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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 16, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm christian fraser. borisjohnson is backing a proposal to ban mps from working as paid consultants, in the wake of the westminster sleaze row. after several weeks of damaging headlines mrjohnson says the code of conduct for mps should be updated so that it "commands the confidence of the public". not exactly the great thaw with china, but president biden says he and president xi understand the others�* boundaries, after a three hour virtual meeting. former cricketer azeem rafiq gives shocking details of the racism he faced in english cricket, claiming the offensive language he was subjected to, was "constantly" used during his time at yorkshire. pretty early on, me and other people from asian backgrounds, there were comments such as, "you lot sit over there
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near the toilets." and the russian missile launch that led to panic on the international space station. good evening. borisjohnson is proposing to ban mps from acting as paid political consultants and lobbyists. the prime minister's intervention comes two weeks after he encouraged his conservative mps to save ex—cabinet minister owen paterson, from an immediate commons suspension, over a breach of lobbying rules. in his letter to the speaker this afternoon, mrjohnson gave his backing to reforms that were proposed in a 2018 report written by the committee on standards in public life. it states that mps�* outside earnings "should be within reasonable limits and should not prevent them from fully carrying out their range of duties".
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our political correspondent chris mason reports. this afternoon, the prime minister welcomed his greek opposite number to downing street with questions about sleaze still swelling. it is nearly a fortnight since the row is a bad parliamentary standards broke out here, entirely because the government wanted to change the rules just as one of their own mps faced suspension. in a letter to the commons speaker, borisjohnson says... the primary role of a member of parliament must be to serve their constituents and to serve parliament and that is why the prime minister is calling for the code of conduct to be tightened so that is made very clear to members of parliament are moving forward.
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second jobs, moonlighting in the caribbean, talking of private businesses for money, the soundtrack to autumn here. and, to labour... enough is enough. we need a government that governs in the public interest. where standards count for something. where truth means something and where honesty is at the heart of everything that it does. when are you finally going to sort out this mess? isn't it all your fault? earlier, sharper questions and notjust from reporters to the chief whip and leader of the commons over the suggestion the government had tried to bend the rules to bail out a friend, the former minister owen paterson. the attempt by right honourable and honourable members of this house, aided and abetted by the government, under cover of reform of the process, effectively to clear his name was misplaced, illjudged and just plain wrong.
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after a deluge of critical headlines, government, parliament, is now trying to sort itself out. chris mason reporting press from westminster. tom peck, is a sketch writer for the independent newspaper. that evening to you. what do you make a today's announcement? piano duck neck timing is rather interesting study of the timing and a sense that he completely undermined kier stamer? that's what i'm talking about, beat the —— have the prime minister beat him to add. he does have many spokespeople, one thing he... he is a canny politician, if not a canny leader, and one thing hejust politician, if not a canny leader, and one thing he just sort of stopped dead was kier stamer being allowed to take the initiative on this story, which he has failed to
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put a lid on. —— kier starmer, and tried to put a lid on it himself but has very much annoyed a large number of his own backbenchers in the process because the quite measurable terms he is placed upon them is entirely of his own making. having them went to _ entirely of his own making. having them went to support _ entirely of his own making. having them went to support the - entirely of his own making. having them went to support the review l entirely of his own making. having| them went to support the review of them went to support the review of the entire process, now he is taking away some of the second jobs that the mps have come i can imagine he has enamoured himself with many of them. what do you make of this line that annie np who is being remunerated should be working within reasonable limits? what does reasonable limits? what does reasonable limits? what does reasonable limits mean? wow, this is the key question- _ reasonable limits mean? wow, this is the key question. i _ reasonable limits mean? wow, this is the key question. i don't _ reasonable limits mean? wow, this is the key question. i don't know- reasonable limits mean? wow, this is the key question. i don't know the - the key question. i don't know the answer to that. i don't think anybody does. which is to steam in there with the big announcement at there with the big announcement at the big promise, with that big pledge, and then i really have the details there and just hope that at the rail go away and the mps that
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want to go back to doing what they were doing before i welljust quietly go back and do it, i don't know whether or notjeffrey cox will be able to go back to living part time in the caribbean and earning millions of pounds a year, but arguably, he is not the one who has really done anything wrong. the mess that he has made means that the two things have come conflated. a conflict of interest, like lobbying from a private company and spending too much of your time on things that are not parliamentary and earning too much money doing it, although it's not really against the rules, although now it potentially is. it’s although now it potentially is. it's been a security street to get to this plane. it was sort of summed up by last night's attempts to u—turn on the owen paterson decision by getting it through on that not only for one of their own mps to the dan object and sabotage the entire process. object and sabotage the entire rocess. ~ . . object and sabotage the entire rocess. ~ ., ., , , , process. what a mess. he is notorious. — process. what a mess. he is
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notorious, isn't _ process. what a mess. he is notorious, isn't he, - process. what a mess. he is notorious, isn't he, fire - process. what a mess. he is - notorious, isn't he, fire stopping things in their tracks and blocked a new private members failed to make up new private members failed to make up starting a crime. the thing that is quite ironic about this one is there are plenty of people who are not fans of christopher who have said, well, actually, maybe this objection is fair enough because they were trying to sort of do the most egregious bit of their u—turn very quietly at half past ten on a monday night and he still then they couldn't. his reasons for doing so, possibly not entirely pure, but it does mean they had to have another hour—long debate on this sleaze staff in the commons today and has been rambling on for two weeks and borisjohnson�*s been rambling on for two weeks and boris johnson's solution been rambling on for two weeks and borisjohnson�*s solution to it all as far, far more frustrating to his party than the original problem. it was a small scale scandal if you like, which has now had a very, very draconian solution long to try to solve it because it has made so much bigger. i’m
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solve it because it has made so much bi cer. �* ., ., bigger. i'm going to venture ossibl bigger. i'm going to venture possibly the _ bigger. i'm going to venture possibly the worlds - bigger. i'm going to venture possibly the worlds most. bigger. i'm going to venture - possibly the worlds most unpopular question. should mps be paid more? c5... let me set the stage for this. i have compared like with like, i've been away and looked at germany in the united states, if i put it into dollars for you for our global audience, uk mps get $109,000, german mps get federaljudges, so they get 142,000, yes members of congress almost twice as much as what the uk mps get. now, let's bear in mind that they spend an awful lot of time in the commons, a lot of them have care responsibilities, i'm not getting on the roads not smiling here, but should we pay them more? and if we paid them more, when we get better calibre of politicians? i will make two points. it is not really evident evidence that pain mps more discourages them from behaviours that borisjohnson is not
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seeking to outlaw. he went to germany, the us, there's not really any... there is no way that np is they are being paid more are not also potentially working as consultants in the states. goodness knows. the other plate really, the thing about mps pay is it's 81,000, that's your basic pay. and if you want people to do that as a career, it's quite tricky. we don't like career politicians. he can lose your job very easily within five years — ten years, or you can bet for 50 years if you end up with a very safe seats. , if you come in on day one when you could be 25 years old and on the 81 grand, then great, but if you are peter bottomley who has been doing it for 50 years, still on 81 grand, if you like, the problem is it's not really a normaljob, it's not really structured in a normal way. some mps, frankly, i stealing a living for 81000 and some frankly are worth a hell of a lot more than that, but it is very hard to build a try system to make that work because
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it's an affront to how democracy is meant to function. it's a difficult question to answer, some should get more, some shouldn't, but how you legislate for that, i have no idea. time, things are coming on. aha, time, things are coming on. pleasure, thank you very much. the world's most powerful leaders have had their most extensive talks yet — on a three hour video conference. china's president xi — and the us president, joe biden, discussed, climate change, trade and taiwan. the chinese warned the americans that encouraging taiwanese independence would be "playing with fire" — while the us warned china it would stand firm against any unilateral moves on taiwan. both sides, emphasised the personal relationship between the two leaders. they first me when each was serving as vice president, under the leadership of barack obama and hujintao. i'm joined now by susan thornton, former acting assistant secretary of state for east asian and pacific affairs. thank you very much for being with us. the one achievements, i suppose, that did come out of this, is that
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neither side wants to go to work. at each site has laid out some pretty firm redlines on taiwan and they are not entirely compatible. yes. firm redlines on taiwan and they are not entirely compatible.— not entirely compatible. yes, i think on taiwan, _ not entirely compatible. yes, i think on taiwan, this - not entirely compatible. yes, i think on taiwan, this was - not entirely compatible. yes, i think on taiwan, this was a - not entirely compatible. yes, i j think on taiwan, this was a big not entirely compatible. yes, i - think on taiwan, this was a big part of the conversation, obviously. i think the upshot is the two agreed to disagree as they always have on the taiwan issue, but we are really looking to try to do is get some claris signalling back and forth between beijing and washington and also with type a involved, to make sure people know what is going to happen and what the other cytoplasmic and ten so that we don't have a conflict here. i think the two leaders are getting worried about that and start a set out that we might have a conversation from a get our militaries together, talk more about this, and that is all to the good. i more about this, and that is all to the aood. ., ., , ., the good. i am looking at this and i'm the good. i am looking at this and i'm thinking _ the good. i am looking at this and i'm thinking long _ the good. i am looking at this and i'm thinking long gone _ the good. i am looking at this and i'm thinking long gone are - the good. i am looking at this and. i'm thinking long gone are the days of the red phone. you now zoom in and wave at each other as these two dead, resuming their relationship they had as vice president. joe
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biden said at the beginning of this what he wanted to establish why some guardrails. at the end, there was no joint statement. would you have expected one after three hours of talks? ~ , . ., ., , expected one after three hours of talks? , ., , ., talks? well, the expectations for this meeting _ talks? well, the expectations for this meeting were _ talks? well, the expectations for this meeting were set _ talks? well, the expectations for this meeting were set very - talks? well, the expectations for this meeting were set very low. i j this meeting were set very low. i think basically they met that low expectation. there were no outcomes to the talks. no announcements, such to the talks. no announcements, such to speak, but what i think they managed to do is set again this kind of clean airtime managed to do is set again this kind of clean air time on that regular communication between the us and china is ok, it's expected, and it's needed. we haven't really had that kind of communication channels with china for the last several years. so i think that is an accomplishment in and of itself that and let a bunch of people start having more conversations and getting clear communication lines to try to avoid some of these potential mishaps that are out there. the some of these potential mishaps that are out there-— are out there. the somewhat disappointing _ are out there. the somewhat disappointing thing _ are out there. the somewhat disappointing thing to - are out there. the somewhat disappointing thing to me - are out there. the somewhat - disappointing thing to me having just come back from glasgow is that
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the chinese side said cooperation on climate change was conditional on stability across the spectrum of their relationship, and i slightly hope to having watched john kerry and its opposite number last week that actually, it would be set aside from all of the other things that are going on. does that worry you? well, i think the attorneys have been pretty clear, if the relationship is set on a constructive fighting and, you know, the president of china tucked in his remarks about some mutual respect, we have to work together in a cooperative way for coexistence and we have to, you know, i have win—win outcomes. we are not going to have this zero—sum hostile competition if it can be constructive, then i would think they will work together but the united states on climate change. a statement last week that glasgow was promising, but it was really just a skeleton architecture. it needs to be filled in with a lot of substances items. we will see in the wake of this phone call if that can happen ifjohn kerry can get down to
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some real brass tacks with his counterpart. some real brass tacks with his counterpart-— some real brass tacks with his counterpart. some real brass tacks with his counterart. �*, .,, counterpart. let's hope so, we need somethin: counterpart. let's hope so, we need something quickly. _ counterpart. let's hope so, we need something quickly. susan, - counterpart. let's hope so, we need something quickly. susan, lovely . counterpart. let's hope so, we need something quickly. susan, lovely to| something quickly. susan, lovely to talk to you. thank you. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: tear gas and water cannon are deployed to help polish forces deter migrants trying to force their way across the borderfrom belarus. we'll have the latest from our correspondent there, next. here, a retired police officer has won his high court bid to hold a former aide of libya's colonel gaddafi jointly liable for the shooting of his friend and colleague 37 years ago. pc yvonne fletcher was killed while policing a demonstration against the former libyan leader outside the country's embassy in central london.the case was brought byjohn murray, who promised he would bring those responsible to justice. the trial over the last few days should never have been necessary. if you go back six years ago
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to the arrest, a report was submitted by the cps recommending that he be prosecuted. the cps agreed with that report, but due to late interference from the home office and the foreign office, they refused vital evidence to be used, the prosecution did not go ahead. the government's interference in the judicial process was disgraceful. the former cricketer — azeem rafiq — has given distressing evidence to a parliamentary committee today, about the bullying and racial abuse he suffered while playing for yorkshire. he was close to tears, as he told lawmakers, that he felt "isolated and humiliated" — and that the club treated him, in an �*inhuman' way. mr rafiq said, there's institutional racism across english cricket. a warning — this report from dan roan — does contain some offensive language.
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how are you feeling, azeem? all right. his allegations have already plunged yorkshire cricket into crisis. today, azeem rafiq brought them to westminster, laying bare the ordeal he says he and other asian players were subjected to at his former club, including a racist term aimed at his pakistani heritage. there were comments such as, "you lot sit over there, near the toilets." "elephant washers." the word expletive used constantly. and there just seemed to be an acceptance in the institution from the leaders and no one ever stamped it out. i felt isolated, humiliated at times. struggling to contain his emotions, rafiq went on to describe his experience at headingley after his son was stillborn in 2017. through that time, the treatment that i received from some of the club officials was inhuman. they weren't really bothered about the fact that
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i was at training one day and i get a phone call to say there is no heartbeat. rafiq claimed former team—mate gary ballance used the name kevin as a derogatory term to refer to any player of colour and that this was an open secret in the england dressing room. that another england star, alex hales, called his dog kevin because he was black. a disgusting joke, rafiq called it. and what of yorkshire's england captain, joe root, who last week said he couldn't recall any racist behaviour at the club. he never engaged in racist language. ido... i found it hurtful. rooty was involved, before he started playing for england, he was involved in a lot of the socialising nights out where i was being called a expletive. but, again, itjust shows, and he might not remember it, but itjust shows how normal it was in that environment, in that institution. rafiq also asked about former england captain michael vaughan, who strongly denied the whistle—blower�*s claims, since corroborated by two other cricketers, that he made a racist remark to a group of asian players.
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he said this yesterday, actually, that his reputation is being trashed unfairly. what's your reaction to that? i think it's important, on michael, that we don't make it all about michael. the simple... look, it was a long time ago, michael might not remember it, as i said about earlier, because it doesn't mean anything to him. rafiq also describing, in harrowing detail, an incident that occurred away from headingley early on in his career. my first instance of drinking, i actually got pinned down at my local cricket club and red wine got poured down my throat. how old were you? 15. 15? 15 years old. the racial harassment rafiq suffered at headingley has sparked a growing number of further allegations in cricket, at yorkshire and beyond. do you think it's institutional in cricket more widely? - yes, i do. there's a real problem here, notjust yorkshire,
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throughout the country. i'm joined now by sunder katwala — the director of british future, a think tank focused on racial integration and national identity. hejoins me from dartford in kent lovely to have you with us on the programme. what do you make of what you have heard in the testimony today? it you have heard in the testimony toda ? . , you have heard in the testimony toda ? ., , ,., ., you have heard in the testimony toda ? ., , ., ., today? it was powerful and brave of mr rafi. today? it was powerful and brave of mr rafiq- it — today? it was powerful and brave of mr rafiq. it was _ today? it was powerful and brave of mr rafiq. it was a _ today? it was powerful and brave of mr rafiq. it was a lot _ today? it was powerful and brave of mr rafiq. it was a lot of— mr rafiq. it was a lot of shocking detail that came out, but i think everybody who had that will have a power fall sense now of what needs to change and the culture at yorkshire cricket club and the wider culture of cricket.— culture of cricket. people need to seak culture of cricket. people need to speak out. _ culture of cricket. people need to speak out, don't _ culture of cricket. people need to speak out, don't they? _ culture of cricket. people need to speak out, don't they? that - culture of cricket. people need to speak out, don't they? that was. speak out, don't they? that was pretty obvious from what he said, that he couldn't recall any racism coming from joe root, but they abuse he was getting was normalised by people who are not racist. i he was getting was normalised by people who are not racist.- people who are not racist. i think that was a _ people who are not racist. i think that was a powerful—
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people who are not racist. i think that was a powerful point, - people who are not racist. i think that was a powerful point, that i that was a powerful point, that there were people engaging in this and that and everyone else was a bystander and there wasn't that standard. i mean, in is own account as well, it is very difficult to speak out. you are under a lot of pressure to not speak out as the victim, as the people around it, so if you don't have a culture and an institution, the leadership that actually makes sure that tolerance and culture is in place and that we are not tolerating this kind of toxic atmosphere. it's going to be very hard for young players to speak out when it's, you know, it's international players. it's people who captain their country, in charge of a culture, so i think we need institutions, managements, leadership sent boards to make sure the culture is there so people can speak out. i the culture is there so people can speak out-— the culture is there so people can seak out. ., ., i. speak out. i would agree with you. the troubling _ speak out. i would agree with you. the troubling part _ speak out. i would agree with you. the troubling part of— speak out. i would agree with you. the troubling part of this, - speak out. i would agree with you. the troubling part of this, though, | the troubling part of this, though, is that these attitudes seem to be still in place as the story exploded in the last few weeks. the former chairman of yorkshire said the club is not wanting to apologise or take the recommendations of the panel
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seriously. sx, who are also facing similar racism allegations are engaging with that but it doesn't seem that yorkshire is. i engaging with that but it doesn't seem that yorkshire is.- seem that yorkshire is. i think there has _ seem that yorkshire is. i think there has been _ seem that yorkshire is. i think there has been a _ seem that yorkshire is. i think there has been a break- seem that yorkshire is. i think there has been a break there, | seem that yorkshire is. i think| there has been a break there, i watershed, you have a change of chairman, lord patel who has come will he have the power and space that he needs? i don't think we would've had this response. this has been going on for 20—30 years. we wouldn't have at this response three years ago in terms of the way sponsors have acted, that way the ecb acted as the story broke, so there is now an acknowledgement come i think a lot more is going to come out, yorkshire has set up a whistle—blowing hotline can i think we need to treat this as a reconciliation moment in the gain of cricket so that we can hear about the pain and then actually decide how is it going to move forward? what needs to change? i think it has to be a moment to see change. sports has to be a part of the answer in our society. we are looking for things that we do together, you know, emotional experiences, shared identities. cricket, sports, should
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have all of that. it's so painful when you hear someone like azeem rafiq saying that he would not tell his son to run for a game of cricket. that's an absolute tragedy. asian representation in this part down 40% since 2010. cricket has got a problem. thank you very much for coming on. a problem. thank you very much for coming on-— polish police say seven officers have been injured in clashes on the border with belarus, as a group of migrants attempted to cross into poland. border guards used tear gas and water cannon against migrants who threw stones, bricks and bottles, and tried to break down a fence. thousands of people are stranded in makeshift camps — in freezing temperatures. our correspondent — steve rosenberg —sent this report from belarus. first, they'd asked to be let in. now they were demanding. in belarus, the migrants have
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run out of patience. well, these are polish water cannons being employed, and that is because around midday, the migrants on the belarusian side of the border started throwing stones and rocks and branches, and all chaos has broken out. the polish forces have responded with water, but also with gas. it's quite difficult to breathe. we don't have a life here. four nights, five nights of not sleeping. my eyes... for two hours, the border crossing was like a battleground. the european union says belarus is using migrants as weapons. to destabilise europe. the belarusian soldiers stood and watched. they did nothing to stop
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the migrants who were storming the border. "why not?" i asked this officer. his reply, "no comment." and while water cannon fought off the attack on the eu's border, the young and the vulnerable took shelter. belarus may have engineered this crisis, but that doesn't change the fact that it's people who are suffering. this is an actor from kurdistan. his brother sold his house so they could afford their tickets and visas to belarus. where do you go now? i don't know. to iraq, to europe, to that camp, to minsk, we don't know where we are going. we are like a bull in the stadium, belarus and poland — they kick us. when the violence was over, some of the migrants packed up and moved on.
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they'd come to belarus to try to get into the european union. now it's destination unknown. steve rosenberg, bbc news, belarus. let's look at some of the day's other news. myanmar�*s ousted leader aung san suu kyi is facing more charges — having been accused of election fraud and lawless actions by the military government. she was among 16 people to be charged on tuesday, including myanmar�*s ousted president and the capital city's mayor. ms suu kyi has not been seen in public since a military coup in february removed herfrom office. and the us drug company pfizer has backed a deal to allow its covid—19 treatment pill to be made and sold in developing nations. the agreement with the un—backed medicines patent pool could make the treatment available to half of the world's population. but it excludes several countries that have had large covid—19 outbreaks, including brazil.
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to stay with us. some live reporting from mexico city in the next half—hour. we will be talking migration on the mexico— us border. good evening. we have been spoiled for much of november so far with temperatures well above average for the time of year. we have got some cold weather on the cards eventually. as we head in to next week. for the here and now, this is the picture on tuesday in rotherham quite a lot of cloud around there and another mild day and actually the mild thing continues for the next few days. it will be one or two showers in the forecast, particularly across the north and northwest of the uk with weather fronts trying to push in. but high pressures neverfar away with the southwest and to the east there, as well. so, quite a lot of dry weather as we head through the course of tonight, particularly across england and wales with the cloud that we've seen during tuesday tending to dissipate and clearing the skies. there will be more showers for the north and a breeze across scotland and northern ireland.
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a little bit of a wintry flavour to some of these showers over the highest ground, some sleet and some hail mixed in. it could be a touch of frost for eastern parts of scotland and northeast england, but generally frost free further south. but a fresh start to your wednesday. wednesday, we are between weather systems and a ridge of high pressure holding onto our weather. fairly dry and settled day for many areas, it'll be a day of sunshine and a few showers. most of the showers will be in the north, particularly for northern and western scotland, one or two getting into northwest england and northern ireland. elsewhere, a lot of dry weather with fairly light winds. and more sunshine on wednesday than we've seen over the recent days. interest on a degree or so about nine to 13 degrees but still several degrees above average for this time of year. heading onto wednesday night and into thursday now, the weather front still bringing in some outbreaks of rain and blustery conditions to the north of scotland but high weather keeping things dry elsewhere. and it is going to be mild yet again with the winds coming in from a south westerly direction. a lot of cloud in the best of some sunshine will be found across southern and eastern parts
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and with a bit of a fern effect, the winds will blow over the higher ground we could see temperatures for the east of scotland, 16 or 17 celsius. about ten degrees above average for one or two spots. so, very much mild air is going to be the story for the next few days and a hoarding on through to saturday as well, but then you'll notice the blue colours returning with these northerly winds heading on into sunday. so, still a couple more days of that very mild, but largely dry and settled weather and then time to dig out the winter coat because things are turning colder for sunday into next week. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. after days of political pressure, the british prime minister boris johnson says the rules around mps having second jobs should be tightened up. migrant arrests along the us—mexico border decline for third month in a row, we're live in mexico city with the latest. countries are losing almost half a trillion dollars to tax abuse every year, according to a new report. plus, how one american fisherman scored a 1—in—100 million catch on an otherwise unremarkable day out. we'll explain.
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the number of migrants taken into custody by border officials along the us mexico border has fallen for the third consecutive month — though overall figures are still at record highs. more than 1.3 million arrests have been made since president biden was inaugurated, as people from central america try to reach the us through mexico. our correspondent laura trevelyan joins me now from mexico city. the interesting thing about that is the number of arrests on the border has gone down. does that suggest that something has changed? there is no ruestion that something has changed? there is no question that _ that something has changed? there is no question that the _ that something has changed? there is no question that the mexicans - that something has changed? there is no question that the mexicans are - no question that the mexicans are under pressure from the united states where what looks like uncontrolled migration is a really bad luck for president biden. the mexicans has stepped up enforcement
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both at the border with the united states and at their southern border with guatemala which is where so many migrants from central and south america crossed hoping to go through mexico and get to the united states. so when you have the president of mexico meeting with president biden on thursday for the first north american leaders summit in five years he no doubt will be saying, "look, i've stepped up enforcement. "was up but you said the record levels of 1.7 million arrests at the mexican border in the last fiscal year alone. mexican border in the last fiscal yearalone. i mexican border in the last fiscal year alone. i sat down with the us ambassador to mexico to ask him why the situation has gotten so much worse under president biden. there are multiple factors that are contributing to migration movements not only here but all across the world. one is the pandemic, people are fleeing from their countries because of the pandemic realities that they are facing. two, economics, the poverty that exists in many places in central america and south
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america _ and three, the political instability that you see in places like venezuela and other countries, nicaragua where people are basically fleeing countries where democracy has failed. so that the ambassador telling me it's all to do with the root causes of poverty in central america. but of poverty in central america. but of course it's also true that our own correspondent has spoken to people in those caravans of migrants heading towards mexico to the united states. they have said they're coming because they think that president biden will be more welcoming than president trump was. all sector of a democratic government in washington for the post—factor of economic difficulties, climate change coming from central america or is it a mix of both, do you think laura? it’s of both, do you think laura? it's definitely all _ of both, do you think laura? it�*s definitely all of those things. if you just think about what is happening in central and south
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america at the moment, the number of issues that you have there, you have venezuela complete almost total economic collapse, you have nicaragua where president ortega just declared himself the winner of an election in which he arrested all of his opponents. you have absolutely record levels of crime as well in el salvador. there are so many reasons for people to move. what's so interesting is immigration analyst have been telling me how the technology now enables people to connect immediately. in the old days it would take three weeks for a letter to reject relative in mexico city come to texas and settle with me. now there are these massive whatsapp groups, people monitoring what's happening in real time. so there are huge problems here. one of there are huge problems here. one of the most interesting thing, it might seem counterintuitive but so many haitians are trying to reach the united states through mexico. not people who fled haiti recently after the killing of the president injuly but haitians who went to central and southern america and were treating
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appallingly once covid hit. they are now trying to reach the united states too. it's the old story of a search for a better life was of new technology thrown in. fast forward to thursday- _ technology thrown in. fast forward to thursday. what _ technology thrown in. fast forward to thursday. what do _ technology thrown in. fast forward to thursday. what do you - technology thrown in. fast forward to thursday. what do you expect l technology thrown in. fast forward l to thursday. what do you expect out of this meeting? it’s to thursday. what do you expect out of this meeting?— of this meeting? it's called the three amigos _ of this meeting? it's called the three amigos summit. - of this meeting? it's called the three amigos summit. it - of this meeting? it's called the three amigos summit. it is - of this meeting? it's called the three amigos summit. it is thej three amigos summit. it is the canadian, the american, the mexican leaders get togetherfor canadian, the american, the mexican leaders get together for this north american leader summit. they didn't have an president dropped because i guess there wasn't a tremendous amount to talk about that trump wanted to build a border wall. it's euphemistically called migration patterns in the region with means mexico police stop the migration to the united states but also covid, climate change and the americans to see their back door of north america as this vibrant economic zone. if only mexico was less corrupt, less crime realism, few mexicans would try to come to the united states. but they see a huge possibility in this developing nation. it's a chance to talk about all the
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possibilities, friendships, ties between mexico and canada with his tough doctor lynn as well. much more from ou tough doctor lynn as well. much more from you for— tough doctor lynn as well. much more from you for mexico _ tough doctor lynn as well. much more from you for mexico city _ tough doctor lynn as well. much more from you for mexico city through - from you for mexico city through the week. thanks for being with us. 7 ? tough talk. a jury in the us state of wisconsin, has been sent out to deliberate the case of kyle rittenhouse, the teenager who shot dead two men and injured a third with an assault rifle, during protests in the city of kenosha. the violence erupted in august 2020, after police shot jacob blake, a black man. rittenhouse said he'd travelled to kenosha from his home in illinois to help people, protect their properties from looters. the case has come to symbolise different things for different slices of america — the shootings happened just months after the police murder of george floyd. prosecutors said kyle rittenhouse walked away from the shootings like some "hero from a western" — the defence says he was exercising his second amendment rights and was acting in self defence. the bbc�*s nomia iqbal has been following the trial and joins us now from kenosha.
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talk to us about the way that the jury talk to us about the way that the jury was sent out today. i know there were 18 jurors and they been whittled down to 12, how did that work? . �* , '!~ work? that's right. there were 18 and basically _ work? that's right. there were 18 and basically they _ work? that's right. there were 18 and basically they were _ work? that's right. there were 18 and basically they were whittled l and basically they were whittled down to 12 using this process by which picking out six numbers from a tumbler which was an interesting move, some people pointing out it's not often see defendants do that. those six numbers will be the jurors that are on standby. the 12 jurors which are made up of seven women of five deliberating their verdict behind me. they been doing this for several hours now. the only moment we heard from them was when they passed a note to the judge asking for copies of the instructions. these are the instructions given to the jurors to assess the charges and it was to look at the issue of
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self—defense and provocation which is at the centre of the trial. the events of that night are not disputed. the fact is that kyle rittenhouse did kill two people and injure a third on august the 25th. what thejurors injure a third on august the 25th. what the jurors have to do is analyse his actions. they have to work out was it reasonable what he did, was a justified, was he in fear of his life? it's not up to the defence to prove it it's up to the prosecution to disprove it. the burden of proof is always been on them. if they want to win the case they have to convince a jury beyond a reasonable doubt that kyle rittenhouse's behaviour was on reasonable, deadly force was unreasonable and there are five charges he faces. they are complicated, to be honest with the you should know about the series charge which is to quote for baden but not verbatim, first degree homicide. this is to do with the death of the second man that kyle rittenhouse shot dead, anthony huber. the prosecution say he chased
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after rittenhouse after he shot the first manjoseph rose involved with has to work out was that in self—defense with up if they decide that he should be convicted specifically on that charge, first—degree intentional homicide than he faces a mandatory life sentence. i than he faces a mandatory life sentence-— than he faces a mandatory life sentence. ., , , sentence. i said it was divisive. the governor — sentence. i said it was divisive. the governor of _ sentence. i said it was divisive. the governor of wisconsin - sentence. i said it was divisive. i the governor of wisconsin putting the national guard on standby. yes. it's not entirely _ the national guard on standby. jazz it's not entirely surprising giving the unrest that happen here in kenosha last year. they are not leaving anything to chance. there are 500 troops on standby for kudos to police and said they are not going to close roads or anything, they don't want to impact people's daily routines too much. but this is a case that has polarised people. there are protests happening on the courthouse steps. it's notjust a verdict on kyle rittenhouse is behaviour. many people are seeing this as a referendum on so many issues that polarised americans. particular on gold culture. for the conservative groups who largely back
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kyle rittenhouse they see this heroic teenager who is standing up to lawlessness about they are worried that if he is convicted what it might mean for self—defense about that you have the more liberal groups who see kyle rittenhouse is a reckless teenager who showed up in a city he had no business being end. they're worried if it is cleared of all charges and if he is by the way you can never be retried for this crime again, they are worried that that sent out a dangerous message potentially to people across america that you can turn up at a volatile process with an arm weapon and not face any consequences. quite a few sides feel they have a lot to lose when that verdict is finally delivered. i when that verdict is finally delivered.— when that verdict is finally delivered. ~ ., delivered. i know you will come back to us when — delivered. i know you will come back to us when the _ delivered. i know you will come back to us when the verdict _ delivered. i know you will come back to us when the verdict is _ delivered. i know you will come back to us when the verdict is before - delivered. i know you will come back to us when the verdict is before us. | to us when the verdict is before us. thank you for the moment. congresswoman liz cheney is no longer recognised as a member of the republican party in wyoming, the state she represents in congress. the decision to kick her out of the state republican party is all part of the escalating battle she is having with the leadership, after she voted to impeach donald trump over his role in the capitol riots
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onjanuary sixth. the congresswoman has described her vote to impeach as an act of conscience — and she is now one of only two republican representatives on the congressional select committee looking into the events of jan sixth. former adviser to president george w bush, ron christie is with us. good evening. they don't come more conservative than liz cheney. she is republican royalty, daughter of the vice president, former vice president dick cheney. what does it tell you that she is no longer considered a viable republican in wyoming? considered a viable republican in omin.? considered a viable republican in omin: ? ., i. considered a viable republican in omina? ., wyoming? good evening to you as well. i wyoming? good evening to you as well- i think _ wyoming? good evening to you as well. i think it — wyoming? good evening to you as well. i think it tells _ wyoming? good evening to you as well. i think it tells you _ wyoming? good evening to you as well. i think it tells you that - wyoming? good evening to you as well. i think it tells you that the i well. i think it tells you that the republican party in wyoming has been overtaken, overrun by team trump. it's notjust dick cheney was a congressman from wyoming for ten years, it's also lynn cheney her mother who was the chair of the national endowment for the humanities. a very prominent position. one of the most prominent republican families other than
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perhaps the bush family and america. it tells you a lot that they deem her to not be republican in good standing. i her to not be republican in good standinu. ., �* ~ ., her to not be republican in good standinu. ., �* ~' ., ,, standing. i don't know whether you know how this _ standing. i don't know whether you know how this vote _ standing. i don't know whether you know how this vote was _ standing. i don't know whether you know how this vote was carried - know how this vote was carried out but i think it was 31 — 29. there are court clearly 29 people who vote on the republican committee who didn't feel very comfortable about this. in didn't feel very comfortable about this. . , didn't feel very comfortable about this. , ., didn't feel very comfortable about this. ._ ., , didn't feel very comfortable about this. ., , ., , this. in the way that this works is that ou this. in the way that this works is that you have _ this. in the way that this works is that you have select _ this. in the way that this works is | that you have select committees. these select committees are in charge of approving slates for people to run from everything from agricultural commissioner and of course the representative, the loan representative to wyoming. what the central committee did on a 31—29 vote is that we no longer recognise you as a republican. i would caution our view is however to recognise it is the voters who cast their lever in the november elections, not the central committees that determine who willow will not be a member of congress. so liz cheney it may be stripped of her party but she still
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a representative to congress without what about her primary coming out? it's good be brutal. she has three other people running against her. she has one of the candidates running against her food been endorsed by the 45th president of a president trump. liz is going to have a lot of time to consider how best to beat back that support but i genuine believed that her numbers, given what they are right now, she's a long shot to win reelection, i'm sad to say. a long shot to win reelection, i'm sad to say-— sad to say. some of those republicans _ sad to say. some of those republicans who - sad to say. some of those republicans who have - sad to say. some of those republicans who have left sad to say. some of those - republicans who have left the party have echoed what you say and probably stronger terms that it's become a cult and that this is the rule of personality over policy. we've had some talk from chris christie the former governor of new jersey in recent days saying there's another way to win without donald trump. of course he points to the recent results in virginia and in newjersey. are you starting to hear that more or is it still donald
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trump that rules the parties? both. i hear significant _ trump that rules the parties? both. i hear significant numbers _ trump that rules the parties? both. i hear significant numbers of- trump that rules the parties? entry. i hear significant numbers of staff and members of congress who say it's not about the cult of personality, it's not about when individual was a part of course they don't want to say that publicly unless donald trump decides to primary them, to take them out in a reelection bid. but governor christie's bookjust came out today. he's one voice i think you're going to hear a lot more from in the coming days and weeks to come to articulate a different path forward. alan to enact and intrinsic or their representative from illinois elected not to run again, a number of republicans who have said enough already. the question becomes donald trump already suck all the oxygen out of the room? we will have to find that out in the weeks to come. it's going to be fascinating midterms next year. we are gearing up midterms next year. we are gearing up for it already. thank you very much. stay with us on bbc news, still to come —
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russia calls the united states hypocritical. russia calls the united states hypocritical. the russian missile launch that led to panic on the international space station. the prince of wales and duchess of cornwall are in the middle east for the first major royal tour by a senior member of the royal family since the pandemic began. they've arrived injordan where they'll celebrate the country's centenary and focus on preserving the country's rich cultural heritage. clarence house said the visit emphasised the importance the government placed on its relationship with the middle east. jonny dymond has more. for the first time in a long time, a royal arrival. charles and camilla came to this key middle eastern ally to deepen ties with britain. it helps thatjordan is a monarchy as well. friendship between the two royal families goes back decades. prince charles thanked the king and people ofjordan for taking
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in so many in need of help. ijust wanted to say particularly just how hugely we all admirejordan for looking after so many refugees. then, they went out, into this biblical land to see the spot wherejesus is said to have been baptised. and here, they paused, away from the turmoil of the present to make contact with the past. this might look like a tourist trip, but it is much bigger than that. it is about building on a key relationship with a long—standing ally, and raising the profile of issues like the environment and religious tolerance. issues that the prince has embraced for decades, but are now a much, much bigger deal.
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the royals are back, and very welcome. countries are losing almost half a trillion dollars to tax abuse every year, according to a new report out today. the research, published by a consortium of tax justice campaigners, estimated that losses reached $483 billion in 2021, that figure made up of cross—border corporate tax abuse by major corporations and offshore tax evasion by the superich. the uk is the worst offender, but the us also plays a big role. on this programme we have talked before about the role of south dakota, a state which takes the dubious title as being one of the world's foremost tax havens.
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my next guest has been investigating that very topic, who it benefits, and equally who it harms. casey michel is the author of american kleptocracy and joins me now. good to have you with us on the programme. it's been in the headlines very recently because of the panama papers. as i say, we focus very much on south dakota. how is south dakota in your view, from your investigation become almost the new switzerland?— new switzerland? that's a fantastic ruestion. new switzerland? that's a fantastic question- in _ new switzerland? that's a fantastic question. in many— new switzerland? that's a fantastic question. in many ways _ new switzerland? that's a fantastic question. in many ways that - new switzerland? that's a fantastic question. in many ways that is - new switzerland? that's a fantastic question. in many ways that is the | question. in many ways that is the trillion dollar question. how is it that this state right in the middle of america, so few of us paying any attention to it and do these offshore transformation right here in the us, why is it, how is it that south dakota seems to have leapfrogged not only so many other american states but so many other traditional offshore jurisdictions themselves? we are only still learning about the depths of the magnitude of that transformation for the you're exactly right, as you
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just mentioned one month ago with a root lease of the pandora papers the biggest offshore leak we've ever seen we finally, finally, finally have a glimpse into how south dakota has made this transformation for that and more importantly who has been taken advantage and what that means for everybody else. who been taken advantage and what that means for everybody else.— means for everybody else. who is drivin: means for everybody else. who is driving ms- _ means for everybody else. who is driving ms- ? _ means for everybody else. who is driving ms. ? clearly _ means for everybody else. who is driving ms. ? clearly local- driving ms. ? clearly local governments, like all state governments, like all state governments they are clearly driving it. but which part of high finance is driving a? we it. but which part of high finance is driving a?— is driving a? we have really to realities. _ is driving a? we have really to realities, to _ is driving a? we have really to realities, to interested - is driving a? we have really to realities, to interested partiesj realities, to interested parties that have come together to transform south dakota into this brand—new cayman islands on the prairie. on the one year and you have these kleptocratic, oligarchic figures, these crooked or criminal politicians, arms traffickers, narco traffickers, human traffickers any and all who have a little bit of dirty money burning holes in their pockets to get to be hidden, mood,
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laundered while nonetheless being controlled by those same individuals without any of us being able to track any of those funds to themselves or that you have this kind of demand—side for these financial secrecy mechanisms. all the other hand right here in the united states of america you have legislators in these smaller states and these kind of overlook states that don't have a lot of the domestic economy, a lot of natural resources or manufacturing base that are looking for ways to raise revenues themselves and realising they can do that by creating this kind of financial secrecy architecture within the states themselves with that bet is to say themselves with that bet is to say the us remains a federal apology, these individual american states still have certain abilities to create this sort of financial secrecy, tools, provisions and protections that as we see is south dakota, the state legislatures been only too happy to create. were talking about these financial
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secrecy mechanisms, particular about trust and south dakota. anonymous trust, perpetualtrust trust and south dakota. anonymous trust, perpetual trust that have attracted hundreds and hundreds of billions of dollars that we can't track, we can't trace for that we only have a small, small idea of who's been taken advantage. even in a small fraction that we know about thanks to the pandora papers, we've already seen what kind of political figures, will garner rights abusers, environmental destroyers have been taking their money to south dakota to hide, to launder while nonetheless controlling that money. it's really those two. the demand—side one—handed also the supply side, those legislators in south dakota creating all of the incentives for that money to find a home right here in the american midwest. i home right here in the american midwest. .., �* home right here in the american midwest. .. �* ., home right here in the american midwest. �* ., ., ., ., midwest. i can't wait to read it for the american _ midwest. i can't wait to read it for the american kleptocracy. - midwest. i can't wait to read it for the american kleptocracy. thankl midwest. i can't wait to read it for i the american kleptocracy. thank you very much indeed. russia has confirmed it conducted a weapons test in space, targeting an unused russian satellite. the us said the test had endangered astronauts on board the international space station
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and called moscow �*dangerous and irresponsible'. russia's defence ministry said the debris created posed no threat. here's our science correspondent rebecca morelle. it was a moment of high drama on the international space station, with an emergency call from mission control. we are sorry for the early call, but we were recently informed of a satellite break—up and need to have you guys start reviewing the safe haven procedure. on board, the seven strong crew including two cosmonauts from russia were told to take shelter inside their return capsules. it was to avoid hundreds of thousands of pieces of space debris created after russia tested a missile system blowing up an old soviet spy satellite. nasa said it was unthinkable that russia would endanger lives. the russian foreign minister denied it was endangering peaceful space activities. and travelling at speeds of around
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14,000, tiny pieces of debris can cause huge damage. an ordinary stainless steel spoon that was hit at 1.6 kilometres per second by something two millimetres across, so you can see it has gone straight through. a fleck of paint caused this crack in the window of the international space station back in 2016. but larger fragments are causing much more concern. something the size of a golf ball, for example, roughly about three centimetres across, if that were to hit the space station, that would be large enough to go through the shields on the space station and cause catastrophic damage. nasa says the next few days will be critical. the space station passes through the debris field every 90 minutes on the worry is that some of the fragments will remain in orbit for years to come, adding to the growing junk surrounding our planet.
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billy coppersmith has been a lobster fisherman for near on 40 years, he has seen it all. well he thought he had. billy was out sailing earlier this month in casco bay near portland when he reeled in his trap and noticed a blue—looking lobster among the others. at first he thought it was a toy, but no, this was a crustacean. and after checking with colleagues back at base it became apparent he had caught a cotton candy lobster, which is extremly rare. in fact industry officials say there's only one in every 100 million. billy named his lobster haddie, after his grandaughter who had just turned nine. there are no plans to sell or cook haddie, they are speaking to local organisations to see if anyone is willing to adopt her. producer and my floor manager peter have been researching this and i can
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tell you that they can live up to a hundred years. so be careful if you want to adopt. also, how do we know it's a girl officer? apparently they keep their eggs underneath their tails. for nine months. hello there. much of the month of november so far has been very mild, temperatures generally about 3 or 4 degrees above average at the moment. the next few days it staying mostly mild. some rate around in the north, things are likely to turn colder towards the end of this ten day forecast. but let's start with the here and now. high pressure not far away so that's going to bring us quite a lot of dry and settled weather of the next few days with a high pressure to the and east of the uk as well. we have got weather fronts pushing across the north and showers on wednesday moving in across parts of scotland, northern ireland, one or two into the northwest of england.
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could be a little bit wintry over the highest ground in scotland particular during the morning. temperatures still above average between about nine to 13 degrees on wednesday. just a degree or so down over what we've had over recent days. moving through into thursday we've still got this very mild south—westerly flow of air as this warm front pushes its way eastwards. in fact on thursday largely dry, subtle day, a bit of sunshine here and there but clearly cloudy skies for most. we've got that rain across the north of scotland and with a bit of fern effect as the winds blow over the higher ground. to the east of scotland we could see temperatures as high as 16 or 17 degrees with a really quite widely temperatures up in the mid teens. so the average this time of year is about 9 degrees or so for top temperature, somewhere in the middle of the uk. so we are about five celsius above average for this time of year. looking towards the end of the working week now, high presssure still sits to the south that we got this waving weather front, maybe a bit of rain to the northwest of scotland as we head on into friday. friday then a very similar day to thursday. again, predominantly dry,
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spells of sunshine around, light winds towards the south. and temperatures yet again are likely to reach mid teens, 16 or even 17 celsius in somewhere like aberdeen for instance. can't be ruled out with that fern affect still around. looking towards the weekend and high pressure still with us. we've got these weather fronts just trying to make inroads to the north of the uk. on saturday could well bring some rain to scotland, perhaps to northern ireland as well. much of england and wales keeping the dry weather for a good part of the day and will feel mild again in the sunshine, 12 or 13 degrees. but back into single figures further north and that's it hint of things to come as we head through saturday night and into sunday. this cold front pushes its way south and that's going to open the doors for these northerly winds to come in behind that so heading through into the early hours of sunday a different air mass around coming in for a more of a northerly direction. so it will feel different. first thing sunday morning i think were likely to see seems a bit like theirs.
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certainly quite a widespread frost around. so a different feel, we've got northerly winds bringing frost and also scattered showers, particularly around the east coast through the irish sea. many areas having quite a bit of sunshine but some of these showers particularly over the higher ground in the north could have a bit of a wintry flavour to them. we are looking at temperatures generally in the mid to high single through the course of next week it does look like we will have high pressure becoming established to the west of the uk with northerly winds. later in the week low pressure approaches but there is some uncertainty about the position at this low pressure. don't take it too literally. it could be a bit further east. so a mild start to our ten day outlook, colder into next week but then as that low pressure approaches some uncertainty later. if it is further east it could mean those cold northerly winds last a little bit longer. bye— bye.
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tonight at ten — english cricket is "institutionally" racist, according to the former yorkshire player azeem rafiq. he told a parliamentary committee at westminster that he'd suffered constant racism during his time at the club. pretty early on, me and other people from an asian background, it was comments such as, "you lot sit over there near the toilets." he said the treatment he'd suffered at yorkshire was inhuman and the problems he's faced were widespread in domestic cricket. we'll have more on mr rafiq's evidence and the questions facing the game's authorities. also tonight... as labour unveils its plans to ban mps' second jobs, borisjohnson rushes in with plans of his own. the liverpool terror suspect was a failed asylum seeker who'd been refused
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permission to stay in the uk seven years ago.

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