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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 16, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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has given compelling evidence to uk lawmakers. azeem rafiq said english cricket is "institutionally racist". he also said officials ignored his complaints. polish authorities have fired tear gas and water canon at migrants massed on the border with belarus. thousands of people are stranded on the poland—belarus border in makeshift camps in freezing temperatures. schools and colleges in the indian capital, delhi, have been ordered to remain closed in an attempt to tackle the problem of smog in the city. all nonessential construction work has also been halted. and search teams have started looking for people trapped in their cars after a violent storm caused flooding and mudslides in parts of the canadian province of british columbia. those are the headlines from bbc news.
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good evening, i'm tulsen tollett, and this is your sports news — where we start with european world cup qualifying, and wales made the task of reaching the world cup just a little easier tonight by holding belgium to a draw. the welsh needed a point to earn a home semifinal in the world cup play—offs in march. kevin de bruyne�*s early goal was a setback, but wales recovered, kieffer moore equalising before half—time. the 1—1 result means robert page's side will be seeded in the draw, which will be made later this month. arsenal midfielderjordan nobbs has been recalled to the england squad for the lionesses�* world cup qualifiers later this month, after being out with an ankle ligament injury. however, her arsenal team—mate leah williamson has picked up a "significant" hamstring problem, which may see her out of action for the rest of the year. williamson came off during the north london derby draw with tottenham at the weekend. as long—term england captain steph houghton is out injured, williamson has had the armband for all four of england's matches under new head coach sarina wiegman.
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but it's not clear who'll replace her as skipper for their games against austria and latvia this month. i can't tell you now because we haven't discussed it yet. it's so fresh that leah is not here with us, so we're just taking our time to make that decision and then talk to the squad first. chelsea striker sam kerr has extended her contract at the club for another two years. the australianjoined in 2019 and won the league with chelsea last season. she's scored 39 goals in 47 appearances. kerr said, "i think the club gives me every opportunity to succeed as a player. i can't see myself going anywhere else in the world or leaving europe, having what i have at chelsea." derby county are now 18 points from safety in the championship after being given a further nine point penalty for breaches of the league's accounting rules. the club had already been docked 12 points after going into administration. the rams are now almost certain to be relegated to league one, and a further three—point penalty
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will apply if they breach the league's profitability and sustainability rules. freddie steward has described scoring his first try for england as "the best moment" of his life. it came against australia at twickenham last saturday, and now the 20—year—old leicester full back says after watching south arica win the world cup final, he's thrilled to have been selected to play against them this weekend. if you'd have told me when i was watching that game that the next time england played south africa, i'd be involved, i would've laughed at you. it's been an incredible two years. it's been a lot of hard work, butjust to have it all happen so quickly has been amazing. it's not been easy, but it's been a fantastic experience, and i'm just grateful for the opportunity to represent england. mercedes have asked for a review of the decision not to penalise red bull's max verstappen, forforcing lewis hamilton wide in the sao paulo grand prix. the incident was "noted" by the stewards, but there was no investigation.
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mercedes have lodged a "right of review" after new evidence emerged, believed to be the on—board camera footage. it happened as hamilton was trying to pass his title rivalfor the lead — he went on to win the race, cutting the dutchman's lead to 14 points with three grand prix�*s to go. staying with formula one, where the driver line—up is now complete for 2022. guanyu zhou will become the first chinese driver to race in an f1 grand prix, when he replaces antonio giovinazzi at alfa romeo next season, partnering current mercedes driver valterri bottas. reginaldo rosario reports. he's been described as a trailblazer that will write a pivotal page in his country's motorsport history by his new team. but guanyu zhou's pass to becoming china first formula one driver has been far from straightforward. born in shanghai, zhou moved to the uk at 12 to pursue his racing career, where he began to make steady progress — first in karting,
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and then single—seaters. drives followed with the backing of ferrari and alpine�*s driver academies — and this season, zhou's three race wins have helped him mount a title challenge in formula two, proving enough for alfa romero to take the plunge. when you are doing the pole position and winning in bahrain, i think you have the ability, that he is a front—runner. i don't know if, at the end, he will be a champion or not. this won't change the potential that he's a frontrunner. aside from talent on the track, zhou also brings in considerable backing from chinese companies — something that played a massive factor in alfa romeo's thinking as they aim to move away from the back of the grid next season. it's good news for us, for the company, for our sponsors, and also for the f1 in general. i think at the end, it's a huge push for everybody. zhou now carries the hopes of 1.4 billion people on his shoulders —
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and formula one will be hoping his arrival can help the sport gain traction in a market that has been crying out for a driver of its own. reginaldo rosario, bbc news. young skateboard star sky brown has made her debut in professional surfing at the layback pro women qualifying series in brazil. despite placing second in herfirst—round heat, she was eliminated as she incurred an interference penalty and saw her score reduced. the 13—year old is the youngest professional skateboarder in the world, and won a bronze medal at the 2020 olympics in the park event. for everything else, you can head to the bbc sport website. but that's all your sport for now.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. a few minutes later than planned. with me are broadcaster henry bonsu, and former trade minister lord digbyjones. tomorrow's front pages... the yorkshire post leads with the racism crisis
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at the county's cricket club, after azeem rafiq's harrowing testimony. the metro also has the cricket scandal on its front page, saying racism is a poison at the heart of the game. the guardian has a picture of azeem rafiq — and his comments that he wouldn't want his son to play cricket. it also carries allegations about michael gove and ppe contracts. the ft reports on an agreement between the us and china to hold talks over the size of their nuclear arsenals. the telegraph raises questions over the role of the church of england in helping asylum seekers convert to christianity, boosting their chances of staying in the uk. the mail also looks at the asylum issue, quoting the home secretary saying the system is a merry—go—round. the times splashes on the mps�* standards row, claiming some tory backbenchers may revolt over the proposed ban on taking second jobs as consultants. the daily star says the latest supply problem for british shops is a shortage of rum —
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apparently it's caused by pirates! those parents may have also been disturbing the broadband system —— pirates with our guests. disturbing the broadband system -- pirates with our guests.— pirates with our guests. believe you me, some pirates with our guests. believe you me. some of _ pirates with our guests. believe you me. some of our — pirates with our guests. believe you me, some of our basic— me, some of our basic infrastructure, and are broad bland, but happened to all those pledges for high—speed super broadband? here i am, a stone's there a way from westminster, and my broadband provider has gone kaput. that is why we are late, i'm sorry... i provider has gone kaput. that is why we are late, i'm sorry...— we are late, i'm sorry... i was thinking — we are late, i'm sorry... i was thinking of— we are late, i'm sorry... i was thinking of faxing _ we are late, i'm sorry... i was thinking of faxing you - we are late, i'm sorry... i was thinking of faxing you my - we are late, i'm sorry... i was- thinking of faxing you my questions, and you could've fax me the answers and you could've fax me the answers and i could read them out in conversation with you and digby. we will now start and begin with the harrowing story, "cricket crisis over racism revelations." azeem rafiq breaks down in tears as he gives evidence to mps in an inquiry
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to racism. ~ , ., gives evidence to mps in an inquiry to racism. ~ ,, _, , to racism. when you saw the couple hours or so — to racism. when you saw the couple hours or so of _ to racism. when you saw the couple hours or so of azeem _ to racism. when you saw the couple hours or so of azeem rafiq's - hours or so of azeem rafiq's testimony, you could see this was his moment. he's excepted his cricketing career is over, he think maybe even his children shouldn't go into cricket. what he realises at this moment is so much bigger than him. he was calm and composed, he shed some tears but he was very calmly, deliberately exposing and lifting the layers to expose the rot at the heart of this establishment at the heart of this establishment at the heart of this establishment at the yorkshire county cricket club, the most successful club in english cricket�*s history. yet it has a huge asian population on its doorstep, it's often been blamed on closed or segregated communities —
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we now see the desire and will do macro community willingness was there, they're notjust being blocked by the culture, but people higher up who didn't really want them and made his life and possibly them and made his life and possibly the lives of others hell.— the lives of others hell. looking at the lives of others hell. looking at the sectioned _ the lives of others hell. looking at the sectioned newspaper - the lives of others hell. looking at the sectioned newspaper dutch . the lives of others hell. looking at - the sectioned newspaper dutch second newspaper, azeem rafiq breaking down in tears with the quote, "i don't want my son to go near it." digby, you will remember the metro newspaper described as poison at the heart of cricket. how will that poison be drained? just heart of cricket. how will that poison be drained? just looking at the yorkshire _ poison be drained? just looking at the yorkshire post _ poison be drained? just looking at the yorkshire post for _ poison be drained? just looking at the yorkshire post for a _ poison be drained? just looking at the yorkshire post for a minute, l the yorkshire post for a minute, i've the yorkshire post for a minute, i've always — the yorkshire post for a minute, i've always admired the yorkshire post for— i've always admired the yorkshire post for - — i've always admired the yorkshire post for — its own headline says yorkshire's_ post for — its own headline says yorkshire's national newspaper, and it projecis _ yorkshire's national newspaper, and it projects the national news feeling — it projects the national news feeling ringed with a regional
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feeling — feeling ringed with a regional feeling. henry is right, it's one of the most — feeling. henry is right, it's one of the most successful counties in english — the most successful counties in english cricket, and it can't be the only county— english cricket, and it can't be the only county where this has happened. it's only county where this has happened. it's carried _ only county where this has happened. it's carried in— only county where this has happened. it's carried in the guardian, the metro. — it's carried in the guardian, the metro, everywhere — and i think this is crickel's _ metro, everywhere — and i think this is cricket's #metoo moment. and i think— is cricket's #metoo moment. and i think we _ is cricket's #metoo moment. and i think we will find there's so many revelations — think we will find there's so many revelations that will come out about revelation democrat racism and cricket _ revelation democrat racism and cricket there are other counties, youll— cricket there are other counties, youll have — cricket there are other counties, you'll have it in australia and new zealand. — you'll have it in australia and new zealand, the relationship in india and the _ zealand, the relationship in india and the west indies which racially has never— and the west indies which racially has never been good, and you'll get it all over— has never been good, and you'll get it all over the place. do i worry, is at _ it all over the place. do i worry, is at the — it all over the place. do i worry, is at the right word — i'm concerned that if_ is at the right word — i'm concerned that if they— is at the right word — i'm concerned that if they have the witchhunt and the defenestration of everybody, youll _ the defenestration of everybody, you'll catch an awful lot of people in the _ you'll catch an awful lot of people in the net — you'll catch an awful lot of people in the net who didn't do anything
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wrong, _ in the net who didn't do anything wrong, you'll decapitate the lot in cricket _ wrong, you'll decapitate the lot in cricket. and where do you go, what do you _ cricket. and where do you go, what do you do? — cricket. and where do you go, what do you do? that's why i don't want azeem _ do you do? that's why i don't want azeem rafiq, in his excellent testimony today, i'm with henry on this, _ testimony today, i'm with henry on this, i_ testimony today, i'm with henry on this, i get— testimony today, i'm with henry on this, i get it — testimony today, i'm with henry on this, i get it — i don't want him turning — this, i get it — i don't want him turning his _ this, i get it — i don't want him turning his back on it, i want him to say, _ turning his back on it, i want him to say, "they— turning his back on it, i want him to say, "they abused me, it was disgraceful. _ to say, "they abused me, it was disgraceful, but we will eat cricket to a better— disgraceful, but we will eat cricket to a better place." " —— lead cricket _ to a better place." " —— lead cricket to— to a better place." " —— lead cricket to a _ to a better place." " —— lead cricket to a better place. " because all that _ cricket to a better place. " because all that happens is, if you get the sacrificial— all that happens is, if you get the sacrificial lambs who don't deserve it, if sacrificial lambs who don't deserve it. if you _ sacrificial lambs who don't deserve it, if you get them all going, i'm not too — it, if you get them all going, i'm not too sure _ it, if you get them all going, i'm not too sure whether leadership will come _ not too sure whether leadership will come because you'll get people saying — come because you'll get people saying it's not worth it, they'll 'ust saying it's not worth it, they'll just get— saying it's not worth it, they'll just get their career ruined. and i would _ just get their career ruined. and i would like — just get their career ruined. and i would like to see some people who have been— would like to see some people who have been abused, who have every i’i l ht have been abused, who have every right in— have been abused, who have every right in the — have been abused, who have every right in the world to turn their lrack—
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right in the world to turn their back on— right in the world to turn their back on it. _ right in the world to turn their back on it, as henry would very rightly— back on it, as henry would very rightly emotionally say, i'd love for them — rightly emotionally say, i'd love for them to say they'll lead this part to — for them to say they'll lead this part to a — for them to say they'll lead this part to a better place. because that's— part to a better place. because that's what children and teenagers need at _ that's what children and teenagers need at this moment, cricket needs quality— need at this moment, cricket needs quality leadership of the young. because — quality leadership of the young. because that's where the salvation will come — because that's where the salvation will come. , ., , ., ., will come. henry, and your own words? l _ will come. henry, and your own words? i don't _ will come. henry, and your own words? i don't get _ will come. henry, and your own words? i don't get any - will come. henry, and your own i words? i don't get any impression whatsoever _ words? i don't get any impression whatsoever that _ words? i don't get any impression whatsoever that people _ words? i don't get any impression whatsoever that people who - words? i don't get any impression whatsoever that people who have| words? i don't get any impression i whatsoever that people who have not been complicit or have not been actively racist and discriminatory will be sacrificed. i don't see that at all. yes, it is true that the activists on the street say silence equals violence — but at the same time, i think a calm, cool, collected review of where cricket is going, especially with the ecb and its policy of nonintervention, that has to change, but also the board membership — because i don't know exactly who is on the board of yorkshire or essex, and other county
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that some trouble, but i can visualise them. i can see them in my mind's i, and that kind of falsifying culture that doesn't want to change and things it has nothing left to learn has to go. that's where the new blood will come in, people like azeem rafiq.— where the new blood will come in, people like azeem rafiq. henry, what will we do with _ people like azeem rafiq. henry, what will we do with australia _ people like azeem rafiq. henry, what will we do with australia and - will we do with australia and new zealand. — will we do with australia and new zealand, with india and the west indies? _ zealand, with india and the west indies? what will be due about that? those _ indies? what will be due about that? those countries and cricket authorities within those countries will deal with what's going on at home. but when it comes to the international tensions and rivalries, of course the icc will have to deal with that. but that is of a different order, that's between international clubs at the highest levels. we are talking about the game at the county level, grassroots and nationally. game at the county level, grassroots and nationally-— and nationally. moving on to a new sto , the and nationally. moving on to a new story, the times, _ and nationally. moving on to a new story, the times, a _ and nationally. moving on to a new story, the times, a story _ and nationally. moving on to a new story, the times, a story that - and nationally. moving on to a new story, the times, a story that a - story, the times, a story that a lot of people will be talking about and they'll expect us to be talking about — tory mp is set to revolt
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over ban on second jobs. johnson accused of surrendering in sleaze row. i imagine you might know some of these people, digbyjones, set to revolt, really? of these people, digby jones, set to revolt. really?— revolt, really? there is an old chinese proverb, _ revolt, really? there is an old chinese proverb, "be - revolt, really? there is an old chinese proverb, "be fair- revolt, really? there is an old| chinese proverb, "be fair what revolt, really? there is an old - chinese proverb, "be fair what you wish for— chinese proverb, "be fair what you wish for because you might just get it." wish for because you might just get ...-- -- — wish for because you might just get it." -- be _ wish for because you might just get it." —— be aware of what you wish for. _ it." —— be aware of what you wish for. everybody could say for the paid for— for. everybody could say for the paid for lobbying, the abuse of both power— paid for lobbying, the abuse of both power and _ paid for lobbying, the abuse of both power and privilege that has been going _ power and privilege that has been going on. — power and privilege that has been going on, and it goes on predominantly from business but it also goes _ predominantly from business but it also goes on from trade unions into the labour— also goes on from trade unions into the labour party, it goes on— it's -ot the labour party, it goes on— it's got to— the labour party, it goes on— it's got to stop. _ the labour party, it goes on— it's got to stop, there's been various attempts— got to stop, there's been various attempts at cutting it back, and hopefully this time it'll stop completely. what i don't understand about _ completely. what i don't understand about the _ completely. what i don't understand about the revolts, for want of a better— about the revolts, for want of a better word, where the times are
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running _ better word, where the times are running the story saying that rmp is saying _ running the story saying that rmp is saying they won't back boris on this. _ saying they won't back boris on this. he's— saying they won't back boris on this, he's now saying he wants to stop— this, he's now saying he wants to stop mps— this, he's now saying he wants to stop mps getting paid from other places. _ stop mps getting paid from other places, secondjobs, effectively fully. _ your places, secondjobs, effectively your star— places, secondjobs, effectively your star is saying the same thing, it will— your star is saying the same thing, it will happen. the problem is, how do you _ it will happen. the problem is, how do you define thiscure why is it ok if you want to be a teacher? — why is it ok if you want to be a teacher? if— why is it ok if you want to be a teacher? if this is about money buying — teacher? if this is about money buying lobbying abuse, i get it. but if it's_ buying lobbying abuse, i get it. but if it's about — buying lobbying abuse, i get it. but if it's about being given full time and it— if it's about being given full time and it democrat attention to being a full democrat mp, i don't get it. i'm full democrat mp, i don't get it. in so— full democrat mp, i don't get it. i'm so sorry, digbyjones, time out from this one, henry? i i'm so sorry, digby jones, time out from this one, henry?— from this one, henry? i would say socially useful—
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from this one, henry? i would say socially usefuljobs, _ from this one, henry? i would say socially usefuljobs, like _ socially usefuljobs, like teaching... i'm using that term because the former director general of the cbi talking about bankers and social usefulness, he was being flip but it was a serious point. bind social usefulness, he was being flip but it was a serious point.— but it was a serious point. and he was wrong- _ but it was a serious point. and he was wrong. fine, _ but it was a serious point. and he was wrong. fine, but _ but it was a serious point. and he was wrong. fine, but he was - but it was a serious point. and he i was wrong. fine, but he was making a most serious — was wrong. fine, but he was making a most serious point. _ was wrong. fine, but he was making a most serious point. here's _ was wrong. fine, but he was making a most serious point. here's what we i most serious point. here's what we are saying with this story — the reason people won't say you can't be a teacher if you are also in mp, you can't be a doctor or midwife — these are a job in which there is a great shortage of skilled people to do them, and these are jobs which command huge amounts of public respect and money, which play a massive role in the formation of the next generation and the health of the nation, ie being a doctor or nurse, and whatever. that's why i don't think anyone in their right mind would say because you are in mp, you can't do an extra ten hours
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as a doctor or 20 as a teacher, etc. let's also remember one of the reasons why borisjohnson is under pressure, because of his ridiculous hill for owen paterson two weeks ago, and now the per wrote reveal zealot rushing to the other side, and because he's going to be on the liaison committee asking some very embarrassing questions, that's why he's done this today — although he's had three years, the best part of three years to do it because there's been a report recommending exactly these things, sitting on his desk before theresa may since 2015. henry, you cannot sit there and say that its— henry, you cannot sit there and say that its doctors and nurses, and teachers — that its doctors and nurses, and teachers who do the only socially useful _ teachers who do the only socially useful stuff. if it wasn't for business, creating wealth, you wouldn't — business, creating wealth, you wouldn't have a doctor because he wouldn't _ wouldn't have a doctor because he wouldn't have a doctor because he wouldn't have any tax revenue to pay them _ wouldn't have any tax revenue to pay them with. _
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wouldn't have any tax revenue to pay them with. but we have to do is clean _ them with. but we have to do is clean up — them with. but we have to do is clean up the relationship between business — clean up the relationship between business and serving politicians, especially — business and serving politicians, especially those in government. but you cannot — especially those in government. but you cannot sit here and make a distinction _ you cannot sit here and make a distinction between the social contribution of a nurse and that of a socially — contribution of a nurse and that of a socially minded business, because they are _ a socially minded business, because they are vital to society. i a socially minded business, because they are vital to society.— they are vital to society. i was told that l _ they are vital to society. i was told that i needed _ they are vital to society. i was told that i needed a _ they are vital to society. i was told that i needed a gavel - they are vital to society. i was i told that i needed a gavel when i was talking to you both. i didn't bring one, so next time i will bring that gavel — we have to review all the papers and, much as we can have the papers and, much as we can have the back and forth, we will look at another story in the times, trimming answers a little bit, busting drugs in the nhs will save lives, henry, 30 seconds or less. we in the nhs will save lives, henry, 30 seconds or less.— 30 seconds or less. we are talking about direct _ 30 seconds or less. we are talking about direct oral— 30 seconds or less. we are talking about direct oral anticoagulants, l about direct oral anticoagulants, people who have irregular heartbeat rhythms and around 610,000 or so people will receive these. the reason for this is that the nhs has
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done a deal with the private companies, digby willapprove done a deal with the private companies, digby will approve of this because of private companies and social developing, who have agreed to cut the price they were previously charging, meaning far more people will have access to them than they currently do and it will save more lives, which is great. digby, did he get you right? haifa digby, did he get you right? how willi sa digby, did he get you right? how will i say anything _ digby, did he get you right? how will i say anything other than henry. — will i say anything other than henry, you're right on this one? i would _ henry, you're right on this one? i would just— henry, you're right on this one? i would just point out that an irregular— would just point out that an irregular heartbeat, loads of people don't know— irregular heartbeat, loads of people don't know they have and it creates strokes. _ don't know they have and it creates strokes. this is about making sure that clock. — strokes. this is about making sure that clock, when it goes around, doesn't — that clock, when it goes around, doesn't create the strokes. so this is something that people who think thatll— is something that people who think that'll do _ is something that people who think that'll do it for them, if you are over— that'll do it for them, if you are over 60 — that'll do it for them, if you are over 60 and may be over 50, you might— over 60 and may be over 50, you might have — over 60 and may be over 50, you might have a problem, get it checked out. we _ in the financial times, in the financialtimes, "cold in the financial times, "cold case, greece _ in the financial times, "cold case, greece renews marble pleat." |
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in the financial times, "cold case, greece renews marble pleat." i was lookin: at greece renews marble pleat." i was looking at plenty — greece renews marble pleat." i was looking at plenty of— greece renews marble pleat." i was looking at plenty of things, - greece renews marble pleat." i —" looking at plenty of things, didn't get to see the marbles are greek ministers, seeing if they were going around, henry, iunderstand ministers, seeing if they were going around, henry, i understand you did around, henry, i understand you did a documentary on this? i did around, henry, i understand you did a documentary on this?— a documentary on this? i did a piece on radio for— a documentary on this? i did a piece on radio for on _ a documentary on this? i did a piece on radio for on this, _ a documentary on this? i did a piece on radio for on this, because - on radio for on this, because it's notjust about on radio for on this, because it's not just about the marbles, on radio for on this, because it's notjust about the marbles, it's about that when a septa of 1897, the greek prime minister has talked with borisjohnson greek prime minister has talked with boris johnson today and he's greek prime minister has talked with borisjohnson today and he's remade that claim from the greeks to their own heritage, to their own treasure, and borisjohnson passed it over to another authority. and borisjohnson passed it over to anotherauthority. but and borisjohnson passed it over to another authority. but in my documentary in 1998 for bbc radio 4, the british museum said, "we can't do it unilaterally because the british museum, it's do it unilaterally because the british museum, its british government business, they'll have to do it." ., , ,
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government business, they'll have to doit." ., , government business, they'll have to do it- '— the - government business, they'll have to do it- '— the only i do it." lord digby jones? the only art of do it." lord digby jones? the only part of that _ do it." lord digby jones? the only part of that l _ do it." lord digby jones? the only part of that i doubt _ do it." lord digby jones? the only part of that i doubt the _ do it." lord digby jones? the only part of that i doubt the veracity, l part of that i doubt the veracity, henry. _ part of that i doubt the veracity, henry. is— part of that i doubt the veracity, henry, is that you are making documentaries in 1998 because you were obviously still doing your own levels. _ were obviously still doing your own levels. �* . levels. laughter. i'm actually - levels. laughter. i'm actually one i levels. laughter. i'm actually one of| levels. laughter. - i'm actually one of those levels. laughter. _ i'm actually one of those people who sees a i'm actually one of those people who sees a , ., , i'm actually one of those people who seesa , , i'm actually one of those people who seesa, sees a considerable bias in making sure the relics _ sees a considerable bias in making sure the relics ball— sees a considerable bias in making sure the relics ball along _ sees a considerable bias in making sure the relics ball along to - sees a considerable bias in making sure the relics ball along to the i sure the relics ball along to the countries — sure the relics ball along to the countries they were. and i would like some — countries they were. and i would like some guarantee that they were looked _ like some guarantee that they were looked after and cared for, and all that kind. — looked after and cared for, and all that kind, and notjust that country. _ that kind, and notjust that country. when you see certain regimes— country. when you see certain regimes start to destroy things out of ideology, when you see them trying _ of ideology, when you see them trying to— of ideology, when you see them trying to sell stuff off in all this stuff. it— trying to sell stuff off in all this stuff, it worries me. the one thing i do stuff, it worries me. the one thing i do know— stuff, it worries me. the one thing i do know about the marbles in the british— i do know about the marbles in the british museum, they will be looked after. _ british museum, they will be looked after. as— british museum, they will be looked after. as long as they were looked after _ after. as long as they were looked after wherever they go to, let's get them _ after wherever they go to, let's get them back— after wherever they go to, let's get them back home. but the looking after— them back home. but the looking after a _ them back home. but the looking after a bit. — them back home. but the looking after a bit, for the benefit of everybody, does worry me. digby, you
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can't steal someone's _ everybody, does worry me. digby, you can't steal someone's car _ everybody, does worry me. digby, you can't steal someone's car and - everybody, does worry me. digby, you can't steal someone's car and hold i can't steal someone's car and hold it for ten years, can't steal someone's car and hold it for ten years.— can't steal someone's car and hold it for ten years, then say you won't aet it it for ten years, then say you won't get it back — it for ten years, then say you won't get it back because _ it for ten years, then say you won't get it back because your _ it for ten years, then say you won't get it back because your garage i get it back because your garage isn't good enough. with; get it back because your garage isn't good enough.— get it back because your garage i isn't good enough._ what? get it back because your garage isn't good enough._ what? isn't good enough. why not? what? in terms of countries _ isn't good enough. why not? what? in terms of countries and _ isn't good enough. why not? what? in terms of countries and response i terms of countries and response ability— terms of countries and response ability to— terms of countries and response ability to mankind, not in terms of ability to mankind, not in terms of a car— ability to mankind, not in terms of a car and — ability to mankind, not in terms of a carand a— ability to mankind, not in terms of a car and a garage in a town, of course— a car and a garage in a town, of course not. _ a car and a garage in a town, of course not. i— a car and a garage in a town, of course not. i hope you are being symbolic— course not. i hope you are being symbolic and, in your symbolism, i would _ symbolic and, in your symbolism, i would say. — symbolic and, in your symbolism, i would say, why not? i symbolic and, in your symbolism, i would say, why not?— symbolic and, in your symbolism, i would say, why not? i wonder why i was even here _ would say, why not? i wonder why i was even here at _ would say, why not? i wonder why i was even here at all. _ would say, why not? i wonder why i was even here at all. laughter i would say, why not? i wonder why i was even here at all. laughter. i was even here at all. laughter. thank you to you both so much, they could do it all without me. that's it for the papers this hour. the papers will be back again tomorrow evening with rachel cunliffe, who's the deputy online editor at the new statesman, and mo hussein, who's a former conservative adviser. dojoin us then if you can, but for now, goodnight.
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wednesday morning will be a little bit colder compared to the last couple of mornings. and, indeed, by day, it'll feel a touch fresher, too. but overall, the next 2—3 days will remain above the average for the time of year. i want to show you the jet stream — and there is a dip in thejet stream at the moment across the uk, and you can see the blue colours — so that's the slightly colder atmosphere that's spread across the country into the early hours of wednesday. and, with the clearer skies, that means that, in many towns and cities, temperatures will be around five celsius or so, especially out towards the east and in central parts of the uk. even colder than that in aberdeen, barely above freezing. but that means a lot of bright and crisp weather in the morning, especially across central, eastern, and southern areas of the uk.
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not necessarily in western scotland and northern ireland, always a bit more cloud here and a chance of catching a shower. and you can see those temperatures actually not far off the average, just a fraction above. but look what happens on thursday — another change in the jet stream. now this time, the jet stream's way to the north of us, it's bulging northwards of the uk and allowing for a stream of really mild air to sweep in from the azores. so, mild south—westerlies across the uk, cloudy and damp in western and northern scotland — but where the skies clear, where the sun pops out for any lengthy period of time, temperatures will reach around 15—16, maybe even 17 celsius to the east of the highlands because of something called the foehn effect — you'll have to look that up, not enough time to explain it. but look where we are, nine celsius is the average this time of november — we are talking about 17 celsius, eight degrees above the average for the time of year. and the same pattern continues in a friday, as well — east of the highlands, possibly 17, we could get 16 also east of the pennines, and widely around 1a—15 celsius.
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and then, a reversal in the wind direction — you can see this time, rather than from the southwest, it's coming in straight from the north. now this looks pretty cold, doesn't it? well, it won't be that cold — it will be relatively speaking, but actually, we'll be going down from 15 to around nine celsius, which, of course, is about the average for the time of year, give or take.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore. i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines: former cricketer azeem rafiq gives shocking details of the racism he faced in english cricket, saying he was "constantly" subjected to the offensive language at yorkshire. pretty early on, me and other people from an asian background, there was comments such as, "you lot sit over there, near the toilets." indian officials announce further drastic measures to tackle air pollution in delhi, with all schools and colleges to remain shut until further notice. polish authorities use water cannon and tear gas to push back migrants trying to enter from belarus.

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