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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 15, 2021 10:45pm-11:00pm GMT

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'thing that thing that oldies don't other thing that oldies don't understand is why it is that on your nhs records, privately but available in the wider domain online, your two jabs are recorded but, until now in england, for sure, you're booster jab was not? if it's so important, why isn't it? i had my two weeks ago, it's still not there. i'm told tonight that boris is saying it'll happen. well, if it's urgent and important, it might have happened one might think.— one might think. looking at the time, it's 10:45pm _ one might think. looking at the time, it's 10:45pm - _ one might think. looking at the time, it's 10:45pm - if- one might think. looking at the time, it's 10:45pm - if i - one might think. looking at the time, it's 10:45pm - if i were i time, it's10:1i5pm — if i were your bossin time, it's10:1i5pm — if i were your boss in portugal, i get in trouble for so late. the front page of the financial times is saying that
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bosses will soon be banned from calling out of ours. this is something that has come about because of the increase in remote working, the fear that rather than improving worklife balance, itjust means work and some of into all hours of the day —— evaporating in all hours of the day and there's no cutoff point. all hours of the day and there's no cutoff point-— cutoff point. one part of the story that's interesting _ cutoff point. one part of the story that's interesting is _ cutoff point. one part of the story that's interesting is bosses - cutoff point. one part of the story that's interesting is bosses won'tl that's interesting is bosses won't be able _ that's interesting is bosses won't be able to— that's interesting is bosses won't be able to e—mail out of hours because, _ be able to e—mail out of hours because, as you quite rightly say, if people — because, as you quite rightly say, if people are set up in front of their— if people are set up in front of their computer at home anyway, that might— their computer at home anyway, that might be _ their computer at home anyway, that might be replying to work e—mails and might— might be replying to work e—mails and might be working odd hours. the other_ and might be working odd hours. the other part _ and might be working odd hours. the other part of — and might be working odd hours. the other part of the stories that employers will be responsible for increased — employers will be responsible for increased energy and communication costs for— increased energy and communication costs for workers. 50 employers might _ costs for workers. 50 employers might be — costs for workers. 50 employers might be facing bills for laptops, wi-fi. _ might be facing bills for laptops, wi—fi, things like that now, and you'll— wi—fi, things like that now, and you'll see — wi—fi, things like that now, and you'll see claiming who are working from home — you'll see claiming who are working from home. but that does for the willingness of employers to allow them _ willingness of employers to allow them to _ willingness of employers to allow them to work from home will be interesting going forward in portugal. interesting going forward in portu~al. ., �* ., ,
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interesting going forward in portu~al. ., , portugal. david, don't get any ideas about sending _ portugal. david, don't get any ideas about sending me _ portugal. david, don't get any ideas about sending me an _ portugal. david, don't get any ideas about sending me an invoice - portugal. david, don't get any ideas about sending me an invoice for - portugal. david, don't get any ideas| about sending me an invoice for your energy bills. but it's an interesting point, isn't it? it is, and my initial— interesting point, isn't it? it is, and my initial reaction - interesting point, isn't it? it is, and my initial reaction to - interesting point, isn't it? it is, and my initial reaction to the i interesting point, isn't it? it 3 and my initial reaction to the story was, how would certain former prime ministers get on who used to regularly reach staff at li—s a. m. 7 how might an heir to the throne who they tell me has a reputation of bringing up his staff all hours of the day and night? than i thought of working for an organisation, the bbc, and also another former employer of mine in football, and if they weren't able to bring me out of hours, good news desk goodness knows what would've happened. that hours, good news desk goodness knows what would've happened.— what would've happened. that may be the oint, what would've happened. that may be the point. there _ what would've happened. that may be the point, there are _ what would've happened. that may be the point, there are some _ what would've happened. that may be the point, there are some areas - what would've happened. that may be the point, there are some areas of- the point, there are some areas of work where it's just impossible to not be contacted out of hours. but the other exemption they've made interestingly is for businesses where there are ten or fewer people, i suppose it's a recognition that
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this is to allow those small businesses that rely on a bit of flexibility and perhaps family—run businesses, they will get caught up in the. ~ , ,., , businesses, they will get caught up inthe. , ~ businesses, they will get caught up inthe. , . ., , in the. absolutely. we are “ust cominu in the. absolutely. we are “ust coming tofi in the. absolutely. we are “ust coming to gripsi in the. absolutely. we are “ust coming to grips with i in the. absolutely. we are “ust coming to grips with someh in the. absolutely. we are just coming to grips with some of. in the. absolutely. we are just i coming to grips with some of the medium—term implications of lockdown, the fact that people are working _ lockdown, the fact that people are working from home more than they use to. i working from home more than they use to i imagine— working from home more than they use to. i imagine some employers will be wondering _ to. i imagine some employers will be wondering why they are paying costs for people _ wondering why they are paying costs for people who are saving on their commute — for people who are saving on their commute - — for people who are saving on their commute — is the flip side of this they— commute — is the flip side of this they can — commute — is the flip side of this they can pay people less because they're _ they can pay people less because they're saving on train fare? but all of— they're saving on train fare? but all of this— they're saving on train fare? but all of this will come out in the wash— all of this will come out in the wash because people settle into a new rhythm and routine, and a new way of _ new rhythm and routine, and a new way of working. but they're all sorts _ way of working. but they're all sorts of — way of working. but they're all sorts of interesting questions that have be _ sorts of interesting questions that have be answered about the relationship between employers and employees if they are not in the same _ employees if they are not in the same physical building as there used to be in— same physical building as there used to be in the — same physical building as there used to be in the past. do same physical building as there used to be in the past.— to be in the past. do you think this is settin: to be in the past. do you think this is setting rules _ to be in the past. do you think this is setting rules and _ to be in the past. do you think this is setting rules and parameters - is setting rules and parameters building some momentum7 somewhere in
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germany forced employees to stop e—mail out of hours, that we have an entire country enforcing these parameters. do you think we will see others following suit7 late parameters. do you think we will see others following suit?— others following suit? we may see some rush to _ others following suit? we may see some rush to legislation _ others following suit? we may see some rush to legislation in - others following suit? we may see some rush to legislation in the - others following suit? we may see | some rush to legislation in the uk, but not that i'm aware of. having said that, the way that covid has, in my view, had an immense impression and made a difference to the way people are working now and likely to work in the future, and anyone who visits london who doesn't actually live in london now, they surely are noticing a different work patterns and different times. i was two platform at 8:20pm and i wondered where everybody was. his
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extraordinary. i’ll wondered where everybody was. his extraordinary-— extraordinary. i'll give you both a break, extraordinary. i'll give you both a break. but _ extraordinary. i'll give you both a break, but only _ extraordinary. i'll give you both a break, but only 40 _ extraordinary. i'll give you both a break, but only 40 minutes, - extraordinary. i'll give you both a break, but only 40 minutes, do | extraordinary. i'll give you both a - break, but only 40 minutes, do come back and we will do the papers again at 11:30pm but thank you both very much. david and anand will be back again at 11:30pm. goodbye for now. good evening, i'm tulsen tollett with your sports news — where we start with football, and three of the home nations were in action tonight. northern ireland produced the biggest shock with a goalless draw at home to italy, meaning roberto mancini's side now head for the playoffs. scotland picked up a crucial win over denmark, meaning they've secured a home play off, and england thrashed a hapless san marino to guarantee a spot in next year's finals. katie gornall was watching. side—by—side, but the gulf between the two could hardly be greater. san marino are the worst team in world football. still, gareth southgate urged
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england to take them seriously. but it's harry maguire who connects! 1—0 up afterfive minutes, the goals against this part—time defence just kept on coming. top corner this time! harry kane's club form may be up for debate, but for country, he just can't miss. this was his fourth and england's sixth of a frantic first half. a draw would have been enough, but they were meant to run up a high score. emile smith—rowe scored his first for his country, 10—0 the final score. england have qualified for qatar and they finished the job in style. there's been a lot to cheer about recently for scotland, but with a playoff place already secured, this was far from a dead rubber. a win against denmark would give them a more favourable draw. they set off at pace. hampden park could feel a goal coming, and john souttar delivered. and souttar! after three years away from the national team with injuries, this was emotional. denmark are in formidable form, but scotland saved their best for last.
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scotland having qualified for a world cup since 1998. —— have not qualified. on this evidence, the dream is very much alive. northern ireland were already out of world cup contention, but they still managed a famous night at windsor park, holding italy to a goalless draw and forcing the european champions into the playoffs. katie gornall, bbc news. after being sacked as aston villa manager little over a week ago, dean smith is back in the premier league. he's the new man in charge at norwich, replacing daniel farke, who was sacked just a day before smith lost his job at villa. his first game in charge will be at home to southampton on saturday. there've been further developments in the racism row involving yorkshire county cricket club. bowler adil rashid has become the third player to claim he heard former england captain, michael vaughan, question the number of players of asian heritage in the yorkshire side in 2009. michael vaughan has again categorically denied it, and says he was very proud that
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asian players were included in the team. 0ur sports editor dan roan has been at lord's cricket ground, and explained that there is no sign of this row going away. the racism crisis that has cast a lengthening shadow over english cricket is intensifying on what seems like a daily basis right now. earlier this month, michael vaughan revealed that he had been named in a landmark report that looked into azeem rafik�*s claims of institutional racism at yorkshire. now vaughan denied the allegations that he had made a racism remark to a group of asian yorkshire players backin a group of asian yorkshire players back in 2009. but today, breaking his silence was the current england star, adil rashid, who said in a statement addressing what he called an intensely personal matter, that he had heard vaughan say that, becoming the second player to corroborate the claims. now a few
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hours later, vaughan issued a statement reiterating his previous denial, saying it was inconceivable that he would say such a thing, and making reference to the fact that you for player in the group said he couldn't recollect the alleged event —— a fourth player in the group. meanwhile maurice chambers, a former essex player, has said he suffered racist bullying while at the county during his period of his career there. he said he also had similar treatment at northamptonshire when he played there. both counties are looking into those claims, the ecb say they are appalled today, and tomorrow i seem rafik will be giving evidence in front of a parliamentary committee. now to rugby union, where england captain 0wen farrell and hooker jamie george have both been ruled out of saturday's test against world champions south africa. the saracens team—mates picked up injuries in the 32—15 win over australia at the weekend. farrell also missed england's opening autumn international against tonga after a false positive covid—i9 test result. and disappointing news for ireland
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captainjonny sexton — he's been ruled out for up to six weeks after he was injured in his side's win over new zealand on saturday, twisting his knee and ankle. it means he'll miss ireland's final autumn international against argentina on sunday. it was the battle of the brits whenjoe salisbury beat jamie murray, as the only british players involved in the atp finals went head—to—head in their opening doubles group match. second seeds and us open champions salisbury and his american partner, rajeev ram, won in straight sets against murray and brazil's bruno soares in turin. novak djokovic recovered from a wobbly start to beat casper ruud 7—6, 6—2 in his opening round—robin match. the world number one is aiming for a record—equalling sixth title at the season—ending tournament, which he hasn't won since 2015. meanwhile, roger federer is unlikely to play in next year's australian open as he continues to recoverfrom injury. the 20—time grand slam champion, who is now 40, hasn't played since losing in the wimbledon
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quarterfinals injuly before undergoing more knee surgery. however, his coach, ivan ljubicic, says he was certain that federer was not thinking about retiring just yet. for more on that and other stories, the bbc sport website is the place to go. but that's all your sport for now. hello. well, tuesday promises to be a dry day across most of the uk. it's going to be cloudy and mild once again. and, in fact, not much change expected for the next few days. if anything, the temperatures could rise even further. so why is it so mild7 well, on the satellite picture, you'll see this big weather front here. this is very much where the jet stream is. thejet stream is pushing along the weather fronts, but it's also separating the mild air to the south, which has engulfed the uk, indeed much of europe, and is keeping the cold air at bay. so we are to the south of the jet
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stream in that milder air. but scotland is a little closer to the weather fronts in the north atlantic, so that does mean some of that rain grazing the western isles through the course of the early hours. elsewhere, it'll be dry. and where the skies will have cleared, perhaps 4—5 celsius at dawn, so a little on the nippy side, but generally mild. now, that weather front does move into scotland, northern ireland, perhaps the lake district and the north of wales, but the rain will be light and fleeting and will complete fizzle away. east and south, it's going to be dry. perhaps a bit of brightness, too. and the same pattern continues into wednesday. so high pressure in the south with that mild air coming in, weather fronts in the north of the atlantic. and again, they are bringing this time some showers to parts of scotland, whereas in the south, central, southern areas of the uk, should be a fine day — in fact, a very bright day, particularly eastern areas and along the south coast. temperatures a little fresher on wednesday, 10—12 celsius,
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but then they rise again as we head into thursday. now, around this high pressure, we'll run along a current of mild air on thursday. and as it engulfs the uk, the temperatures could a chilly rise even further with a bit of sunshine. so, yes, a bit of cloud and rain here in the northwest of scotland, but widely i think the mid—teens. and look at that — 16 in aberdeen. wouldn't be surprised if it gets up to 17, 17 this time in november — extraordinarily mild for eastern parts of scotland. shouldn't last for too long, perhaps into friday. friday could well be another very mild day, with the mid—teens across the country, but i think as we head into the weekend, it's going to turn a lot, a lot cooler. so a very mild week, particularly mild towards the end of the week, and i think the weekend and beyond is going to turn quite a bit colder. bye— bye.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore. i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines: on his way home — an american journalist sentenced to 11 years in prison in myanmar is released. the government tells the bbc their reasons. translation: our foreign policy is to keep good _ translation: our foreign policy is to keep good relations _ translation: our foreign policy is to keep good relations with - translation: our foreign policy is to keep good relations with other. to keep good relations with other countries. and we also considered human and tearing reasons. 0n countries. and we also considered human and tearing reasons. on these grounds, we granted amnesty and deported him today —— humanitarian reasons. police in the uk name the man who died when a taxi exploded, as the investigation into what they've called a terrorist attack continues.
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0ur inquiries will now seek to understand how the device was built, the motivation for the incident

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