewer co2 emissions. last week i least 75% fewer co2 emissions. last week i visited _ least 75% fewer co2 emissions. last week i visited a _ least 75% fewer co2 emissions. last week i visited a gp _ least 75% fewer c02 emissions. last week i visited a gp practice in my constituency and was horrified to hear about the amount of abuse staff are currently experiencing. their workloads are under extreme pressure and this is not helped by the prime minister making demands about appointments whilst he has still failed on his manifesto pledge to recruit 6000 more gps. so, will the prime minister apologise for this
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promised to gps and staff who are on the front line working under ever—increasing pressure and depleted staffing resources. first of all, i depleted staffing resources. first of all. i want _ depleted staffing resources. first of all, i want to _ depleted staffing resources. first of all, i want to thank— depleted staffing resources. first of all, i want to thank gps for everything they are doing, particularly during the booster roll—out and what we are doing is notjust recruiting as many gps as we can, but we have 10,000 more nurses this year than last year, 25,000 more health care professionals and there are more people now working on the nhs than at any time in its history and because of our investment the extra 36 billion that we are putting then, there will be even more and i am afraid that the lady opposite voted against that investment.— afraid that the lady opposite voted against that investment. thank you. followinu against that investment. thank you. following on — against that investment. thank you. following on from _ against that investment. thank you. following on from cop26, _ against that investment. thank you. following on from cop26, can - against that investment. thank you. following on from cop26, can he i following on from cop26, can he confirm that maximising carbon capture and storage capacity across the whole uk is a priority from this government and, despite the doom and gloom and words of rejection and
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stumbling, can he also confirm that the hydrogen project in my constituency has a key role to play in the future carbon capture and storage capacity targets to meet net zero? i storage capacity targets to meet net zero? ., ~ , storage capacity targets to meet net zero? . ~ , ., ., ., , zero? i thank my right honourable friend and he _ zero? i thank my right honourable friend and he is _ zero? i thank my right honourable friend and he is right _ zero? i thank my right honourable friend and he is right to _ zero? i thank my right honourable friend and he is right to champion | friend and he is right to champion carbon capture and storage which has a great future in scotland. in spite of all the gloom from the party opposite, the scottish cluster remains on the reserve we continue to study it and we hope to bring it forward in due time.— forward in due time. thank you. there is a _ forward in due time. thank you. there is a time _ forward in due time. thank you. there is a time when _ forward in due time. thank you. there is a time when this - there is a time when this world—renowned offshore sector has been repeatedly sidelined by this government, despite me and others constantly lobbying ministers for investment that would massively increase employment opportunities. it would help the uk to transition to net zero. however, i am very
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excited to see our voice is now been magnified by a new time task force set up by the local authorities, the port, businesses and the combined authority. when the prime minister, here and now, commit his government to work with us, to realise the full potential of our great river? prime minister. potential of our great river? prime minister- i — potential of our great river? prime minister. i thank— potential of our great river? prime minister. i thank you _ potential of our great river? prime minister. i thank you for _ potential of our great river? prime minister. i thank you for her - minister. i thank you for her question and she is right that the river time is a massive economic asset for the whole of the north—east, it has suffered from historic contamination, but we are going to work with the northeast local enterprise partnerships to invest another £6 million to help develop clear plans for sustainable economic growth along the whole of the estuary. economic growth along the whole of the estua . ., ~ economic growth along the whole of the estuary-— the estuary. thank you. crawley constituency _ the estuary. thank you. crawley constituency was _ the estuary. thank you. crawley constituency was one _ the estuary. thank you. crawley constituency was one of - the estuary. thank you. crawley constituency was one of the - the estuary. thank you. crawleyl constituency was one of the most negatively affected by the covid—19 pandemic but thanks to significant support from this government, we are seen recovery, unemployment is now
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beginning to come down and we look to a confident future. in that vein, will my right honourable friend please look favourably on crawley�*s platinum jubilee city status bid? well, i am very grateful to my honourable friend, i was not aware until today that crawley was bidding to become a city but i will look at it very carefully, mr speaker, and i'm sure there is an excellent case in there somewhere.— in there somewhere. every year, 100,000 babies _ in there somewhere. every year, 100,000 babies are _ in there somewhere. every year, 100,000 babies are born - in there somewhere. every year, - 100,000 babies are born prematurely in the uk and the premise there will be aware that there is cross—party agreement in this temple to bring forward, ratherthan agreement in this temple to bring forward, rather than wait for a controversial plimmer bill, will the prime minister bring along a long ——
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a stand—alone bill, to ensure that parents do not have to choose between spending time in the hospital or taking time from work? i thank the honourable gentleman and i know he is a passionate campaigner in this area and one way or another, i will get back to him on the exact way, we will legislate to allow parents of children in neonatal care to take extended leave, giving them more time during the most vulnerable and stressful days of their lives. thank you. further education colleges in my constituency will build an essential part in building back better and the he might hope would have supported 8000 learners on diverse courses as well as six new courses, can i invite my friend to come and visit the team and students at hopwood hall and can i say —— and they can also see our flamingos? i say -- and they can also see our flamingos?— say -- and they can also see our
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flaminuos? . ~' ., , ,, flamingos? i thank him for his kind invitation and _ flamingos? i thank him for his kind invitation and i _ flamingos? i thank him for his kind invitation and i will— flamingos? i thank him for his kind invitation and i will keep _ flamingos? i thank him for his kind invitation and i will keep it - flamingos? i thank him for his kind invitation and i will keep it in - invitation and i will keep it in mind and the government is committed to reforming technical education through new t levels and that is why we are investing a further 65 million to develop teacher retention and support and recruitment for teachers in further education and as for the potter ruse in his area, i will do my utmost to come and inspect them. mr; will do my utmost to come and inspect them-— will do my utmost to come and insect them. y .., , ., ., inspect them. my constituent laura told me that _ inspect them. my constituent laura told me that remembrance - inspect them. my constituent laura told me that remembrance sundayj told me that remembrance sunday hurts. it hurts because there were no medals for the service of a grandfather and the thousands of men involved in nuclear weapons tests overseas between 1952 and 1991. it hurts because studies of such veterans have shown increased miscarriages, increase birth defects and the same rate of genetic damage as clean—up workers at chernobyl and it hurts because the uk is the only
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nuclear power on earth who has denied recognition. iask nuclear power on earth who has denied recognition. i ask the prime minister, will he recognise nuclear testing veterans today and agreed to make them? the leader of the opposition has. lam i am grateful to her for bringing this to — i am grateful to her for bringing this to my— i am grateful to her for bringing this to my attention and will make sure we _ this to my attention and will make sure we get a proper meeting with the representatives of the nuclear veterans — the representatives of the nuclear veterans that she raises.- the representatives of the nuclear veterans that she raises. when i was in greece was _ veterans that she raises. when i was in greece was save _ veterans that she raises. when i was in greece was save the _ veterans that she raises. when i was in greece was save the children - veterans that she raises. when i was in greece was save the children i - in greece was save the children i learned that change at any border was quickly communicated down the line and if migrants and asylum seekers knew that they would be directly returned to france are taken to a third country pending application, if they knew this would they risk a dangerous and illegal crossing and make their way to france in the first place? can i ask
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my right honourable friend what further measures are being considered because this is an issue of great concern in eastbourne and along the coast and along the country and i am anxious to be able to reassure my constituents that there are plans ahead. sound like i thank you very much and she has much relevance in her work for save the children in greece. the only way to fix this is with the new plan for emigration which will be made possible with a new nationality and borders will which will make it possible for us to distinguish it last between those who come here legally and those who come here illegally. and i hope very much it will command the support of the whole house. in will command the support of the whole house.— whole house. in may, part of northwich — whole house. in may, part of northwich station _ whole house. in may, part of northwich station in - whole house. in may, part of northwich station in my - whole house. in may, part of- northwich station in my constituency collapse _ northwich station in my constituency collapse i_ northwich station in my constituency collapse i have _ northwich station in my constituency collapse. i have asked _ northwich station in my constituency collapse. i have asked the _ northwich station in my constituency collapse. i have asked the transportl collapse. i have asked the transport secretary _ collapse. i have asked the transport secretary to — collapse. i have asked the transport secretary to intervene _ collapse. i have asked the transport secretary to intervene and - collapse. i have asked the transport secretary to intervene and build - secretary to intervene and build back— secretary to intervene and build back better _ secretary to intervene and build
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back better and _ secretary to intervene and build back better and fairer— secretary to intervene and build back better and fairer to - secretary to intervene and build back better and fairer to allow i back better and fairer to allow access — back better and fairer to allow access for— back better and fairer to allow access for people _ back better and fairer to allow access for people with - back better and fairer to allow - access for people with disabilities. he has— access for people with disabilities. he has declined _ access for people with disabilities. he has declined by— access for people with disabilities. he has declined by kind _ access for people with disabilities. he has declined by kind offer. - access for people with disabilities. he has declined by kind offer. i. he has declined by kind offer. i have _ he has declined by kind offer. i have asked _ he has declined by kind offer. i have asked the _ he has declined by kind offer. i have asked the prime - he has declined by kind offer. i have asked the prime ministerl he has declined by kind offer. i. have asked the prime minister to intervene — have asked the prime minister to intervene no— have asked the prime minister to intervene. no bluster, _ have asked the prime minister to| intervene. no bluster, substance, build _ intervene. no bluster, substance, build back— intervene. no bluster, substance, build back better, _ intervene. no bluster, substance, build back better, the _ intervene. no bluster, substance, build back better, the station - intervene. no bluster, substance, build back better, the station is i intervene. no bluster, substance, build back better, the station is in the north— build back better, the station is in the north of— build back better, the station is in the north of england. _ build back better, the station is in the north of england. i— build back better, the station is in the north of england. [instill- build back better, the station is in the north of england.— build back better, the station is in the north of england. i will look at what he has _ the north of england. i will look at what he has to _ the north of england. i will look at what he has to say _ the north of england. i will look at what he has to say about - the north of england. i will look at| what he has to say about northwich station _ what he has to say about northwich station with keen interest. all for 2400 _ station with keen interest. all for 2400 service men and women veterans use, 2400 service men and women veterans use and _ 2400 service men and women veterans use and wait— 2400 service men and women veterans use, and wait for a formal response from _ use, and wait for a formal response from the _ use, and wait for a formal response from the ministry of defence. whilst the majority of women and a fulfilling _ the majority of women and a fulfilling career in the military shocking _ fulfilling career in the military shocking issues were raised around sexual— shocking issues were raised around sexual assault and bullying and harassment. i know the prime minister— harassment. i know the prime minister agrees with me are on forces — minister agrees with me are on forces of— minister agrees with me are on forces of the best in the world.
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woody— forces of the best in the world. woody also agree we need to make sure the _ woody also agree we need to make sure the british army is the best place _ sure the british army is the best place to— sure the british army is the best place to serve as a woman? i thank my honourable friend and she is campaigning on a very important issue _ campaigning on a very important issue i— campaigning on a very important issue. i think too often we find our armed _ issue. i think too often we find our armed forces failed to provide the wonderfut— armed forces failed to provide the wonderful women in our armed forces with the _ wonderful women in our armed forces with the support they deserve and the defence secretary secured a parliamentary enquiry for the first time and — parliamentary enquiry for the first time and it's important we encourage women _ time and it's important we encourage women around forces who make a massive _ women around forces who make a massive difference to those services _ massive difference to those services. it has cost as nurses in northern— services. it has cost as nurses in northern ireland— services. it has cost as nurses in northern ireland j~ :: 11:11: ., ., ., northern ireland £850,000 to date to o erate the northern ireland £850,000 to date to operate the field _ northern ireland £850,000 to date to operate the field and _ northern ireland £850,000 to date to operate the field and suffocating - operate the field and suffocating protocot — operate the field and suffocating protocot lord _ operate the field and suffocating protocol. lord frost _ operate the field and suffocating protocol. lord frost is _ operate the field and suffocating protocol. lord frost is today- operate the field and suffocating protocol. lord frost is today in i protocol. lord frost is today in belfast — protocol. lord frost is today in belfast. when _ protocol. lord frost is today in belfast. when will— protocol. lord frost is today in belfast. when will the - protocol. lord frost is today in belfast. when will the prime i belfast. when will the prime minister— belfast. when will the prime minister fixed _ belfast. when will the prime minister fixed this— belfast. when will the prime minister fixed this by- belfast. when will the prime - minister fixed this by legitimately activating — minister fixed this by legitimately activating article _ minister fixed this by legitimately
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activating article 16? _ minister fixed this by legitimately activating article 16? i— minister fixed this by legitimately activating article 16?— activating article 16? i thank the honourable _ activating article 16? i thank the honourable gentleman - activating article 16? i thank the honourable gentleman and - activating article 16? i thank the honourable gentleman and i - activating article 16? i thank the i honourable gentleman and i think activating article 16? i thank the - honourable gentleman and i think the word i_ honourable gentleman and i think the word i would fasten on his question is legitimately and there is no question— is legitimately and there is no question that the use of article 16 which _ question that the use of article 16 which after all has been done by the eu commission to stop vaccines being exported _ eu commission to stop vaccines being exported to _ eu commission to stop vaccines being exported to this country something that is— exported to this country something that is perfectly legal and within the bounds of the protocol. | the bounds of the protocol. recently the bounds of the protocol. i recently visited humphrey perkins at school and barrel upon saul. i asked what the government is doing to encourage students from all backgrounds to encourage them to become an mp and even the prime minister? i become an mp and even the prime minister? ~ ., ., _ minister? i think what i would say to my honourable _ minister? i think what i would say to my honourable friend - minister? i think what i would say to my honourable friend and - minister? i think what i would say to my honourable friend and her i to my honourable friend and her students — to my honourable friend and her students is nothing that is said that takes place in this house, none of the _ that takes place in this house, none of the argy—bargy that takes place in this house, none of the argy— bargy and that takes place in this house, none of the argy—bargy and the repartee, the occasional abuse to which we subject— the occasional abuse to which we subject each other should in any way
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deter— subject each other should in any way deter anybody from seeking a career in politics— deter anybody from seeking a career in politics because it is a wonderful privilege and we are all very lucky— wonderful privilege and we are all very lucky to be here. in wonderful privilege and we are all very lucky to be here.— very lucky to be here. in my constituency _ very lucky to be here. in my constituency of _ very lucky to be here. in my constituency of edinburgh i very lucky to be here. in my i constituency of edinburgh west very lucky to be here. in my - constituency of edinburgh west we now find _ constituency of edinburgh west we now find numerous _ constituency of edinburgh west we now find numerous people - constituency of edinburgh west we now find numerous people coming| constituency of edinburgh west we i now find numerous people coming to us with— now find numerous people coming to us with delays — now find numerous people coming to us with delays from _ now find numerous people coming to us with delays from the _ now find numerous people coming to us with delays from the dwp - now find numerous people coming to us with delays from the dwp in - us with delays from the dwp in pensions — us with delays from the dwp in pensions and _ us with delays from the dwp in pensions and benefits - us with delays from the dwp in pensions and benefits to - us with delays from the dwp in pensions and benefits to add i us with delays from the dwp in| pensions and benefits to add to us with delays from the dwp in - pensions and benefits to add to the delays _ pensions and benefits to add to the delays others — pensions and benefits to add to the delays others are _ pensions and benefits to add to the delays others are facing _ pensions and benefits to add to the delays others are facing over - delays others are facing over passports _ delays others are facing over passports and _ delays others are facing over passports and dvla. - delays others are facing over passports and dvla. can - delays others are facing over passports and dvla. can the delays others are facing over - passports and dvla. can the prime minister— passports and dvla. can the prime minister tell— passports and dvla. can the prime minister tell us— passports and dvla. can the prime minister tell us amongst— passports and dvla. can the prime minister tell us amongst the - passports and dvla. can the prime minister tell us amongst the manyl minister tell us amongst the many 'obs minister tell us amongst the many jobs being — minister tell us amongst the many jobs being done _ minister tell us amongst the many jobs being done at— minister tell us amongst the many jobs being done at the _ minister tell us amongst the many jobs being done at the moment i minister tell us amongst the many. jobs being done at the moment was making _ jobs being done at the moment was making sure — jobs being done at the moment was making sure that _ jobs being done at the moment was making sure that the _ jobs being done at the moment was making sure that the departments i jobs being done at the moment wasl making sure that the departments of government— making sure that the departments of government are _ making sure that the departments of government are running _ making sure that the departments of government are running smoothly. making sure that the departments of. government are running smoothly and quickly? _ government are running smoothly and quickly? i— government are running smoothly and cuickl ? ., ~ ., government are running smoothly and cuickl ? . ~ ., ,, quickly? i thank her and i think the department _ quickly? i thank her and i think the department for _ quickly? i thank her and i think the department for work _ quickly? i thank her and i think the department for work and - quickly? i thank her and i think the department for work and pensions under— department for work and pensions under the — department for work and pensions under the secretary of state has been _ under the secretary of state has been up — under the secretary of state has been up performing outstanding service — been up performing outstanding service and performed miracles and amongst _ service and performed miracles and amongst the things it is achieved is to help _ amongst the things it is achieved is to help to— amongst the things it is achieved is to help to get millions of people effectively back into employment in spite of _
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effectively back into employment in spite of all the difficulties we are faced _ spite of all the difficulties we are faced and — spite of all the difficulties we are faced and we now have unemployment running _ faced and we now have unemployment running at _ faced and we now have unemployment running at virtually record lows in spite _ running at virtually record lows in spite of— running at virtually record lows in spite of all— running at virtually record lows in spite of all the difficulties we have — spite of all the difficulties we have faced in this pandemic as we come _ have faced in this pandemic as we come out — have faced in this pandemic as we come out of furlough largely thanks to the _ come out of furlough largely thanks to the work of the dwp. pip was up the game _ to the work of the dwp. pip was up the game but i think with the officials — the game but i think with the officials working in the dwp across the country, huge numbers of men and women _ the country, huge numbers of men and women have _ the country, huge numbers of men and women have done an outstanding job. injuty_ women have done an outstanding job. injuty 2019 _ women have done an outstanding job. injuly 2019 i was in manchester when _ injuly 2019 i was in manchester when the — injuly 2019 i was in manchester when the prime minister committed to a huge _ when the prime minister committed to a huge northern powerhouse real across— a huge northern powerhouse real across manchester and leeds. it was across manchester and leeds. it was a commitment reaffirmed in our manifesto — a commitment reaffirmed in our manifesto in 2019 and last month reaffirmed and the prime ministers conference — reaffirmed and the prime ministers conference speech in manchester. where _ conference speech in manchester. where the — conference speech in manchester. where the waters of the north right to take _ where the waters of the north right to take the prime minister at his word _ to take the prime minister at his word was— to take the prime minister at his word was the mud to take the prime minister at his word was the mu— to take the prime minister at his word was the mud yes, mr speaker, and they should _
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word was the mud yes, mr speaker, and they should wait _ word was the mud yes, mr speaker, and they should wait and _ word was the mud yes, mr speaker, and they should wait and see - word was the mud yes, mr speaker, and they should wait and see what i word was the mud yes, mr speaker, | and they should wait and see what is unveiled tomorrow where he may learn something to his advantage. we will leave the house of commons in a moment we will be back because there will be talking about mps second jobs. our political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster. quite an intervention from the speaker,, lindsay hoyle there was keir starmer calling him a coward and language normally frowned uponin coward and language normally frowned upon in parliament and we had a prime minister saying it was wrong to conflate the owen paterson case with the wider standards issue,
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something ministers have said quite a few times over the past few weeks but not quite getting to the apology we have heard from some other ministers and he was trying to deflect some of this back onto keir starmer talking about his second job before he was leader of the labour party and the speaker was furious at the whole thing, shutting the prime minister down a couple of times. this was quite a remarkable moment. lindsay hoyle is the kind of speaker who likes to be in the background but today it was quite different. prime minister! i'm very happy to publish all the details of the randox contracts which have been investigated by the national audit office already. talking of cover—ups, i am sorry, mr speaker, but we still have not heard why the honourable gentleman will not tell us... order!
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prime minister, sit down, prime minister! i'm not going to be challenged. you may be the prime minister of this country, but _ in this house i'm in charge. cheering. end of that. keir starmer. mr speaker, i think the prime ministerjust said that he is happy to publish all the randox papers in relation to these contracts so we'll take that and we'll pursue it. randox as the company that owen paterson lobbied for when he was an mp and got some pretty lucrative covid contracts and the prime ministers seem to suggest he would publish them all. what have we heard from that incredibly —— land from that incredibly bad—tempered prime minister's questions? there is a lot of heat in the allegations of sleaze and conflict of interest and it will clearly be quite a heated afternoon and we have the debate coming up in and we have the debate coming up in a few minutes on the issue in the chamber and then the prime minister
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is up before the liaison committee of senior mps this afternoon. clearly lots of anger still over this issue and big questions still about whether the plan is that the prime minister came up with yesterday after two weeks of pressure to do something will be enough to satisfy the opposition and whether he will be able to keep his own side in the same page. there were big gaps in the tory benches that prime minister questions. if we take a look at the scene in the house of commons right now as we had for that debate, the government benches are even more empty. we have a close up at the moment but it is really emptied up great mat out now. one of the suggestions we got from the snp westminster leader ian blackford is that because as he put it the tory rebellion started and many mps are deeply uneasy about the
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way borisjohnson has approached the last couple of weeks. i think that is right, there were tory mps two weeks ago really uneasy about the way the government was trying to kick the owen paterson issue down the road. there are no tory mps in different camps on this. some are unhappy borisjohnson seems to have come up with a new approach to banning paid consultancies and are wondering what the rules will look like and how they will be policed and whether in the words of one they will have to have a time sheet to figure out when exactly they are allowed to do the right side job. and there is some worry that the prime minister looks pretty weak on this and looks to be reacting to labours pressure on it rather than being on the front foot and i think we will see that continue to play out over the rest of the day when it comes to that labour debate in the commons, the prime ministerfacing a grilling from senior mps at three o'clock this afternoon. it is a busy afternoon here in the government is still facing a lot of pressure when
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it comes to its plans to cut down on abuses of the standard system. so what is the timeframe on how the new rules might be worked out and when they might come in? it does seem to be a pretty quick process. what both government and the labour party are calling for is for the standards committee in parliament which is made of crossbench mps and some ordinary members from the public as well, that will report back by the end of january next year, so within the next two and a half months some proposals about how exactly the system could be tightened up, that is likely to focus on two particular things, one is how mps split their time between being a parliamentarian and potentially some outside jobs and potentially some outside jobs and secondly what consultancies should be allowed. the government says agrees with paid political
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consultancies being cut down on and eventually banned. what is not clear is when exactly that would be implemented and what exactly how those things would be referenced and what exactly would be decided to be a political consultancy and how to exactly police the outside interest of mps and how many hours you would be allowed to work in a second job if you were an mp. the results of this question of who would endorse the final system and when it would come into play which is going to be debated this afternoon. labour want to vote by the end of january on a new system and the government has just said it wants a new system to be developed and reported on by the standards committee, by the end of january. so when exactly will come into force? don't know the answer, thatis into force? don't know the answer, that is one of the things that the government is coming under some pressure over. but what does seem to be happening now is that process of speeding up. remember that a week ago the government did not want to
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do this at all. the government was trying to avoid getting into position when it was talking about new rules on political consultancies, two weeks ago when it was talking about reform of the system it was a form of the system about how the rules that were already in place were policed and whether mps got an appeal to the standards process. we are now in a place with the public pressure, the political pressure has been so extreme that the government is moving on this. the question is, how far it goes on exactly when we get those new rules. thank you, neck. we thought the debate would start after the point of order but the chamber is pretty empty so there is honestly a delay to that debate starting and we will go back when it does. thank you very much. we have got some
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picture in (of her majesty the queen at windsor — where she has been having an audience with her chief of staff. she had to miss the cenotaph day parade on remembrance day last sunday because of a sprained back. palace sources said the queen was deeply disappointed to miss the service which she regards as one of the most significant engagements of the year. the service which she regards as one of the most significant engagements of the year. eight years as a chief of staff is a long time and the only person i've been told he was no longer as lord mountbatten. i been told he was no longer as lord mountbatten-— been told he was no longer as lord mountbatten. , , ,.,, , ., mountbatten. i suppose when you get to the end of — mountbatten. i suppose when you get to the end of that _ mountbatten. i suppose when you get to the end of that job _ mountbatten. i suppose when you get to the end of that job it _ mountbatten. i suppose when you get to the end of that job it is _ mountbatten. i suppose when you get to the end of that job it is easier- to the end of thatjob it is easier to the end of thatjob it is easier to continue, isn't it? i to the end of that job it is easier to continue, isn't it?— to continue, isn't it? i think that is riaht to continue, isn't it? i think that is right by _ to continue, isn't it? i think that is right by the — to continue, isn't it? i think that is right by the time _ to continue, isn't it? i think that is right by the time comes - to continue, isn't it? i think that is right by the time comes when j to continue, isn't it? i think that i is right by the time comes when it is right by the time comes when it is ready— is right by the time comes when it is ready to — is right by the time comes when it is ready to move on. that is right by the time comes when it is ready to move on.— is ready to move on. that is the queen at _ is ready to move on. that is the queen at windsor _ is ready to move on. that is the queen at windsor today - is ready to move on. that is the queen at windsor today and - is ready to move on. that is the queen at windsor today and it i is ready to move on. that is the| queen at windsor today and it is understood she will rest their in the run—up to the end of the year only undertaking light duties and also doing some virtual stuff as well but the rest of the family stepping up on the formal events while she takes it easy on doctor's orders.
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former cricketer azeem rafiq says he believes english cricket is "institutionally" racist. speaking to a digital, culture, media and sport committee of mps about yorkshire cricket club yesterday, he described his treatment as "inhuman" and said racism cost him his career. mr rafiq said racist language was "constantly" used during his time at yorkshire, and that the issues he faced there are widespread in domestic cricket. he added that he hopes by speaking out, there will be cultural change. azeem rafiq spoke to our sports editor, dan roan, saying his evidence to mps yesterday about racism in the sport was more powerful than anything he could have done on the pitch. he says he hopes it will have �*woken a lot of people up', and that both cricket and society should seize the moment as an opportunity for change. i think it's a difficult forum for me right now, i think, in terms of tackling prejudice on this subject, i want to play a huge role. from the outside, as it were, as a critic, or do you want
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to actually go inside and take a formal role to help? i'm not sure at this stage. if it ends up being the inside it will be the system will have to accept me as i am. i will still continue to be a critic and continue to call out what is wrong because i think what this 15, 16 months has shown is that actually it needs some disruptiond, it actually needs people challenged publicly for them to listen, and this is where i think the media has been very influential and very supportive where i think if it wasn't for that i'm not sure the game would have listened and we would have got to where we are yesterday. azeem rafiq also described the death threats he received after reporting racist abuse, let's listen to what he said. yeah, look, we've had threats throughout, really, to be honest. different types.
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i think it's going to come with the territory. you've got a lot of people that are in denial and i think it's sad, but hopefully we can sort of get through it. very quickly, what's your message to those people? you see it on social media and even we see it as journalists covering the story and you get it, obviously, much more, people saying you went back there for a second spell, it can't have been that bad, this is something to do with self—interest, attention seeking, whatever it is that they are throwing at you, what would your message be to those people? look, i mean, ianswered the question for going back a second time. i was in denial, i didn't know what it was. in my first spell, i knew there was something wrong but i couldn't put my finger on what it was and, as a person of colour, the worst thing is to actually accept and believe that you are being treated differently
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because of your race or colour. being treated differently look, people are going to have their own opinions, i can't control that, but what i can say is hopefully my actions over the last 16 months and moving forward will show it's been nothing but damaging for myself and, like i said, my kids have not had a dad for 16 months so i don't think any self—interest can compensate for that. the cost of living has reached the highest rate in almost a decade — due to rising fuel and energy costs. inflation is now more than double the bank of england's target. consumer prices were 4.2% higher last month than a year ago. the costs of transport, gas and electricity bills —— as well as second hand cars — all climbed. in september, inflation was 3.1%. the bank of england's aim is to keep inflation to around 2%. rising prices are putting new pressure on households and businesses. economists are debating how much of the surge in inflation
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can be blamed on the pandemic —— and how long it will last. our business correspondent andy verity has the latest on the cost of living. we have heard how much the electricity bills and the gas bills are going up and in a month it is almost hit double digits, and a year and 19% rise in allergies to bills and 19% rise in allergies to bills and editing percent rise in gas bills and those of the biggest reasons inflation has gone up. price of persia was artificially lower on the pandemic because there was artificially reduced demand going into lockdown is. compare two years ago it is a lot higher and you have average price is now the since 2012, around £1 38 average price is now the since 2012, around £138 per litre according to the office for national statistics on the office for national statistics although i expect quite a few of our viewers will say i paid more than that. that is up by 25p compared to a year ago and if we are set up by about 15% and other things like for example the cost of your groceries, that is also edging up.
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it is mostly goods as opposed to services that are shooting up fastest in one of the biggest question for the bank of england will be if we do raise interest rates this actually have any effect because a lot of the reasons why energy prices are higher is not due to domestic demand, not due to anything in the uk economy, it is global and due to the fact the economy across the world is reopening and supply cut really meet demand, can't catch up with the surge in demand as economies reopen and that is why global energy prices are so high. the hope of the bank of england as that will be a passing and temporary thing and those prices will come down and eventually which will come down and eventually which will be high enough to exceed the rise in the cost of living. what we are looking at in the company year as our standard of living will come down because our costs are going up and our wages are not going up so fast.
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amazon has told customers in the uk it will stop accepting payments made using visa credit cards from next year. the company sent an email to customers saying the change will affect visa credit cards issued in the uk, from the 19th ofjanuary. it sets up a clash between two giant global corporations. in a statement, amazon said: starting 19 january 2022, we will unfortunately no longer accept visa credit cards issued in the uk, due to the high fees visa charges for processing credit card transactions. but they said customers would still be able to use visa debit cards. visa responded to the announcement, saying: "we are very disappointed that amazon is threatening to restrict consumer choice in the future. when consumer choice is limited, nobody wins. "we have a long—standing relationship with amazon, and we continue to work toward a resolution, so cardholders can use their preferred visa credit cards at amazon uk without amazon—imposed restrictions come january 2022." the supermarket chain lidl is upping it's minimum hourly pay in the uk by 6% in march next year. around 21,000 workers, that s 80% of its staff, will see their hourly pay increase from £9.50 to £10.10 an hour
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outside of london and up to £11.30 within the m25. lidl s chief hr officer, nan gibson, has been speaking to our business correspondent, emma simpson, and told her the move will make lidl the highest paying supermarket in the uk we are announcing a wage increase for all of ourfront line we are announcing a wage increase for all of our front line colleagues who work in stores and warehouses which will take the minimum pay for £9 50 per hour to ten spent in prayer. that represents an investment of £18 million in our front line colleagues which is the biggest ever witch investment that we have made in the uk. haifa we have made in the uk. how difficult is _ we have made in the uk. how difficult is it — we have made in the uk. how difficult is it to _ we have made in the uk. how difficult is it to recruit - we have made in the uk. how difficult is it to recruit staff i difficult is it to recruit staff right now?— difficult is it to recruit staff riaht now? , , . difficult is it to recruit staff riahtnow? , ' . , right now? very difficult, i will be absently honest _ right now? very difficult, i will be absently honest with _ right now? very difficult, i will be absently honest with you. - right now? very difficult, i will be absently honest with you. we - right now? very difficult, i will be absently honest with you. we are j absently honest with you. we are competing for talent with all the other retailers and indeed other industries. part of the announcement is to secure our staff and retain
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them as much as possible but also attract anyone else would like to come and join this fantastic team in a supermarket that is expanded massively. a supermarket that is expanded massivel . ~ , ., a supermarket that is expanded massivel . ~ , a supermarket that is expanded massively-— massively. will you be able to absorb this — massively. will you be able to absorb this pay _ massively. will you be able to absorb this pay increase - massively. will you be able to absorb this pay increase of. massively. will you be able to i absorb this pay increase of some massively. will you be able to - absorb this pay increase of some of it be passed on to shoppers? brute it be passed on to shoppers? we ride it be passed on to shoppers? e pride ourselves on being dynamic and full power to our teams. we don't expect to pass that on to customers in the form of price rises. itrufhat in the form of price rises. what other inflationary _ in the form of price rises. what other inflationary pressures - in the form of price rises. what other inflationary pressures are you seeing? some raise other inflationary pressures are you seeing? som— seeing? some raw materials are increasin: seeing? some raw materials are increasing in _ seeing? some raw materials are increasing in price _ seeing? some raw materials are increasing in price and _ seeing? some raw materials are increasing in price and when - seeing? some raw materials are increasing in price and when youj increasing in price and when you have that at the start of your supply chain that will inevitably lead to further increases down the line. , ., , ., lead to further increases down the line. , . , ., , lead to further increases down the line. , ., , ., , , . line. tell us about hgv drivers. we know there — line. tell us about hgv drivers. we know there is _ line. tell us about hgv drivers. we know there is a _ line. tell us about hgv drivers. we know there is a huge _ line. tell us about hgv drivers. we know there is a huge problem - line. tell us about hgv drivers. we i know there is a huge problem there. how short are you at the moment? brute how short are you at the moment? we don't how short are you at the moment? e don't actually employed hgv drivers ourselves, we do that through third party contractors and they like everyone else in the industry have of course experience those challenges but our colleagues in logistics and supply chain are in constant contact with those third party suppliers and so far we are
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managing to battle our way through. i'm at home christmas looking? mac christmas is going to be fantastic at lidl is always theirs. i think we all missed christmas last year as it was cancelled at the last minute and we feel the need to get to christmas enjoy it. pare we feel the need to get to christmas en'o it. . , ., we feel the need to get to christmas en'o it. . ,, _, ,, we feel the need to get to christmas en'o it. . enjoy it. are you confident you can kee the enjoy it. are you confident you can keep the shelves _ enjoy it. are you confident you can keep the shelves full? _ enjoy it. are you confident you can keep the shelves full? yes. - keep the shelves full? yes. detectives investigating the explosion outside liverpool hospital say they believe that the man had been buying parts for his home—made bomb over months. it was revealed yesterday he was a field on site
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asylum speaker. that's like he was a failed asylu m asylum seeker. detectives investigating the taxi blast outside liverpool women's hospital believe the man behind the attack had been buying parts for his homemade device since at least april. the head of counter terrorism policing in north—west england, russ jackson said that the bomber was born in iraq, and that he suffered from periods of mental illness that will "form part of the investigation'. health officials are warning of a "hidden pandemic" of antibiotic—resistant infections if people fail to act responsibly after covid. that's according to the uk health security agency, who say they should only be prescribed when really needed. last year one in five people with an infection had an antibiotic—resistant one, although the overall number of infections in england did fall because of the lockdown. (a large—scale study in britain suggests that drinking coffee or tea may be associated with a lower risk
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of stroke and dementia. (researchers who followed more than three hundred and sixty thousand participants said that those who drank several cups of tea or coffee every day had the lowest incidence of stroke or dementia. in a moment, the bbc news at one with ben brown, but first it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. it has been a chilly start to the day, but a lot of dry weather around, with plenty of sunshine, away from the north of the uk. this is where we have seen thicker cloud, particularly western scotland, where there have been a few showers. so, it has been quite windy as well across northern areas, close to these areas of low pressure, you can see plenty of isobars across scotland, but fewer isobars further south, closer to this area of high pressure, bringing lighter winds. you can see that here on the wind chart, these are mean wind speeds, costs in fact have been reaching up to 40 or 50 mph across north—west scotland, with the showers. now, as we head on into the evening period, it will be fairly mild, i think, across north and western areas, but under clear skies, and those lighter winds, temperatures will start falling away into single digits. as we move through the night, it is central, southern and eastern areas, which will see the clear spells and
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the lighter winds, so it will turn quite chilly once again, but for most there is a milder air mass pushing in on all the cloud and the breeze, so lows of around 10 degrees, as you can see, in many northern and western areas, threes and fours though across the east and south east. so, for thursday, we have got high pressure to the south of the country, lower pressure to the north. once again, isobars indicate it is going to be another windy one, with weather fronts, so it is going to be wet, but what we will all notice through thursday is that we are in a very mild air mass, with a pretty balmy temperatures for the time of year. but, the air mass is fairly moisture laden, there is going to be quite a bit of cloud around, moving through thursday, just some glimmers of sunshine, up through the east of england, into north—east scotland, with a bit of shelter there and it will be windy with outbreaks of rain in the north and west of scotland. maybe a few spots of rain further south as well. look at those temperatures, highs of 14 or 15 degrees. we could even see 16 or 17 in some sheltered areas of north—east scotland. our area of high pressure still to the south of the country, lower pressure to the north, again for friday and we are in a run of wet ? michael west and
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south westerly winds, a lot of cloud hello. a brighter day out there for many of us, perhaps feeling a little bit cooler than it did yesterday, more of a breeze, of north—east scotland. our area of high pressure still to the south of the country, lower pressure to the north, again for friday and we are in a run of west and south westerly winds, a lot of cloud once again, outbreaks of rain for the north and west of scotland where it will be quite windy and another very mild day. those temperatures for many of us in the mid teens. but it is all change as we move into the weekend, that area of high pressure pulls back west and allows northerly winds to flood southwards, right across the country. that cold air will be moving south on saturday, pretty much across all areas by the time we reach on sunday. a few showers around, so for all of us it is turning much colder this weekend, by day and certainly by night with widespread frost. a few showers around, so for all of us it is turning much
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the cost of living hits its highest level for a decade. inflation is running at 4.2% — driven by increasing costs of fuel, energy, transport and hospitality. everything has gone up. it might only be 50p but it all mounts up. we'll be looking at whether higher inflation will inevitably mean higher interest rates. also this lunchtime... clashes in the commons as borisjohnson faces labour claims he tried to give the green light to corruption — and gets a telling off from the speaker. the prime minister, sit down. you may be be prime minister of this country but in this house i'm in charge. police say the liverpool bomber
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started making preparations for his attack back in april.

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