Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 15, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

10:30 pm
the eu is imposing new sanctions against belarus over the migrant crisis on the polish border. the latest measures are said to target people and companies involved in transporting the migrants to the border. the controversial former adviser to donald trump, steve bannon, has appeared in court on criminal charges. he's been indicted for contempt of congress after refusing to cooperate with the investigation into the january sixth attack on the us capitol. a us journalist sentenced to 11 years in prison in myanmar only last week has been released from jail. danny fenster is on his way home. his release was negotiated by the former us diplomat, bill richardson. the president of the philippines, rodrigo duterte, will seek election as a senator next year when his six—year term of office ends. campaigners believe the move is an attempt to evade prosecution for his war on drugs.
10:31 pm
hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are broadcaster david davies, and anand menon, who's the director of uk in a changing europe. let's ta ke let's take a look at tomorrow's front pages. the financial times leads with plans by shell to move its hq and tax base from the netherlands to the uk. the metro tells of the extraordinary escape by taxi driver david perry, who was in his cab when sunday's bomb went off in liverpool. the guardian goes with the raising of the terror threat level, after the bomb attack in liverpool. the i splashes on the fact that people aged over a0 will be able to get a covid boosterjab, while the manchester evening news —
10:32 pm
along with a number of other northern papers — mocks up the poster from the movie trainspotting to urge the government to build the high—speed hs2 rail system in full. let's get into some of those stories. we begin with the guardian, david, do you want to start us off with this? it's been said that it's not based around any specific intelligence, but rather precautionary stomach or a precautionary stomach or a precautionary move?- precautionary move? yes, precautionary— precautionary move? yes, precautionary is _ precautionary move? yes, precautionary is the - precautionary move? yes, precautionary is the word | precautionary move? yes, - precautionary is the word being precautionary move? 1&1: precautionary is the word being used by a number of senior police officers. but their story goes further than some correspondence today and that this is a suspected suicide bomber blowing himself up with a homemade device. now what that sentence sums up, really, is
10:33 pm
the real concerns on thinks of in the real concerns on thinks of in the last month, the awful murder of the last month, the awful murder of the mp sir david amess, and this incident in liverpool is that we are talking now, and this has been highlighted by a number of counter terrorism experts today, that we are talking about smalltime, if this can be described as smalltime, homemade terrorists who are going their own way, not necessarily part of some huge conspiracy, but of course are immensely difficult for the likes of mis to immensely difficult for the likes of mi5 to keep tabs on if they know anything about them at all. at mi5 to keep tabs on if they know anything about them at all. at the moment the _ anything about them at all. at the moment the police _ anything about them at all. at the moment the police are _ anything about them at all. at the moment the police are not - anything about them at all. at the | moment the police are not making anything about them at all. at the - moment the police are not making an explicit link between the events that happened in liverpool and the fact it was on remembrance sunday. but it is a very sensitive day — any
10:34 pm
day to do that is awful and frightening, but particularly so on such a significant date to. the symbolism — such a significant date to. the symbolism was _ such a significant date to. the symbolism was hideous into ways. firstly, _ symbolism was hideous into ways. firstly, the — symbolism was hideous into ways. firstly, the date on which it was carried — firstly, the date on which it was carried out, _ firstly, the date on which it was carried out, and secondly, this appeared — carried out, and secondly, this appeared to be targeting a hospital. the other— appeared to be targeting a hospital. the other noteworthy about this story— the other noteworthy about this story is — the other noteworthy about this story is the nhs chiefs have told them _ story is the nhs chiefs have told them to— story is the nhs chiefs have told them to step up their security. so there's— them to step up their security. so there's clearly some where in the system _ there's clearly some where in the system that there's a fear that other— system that there's a fear that other people are planning some attacks, — other people are planning some attacks, and hospitals might be the target _ attacks, and hospitals might be the target in _ attacks, and hospitals might be the target. in all sorts of ways, the symbolism of this is all. what it is permit— symbolism of this is all. what it is permit status of hospitals, on top of everything they're currently dealing — of everything they're currently dealing with,, and on top of that having _ dealing with,, and on top of that having to — dealing with,, and on top of that having to be democrat look over their— having to be democrat look over their shoulders and be extra vigilant— their shoulders and be extra vigilant - _ their shoulders and be extra vigilant — some within the health service _ vigilant - some within the health servic ~ ., . ., ., service will think, how much more of this can we — service will think, how much more of this can we take, _ service will think, how much more of
10:35 pm
this can we take, david? _ service will think, how much more of this can we take, david? that - service will think, how much more of this can we take, david? that of - this can we take, david? that of course is horribly _ this can we take, david? that of course is horribly true. - this can we take, david? that of course is horribly true. one - this can we take, david? that of i course is horribly true. one would also say that hospitals have been targeted in several tax well beyond the uk in the recent past and in the not so recent past. so this is something that has got to be looked up something that has got to be looked up very seriously by the security forces. but you are absolutely right, how do we burden hospitals with something else at this wretched time? i with something else at this wretched time? , , , ., , with something else at this wretched time? , , time? i suppose the point about this is that mercifully, _ time? i suppose the point about this is that mercifully, thank _ time? i suppose the point about this is that mercifully, thank god - time? i suppose the point about this is that mercifully, thank god it - is that mercifully, thank god it didn't actually end up getting to a point where this device was going off where there were lots of other people at a busy area? absolutely, we should be _ people at a busy area? absolutely, we should be thankful— people at a busy area? absolutely, we should be thankful this - people at a busy area? absolutely, we should be thankful this didn't i we should be thankful this didn't succeed. — we should be thankful this didn't succeed, and also it sounds like, to the bravery—
10:36 pm
succeed, and also it sounds like, to the bravery of a taxi who helped stop a _ the bravery of a taxi who helped stop a terrorist incident. we got away— stop a terrorist incident. we got away with— stop a terrorist incident. we got away with it this time, but the fact that other— away with it this time, but the fact that other people are being held by police _ that other people are being held by police and — that other people are being held by police and other parts of the world speaks _ police and other parts of the world speaks of — police and other parts of the world speaks of a larger plot and perhaps something a bit more organised. and those something a bit more organised. those pictures something a bit more organised. fific those pictures of what something a bit more organised. fific those pictures of what happened in the way that the taxi driver gets himself out of the cab were quite extraordinary, it seemed to me. he had it in his soul, in his brain to get out— and what on earth, the people who are almost all on the scene, minding their own business on a sunday morning in a car park, might be thinking, who knows? i’m might be thinking, who knows? i'm sure we will return to this at a
10:37 pm
future date, but i'd like to turn to some of the other front pages. let's focus on the regional papers from the north of england. the manchester evening news, along with several others have all published a coordinated demand to the government not to drop what they see as a crucial element of the hs2 high—speed rail plans. all our understanding is that crucial bit of the link will not go ahead to? yes. the link will not go ahead to? yes, what the indications _ the link will not go ahead to? yes, what the indications are _ the link will not go ahead to? yes, what the indications are that the final hits — what the indications are that the final bits of the proposed line from manchester to leeds will not happen and what _ manchester to leeds will not happen and what these newspapers are doing, it's a very— and what these newspapers are doing, it's a very striking front page, they— it's a very striking front page, they are — it's a very striking front page, they are contrasting what they think they are contrasting what they think the news _ they are contrasting what they think the news will be with government rhetoric — the news will be with government rhetoric. rememberthe the news will be with government rhetoric. remember the government has promised an infrastructure revolution, borisjohnson put enormous stress on the fact that he was going _ enormous stress on the fact that he was going to get leads to manchester
10:38 pm
rail line _ was going to get leads to manchester rail line done, there are other parts — rail line done, there are other parts of— rail line done, there are other parts of the northeast, around humberside who are expecting the electrification of their lines, that all know— electrification of their lines, that all know looks to be in doubt. what these _ all know looks to be in doubt. what these papers are trying to do is hit these papers are trying to do is hit the government where it hurts, are you with _ the government where it hurts, are you with the voters? "you promised all this— you with the voters? "you promised all this stuff, we gave you your votes. — all this stuff, we gave you your votes. now _ all this stuff, we gave you your votes, now it's time to deliver." this— votes, now it's time to deliver." this is— votes, now it's time to deliver." this is according to campaign. it this is according to campaign. [it must this is according to campaign. must take this is according to campaign. it must take quite an issue for the editors of all these rival titles to get on the phone to each other and say, "look, let's do this". this say, "look, let's do this". as someone _ say, "look, let's do this". as someone who _ say, "look, let's do this". is someone who still regards manchester as his spiritual home, i have to say to you that this is not unique, that the papers have done this. it is unusual, and the prime minister is in real danger here of being seen to break what are perceived to have
10:39 pm
been his promises — and that is deeply concerning, i have little doubt at all, particularly the 2019 intake of conservative mps in the redwall seats, now blue wall seats as they became. the redwall seats, now blue wall seats as they became-— redwall seats, now blue wall seats as they became. the yorkshire post also takes the _ as they became. the yorkshire post also takes the story _ as they became. the yorkshire post also takes the story on _ as they became. the yorkshire post also takes the story on its _ as they became. the yorkshire post also takes the story on its front - also takes the story on its front page, and it links this to the government's so—called leveling up agenda, saying that genda democrat agenda, saying that genda democrat agenda is now in doubt, with the cancellation of parts of the project. i think the government's argument for this is that in some of these areas, it is quicker and cost—effective to update existing lines and try to build from scratch. so the benefits would be delivered more quickly — what's your take on
10:40 pm
that? more quickly - what's your take on that? ~ ., more quickly - what's your take on that? . ., ., .,, more quickly - what's your take on that? ~ ., ., .,, , that? what the yorkshire post is sa in: is that? what the yorkshire post is saying is citing — that? what the yorkshire post is saying is citing a _ that? what the yorkshire post is saying is citing a report - that? what the yorkshire post is saying is citing a report from - that? what the yorkshire post is saying is citing a report from the national— saying is citing a report from the national infrastructure committee that is— national infrastructure committee that isjust signalling that it might— that isjust signalling that it might be the levels of investment the government is talking about might— the government is talking about might not be enough to bring about this famous leveling up that government ministers like to talk about— government ministers like to talk about so— government ministers like to talk about so much. the yorkshire post is basically— about so much. the yorkshire post is basically saying there's a danger here that — basically saying there's a danger here that if you go from cheap alternatives, the kinds of capacity issues _ alternatives, the kinds of capacity issues that have plagued public transport across the north of england _ transport across the north of england will continue to plague that region _ england will continue to plague that region. just building on what david 'ust region. just building on what david just said. — region. just building on what david just said, the yorkshire post also cites— just said, the yorkshire post also cites a _ just said, the yorkshire post also cites a sense of unease amongst these _ cites a sense of unease amongst these northern research groups of tory mps — these northern research groups of tory mps that the government is failing _ tory mps that the government is failing to — tory mps that the government is failing to deliver on the promises to help _ failing to deliver on the promises to help get those mps elected in the first place _ to help get those mps elected in the first place. so again, a bit of a problem — first place. so again, a bit of a problem in _ first place. so again, a bit of a problem in parliament for boris johnson — problem in parliament for boris johnson because unlike previous conservative governments, not investing — conservative governments, not investing in the north can have real electoral— investing in the north can have real electoral consequences because they hold many— electoral consequences because they hold many of those seats now. david,
10:41 pm
ou wanted hold many of those seats now. david, you wanted to — hold many of those seats now. david, you wanted to come _ hold many of those seats now. david, you wanted to come in? _ hold many of those seats now. david, you wanted to come in? can - hold many of those seats now. david, you wanted to come in? can i - hold many of those seats now. david, you wanted to come in? can ijust - you wanted to come in? can i 'ust sa that, you wanted to come in? can i 'ust say that. as fl you wanted to come in? can i 'ust say that, as well i you wanted to come in? can i 'ust say that, as well as in i you wanted to come in? can i 'ust say that, as well as in this i say that, as well as in this yorkshire post story, stuck to the right hand side of the front page at the top of the column is this open letter to the prime minister from the west yorkshire mayor, former conservative mp who basically says, "the government can choose to unlock the north's potential or let us down one again." so that's the strength of feeling well out of london. david, like you, i consider manchester a home from home, i lived and worked there very happily for many years, and manchester is a city that will thrive come what may. it's a big city with lots of investment there — it's the smaller towns and areas that would look to be improving their conductivity to these bigger cities and get some of these bigger cities and get some of the benefits flowing out that will really suffer, perhaps? band the benefits flowing out that will really suffer, perhaps? and that's
10:42 pm
wh , really suffer, perhaps? and that's why. certain _ really suffer, perhaps? and that's why, certain people _ really suffer, perhaps? and that's why, certain people have - really suffer, perhaps? and that's why, certain people have said - really suffer, perhaps? and that's why, certain people have said to i really suffer, perhaps? and that's i why, certain people have said to me, i'm not an expert on that railway industry, i was born and brought up near euston station and love travel, and still love travelling by train — but the basic point is, stepping back a bit from this east midlands link from up to leeds was always the least worst option, as has been explained to me. yet it's possibly the most damaging.— explained to me. yet it's possibly the most damaging. david, i must correct one _ the most damaging. david, i must correct one thing _ the most damaging. david, i must correct one thing you _ the most damaging. david, i must correct one thing you said, - the most damaging. david, i must correct one thing you said, you - the most damaging. david, i mustl correct one thing you said, you said she was a conservative party mp, she was a labour party politicians. i was a labour party politicians. i know that, but she feels very strongly. know that, but she feels very stron al . ., ., know that, but she feels very stronal . ., ., ., ., strongly. indeed. i want to move on because the — strongly. indeed. i want to move on because the other _ strongly. indeed. i want to move on because the other big _ strongly. indeed. i want to move on because the other big story - strongly. indeed. i want to move on because the other big story of - strongly. indeed. i want to move on because the other big story of the i because the other big story of the day that's also on the front page of the eye is the boosterjobs being extended to everyone over 40, which means they are now 40 million adults
10:43 pm
in the uk eligible for the booster — yet only 13 million have actually had that boosterjab. so there is a bit of a gap there?— bit of a gap there? there's a real ia . l bit of a gap there? there's a real ~a,- and bit of a gap there? there's a real gap. and the _ bit of a gap there? there's a real gap, and the government - bit of a gap there? there's a real gap, and the government is - bit of a gap there? there's a real. gap, and the government is obvious is starting _ gap, and the government is obvious is starting to get worried, and it's an awful— is starting to get worried, and it's an awful sense of d ja vu about that headline, _ an awful sense of d ja vu about that headline, talking about saving christmas, which we all remember last year~ — christmas, which we all remember last year. the government is concerned because there has been a massive _ concerned because there has been a massive climate infection by a court or on— massive climate infection by a court or on last _ massive climate infection by a court or on last week, and the fact that many— or on last week, and the fact that many of— or on last week, and the fact that many of those who are eligible for a third jab— many of those who are eligible for a third jab haven't gone to get it. the science seems to be quite clear on this, _ the science seems to be quite clear on this, that — the science seems to be quite clear on this, that a third jab massively increases — on this, that a third jab massively increases protection against covid, and efficacy of the two jabs starts to wane _ and efficacy of the two jabs starts to wane overtime. and efficacy of the two jabs starts to wane over time. but the government is trying to do is use christmas — government is trying to do is use christmas as an enticement to get jabs, _ christmas as an enticement to get jabs, without saying what they are hinting _ jabs, without saying what they are hinting at — jabs, without saying what they are hinting at very strongly as it might be further— hinting at very strongly as it might be further measures are necessary in the run-up— be further measures are necessary in
10:44 pm
the run-up to— be further measures are necessary in the run—up to christmas or potentially over christmas if people do not _ potentially over christmas if people do not go _ potentially over christmas if people do not go and get this third jab. so things— do not go and get this third jab. so things are — do not go and get this third jab. so things are getting serious again on the cove _ things are getting serious again on the cove at— things are getting serious again on the cove at my front.— the cove at my front. david, we looked at _ the cove at my front. david, we looked at the _ the cove at my front. david, we looked at the situation - the cove at my front. david, we looked at the situation in - the cove at my front. david, we looked at the situation in the i looked at the situation in the countries in europe, there does seem to be a strong correlation with the measures and extremity of measures that need to be taken and a low vaccination rates in those countries?— vaccination rates in those countries? ., , ., ., ., countries? no question about that at all, and countries? no question about that at all. and one — countries? no question about that at all, and one does _ countries? no question about that at all, and one does wonder _ countries? no question about that at all, and one does wonder if - countries? no question about that at all, and one does wonder if we - all, and one does wonder if we get more and more people jabbed, is the government even going to... what is the government ultimately going to do about those who refuse to get jabbed? will they follow the austrian example and basically say that people can only go out for work into the shops? it will be very interesting to see because we will reach... when the percentage of people who have refused to get
10:45 pm
vaccinated gets very low indeed. the other thing that oldies don't understand is why it is that on your nhs records, privately but available in the wider domain online, your two jabs are recorded but, until now in england, for sure, you're booster jab was not? if it's so important, why isn't it? i had my two weeks ago, it's still not there. i'm told tonight that boris is saying it'll happen. well, if it's urgent and important, it might have happened one might think.— one might think. looking at the time, it's 10:45pm _ one might think. looking at the time, it's 10:45pm - _ one might think. looking at the time, it's 10:45pm - if- one might think. looking at the time, it's 10:45pm - if i - one might think. looking at the time, it's 10:45pm - if i were i time, it's 10:45pm — if i were your boss time, it's10:45pm — if i were your bossin time, it's10:45pm — if i were your boss in portugal, i get in trouble for so late. the front page of the financial times is saying that
10:46 pm
bosses will soon be banned from

23 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on