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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 15, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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you're watching bbc news and we are alive at the south lawn of the white house watching a ceremony where president biden will soon sign his $1 billion infrastructure bill. let's listen in. someone who understands what workers like me are going through and who of always believed in us is what we can do if given a chance. i never imagined it a million years that i would be standing here today. yeah. but that's what's great about america. thank you. cheering. thank you, thank you. yeah. but that's what's
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so great about america and having a president who believes that someone like me should be standing here. on behalf of local 86 in seattle and union workers everywhere, for the faith he is placing in others i am honoured to introduce the 46th president of the united states, joe biden. president of the united states, joe biden. , president of the united states, joe biden-_ thank _ president of the united states, joe biden._ thank you, - president of the united states, joel biden._ thank you, thank biden. cheering. thank you, thank ou, thank biden. cheering. thank you, thank you. thank yom _ biden. cheering. thank you, thank you, thank you. thank— biden. cheering. thank you, thank you, thank you. thank you. - biden. cheering. thank you, thank you, thank you. thank you. thank i you, thank you. thank you. thank you, thank you. thank you. thank you, heather! thank you, thank you, thank you. you surprise you're standing here. jill is very surprise i'm standing here. heather, thank
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you for the introduction. and it can't look over here because the sun is shining in my eyes. but thank you, thank you, thank you for all you've done. look, thanks for sharing the stay with us. why this date matters to you and are yellow iron workers and your families and you explained it well. for all the folks at home, i know this date matters to you as well. i know you are tired of the bickering in washington. frustrated by the negativity and you just want us to use and focus on your needs, your concerns. and the conversations are taking place at your kitchen table. conversations as profound as they are ordinary. how do i find work? and how do i get there? how can our small business thrive in our child succeed in school? or how do we emerge from this pandemic was met
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notjust a little bit of breathing room but a realfighting chance to get ahead. when we ran for president the help, i thought maybe i could help answer some of those questions for you and the deed you have. every time i drive home on amtrak i go throughjust north, just time i drive home on amtrak i go through just north, just south of baltimore it will go through suburban neighbourhoods and look and all those lights around in the windows. at looking at wonder what are they talking about? i'm serious, i swear to god, what are they talking about sitting at that table? what are they talking about? they're talking about the things that i talked about in my check did not kitchen table jill at talked about in my check did not kitchen tablejill at hers and you as well. ask about how can we come together, to be a president for all americans, to make sure our democracy delivers for you, for all of you. and i promise that we couldn'tjust build back better to what it was before we literally had to build back better. we are the only country that's come out of
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great tart crises stronger than when we were in. the world has changed. we have to be ready... president biden on the south lawn of the white house with a p is about to sign the $1 billion infrastructure bill. we will be back at the white house it a little bit later to speak to a democratic congressman. on two other news. the uk's terror threat level has been raised to severe. that means that officials think an attack is highly likely. it comes after police in liverpool said that an explosion outside a hospital yesterday is being treated as a terrorist incident. this evening the man killed in the explosion has been named as 32—year—old emad al swealmeen. police suspect he made the explosive device — but say that the motive for its detonation is unknown. ed thomas reports from liverpool remembrance sunday, as the nation for silent. the taxi rose in before the unthinkable happens.
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moments after the blast, look at the driver's door. you can see david escape. he runs away. others rushing to help. this is thought to be david with his hands on his head. this evening, his wife rachel said it was a miracle he survived and he is trying to process what happened. today detectives confirmed the passenger who had the explosive device had asked to be taken to the hospital. yesterday shortly before 11am a local taxi driver a fare in the rutland avenue area of liverpool. the fare, a man, asked to be taken to liverpool hospital, about ten minutes away. as a taxi approach the drop—off point at the hospital, an explosion occurred within the car. tonight david perry's family said he's lucky to be alive, that he is doing ok. he is being praised
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by the prime minister who urged the public to be alert. it is a stark reminder of the need for us all to remain utterly vigilant, and the independent joint terrorism analysis centre are today raising the uk threat level from substantial to severe, meaning an attack is highly likely. there is a forensic search for evidence at the hospital. clues into who did this, and why, and just one mile away, four people have now been arrested under the terrorism act. just horrifying, you cannot believe what type of person would do that. whilst david perry's friends and colleagues carry on working in disbelief, at what has happened. it is shocking how a man can go out to do his normal day's work and potentially lose his life. he sustained a lot of injuries,
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i believe, burst eardrums, back fracture, that is just a word going between different drivers, so, mostly, it is going to be a shock for him and his family. he is a hero. he is a very nice person, - he comes in the shop all the time. people here are saying he's a hero? he's a hero, yes. it is here at the hospital where the panic of yesterday was most acute. this was filmed inside the hospital by the father a newborn baby. we are not using the sound but he comforts his distraught wife, as the fire takes hold. today, parents, expectant mothers, told us that it was terrifying. just horrible. when we saw it. just really scary, that they would end up at police , at a hospital where there is loads of babies and things like that, it isjust awful. this is an investigation involving
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counterterrorism police and security services, as they move quickly to find out who did this, and why. ed thomas, bbc news, liverpool. let's get the latest on the increase in the terror threat level to severe here in the uk. the bbc�*s security correspondent gordon correra is with me. it appears this is an individual that originally came from the middle east and came to the uk is in asylum—seekers. it's not clear what is motivation wasn't whether he subscribed to any particular ideology, that's not clear. employees and others have been very cautious today about given any clear sense that he did ascribe jihadist ideology. it looks like this was declared a terrorist incident primarily because what it look like with this explosion going up but not necessarily because they know that this individual is affiliated with the group. he often has issues around mental health as well. it's still a complex and evolving picture even though we have the name of this individual. ., ' . , ., individual. how difficult is it for the authorities _
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individual. how difficult is it for the authorities to _ individual. how difficult is it for the authorities to defend - individual. how difficult is it for. the authorities to defend against individual. how difficult is it for i the authorities to defend against a threat posed by people who may not be on their radar?— be on their radar? that's one of the oints. be on their radar? that's one of the points- here _ be on their radar? that's one of the points- here you — be on their radar? that's one of the points. here you have _ be on their radar? that's one of the points. here you have an _ be on their radar? that's one of the points. here you have an individual| points. here you have an individual who does not appear or was known to the security services, mi five. that in itself raises questions because the fact that someone could organise and plan something like this without being spotted will clearly worry them. that's one of the reasons we see that threat level go up. because we've now had two incidents of the month of the uk. we had a killing of the member of parliament a month ago and that this incident yesterday involving an explosive device. because of those two incidents is coming together in a relatively short and they decided they need to raise the threat level from substantial to severe. still not top level critical but an indication that even if they don't necessarily know the affiliation of any of these events there is a concern that things could still happen. so they are alert level. _ things could still happen. so they are alert level. what _ things could still happen. so they are alert level. what does - things could still happen. so they are alert level. what does that i things could still happen. so they . are alert level. what does that mean in practical terms? it are alert level. what does that mean in practical terms?— in practicalterms? it doesn't necessarily — in practicalterms? it doesn't necessarily mean _ in practicalterms? it doesn't necessarily mean a _ in practicalterms? it doesn't necessarily mean a lot - in practicalterms? it doesn't necessarily mean a lot for i necessarily mean a lot for individuals with what they don't have to change her behaviour. it's a
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signal to them that there is more to be worried about. it's often an indicator for police, be worried about. it's often an indicatorfor police, other be worried about. it's often an indicator for police, other security services to change their behaviour. if there suddenly at severe rather than substantial you may have more patrols around building, more visible police, more security checks at doors and places. it leads to institutions, organisations, government, nongovernment changing their behaviour. it doesn't necessarily require individual citizens to change what they're doing other than to remain vigilant. i know earlier on another programme we were talking about the nature of that explosion, how that might be a suggestion that he didn't fully go off of that what are you able to tell us about that was that a lot of forensic experts have looked at that explosion and said it doesn't look like a typical blast. you explosion and said it doesn't look like a typical blast.— like a typical blast. you haven't not the like a typical blast. you haven't got the same — like a typical blast. you haven't got the same blast _ like a typical blast. you haven't got the same blast radius, - like a typical blast. you haven't - got the same blast radius, crumbling of the car you'd expect with a full explosion you get a lot of white powder. two theories, either it was a very small explosion or something
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larger didn't go up properly and you had may be the detonator go but not the main charge. of course that would explain why there was a driver in the front seat of the taxi drivers are doing a driver who survives with relatively few injuries which is remarkable if you think about it. that again would suggest either it was a very big bob orjenna go up properly. but is still clearly brought it into the taxi. jurors in the state of wisconcin are hearing the closing arguments in the homicide trial of kyle rittenhouse. he fatally shot two men and injured a third with an assault rifle during protests in the city of kenosha last year. you may remember these images from last year. mr rittenhouse had travelled to the area — he said, to protect people's property during riots that had erupted after police shot a black man — jacob blake. here's the prosecution laying out their closing arguments — you'll hear a mention ofjoseph rosenbaum — he was the first person mr rittenhouse shot and killed.
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they have to convince you that joseph rosenbaum was going to take that down and use it on the defendant because they know you can't claim self—defense against an unarmed man like this. you lose the right to self—defense when you at the one who brought the gun, when you are the one creating the danger, when you're at the one provoking other people. the bbc�*s nomia iqbal has been following the trial and joins us now from kenosha. we heard briefly from the prosecution, what is the defence been saying? the prosecution, what is the defence been saying?— prosecution, what is the defence been saying? prosecution, what is the defence been sa inc? . , ., ., been saying? the defences do to give their closing — been saying? the defences do to give their closing arguments _ been saying? the defences do to give their closing arguments as _ been saying? the defences do to give their closing arguments as well. - been saying? the defences do to give their closing arguments as well. it - their closing arguments as well. it comes down to this question, was kyle rittenhouse in armed vigilante or was he someone who had come to kenosha and, for good reason and acted in self—defense? the defence are the butchering car rittenhouse in their closing argument as a courageous teenager who came to
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kenosha to help, he came here to protect building, to stop theft. and that he only used his gun in self—defense without the prosecution are portraying him as an armed vigilante who came here inserted himself in a city where is not from and that he was the instigator of the only bloodshed that happened that night. it's a case that as you can imagine really divided this country. ultimately the 12 jurors will decide. they are due to retire to consider their verdict later this afternoon. ~ . ~ to consider their verdict later this afternoon. ~ ., ~ ., . afternoon. what kind of wider impact does this trial _ afternoon. what kind of wider impact does this trial had _ afternoon. what kind of wider impact does this trial had on _ afternoon. what kind of wider impact does this trial had on the _ afternoon. what kind of wider impact does this trial had on the united - does this trial had on the united states? we does this trial had on the united states? ~ ., ., , ., , ., does this trial had on the united states? ~ ., ., , ., ., states? we hear that phrase a lot that america _ states? we hear that phrase a lot that america is _ states? we hear that phrase a lot that america is politically - states? we hear that phrase a lotj that america is politically divided. becomes almost a cliche phrase but it really is the case with the story. it really does encapsulate so many different issues. the case has raised questions about racial injustice, police protesting, about
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lots of different issues which include the concept of white privilege as well. because kyle rittenhouse is white, the three men, the jewish are rittenhouse is white, the three men, thejewish are dead and one that was injured are white as well. ? two are dead. you have really two sides here that look at kyle rittenhouse in two different ways. you have conservative groups who largely back kyle rittenhouse was up to them he is a patriot who came here to stand up is a patriot who came here to stand up against lawlessness and the only reason he used his gun was self—defense. where is for the more liberal groups, they look at kyle rittenhouse as the face of a gun culture that is out of control here in america. and both sides are invested in the outcome. if he is convicted, conservative groups who are in favour of expensive gun rights feel they will have a chilling effect on what it means to defend yourself and own a gun. where is liberal groups say if he is cleared and he walks out of court
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and he can't be retried for this case ever again then they think that could potentially send a green light to anyone in the country to turn up with a gun and insert themselves in volatile protests and not face any consequences or both sides feel they have something to lose in this case. is there a single overriding point that thejury will is there a single overriding point that the jury will have to consider when they retire to think about their verdict?— when they retire to think about their verdict? they've got to take into account _ their verdict? they've got to take into account five _ their verdict? they've got to take into account five charges. - their verdict? they've got to take into account five charges. there l their verdict? they've got to take i into account five charges. there was another charge that was dropped earlier today by the judge which caused some controversy and this was to do with the weapon he brought into wisconsin under wisconsin law the military style rifle is banned for under 18—year—olds. there are legal loopholes that will go into too much detail but basically the judge decided that it was lawful for him to bring this gun. really, what comes down is that question. the
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jury comes down is that question. the jury has to consider is kyle rittenhouse and armed vigilante who talked a lot into his own hands or was he acting in self—defense? did he truly believed that his life was at risk and that is why he used his gun? that is literally the heart of this case and that is what they will have to decide. stay with us on bbc news, still to come — a standoff at the border of belarus and poland. thousands of migrants are trapped in freezing conditions. here, the government is set to scrap the high speed rail link between the east midlands and leeds. the department for transport is expected to announce plans later this week, which will see the existing line between east midlands parkway and leeds being upgraded rather than replaced. the labour mayor of west yorkshire tracy brabin has written a letter to the prime minister, calling on him to deliver on his promises. she says ditching the plan to build the eastern leg of the hs2 rail network will be "levelling down
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and a betrayal of the north." we have been promised 60 announcements about transport for our region and not a shovel in the ground yet. so we were promised the biggest infrastructure plan of hs two for a decade ago. we've been talking about it for time immemorial. had we got started with the at least be on her way. and now if it's true that it's going to be scrapped, that's going to be devastating for the potential of our region and for our communities. steve bannon — who was an advisor to former president, donald trump has appeared in court after refusing to cooperate with the investigation into the deadly january 6th attack on the us capitol. bannon has been charged with contempt of congress. the committee investigating the capitol hill attacks believes he could have information on links between the white house and trump
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supporters involved in the riot. the committee said on twitter that the indictment of mr bannon should send a clear message that it will not hesitate to use the tools at its disposal to get the information it needs. i'm joined now by bryan lanza, formertrump transition team advisor. great to have you with us. do the basic rules, turn up when subpoenaed not apply to steve banning? i basic rules, turn up when subpoenaed not apply to steve banning?— not apply to steve banning? i don't -a a- -l not apply to steve banning? i don't pay apply any _ not apply to steve banning? i don't pay apply any more- _ not apply to steve banning? i don't pay apply any more. think- not apply to steve banning? i don't pay apply any more. think of- pay apply any more. think of having me. i think what we learned over the last four years of president dropping in the fbi and justice department done with them i think there's a new set of rules how republicans and deal with law enforcement go in doing that forward. i think he saw the stall tactics from the clinton and obama wreck administrations or to change how republicans view law and order in thejudicial system. i think you'll see more of a democratic party approach and ignore the judicial system when it comes to subpoenas for contempt of congress.
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thejudicial subpoenas for contempt of congress. the judicial system doesn't sound like a thing you do in a democracy? we've come a long way from honouring the system and appearing before the savannahs with members of congress set up. it's a shame. i do wish steve would've gone forward and cooperated with the investigation. i think our politics is where it is todayis think our politics is where it is today is that both sides don't see the strength of subpoena and subpoenas from the congressional investigation and certainly both sides do not see fairness when it comes to the application of state subpoenas. let's not forget, the republicans did file a contempt of congress subpoena against eric holder that the obama justice department never move forward with. now it's sort of feels a little bit more of a political witch hunt than it originally was the case change the way that other former trump officials including the former white house chief of seek their own
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subpoenas to appear before the committee? i think it's going to chase away any federal employees to see the way towards subpoenas whether it's a biden administration, a trump administration or any administration going forward. i think illegible really tease between the subpoenas, a review of how the process works are going to see more of this take place was up let's not forget, during the obama administration the attorney general was charged with by congress asked for current criminal referral for contempt of congress was up that never went anywhere. you have examples of the other side doing it in passing not going anywhere or not you have examples of republicans doing the same thing and actually going somewhere. you'll see there is less incentivise play the subpoena game that congress does. america stillt to game that congress does. america still try to work _ game that congress does. america still try to work out _ game that congress does. america still try to work out what _ game that congress does. america still try to work out what happened not just on the still try to work out what happened notjust on the 6th of january but in the days leading up to that. you know as well as i do that on the 5th of january steve bannon said know as well as i do that on the 5th
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ofjanuary steve bannon said all hell will break loose was up that needs to be investigated, doesn't it? ., ~ , needs to be investigated, doesn't it? ., ~ ., it? no. anybody that hears steve bannon is language _ it? no. anybody that hears steve bannon is language over- it? no. anybody that hears steve bannon is language over the i it? no. anybody that hears steve bannon is language over the last| bannon is language over the last years knows he uses that language. he says weapon eyes of all hell needs to break loose, the rooster coming to grow, he uses that type of language every time. i've always asked founded to be excessive. i just tune out steve when he gets a hyper bowl language. but this is consistent with the language is used for the last 20 years. now the left is found a reason to weapon eyes his words and turn it into something it wasn't meant to be.— words and turn it into something it wasn't meant to be. wouldn't it have been more simple _ wasn't meant to be. wouldn't it have been more simple for _ wasn't meant to be. wouldn't it have been more simple for him _ wasn't meant to be. wouldn't it have been more simple for him to - wasn't meant to be. wouldn't it have been more simple for him to give i wasn't meant to be. wouldn't it have | been more simple for him to give the explanation you just given me in front of a committee? i certainly auree front of a committee? i certainly agree with _ front of a committee? i certainly agree with that. _ front of a committee? i certainly agree with that. like _ front of a committee? i certainly agree with that. like i _ front of a committee? i certainly agree with that. like i said, i i front of a committee? i certainly. agree with that. like i said, i wish steve would've cooperated. there is now less of a reward to cooperate with this committee and certainly less of a reward to cooperate with the justice department.— less of a reward to cooperate with the justice department. should that 0 erate in the justice department. should that operate in terms _ the justice department. should that operate in terms of _ the justice department. should that operate in terms of rewards - the justice department. should that operate in terms of rewards and i operate in terms of rewards and incentives? if you get a subpoena that doesn't need to be a reward involved a matth us a? i
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that doesn't need to be a reward involved a matth us a?— that doesn't need to be a reward involved a matth us a? i think there has to be due _ involved a matth us a? i think there has to be due process _ involved a matth us a? i think there has to be due process and - involved a matth us a? i think there has to be due process and that i has to be due process and that subpoena. steve does have somewhat of a case was when the committee made the original request to how quickly the criminal indictment came forward is inconsistent with the americanjudicial forward is inconsistent with the american judicial history, forward is inconsistent with the americanjudicial history, american american judicial history, american law. americanjudicial history, american law. he'll have to litigate that court. the us still in title out of your day in court and that steve is doing. it's a delay tactic but it's also an address the speed and ferocity of the subpoena that is inconsistent with american judicial history of something moving that fast. . ~ history of something moving that fast. ., ~' ., history of something moving that fast. ., ~ ., , ., , history of something moving that fast. ., ~ ., , .,y �*, fast. talking about history, he's talked about _ fast. talking about history, he's talked about executive - fast. talking about history, he's| talked about executive privilege, using that as a defence. most famously the expansive definition of executive privilege was rebutted in the watergate era. who; executive privilege was rebutted in the watergate era.— executive privilege was rebutted in the watergate era. why would he be used again? — the watergate era. why would he be used again? courts _ the watergate era. why would he be used again? courts change - the watergate era. why would he be used again? courts change pensionl used again? courts change pension all the time. just like size changes over the years, court changes all drivers that were seen out with the new conservative court, have far different appearance two opinions of what the 1970s it was a court should address new concern and i think steve is probably the right person
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to bring it up of addressing what these things executive privilege me. i personally think is it'll lose but our court process allows them to have his day in court. and he's going to have his day in court never let a previous court decisions decide what you can do today, courts change all the time. it's become more political they change even faster. ., speak to you. austria has introduced a partial lockdown for the two million people there who haven't had two doses of a coronavirus vaccine. they've been told to stay at home except for work and essential shopping, initially for the next 10 days. the country has one of the highest infection rates in europe, but one of the continent's lowest vaccination rates. bethany bell reports from vienna. carina doesn't want to get vaccinated against covid—19, so she's under lockdown like two million other austrians. as of today, she is only allowed to leave her home for essential reasons like work or shopping for food. we met her in a vienna park, where
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she's allowed to take exercise. i was walking by the cafes and it's a bit strange to look inside and no that if i wanted to, i couldn't go in and join. it makes you feel really excluded and ostracised. the lockdown for the unvaccinated is controversial. some took to the streets in protest. police say they are carrying out random spot checks on people in public places and fine anyone who can't show a certificate of vaccination or recovery. austria's chancellor says the government was forced to act because of the surge in new infections. translation: we must raise the vaccination rate. - it is shamefully low. a low vaccination rate will not allow us to escape from the pandemic. it will keep us trapped in a vicious circle from one lockdown to the next. since the measures tightened, more
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austrians have been getting jabbed. as you can see, there are long lines of people that are forming here outside this vienna vaccination centre. some people are coming for their boosterjabs. others are getting their first injections. some austrians are concerned the move isn't constitutional. karl is pro—vaccination, but he's worried about the impact of the lockdown. i think it's a catastrophe to divide between vaccinated and not vaccinated. clothes shopping is now only for the vaccinated. many austrians say that makes them feel safer. we all have to be vaccinated. it's the only solution. otherwise we have the problem for quite a long time. people disagree on lockdowns, but if the covid numbers keep rising, austria faces a bleak christmas. bethany bell, bbc news, vienna.
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just to keep you up to date president biden hasjust just to keep you up to date president biden has just signed that infrastructure bill. he is out undergoing a victory lap on the south of the white house. good evening. it has been another mild and mainly cloudy day. a few outbreaks of rain around. this was the picture of the sun set earlier in wakefield. some clear skies around and through the rest of this evening and overnight where we see clear skies it could turn a bit chilly and misty. over the next few days we still have mild and cloudy weather. a lot of dry weather but not completely dry because weather fronts will move in at times from the north—west. we have high pressure not far away dominating the weather particularly across southern parts of the uk. moving through tonight we have this front pushing a bit of rain into the far north—west of scotland. much of the uk dry and variable amounts of cloud, perhaps they can offer the odd spot of drizzle perceptual parts of england
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and the south—west. either side of that some clear spells and temperatures around four or five in some towns and cities. cooler than that in the countryside. perhaps just a touch of frost in the most rural spots and a few misty patches as well. through the day we have this front making inroads to northern ireland and scotland through the day. for many of us it will stay dry for a good part of the day. try for a good part of the day. for a good part of the de was try for a good part of the dailies was quite a lot of cloud on the cards but they will be some brightest bells break into the cloud during tuesday afternoon. some of rain pushing into cumbria and anglesey. showers moving in behind that. on the east it is looking dry and mild. that mild there gets squeezed away towards the east. you can see blue colours on the cards as we head into wednesday. the difficult air mass around on tuesday. sunshine despite the cold weather
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but a few showers moving in at perhaps one or two per northern ireland and the west of scotland. for the bulk of the uk wednesday is looking dry with light winds and fairly long spells of sunshine around. temperatures between nine and 13. for some. a bit above average for the time of year. those temperatures will continue to rise towards the end of the week. milder air spills in again for thursday and friday. 1a and 15. predominantly dry and the outlook with mainly light winds. cold weather on the way for the end of the month.
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this is bbc news. the uk terror threat is raised to severe after yesterday's attack outside a hospital in liverpool. the man killed in the explosion at liverpool women's hospital has been named by police as 32—year—old emad al swealmeen. the eu steps up sanctions against belarus over the escalating migrant crisis at its border. president biden signs into law his $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill, paving the way for new roads, railways and bridges. and the french flag has had an oh—so—subtle makeover. did you spot it?
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the tension between the eu and belarus has increased with the eu imposing additional sanctions and thousands of migrants now moved right up to the border crossing with poland, trapped in freezing conditions with troops in front and behind them. belarus' president lukashenko is accused of orchestrating the crisis by flying in migrants from the middle east and pushing them towards the country's eu borders with poland, lithuania and latvia — all in revenge for earlier sanctions. lukashenko , who has the support of russia's president putin, has denied the allegations. he claims he's trying to convince the migrants to go home but says they don't want to. our correspondent steve rosenberg has spent the day on the belarus side of the border, from where he sent this report. in the migrant camp, word had got out, they'd been told this was the moment to make it into the eu. everyone here wanted to believe it was going to happen
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and the belarusian soldiers didn't try to stop them. in their thousands they streamed towards the border crossing that leads from belarus to poland. and the closer they came, the more urgent it got. the last fence on the belarus side swept away. so after a week in the camp, the migrants are now pouring through, right up to the checkpoint with poland, they're determined to be let through to the european union.
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always baby crying for the milk, for nappy, we don't have nothing. please come and help these people, all the guys. the eu says belarus is using migrants as a weapon against the west, to pressure europe, a form of hybrid warfare. these people want a better life. they are desperate to get to the european union, which is right here. but the eu says that these migrants are being used, exploited by belarus to spark a humanitarian crisis on the eu's doorstep. back in the camp, we heard stories of how belarusian soldiers had helped some migrants try to cross illegally into poland. in the night they told us, you will go to poland. they cut the fence. the belarusians cut for us and we ran. we run a lot. and then we hide ourselves in the forest. they see us and return back to the site, itjust like a football game. we are in the middle. many of these migrants from the middle east say they're escaping conflict at home.
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they've paid thousands of dollars each to get here, but they're stuck. they say there's no way back, but for now, there's no way forward. steve rosenberg, bbc news, belarus. i'm joined now by member of european parliament and former foreign minister of poland, radoslaw sikorski in london. thank radoslaw sikorski in london. you forjoining us. is risk thank you forjoining us. is there a risk all of this spirals out of control? ., . ., risk all of this spirals out of control? ., .., _, , , control? you can never completely discounted. _ control? you can never completely discounted, when _ control? you can never completely discounted, when you _ control? you can never completely discounted, when you have - control? you can never completely discounted, when you have young| discounted, when you have young people with weapons. someone can panic, accidents do happen, which is why it is so outrageous of mr lukashenko to engineer this crisis. he is trying to do what president erdogan did between turkey and greece. he is trying to force the eu into a negotiation and hopefully payments for himself. but of course,
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we cannot submit to such a blatant blackmail. ,, ., ., , blackmail. should the role be with eu and nato? _ blackmail. should the role be with eu and nato? this _ blackmail. should the role be with eu and nato? this is _ blackmail. should the role be with eu and nato? this is a _ blackmail. should the role be with eu and nato? this is a migration i eu and nato? this is a migration crisis, eu and nato? this is a migration crisis. not _ eu and nato? this is a migration crisis. not a _ eu and nato? this is a migration crisis, not a military _ eu and nato? this is a migration crisis, not a military one. - eu and nato? this is a migration crisis, not a military one. you i eu and nato? this is a migration i crisis, not a military one. you have a similar problem with france, insisting france keeps the migrants on its side of the english channel. you know, people do need visas to come into countries. we have the schengen zone, the area of free travel in the european union and if we are to keep it the external perimeter has to be physically secure. , ., ., , ., secure. one interpretation is that russia, secure. one interpretation is that russia. which _ secure. one interpretation is that russia, which is _ secure. one interpretation is that russia, which is the _ secure. one interpretation is that russia, which is the big - secure. one interpretation is that russia, which is the big patron i secure. one interpretation is that russia, which is the big patron ofj russia, which is the big patron of belarus plays it we can dwell, unable to compete symmetrically with the west, it keeps the west of balance with moments of pressure
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like this, do you buy that analysis? i think it is largely lukashenko, but where russia might be sympathetic is it is massing troops around the borders of ukraine. this very usefully distracts from that. what kind of negotiations do you envisage, if any, what kind of negotiations do you envisage, ifany, direct negotiations between poland and belarus between the eu and belarus? it should be the eu institutions, the various commissioners. instead, president macron and chancellor angela merkel have spoken to lukashenko. we have means of stopping the supply of migrants and the un has persuaded iraq to close down belarusian consulates and the airlines that make money on people smuggling enterprises, have been
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threatened with losing licences in flying to the eu.— threatened with losing licences in flying to the eu. there is a human dimension — flying to the eu. there is a human dimension in _ flying to the eu. there is a human dimension in all _ flying to the eu. there is a human dimension in all of _ flying to the eu. there is a human dimension in all of this _ flying to the eu. there is a human dimension in all of this that i flying to the eu. there is a human dimension in all of this that you i flying to the eu. there is a human j dimension in all of this that you or i haven't mentioned and we saw it in steve rosenberg's report. people are desperate, cold and want a better life, what would you say to them? i speak as a former refugee myself, britain gave me refuge when i needed it when martial law was imposed in poland. ifeel their pain it when martial law was imposed in poland. i feel their pain and it when martial law was imposed in poland. ifeel their pain and i am afraid some people have already died but the complex of it and the legality of it are very very dubious. the polish government, of which i am no fan, has a real dilemma. because you don't want to create a supply effect.— create a supply effect. should they take an of create a supply effect. should they take any of the _ create a supply effect. should they take any of the migrants, - create a supply effect. should they take any of the migrants, poland? | take any of the migrants, poland? they should read the help of serious
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ngos and the un agencies, create processing centres right on the border, at the border crossings where asylum claims can be processed quickly and people can either be admitted tojoin their quickly and people can either be admitted to join their families quickly and people can either be admitted tojoin theirfamilies in germany and beyond, all being turned back and flown back to their countries quickly.— back and flown back to their countries quickly. back and flown back to their countries ruickl . . ~' , ., . countries quickly. thank you so much for “oininr countries quickly. thank you so much forjoining us- — hydrogen has been hailed as a future clean fuel and in an effort to tackle climate change, many governments are making it a key part of their emission—cutting plans. the problem though is most of the worlds hydrogen is made from fossil fuels — but there could be a solution in demark — as adrienne murray reports. these giants of renewable energy tower over the danish countryside. here in brande, a pioneering project offers what might be a glimpse of the future. this enormous turbine is harnessing energy from the wind. and that power is being used
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to produce another type of clean fuel — hydrogen gas. the pilot plant is not connected to the grid. and the green hydrogen made here supplies local taxis. we can produce a maximum, like, eight kilos per hour with the equipment you see behind me here, so it's, of course, extremely small. nevertheless eight kilos is actually what a car could drive like 800km on. the need to slash our carbon emissions has brought hydrogen increasingly into focus. the good thing with hydrogen, when you burn it, you actually do not get the co2 emissions so what comes out of the exhaust is water, instead of all the nasty stuff we see today. today, most hydrogen — about 95% — is made using fossil fuel. green hydrogen, however, is produced from water and renewable electricity. this facility makes electolysers — the technology needed to produce it.
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we split water into hydrogen and oxygen. so what this does is, through electricity, we can actually take out the hydrogen molecule from h20. hydrogen has been touted as a climate solution before but it has not really taken off. proponents say it is a different picture today. the difference is climate — the need to react rapidly on the climate change. renewable electricity sources, they have become available in a much different volume than before and in the past, and they have also become much cheaper. hydrogen has many uses, particularly in heavy industry. in the uk, there are plans to heat homes. it could also store excess energy from wind or solar. some transport, like buses and trains already run off it. and in copenhagen, it drives a fleet of more than 100 taxis. danish firm everfuel is making a big bet on green hydrogen and running
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danish firm everfuel is making a big bet on green hydrogen and rolling out a network of fuelling stations. we see it as for taxis and then, well, buses — there is quite a few hydrogen buses on the market right now. the long haul trucking is a real challenge on batteries because struggle with arteries because the grid cannot supply enough, they have to charge for hours and the batteries weigh too much. dozens of new green hydrogen plants are now on the horizon but much needs to be done if the hopes for this new, clean fuel can live up to the hype. adrienne murray, bbc news, jutland. stay with us on bbc news. the prime minister was speaking at the load bear�*s guild and talking about the deal on climate change
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talking about phasing down rather than phasing out coal. borisjohnson agreed that work still needed to be done. we agreed that work still needed to be done. ~ , . ., , , agreed that work still needed to be done. , ,, , ., done. we must confess this deal, this act done. we must confess this deal, this pact won't — done. we must confess this deal, this pact won't do _ done. we must confess this deal, this pact won't do it _ done. we must confess this deal, this pact won't do it on _ done. we must confess this deal, this pact won't do it on its - done. we must confess this deal, this pact won't do it on its own. . this pact won't do it on its own. glasgow won't stop climate change. glasgow won't stop climate change. glasgow won't stop climate change. glasgow won't prevent the heating of the planet that is now baked in, but glasgow can still help us to slow that warming down. and what we have in our hands right now is a road map detailed and marked with milestone after milestone. and for the first time in history humanity has agreed to move beyond coal. i want to thank alok sharma for everything he did and for what he's going to continue to do. because our cop didn't end on
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saturday, we are still well cop holders for a long time to come. a long time since we have been that. we will build on the historic glasgow pact, which calls for countries to do better next year, accelerating the five year cycle set out in the paris agreement. we will push for more ambitious goals, stronger plans and better implementation. and so we further narrow that gap to 1.5 degrees. we will work from now on with partners around the world, because this is global britain in action. former us president donald trump is the subject of three separate criminal investigations, including by fulton county in the us state of georgia, over an alleged
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attempt at pressuring the secretary of state to committ election fraud. in his new book out this month called, "integrity counts", brad raffensperger details the infamous phone call trump made to him, where he says the president pressured raffensperger to find" the votes to win the state in the 2020 election and beatjoe biden. mr trump still maintains the election was stolen from him. i'm joined now by secretary brad raffensperger from atlanta, georgia. thank you forjoining us, did american democracy and the rule of law come down, partly in the interview? it law come down, partly in the interview?— law come down, partly in the interview? ., ., ., , ., interview? it came down to anyone involved in — interview? it came down to anyone involved in elections _ interview? it came down to anyone involved in elections and _ interview? it came down to anyone involved in elections and make i interview? it came down to anyone | involved in elections and make sure we follow the constitution and the rule of law. tell we follow the constitution and the rule of law-— rule of law. tell us about this infamous _ rule of law. tell us about this infamous phone _ rule of law. tell us about this infamous phone call, - rule of law. tell us about this i infamous phone call, hour-long rule of law. tell us about this - infamous phone call, hour-long phone infamous phone call, hour—long phone call, i understand, infamous phone call, hour—long phone call, iunderstand, how infamous phone call, hour—long phone call, i understand, how much pressure did you feel you were under at the time?— at the time? president trump asked us to recalibrate, _
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at the time? president trump asked us to recalibrate, recalculate - at the time? president trump asked us to recalibrate, recalculate our i us to recalibrate, recalculate our numbers. we looked at every single allegation that was made. at the end of the day president trump came up short by about 11,800 votes. there is nothing to recalculate because the numbers were just not there. mas the numbers were 'ust not there. was it unusual for — the numbers were just not there. was it unusual for the president of the united states to speak to you so directly in one state about this? i have never had a conversation before and i suspect i will never have a conversation again. typically, presidents don't speak out to state secretaries of state.— secretaries of state. where you in our secretaries of state. where you in your office — secretaries of state. where you in your office on _ secretaries of state. where you in your office on the _ secretaries of state. where you in your office on the phone - secretaries of state. where you in your office on the phone just i secretaries of state. where you in | your office on the phone just rang, how did it come about? his your office on the phone 'ust rang, how did it come about?i your office on the phone 'ust rang, how did it come about? his chief of staff reached _ how did it come about? his chief of staff reached out _ how did it come about? his chief of staff reached out to _ how did it come about? his chief of staff reached out to my _ how did it come about? his chief of staff reached out to my chief i how did it come about? his chief of staff reached out to my chief of i staff reached out to my chief of staff reached out to my chief of staff and wanted to have a conversation that saturday afternoon. i was at home with my wife, tricia. itook afternoon. i was at home with my wife, tricia. i took the phone call and i had my general counsel on there and my deputy and we respectfully listen to what president trump had to say and then
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we respectfully responded with the facts that we had. did we respectfully responded with the facts that we had.— facts that we had. did he listen? apparently _ facts that we had. did he listen? apparently not- _ facts that we had. did he listen? apparently not. when _ facts that we had. did he listen? apparently not. when you i facts that we had. did he listen? apparently not. when you finish | facts that we had. did he listen? i apparently not. when you finish the -hone apparently not. when you finish the phone conversation, _ apparently not. when you finish the phone conversation, you _ apparently not. when you finish the phone conversation, you are - apparently not. when you finish the phone conversation, you are at i apparently not. when you finish the i phone conversation, you are at home, did you recognise at the time the importance of that phone call? 140. importance of that phone call? no, at the time — importance of that phone call? no, at the time tricia _ importance of that phone call? tip, at the time tricia and i were probably thinking about where our parents came from. my father came from a steel town in western pennsylvania and both her parents were british—born, from stockport. to think about their children were having a conversation with the president of the united states, my parents wouldn't have believed it. i want to respect his position as president of the united states of america. , ., , , ., , ., ., america. presumably he wanted you to find out if there _ america. presumably he wanted you to find out if there were, _ america. presumably he wanted you to find out if there were, 11,800 - find out if there were, 11,800 imaginary votes? he find out if there were, 11,800 imaginary votes?— find out if there were, 11,800 imaginary votes? find out if there were, 11,800 imaaina votes? ., ., , imaginary votes? he made all sorts of charues imaginary votes? he made all sorts of charges and _ imaginary votes? he made all sorts of charges and allegations. - imaginary votes? he made all sorts
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of charges and allegations. he i imaginary votes? he made all sorts of charges and allegations. he said| of charges and allegations. he said in his phone call there were 5000 dead people who voted. his team sued and said there was 10,000. there was less than five. he said there were thousands of felons that voted, there was less than 7a under sentence. it was things like that, but we had the data, we had all the facts. my followed it up with a letter to congress and rebutted every single allegation made. both sides have it, both houses of congress and no one has disputed any of our data points we provided to congress. that of our data points we provided to concress. �* ., , congress. at any point, even in the back of your _ congress. at any point, even in the back of your mind _ congress. at any point, even in the back of your mind did _ congress. at any point, even in the back of your mind did it _ congress. at any point, even in the back of your mind did it strike i congress. at any point, even in the back of your mind did it strike you i back of your mind did it strike you it might be easier to string the president along, or go along with some of his suggestions? ida. president along, or go along with some of his suggestions? 140.1 some of his suggestions? no, i thou~ht some of his suggestions? no, i thought it _ some of his suggestions? no, i thought it was _ some of his suggestions? no, i thought it was appropriate i i some of his suggestions? no, i | thought it was appropriate i just thought it was appropriate ijust calmly and factually explained to him that his data was wrong. that is the appropriate way to treat people,
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treat them honestly, calmly, rationally and respectfully and let them know why their data is long. mr secretary, is america in a good position to 2024 if there are challenges to some close state, like georgia? taste challenges to some close state, like geora ia? ~ ., challenges to some close state, like georaia? ~ ., , georgia? we have been fighting the stolen election _ georgia? we have been fighting the stolen election claims _ georgia? we have been fighting the stolen election claims going - georgia? we have been fighting the stolen election claims going back. georgia? we have been fighting the stolen election claims going back to the 2018 election when stacey abrams lost the governor's race. she did not concede, she said it was due to voter suppression. not concede, she said it was due to votersuppression. it not concede, she said it was due to voter suppression. it came out in the data that the term voter suppression was a good book grabber. she wasn't honest either. it is important we have fair and free elections in the united states of america. ., ~ elections in the united states of america. ., ,, , ., ., elections in the united states of america. ., ,, ., ., , we live in a time of deeply fractured politics and yet, there was a reminder today that washington bipartisanship
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still exists in some form. in the last half an hour, president biden signed into law a trillion dollar infrastructure bill at a ceremony on the white house south lawn alongside his republican colleagues, ready to implement america's biggest public—works bill since president eisenhower created the interstate highway system in the 1950s. it's an obvious victory lap, but a grey cloud hangs over what should be a jubilant day for the president. a new washington post—abc poll puts mr biden's approval rating at a new low of 41%. what's to blame for the dip? concerns over inflation, which hit a 30—year high in october, that would be a challenge for any president. but also another clue from the poll: just 35% of voters say mr biden has accomplished much during his first ten months, while only 31% believe he's keeping his campaign promises. is that a fair assessment? let's bring in the bbc�*s senior north america
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reporter anthony zurcher. thank you forjoining us. only 35% say mr biden has accomplished much in his first ten months, does this signing of the bill change that? this bill passed the senate in august and then three months went by where there was wrangling among democrats before they were able to get it passed and signed into law now. i think the public will remember the long, drawn—out process where it seemed like the democrat momentum and joe biden's momentum started to sap. will this turn it around now while these opinions have been setting in four months? i don't know. it will probably be a start on the did try to create the celebratory atmosphere at the white house today. they will have to do more than one day celebrations, they will have to pass the second part of legislation, big spending package which includes spending on social issues if they want to change the
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public opinions, now that are becoming set in stone.- public opinions, now that are becoming set in stone. what is the lan becoming set in stone. what is the plan briefly — becoming set in stone. what is the plan briefly on _ becoming set in stone. what is the plan briefly on inflation? _ becoming set in stone. what is the plan briefly on inflation? when i becoming set in stone. what is thej plan briefly on inflation? when you talk to administration _ plan briefly on inflation? when you talk to administration officials i talk to administration officials they say this will start to ebb away once the government spending picks up once the government spending picks up and once the supply chain issues are tackled. they are contributing to inflation in these bottlenecks in the supply chain. and infrastructure spending at ports will help, bringing the goods and drive down prices and they hope by next year when they face the maternal elections, which that poll shows a lot of americans will vote for republicans, that will be the test. thank you so much forjoining us from washington. adele has revealed she was "embarrassed" by her divorce. speaking to oprah winfrey ahead of the release of her latest album, the star said she felt like she had "disrespected" the idea of marriage when she separated from her husband, simon koneki, in 2018. she added that "terrifying anxiety attacks" after the divorce
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prompted her to adopt an exercise and weight loss regime over the next two years. there are some flashing images in this report. this was adele's first tv interview about the release of her new album. she said because her own dad left when she was just two, she had promised herself that whatever happened, when she had children, she would always stay with her partner. what do you think the deep wound from the past from you as a little girl growing up, you are trying to heal as you reach for your relationships as an adult woman? my dad's absolute lack of presence and effort with me. but as i got older, i definitely understood that it was the alcohol, it wasn't a choice that he was necessarily making himself that he didn't want... but when you are little, you don't know. she told oprah she was embarrassed her marriage of eight years crumbled and said it felt like that meant she was disrespecting the institution of marriage. it was just exhausting trying
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to like keep going with it. it's a process, the process of a divorce, the process of being a single parent. the process of not seeing your child every single day wasn't really a plan that i had when i became a mum. adele also revealed she had suffered a paralysing anxiety attacks after her divorce and only started going to the gym mainly to control the stress. it led to her losing over seven stone in two years, but crucially, she said, it helped her mental health. it became my time, me having a plan every day when i had no plans, i had no idea what each day was going to bring for me, but me knowing at 9am i would go to the gym, 0k, great, that gives me some discipline. at 1pm, i go fora hike. having these pins in my day helped me keep myself together. you weren't starting out trying to lose weight? no, not at all, i wasn't bothered about that at all, but in that process of having lost all that weight, i definitely really
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contributed towards me getting my mind right and giving me... it sharpened everything. without a shadow of the doubt. it gave me a real purpose. a flag is the ultimate depiction of a country. instantly recognisable, at least for the citizens of that nation. so if someone decided to change the colour of your country's flag, you'd notice — right? not so the case in france apparently. president emmanuel macron switched from this brighter shade of blue in the tricolore, as seen in 2019 — to this one, using a darker navy blue with the new hue hoisted on the presidential palace last year. not a word was said, and no one noticed. until now, when officials confirmed the change to europe one radio station. here's a before and after. apparently mr macron wanted to bring
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back the navy blue flag, whch is a symbol of the french revolution. hello there. the start to meteorological winter is a couple of weeks away now and you will notice through this ten day forecast that there is a bit of a theme of things getting colder towards the end of the period, but for the next week or so a lot of mild weather in the forecast. some rain around towards the north and that's because we've got weather fronts at times that are going to be trying to push their way in. this one on tuesday bringing some rain to northern ireland and scotland early in the day but it's bumping into high pressure which is sitting both to the south—west and to the east of the uk at the moment, too. so this front will bring some rain initially to northern ireland, it'll be fairly patchy. quite heavy for a time across the west of scotland, just pushing into the far north—west of england and north wales later in the afternoon. but for much of the day, england and wales stay dry
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with early mist clearing away but fairly cloudy conditions persisting, temperature is about ten to 13 degrees on tuesday. once this front clears away towards the east into wednesday, you will notice a bit of a change in the colour of the air mass. so a slightly colder day to come on wednesday. it's only going to be a brief colder, fresher feel to the weather. some scattered showers for northern ireland and for scotland, england and wales stay dry with light winds and more sunshine than we've had over recent days. so after that chilly start to wednesday i think it'll feel quite fine in the afternoon with temperatures about nine to 13 degrees, so a touchdown on what we've had over recent days. but that fresher spell doesn't last very long at all as we move through into thursday now. you can see this warm front approaching the north so that's going to bring a bit of rain to parts of western scotland perhaps, but it's also importing that milder air mass from the south—west once again. into thursday, most places settled and dry with variable amounts of cloud. best of the sunshine to the south and east and we could see temperatures as high as 16 or 17
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degrees to the east of scotland. quite widely we are looking at the mid—teens. very mild for the middle of november. not much change towards the end of the working week. weather fronts trying to topple into the north of scotland to friday, pretty similar to thursday again. mild, largely dry and rain across the north and the west of scotland and temperatures will be around 14, 15 degrees and we could see the highest temperatures across the east of scotland on friday. we head towards next weekend and we still have high pressure dominating our weather. sitting to the south here and we have weather fronts towards the north—west and they are bringing in this mild south—westerly flow of air. through the course of the weekend we are looking at the mild air in place, just starting to turn colderfrom the air in place, just starting to turn colder from the north as we head through saturday night. the saturday itself, a bit of rain across parts of scotland and northern ireland and england and wales once again looking dry and settled. top temperatures perhaps down a little bit, 12, 13
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degrees in the south but we are into single figures across the far north of scotland. through next week, we will see a change, high pressure establishing itself to the west of the uk and with the wind is rotating around the high pressure, they will start to come in from a northerly direction, particularly as we head towards the latter part of next week. a real change in feel to the weather, has been mild this week, but a return to the colder and potentially northerly winds. could bring winteryness and sleet showers for some areas through the course of next week. it is a cold outlook, single figures for next week, but for the here and now we keep the mild weather for at least the next five days or so. you can find more details on our website. goodbye.
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the liverpool terror attack — police name the man who was in the taxi that exploded. the car was outside liverpool women's hospital when a home—made bomb was set off, killing the passenger inside. tonight, police say they believe he was 32—year—old emad al swealmeen and are appealing for information from the public as the investigation continues. our inquiries will now seek to understand how the device was built, the motivation for the incident and to understand if anyone else was involved in it. as the uk's terror threat level is raised to severe, we'll have the latest from liverpool. also tonight... more protection from covid — the boosterjab programme is expanded to all over—40s, and 16— and 17—year—olds are to get second doses.
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belarus faces more eu sanctions, with thousands of migrants now

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