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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  November 15, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the eu steps up sanctions against belarus over the escalating migrant crisis at its border. we will be able to sanction more people according with their activities on the organisation of these flights. the aim — to target all those involved in getting thousands of migrants — mostly from the middle east — to the border with poland. the polish helicopter monitoring situation here which is very tense, because hundreds of migrants have just pushed their way through the
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gates on the belarus the inside of the border. the uk terror threat is raised to severe after an explosion in liverpool, now being treated as a terrorist incident. and trump ally steve bannon hands himself in to the fbi on charges of contempt of congress. the european union has stepped up sanctions against belarus. it's targeting airlines it says are trafficking migrants to the belarusian capital, minsk. and we know migrants are heading from the city to the border with poland — which is in the eu. which is why the eu is saying this. we will be able to sanction more people according with their activities on the organization of these flights, of people from several countries going into the belarus
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and from there to the european union member states borders. and at the same time, we agreed to an adoption of a new package. it would be the fifth one, a new package on sanctions which will be finalized in the coming days. and belarus, which isn't. for the past week, thousands of migrants — most from the middle east — have been stuck in freezing conditions in make—shift tents. eight have died from hypothermia. the situation escalated earlier when hundreds of migrants moved towards a border crossing. polish police, water cannon and a razor wire fence are all there to stop people coming across. and poland accuses belarus of preventing them from moving back from the border. the bbc�*s steve rosenberg was with them as the reached the crossing on the belarus side.
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any migrant... this was the moment to make it into the eu. everyone here wanted to believe it was going to happen. the belarus scenes soldiers didn't try to stop them. the border crossing leeds from belarus to poland. the closer they came the more urgent it got. the last fence on the belarus side swept away. after a week in the camp... but it was no entry. polish police were out in force and standing firm.
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they are crying for milk and nappies, we don't have nothing. these people want a better life. they are desperate to get to the european union which is right here. but the eu says these migrants are being used, exploited by belarus to spark a humanitarian crisis on the eu doorstep. back in the camp we heard stories of how belarus in soldiers and helped some migrants try to cross illegally into poland. in the night they told us, he will go to poland, they cut the fence. the building they see us and return back to the site. it is like a football game. we are in the middle.
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now, if we look back over the last two weeks — poland says over 5,000 migrants have tried to illegally cross from belarus. to put that in context — in 2020, that figure was just 120. on sunday alone, there were 118 attempts. also on sunday, poland sent more police and military and they began broadcasting this warning. attention, attention. so that was the situation in poland. this crisis is also playing out which is also in the european union. it's beefed up security along its frontier and erected razor wire fencing. and the lithuanian prime minister is clear on who's to blame.
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well, we are seeing this state sponsored human smuggling and the state, the belarusian state, the government of lukashenko is doing whatever they can to increase the number of people coming to minsk from middle east and other countries so that he could only promise the people passage to the european union, which is not which is not possible because people do not have visas or other legal grounds to to be there. so we see the number of people increased significantly. now we have a quite dire weather conditions in this part of europe. and what we see is that very complicated situation at the border of poland. but i cannot say that i feel somehow less alarmed for my own border with belarus. at the centre of this is the belarusian president alexander lu kashenko. the eu accuses him mounting
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a �*hybrid attack�* by flying migrants to minsk from countries like iraq, syria and afghanistan — and pushing them to cross illegally into poland. the eu says president lukashenko against existing eu sanctions, imposed after the disputed presidential election last year. president lukashenko denies engineering the crisis. his message for the eu is this. it's more trouble than it's worth. we have never done that and we don't plan to. they threaten us with sanctions. 0k, we'll see. they think that i'm joking. we do everything for this camp not to exist so that those willing to get into the european union can do so. but for those not willing, we are ready, as we've always been, to put everyone on planes. but i need to say that these people are very stubborn and no one wants to return.
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well, the united arab emirates has now barred afghan, syrian, yemeni and iraqi citizens from taking flights to minsk. while iraq says it's organising a voluntary flight this thursday for citizens stuck on the poland—belarus border who want to go back to iraq. let's hear from steve rosenberg on the border again. translation: we have informed airlines we will _ translation: we have informed airlines we will pave _ translation: we have informed airlines we will pave the - translation: we have informed airlines we will pave the way - translation: we have informed airlines we will pave the way for l translation: we have informed airlines we will pave the way for a low to sanction those which support human trafficking. with the effect, and this is good and right, turkish airlines have said they will no longer service belarus. as you heard there, russia denies being involved in the crisis. it repeated that message today. here's russian�*s deputy ambassador to the un. so there is a game of shifting blame now by european union. they want to picture belarusians, sometimes even russia,
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as perpetrators of this crisis. well, we've got news that the main slogan of european and western politics right now is keep calm and blame russia. so it's no surprise for us. well, russia has offered to mediate between its ally belarus and the eu to help bring an end to the crisis. many in the eu are sceptical. here's the lithuanian deputy foreign minister on why. russia is at war with ukraine and in east ukraine already. so in a sense, opening a new theatre of war would not surprise us. and putin is engaged in some sort of nefarious game here. it's not clear. what is the cover for? what is the migrant crisis a coverfor a new hostile action in ukraine? or is escalation along the ukrainian border a coverfor take over anschluss of belarus, which is we suspect this is going on at the moment when putin trying to present himself
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as a sort of mediator, whereas the true game plan may be sort of the takeover of belarus using using this crisis as a pretext to bring in russian troops, which has already happened, and gradually take over the control. so to be clear — that's the lithuanian government telling the bbc that western countries can't rule out a russian attack on ukraine while attention is focused on belarus. the secretary general of the nato defence alliance also shares his concerns. in recent weeks we have seen large and unusual concentrations of russian forces close to ukraine's borders, similar to russia's build up in crimea and the black sea region earlier this year. the fact that we see this military build—up also reduces any warning
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time between a decision in russia before they are able to actually conduct a military aggressive action against ukraine. i don't want to speculate, but we need to be honest and we need to be clear eyed about the potential capabilities or the capabilities that russia has to conduct potential aggressive actions against ukraine. russia denies that it's about to mount an incursion into ukraine. next let's hearfrom a belarusian opposition leader in exile on how this issue must be resolved. the crisis has started not yesterday. it has started a year ago with fraudulent elections and it has to be sold in belarus, not in russia or somewhere else. i think that every country can play its constructive role in solving this crisis, but not communicating with the dictator. well, in the past hour the french president has held a phone call with vladimir putin —
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agreeing on a �*de—escalation�* of the migrant crisis. bbc russian�*s petr kozlov is in moscow for us — what did macron and putin say to each other? we what did macron and putin say to each other?— each other? we know they have different problems _ each other? we know they have different problems between - each other? we know they have different problems between the j different problems between the countries but they have spoken about the problem you're talking right now, about the situation in the belarusian border between belarus and the european union. we know today and yesterday president putin, first time commented on this situation, and according to him he learned about this situation literally from the news from television. president putin's spokesman dismissed all allegations that russia is preparing the
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military invasion of ukraine and it is being a cover—up to do this. still we don't know what is happening right now. but still we don't know what is happening right now. but we know about the relationship _ happening right now. but we know about the relationship between - about the relationship between vladimir putin and alexander lukashenko. would lukashenko be able to do this without the of vladimir putin? , , ., ., to do this without the of vladimir putin? ,, . ., �* ., , to do this without the of vladimir putin? ,, . . �* ., , ., , putin? russia and belarus are very close allies- _ putin? russia and belarus are very close allies. in _ putin? russia and belarus are very close allies. in fact _ putin? russia and belarus are very close allies. in fact russia - putin? russia and belarus are very close allies. in fact russia is - close allies. in fact russia is between two countries in this relationship, like an elder brother, russia has the upper hand in this relationship first of all because of the belarusian economy which is heavily dependent on russia and its financial resources support, but still president lukashenko is trying to be like an equal partner. it is of course difficult to be an equal
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partner, but we know he behaves quite unpredictable, his policies, trying to play between the west and russia on the contradictory, and he is trying to get some advantage in this relationship, so possibly sometimes he can do some unpredictable things that could be not even waited from moscow. flan unpredictable things that could be not even waited from moscow. can i also ask you — not even waited from moscow. can i also ask you about _ not even waited from moscow. can i also ask you about the _ not even waited from moscow. can i also ask you about the russian troop build—up on the border with ukraine? what do we understand about the russian plan there? it is what do we understand about the russian plan there?— russian plan there? it is quite difficult to _ russian plan there? it is quite difficult to say, _ russian plan there? it is quite difficult to say, because - russian plan there? it is quite l difficult to say, because russian military usually says beforehand its plans, but we know the military drills started just after this crisis was a few days already in progress and according to official
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russian position, the kremlin always says, we can do the drills anywhere in russian territory and we don't need to warn anybody beforehand. on the other hand if we talk about the drills which are taking place in belarus, it has been together with belarusian troops and it was with the invitation of alexander lukashenko, so there is nothing special with what the kremlin says in this situation.— let's turn to the uk now where the authorities have raised the official terror threat level to severe — meaning an attack is considered highly likely. that comes after police in liverpool said an explosion outside a hospital yesterday is being treated as a terrorist incident. in the last few minutes police have named the man who died in the blast — believed to be carrying
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a home—made bomb — as 32—year—old emad al swealmeen. ed thomas reports. remembrance sunday, as the nation falls silent. the taxi rose in before the unthinkable happens. moments after the blast, look at the driver's door. you can see david escape. he runs away. others rushing to help. this is thought to be david with his hands on his head. this evening, his wife rachel said it was a miracle he survived and he is trying to process what happened. today detectives confirmed the passenger who had the explosive device had asked to be taken to the hospital. yesterday shortly before ”am a local taxi driver a fare in the rutland avenue area of liverpool. the fare, a man, asked to be taken to liverpool hospital,
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about ten minutes away. as a taxi approached the drop—off point at the hospital, an explosion occurred within the car. tonight david perry's family said he's lucky to be alive, that he is doing ok. he is being praised by the prime minister who urged the public to be alert. it is a stark reminder of the need for us all to remain utterly vigilant, and the independent joint terrorism analysis centre are today raising the uk threat level from substantial to severe, meaning an attack is highly likely. there is a forensic search for evidence at the hospital. clues into who did this, and why, and just one mile away, four people have now been arrested under the terrorism act. just horrifying, you cannot believe what type of person would do that.
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whilst david perry's friends and colleagues carry on working in disbelief, at what has happened. it is shocking how a man can go out to do his normal day's work and potentially lose his life. he sustained a lot of injuries, i believe, burst eardrums, back fracture, that is just word going between different drivers, so, mostly, it is going to be a shock for him and his family. he is a hero, very nice person, - he comes in the shop all the time. people here are saying he's a hero? he's a hero, yes. it is here at the hospital where the panic of yesterday was most acute. this was filmed inside the hospital by the father a newborn baby. we are not using the sound but he comforts his distraught wife, as the fire takes hold. today, parents, expectant mothers,
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told us that it was terrifying. just horrible. when we saw it. just really scary, that they would end up at a hospital where there is loads of babies and things like that, it isjust awful. this is an investigation involving counterterrorism police and security services, as they move quickly to find out who did this, and why. ed thomas, bbc news, liverpool. that new development again — reuters and others are reporting this evening that uk police say on liverpool taxi blast strongly believe that the deceased is 32—year—old emad al.. gordon corera has more on the terror
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alert. , ., ., , ., , alert. investigators are still cautious about _ alert. investigators are still cautious about what - alert. investigators are still| cautious about what exactly alert. investigators are still- cautious about what exactly lay behind this attack, what the motivation was. it doesn't look as though but explosive went off properly or it was very large, one of the two. as witnessed by the fact that the taxi driver survived even though the perpetrator died. that perpetrator who appear to have carried this device on board the taxi wasn't known to mi5, that is also a source of concern because it means he wasn't on their radar and it does make it harder to understand what his background might have been and what connections he might have been and the ideology if there was one that motivated him was so they will be looking for any connections and any contacts. so far as we heard, no sign of an ongoing threat of a credible intelligence of something else being planned. but theissueis something else being planned. but the issue is we have now had two attacks within a month. we had the killing of the mp sir david amis a month ago and this today. put them
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together and it has changed the picture for the authorities about what the uk faces in a terrorist threat. let's turn to the us. donald trump's former presidential advisor steve bannon has appeared in court. he turned himself in after being charged with contempt of congress. he had refused to appear before a committee investigating the storming of the us capitol on 6 january. here is steve bannon arriving to surrender to the fbi earlier. he's expected to appear in court to face the first charges to come out of the inquiry. he spoke before turning himself in. every day the focus you have that doctor, captain barnett, boris epson, the whole so, economic data out everything, once a got to stay focused.
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the investigating committee believes steve bannon could have information on links between the white house and trump supporters involved with the attack. for he was summoned to testify, but refused. for that, he was charged with contempt of congress. he faces up to a year in prison and a 100,000 dollar fine. on friday, when he was charged, the committee tweeted... court documents quote steve bannon saying on his podcast on the eve of the riot that "all hell is going to break loose tomorrow". his lawyers argue that mr bannon�*s communications are protected by a legal doctrine of executive privilege. the committee has called this an "unsupported premise". anthony zurcher in washington. help me understand what happens from this moment onwards in terms of how the charge plays out.— the charge plays out. steve bannon was 'ust in the charge plays out. steve bannon wasjust in his _
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the charge plays out. steve bannon was just in his first _ the charge plays out. steve bannon wasjust in his first court _ was just in his first court appearance where they determined, thejudge determined he appearance where they determined, the judge determined he would appearance where they determined, thejudge determined he would not appearance where they determined, the judge determined he would not be detained prior to trial, he could go home although he has to surrender his passport and inform the court of any... he has another court hearing on thursday before the presiding judge, a trump pointy, very distinguished conservative pedigree, he cooked for conservative supreme courtjustice clarence thomas. the trial date is somewhere in the future. i imagine it will be a long drawn out trial process and because there are these questions, presidential privilege, being involved, this could be appealed all the way to the supreme court at some point. i the way to the supreme court at some oint. . , the way to the supreme court at some oint. ., , ., ~ the way to the supreme court at some oint. .,, ., ~ 1, ., �*, point. i was mentioning mr bannon's odcast point. i was mentioning mr bannon's podcast was — point. i was mentioning mr bannon's podcast was referenced. _ point. i was mentioning mr bannon's podcast was referenced. he - point. i was mentioning mr bannon's podcast was referenced. he uses - point. i was mentioning mr bannon's| podcast was referenced. he uses that language quite frequently. our other sick accusing him of knowing more about the potential link between those who stormed the capital and mr
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trump, are they offering more than quotes from his put because? also quotes from his put because? also the want quotes from his put because? also they want evidence _ quotes from his put because? i"r they want evidence of the meetings he had onjanuary the 5th with people organising the trump rallies, contacts he may have had with all trump himself, administration officials. they want to see what sort of involvement steve bannon had any planning of the trolley and if there was any planning and notification about what happened afterwards, which as you recall was the group that was outside the white house marching to the us capital and breaking into the building and disrupting the certification ofjoe biden�*s electoral college victory. in the last minute, whichever way this goes presumably it plays into mr bannon and mr trump is make believe it is them against a not particularly well specified elite in washington. particularly well specified elite in washington-— particularly well specified elite in washinuton. , ., ., washington. absolutely. you heard what steve bannon _ washington. absolutely. you heard what steve bannon himself - washington. absolutely. you heard what steve bannon himself said - what steve bannon himself said outside the courthouse. he has betraying this as us against them, focus on disrupting joe biden�*s presidency, not on what is happening to me and you're also hearing from
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donald trump and his supporters to look at this as a fight they are waging against thejustice waging against the justice department, political persecution in their view, all of this part and parcel of donald trump's attitude from the very beginning ever since he ran for president. it is the elite out to get him and by extension his supporters. more on the bbc news website. a reminder of the breaking news. police in the uk have named the person they believe died in that explosion in a taxi in liverpool on sunday. they believe it is a 32—year—old man. they are saying he is a person who died in that explosion. you may have seen the video of the car exploding outside a hospital in liverpool. further
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updates on that story in a next top of the programme. it has been another mild and mainly cloudy day. a few outbreaks of rain around. this was the picture of the sun set earlier in wakefield. some clear skies around and through the rest of this evening and overnight where we see clear skies it could turn a bit chilly and misty. over the next few days we still have mild and cloudy weather. a lot of dry weather but not completely dry because weather fronts will move in at times from the north—west. we have high pressure not far away dominating the weather particularly across southern parts of the uk. moving through tonight we have this
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front pushing a bit of rain into the far north—west of scotland. much of the uk dry and variable amounts of cloud, perhaps they can offer the odd spot of drizzle perceptual parts of england and the south—west. either side of that some clear spells and temperatures around 4 or 5 in some towns and cities. cooler than that in the countryside. perhaps just a touch of frost in the most rural spots and a few misty patches as well. through the day we have this front making inroads to northern ireland and scotland through the day. for many of us it will stay dry for a good part of the day. there will be some brighter spells breaking through the cloud during tuesday particularly to the south and east. some of rain pushing into cumbria and anglesey. showers moving in behind that. torso says on the east it is looking dry and mild. but mild there gets squeezed away
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towards the east. you can see blue colours on the cards as we head into wednesday. the difficult air mass around on tuesday. sunshine despite the cold weather but a few showers moving in at perhaps one or two per northern ireland and the west of scotland. forthe northern ireland and the west of scotland. for the bulk of the uk wednesday is looking dry with light winds and fairly long spells of sunshine around. temperatures between nine and 13. for some. a bit above average for the time of year. those temperatures will continue to rise towards the end of the week. milder air spills and again for thursday and friday. 1a and 15. predominantly dry and the outlook with mainly light winds. cold weather on the way for the end of the month.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the eu steps up sanctions against belarus over the escalating migrant crisis on its border. we will be able to sanction more people according with their activities on the organisation of these flights. the aim: to target all those involved in getting thousands of migrants — mostly from the middle east — to the border with poland. police in the uk have named the man who died in an explosion in liverpool yesterday as 32—year—old emad al swealmeen. it's thought he was carrying a home made bomb. and we'll consider where has the cop26 climate conference left our planet? we'll look at what was achieved and whether it goes
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anything like far enough. now as the dust settles on the cop26 climate conference — everyone's trying to assess what it achieved. or as plenty of people on twitter are putting it — good cop or bad cop? these are the headline numbers. the core aim was to make commitments that made it possibel for global warming to be limited to 1.5c above pre—industrial levels. well current analysis suggests the comments that were made has us on track for 2.4c warming. and that's assuming countries stick to their commitments. something which they have a poor track record on. the deal struck late on saturday came after a dramatic last—minute change to the text. the first draught called on the parties "to accelerate the phasing—out of coal" power, but the wording was changed in the final agreement
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to: "accelerate efforts towards the phase down of unabated coal". that followed interventions from india and china, two of the world's biggest users of coal. the change came as a huge disappointment to countries at the sharp end of climate change. here's the foreign minister of the pacific island nation, tuvalu. we were disappointed with the last—minute change. the language around the coal from phasing out to phasing down. they were all quite disappointed is as well as other pacific island countries with last—minute change. the cop26 president was alok sharma he's acknowledged the disappointment being felt. these are countries in the front line of— these are countries in the front line of climate change. for them, 1.5 line of climate change. for them, 15 is_ line of climate change. for them, 15 is really— line of climate change. for them, 1.5 is really a very bad news, 2 degrees — 1.5 is really a very bad news, 2 degrees is _ 1.5 is really a very bad news, 2 degrees is a death sentence. of course — degrees is a death sentence. of course it— degrees is a death sentence. of course it matters to them and there's— course it matters to them and there's lots of emotion there. in
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terms _ there's lots of emotion there. in terms of— there's lots of emotion there. in terms of china and india, they on this particular issue, have to explain _ this particular issue, have to explain themselves to developing countries. we have to do more can we have to be careful_ we have to do more can we have to be careful about _ we have to do more can we have to be careful about the consequences - we have to do more can we have to be careful about the consequences of - careful about the consequences of climate _ careful about the consequences of climate change _ careful about the consequences of climate change. and _ careful about the consequences of climate change. and we _ careful about the consequences of climate change. and we have - careful about the consequences of climate change. and we have to l careful about the consequences of . climate change. and we have to talk about _ climate change. and we have to talk about the _ climate change. and we have to talk about the international _ climate change. and we have to talk about the international partners, - about the international partners, about— about the international partners, about our— about the international partners, about our situation. _ about the international partners, about our situation. because - about the international partners, - about our situation. because climate change _ about our situation. because climate change has _ about our situation. because climate change has brought— about our situation. because climate change has brought social— about our situation. because climate change has brought social injustice. i change has brought social injustice. because _ change has brought social injustice. because caper— change has brought social injustice. because caper verde _ change has brought social injustice. because caper verde and _ change has brought social injustice. because caper verde and other- because caper verde and other countries — because caper verde and other countries did _ because caper verde and other countries did not _ because caper verde and other countries did not contribute - because caper verde and other countries did not contribute toi because caper verde and other. countries did not contribute to the climate _ countries did not contribute to the climate change. _ countries did not contribute to the climate change, it— countries did not contribute to the climate change, it was _ countries did not contribute to the climate change, it was the - countries did not contribute to the climate change, it was the rich - climate change, it was the rich countries — climate change, it was the rich countries in _ climate change, it was the rich countries in the _ climate change, it was the rich countries in the countries - climate change, it was the rich countries in the countries that| countries in the countries that foiiow— countries in the countries that follow some _ countries in the countries that follow some kind _ countries in the countries that follow some kind of _ countries in the countries that - follow some kind of development. china has rejected criticism — saying many developing countries still don't have universal access to electricity and rich countries should do more to help them transition.
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so where does this leave us? nicholas stern is climate economist at the london school of economics. this is his overall assessment of the summit: it was a pity that we moved from phase out to face down, but i don't think it's a huge significance. you've got to look at the things of the whole, and all the things that happened in the first week leading up happened in the first week leading up to the last—minute negotiations. for example, 130 trillion, that's the glasgow numbers. hundred and 30 trillion of private money declaring for net zero, that means moving away from the dirty stuff to sustainable technologies of this century. myanmar have released the us journalist — danny fenster — from prison. just last week he was sentenced to 11 years injail — he'd bene detained in may while attempting to leave the country.
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he flew to doha en route back to th us — and spoke alongside us ambassador and hostage negotiator bill richardson. i was arrested and held in captivity for no reason. physically, i was healthy, i was not starved or beaten. our south east asia correspondentjonathan head has the details. this was very unexpected. a release so quickly— this was very unexpected. a release so quickly of, i think most people assunred — so quickly of, i think most people assumed eventually the burmese military— assumed eventually the burmese military would release him. there was no _ military would release him. there was no obvious reason to keep them. the church— was no obvious reason to keep them. the church they filed against him appeared — the church they filed against him appeared to be absurd. they're related — appeared to be absurd. they're related to — appeared to be absurd. they're related to a news organisation he had already left more than a year before _ had already left more than a year before. and we had a visit to myanmar— before. and we had a visit to myanmar a few weeks ago by bill richardson and he said he didn't
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even _ richardson and he said he didn't even raise — richardson and he said he didn't even raise danny's case they been asked _ even raise danny's case they been asked not— even raise danny's case they been asked not to and then flew back to us after— asked not to and then flew back to us after his visit. it seems nobody was this— us after his visit. it seems nobody was this quite so soon. governor richardson— was this quite so soon. governor richardson did fly to my and mark to pick up _ richardson did fly to my and mark to pick up danny with a private jet and -et pick up danny with a private jet and get them _ pick up danny with a private jet and get them out. it appears the decision— get them out. it appears the decision was made for whatever reason, — decision was made for whatever reason, not very clear that danny was sentenced to 11 years in prison. only iast _ was sentenced to 11 years in prison. only last week. ed was also receiving _ only last week. ed was also receiving additional much more serious — receiving additional much more serious charges that were filed against — serious charges that were filed against him that might have resulted in a life _ against him that might have resulted in a life sentence. back then very grin1 _ in a life sentence. back then very grin1 for— in a life sentence. back then very grin1 for his— in a life sentence. back then very grim for his family and looked as though— grim for his family and looked as though the military was going to go after hinr _ though the military was going to go after him and apply for serious punishment. what the burmese military— punishment. what the burmese military got out of this is very hard — military got out of this is very hard to— military got out of this is very hard to guess. clearly they had some diplomatic— hard to guess. clearly they had some diplomatic engagement from governor richardson although he is does not represent — richardson although he is does not represent the us government. the
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time for— represent the us government. the time for thai foreign minister has gone _ time for thai foreign minister has gone to— time for thai foreign minister has gone to myanmar this week. that's controversial because ministers are not normally engaging with the nriiitarv — not normally engaging with the military. this might be the reason that the _ military. this might be the reason that the military that they need to make _ that the military that they need to make this — that the military that they need to make this concession at this stage. in an exclusive interview with the bbc — myanmar�*s deputy minister of information explained the decision. translation: three people, including mr bill richardson, _ translation: three people, including mr bill richardson, chairman _ translation: three people, including mr bill richardson, chairman for- mr bill richardson, chairman for global enrichment. this is the main reason. the court sentence to 11 years injail — why's he released now. according to our laws, he committed many crimes. but we were able to carry out an amnesty and waiver the punishment after the court verdict. we already had the intention to release him. what was promised by the united states in return for this release today?
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nothing. our foreign policy is to keep good relations with other countries. and we also considered humanitarian reasons. on these grounds, we grant amnesty and deported him today. he has flown out together with mr bill richardson. and you can see much more of that exclusive interview with myanmar�*s deputy minister of information on the bbc�*s newsday programme later this evening — and on the bbc website. we can speak to david waskow, from the world resources institute, who was in glasgow for the summit. thank you very much for your time. what is your overall assessment of what was achieved?—
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what is your overall assessment of what was achieved? we've made some im ortant what was achieved? we've made some important progress _ what was achieved? we've made some important progress but _ what was achieved? we've made some important progress but not _ what was achieved? we've made some important progress but not nearly - important progress but not nearly enough. we sought countries come into the summit with a stronger climate targets, targets for 2030 to cut emissions. and there were a number of countries that did so. there were some that did not and for example australia, brazil, china just did not do enough on their targets. so we need to go further and that's what this conference at the end was really about, how to spread that action going forward. we saw a commitment that countries will in fact come back next year. particularly the major emitters we hope will do so to bring even stronger targets. that's what we need to come we have made headway but there's a long way to go. if those big emitters come back next year and have the same position on something like coal, the position that india and china insisted upon, how much progress can really be made? i how much progress can really be made? ~' ., , how much progress can really be made? ~' ., how much progress can really be made? ~ ., , ., , ., , , made? i think there was an emphasis
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on coal at the — made? i think there was an emphasis on coal at the end _ made? i think there was an emphasis on coal at the end of _ made? i think there was an emphasis on coal at the end of the _ on coal at the end of the conference, coal is quickly important. it's the most dangerous fossil fuel there is. important. it's the most dangerous fossilfuel there is. we do have to keep it in context. this was the first time we'd ever seen coal addressed in a un climate conference in the final outcome. it was actually an important step forward. we also have to remember there's other fossil fuels out there, oil and gas that were also going to need to address. so to be a task going forward. i would just say that i think one of the key outcomes was this notion of coming back to strengthening targets. we are going to have countries back at the table in a year and that's going to be critical. �* , ., ,., in a year and that's going to be critical. �* , ., ., ,, in a year and that's going to be critical. �*, ., ., ,, ., critical. let's also talk about money because _ critical. let's also talk about money because one - critical. let's also talk about money because one of - critical. let's also talk about money because one of the l critical. let's also talk about - money because one of the demands before and after now for the developing world is that the developed world provides more money to help them adapt to commit to help them change their economies. what is your assessment of where cop26 got
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us to on that issue? that your assessment of where cop26 got us to on that issue?— us to on that issue? that was one of the disappointments _ us to on that issue? that was one of the disappointments as _ us to on that issue? that was one of the disappointments as you - us to on that issue? that was one of the disappointments as you said. . the disappointments as you said. this was the key question in this finance question on the table from developing countries, we saw some progress on funding to help countries adapt to the climate impacts they are facing. that's very important for vulnerable countries to be able to do that preparation. there's also impacts that are not going to be able to adapt to. and that ranges from sea level rise to severe weather events, and people will lose their homes and their livelihoods. and there was also an issue on the table about financing to address that. how do we address those severe impacts thatjust can't be adapted to? and that's where the conference unfortunately it fell short. we have it with the dialogue is going to commence among countries, but we need that to come to ground. going to have to have it lead to some results.—
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to ground. going to have to have it lead to some results. thank you very much indeed — lead to some results. thank you very much indeed for _ lead to some results. thank you very much indeed for sharing _ lead to some results. thank you very much indeed for sharing your - much indeed for sharing your assessment. much, much more on cup 26, what was agreed to what was not agreed on the bbc news website. stay with us on outside source — still to come... the cuban pro—democracy activist barricaded in his home, as the state cracks down ahead of a planned protest. all people in their 40s across the uk will be offered a covid boosterjab following advice from government scientists. the move adds another 8 million people to the eligible list taking the total that qualify for a booster to an estimated a0 million people in the uk. our medical editor fergus walsh has the details. just a0 days till christmas, and this year's must—have item is not available in the shops. it's the covid boosterjab
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that is seen as crucial to saving the festive season. you are here for a booster? yes. now it's being extended to the over—40s. not everyone will get a badge from the prime minister, visiting a medical centre in east london. later in downing street, he warned of storm clouds gathering across europe amid a surge in infections. we don't yet know the extent to which this new wave will wash up on our shores, but history shows that we cannot afford to be complacent. can you categorically rule out a christmas lockdown, and how dependent is that on boosterjabs? we don't see anything in the data that says we have to go now to plan b. but clearly we cannot rule anything out. what it means to be fully vaccinated may be changing from two to three doses as it becomes clear that
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immunity does wane over time. among the over—50s who had the astrazeneca vaccine protection 16 and 17—year—olds will now be offered a second jab as the risk of side—effects, especially heart inflammation, has been found to be rarer than previously thought. we've become more and more reassured that the safety picture in young people and children, teenagers, is just what we've seen in the older population, so our message today is definitely, come forward for your second dose. what freedom we all enjoy this christmas is still dependent on how much covid is kept under control. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story the eu is to step up sanctions against belarus in response to the escalating migrant crisis on the border with poland. police in the uk have named the man who died in an explosion in liverpool yesterday as 32 year old emad al swealmeen. it's thought he was
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carrying a home made bomb. let's just stay with that news from liverpool for a moment — in the past hour, police have released the name of the man who died in the bomb blast yesterday. detective chief inspector andrew meeks, from greater manchester police said... the latest statement from the police on a story rush i'm sure you have been following. mesilla taxi driving up been following. mesilla taxi driving up towards the hospital, it stops and almost immediately afterwards there's an explosion. was it a taxi driver stumbling out from the front door. he was taken to hospital, but the man inside who remained inside
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that taxi is being named as emad al swealmeen. 832—year—old who is believed died in the explosion. to the us now. jurors in the state of wisconcin are hearing the closing arguments in the murder trial of kyle rittenhouse. he fatally shot two men with an assault rifle during protests in the city of kenosha last year. you might remember the images from the time. kyle rittenhouse was caught on video carrying a semi automatic assault rifle. he gave himself up to police after the shooting. he had travelled to the area — he said to protect people's property during riots that had erupted after police shot a black man — jacob blake. the trial has not been without incident. here's the judge during today's proceedings. last week he rebuked prosecutors for airing apparently inadmissible evidence. the defence asked that the case be dismissed — the judge denied that motion. let's hear from the prosecution's closing arguements — you'll hear mention ofjoseph rosenbaum —
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he was the first person mr rittenhouse shot and killed. they had to convince you thatjoseph rosenbaum was going to take that gun and use on the defendant because they know you can't claim self—defense against an unarmed man like this. you lose the right to self—defense when you are the one who brought the gun. when you are the one creating the danger. when you are the one provoking other people. mr rittenhouse took the stand last week and broke down during his testimony. i was cornered from in front of me, and there were... there were three people right there...
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nomia iqbal, kenosha. we have heard some of what the prosecution is saying, what is the primary line that the defence is taking in this trial? the primary line that the defence is taking in this trial? the defence is ortra in: taking in this trial? the defence is portraying kyle _ taking in this trial? the defence is portraying kyle rittenhouse - taking in this trial? the defence is portraying kyle rittenhouse as - taking in this trial? the defence is portraying kyle rittenhouse as a l portraying kyle rittenhouse as a courageous teenager who came to kenosha that night last year during those few days of civil unrest here in kenosha to try and protect buildings and prevent theft. and that the only reason he used his gun was in self—defense. and that is their lien, that's what they are summing up their arguments later on today. but as you mentioned there there portraying rittenhouse in a very different way. this he was an armed vigilante that had no business being here the answer to himself in a volatile situation that he instigated the only bloodshed that happened that night. he is facing five charges stuck earlier this morning there was one charge
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relating to the weapon that he brought into wisconsin, a military style rifle. that was dropped. not to get into too many details but basically thejudge to get into too many details but basically the judge ruled that under the law here in wisconsin it was ok for him to be carrying that weapon, but that has been dropped. he is now facing five charges. if he's convicted of the most serious charge of first—degree reckless homicide he does face life behind bars. i5 of first—degree reckless homicide he does face life behind bars. is it fair to say _ does face life behind bars. is it fair to say that _ does face life behind bars. is it fair to say that this _ does face life behind bars. is it fair to say that this trail has become part of broader cultural and political battles playing out in the us? , . ,., ., i: i: us? very much so. there are 500 national troop _ us? very much so. there are 500 national troop guards _ us? very much so. there are 500 national troop guards here - us? very much so. there are 500 national troop guards here on - national troop guards here on standby in case there are protests which turned violent. there's so much media here as you can imagine. it's sometimes a cliche to say that is politically divided. you are that phrase a lot but it genuinely has divided people. and it's gone all the way to the top. then president donald trump had backed rittenhouse
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and joe biden had condemned him. this trail has raised so many questions with questions of racial injustice, policing and protest in the right to bear arms. and even the concept of white privilege. kyle rittenhouse is white, the man he shot are white in the issues that are polarising americans beyond kenosha. there are groups really here. that's the rittenhouse in a different ways. they see conservatives genuinely back him they see him as a patriot that stands up to lawlessness and then you have more liberal groups who say that he is the face of a gun culture thatis that he is the face of a gun culture that is out of control. and both are invested in the outcome, but ultimately his 12 jurors that will decide and they will retire to consider their verdict later today. thank you very much indeed for joining us live from kenosha.
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with that love reports are kenosha, moscow and washington, dc. let's turn to cuba now. it's a one—party state — and unauthorised public gatherings are against the law. but despite that, democracy activists there are trying to stage protest. at 3pm local time — a few minutes from now — they've called on people to take to the streets in havana and elsewhere. this was the scene in havana a few hours ago — all calm. the organisers of the protest has told people to come dressed in white — and if they don't feel comfortable taking to the streets, to hang white sheets from their balconies at home. the main organiser of the protests won't be attending because since yesterday state security agents won't let him leave his house. yunior garcia appeared at the window with a sign saying "my home is being blockaded". some of his neighbours who support the government then started hanging the cuban national flags to block his view. and then, they found an even biggerflag. mr garcia posted the following message online.
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translation: my house is under sieae. the translation: my house is under siege. the entire _ translation: my house is under siege. the entire building - translation: my house is under siege. the entire building is - siege. the entire building is surrounded by agents of the state dressed in civilian clothes passing off as a residence as they usually do. this does not surprise any cuban. there are cars on all corners and groups of the blood of my building and stands. last time cuba saw protests was back injuly — police responded by arresting more than a thousand people. 650 of them are still being detained. today's protests was called to demand their release, and to demand more political freedoms. cuba's president, miguel diaz—canel yesterday criticised those planning on protesting again. translation: we condemn what you are doinu b translation: we condemn what you are doing by meeting- — translation: we condemn what you are doing by meeting. the _ translation: we condemn what you are doing by meeting. the campaigns - translation: we condemn what you are doing by meeting. the campaigns to - doing by meeting. the campaigns to subvert the internal order committed media against cuba. cuba will live in peace and living in peace we will perfect ourselves.
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will grant, mexico city. how do we understand these protests? other part of a more structured opposition movement or is that overstating things? i opposition movement or is that overstating things?— opposition movement or is that overstating things? i think to an extent they _ overstating things? i think to an extent they are. _ overstating things? i think to an extent they are. we _ overstating things? i think to an extent they are. we have - overstating things? i think to an extent they are. we have to - overstating things? i think to an extent they are. we have to see overstating things? i think to an - extent they are. we have to see them in the context of the protests on the 11th ofjuly, and the fact that so many people were arrested after those demonstrations. obviously there have been calls for by, as you mention mr garcia a playwright who has become little or by little the youth and want to see change and is certainly managed to rally opinions in favour of turning out on this event, but i actually think that the security process is such that a lot of people simply won't risk it. can i ask ou of people simply won't risk it. can i ask you about — of people simply won't risk it. can i ask you about the president position the government position when it is asked why won't you allow a democracy, what is the justification for saying that political opposition is not good for
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cuba? but political opposition is not good for cuba? �* ., , , , cuba? but ultimately these things are bein: cuba? but ultimately these things are being funded _ cuba? but ultimately these things are being funded by _ cuba? but ultimately these things are being funded by the _ cuba? but ultimately these things are being funded by the united i are being funded by the united states, their anti—revolutionary and attempts to bring down the government. not as simple as to be expressing one public opinion in which they suggest there are spaces to do so but they are in fact attempts at insurrection. obviously thatis attempts at insurrection. obviously that is denied by the organised convince her to have an received a central united states and all they are trying to do is within the constitution itself be allowed to be heard and to make it clear that a lot of people are very, very tired after six decades of communist rule. just quickly come to give us an idea of how many people we think might take part in this. i think the government has been quite successful in stopping this thing getting to four of the ground. i of those members of the church were a little bit more protected and they might turn out to, and the more committed
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dissidents, but i don't think it's going to be a huge explosion we saw injuly amended because that was in july amended because that was spontaneous and this was planned. which give the government time to work out the response. let's recap the news from liverpool in the past hour police have released the name of the man who died in the bomb blast yesterday. detective chief inspector andrew meeks, from greater manchester police said... no doubt you have seen the pictures of the scene and the aftermath but just in the last hour the police saying they can now identify the person who died inside the vehicle.
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will have ongoing coverage of that story here on bbc news. but for this edition, thanks for watching. bye—bye. it has been another mild and mainly cloudy day. a few outbreaks of rain around. this was the picture of the sun set earlier in wakefield. some clear skies around and through the rest of this evening and overnight where we see clear skies it could turn a bit chilly and misty. over the next few days we still have mild and cloudy weather. a lot of dry weather but not completely dry because weather fronts will move in at times from the north—west. we have high pressure not far away dominating the weather particularly across southern parts of the uk. moving through tonight we have this front pushing a bit of rain into the far north—west of scotland. much of the uk dry and variable amounts of
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cloud, perhaps they can offer the odd spot of drizzle perceptual parts of england and the south—west. either side of that some clear spells and temperatures around 4 or 5 in some towns and cities. cooler than that in the countryside. perhaps just a touch of frost in the most rural spots and a few misty patches as well. through the day we have this front making inroads to northern ireland and scotland through the day. for many of us it will stay dry for a good part of the day. there will be some brighter spells breaking through the cloud during tuesday particularly to the south and east. some of rain pushing into cumbria and anglesey. showers moving in behind that. torso says on the east it is looking dry and mild. but mild there gets squeezed away towards the east. you can see blue colours on the cards as we head into wednesday. the difficult air mass around on tuesday. sunshine despite the cold weather but a few showers moving in at perhaps one or two per northern ireland and the west of scotland. for the bulk of the uk wednesday
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is looking dry with light winds and fairly long spells of sunshine around. temperatures between nine and 13. for some. a bit above average for the time of year. those temperatures will continue to rise towards the end of the week. milder air spills and again for thursday and friday. 1a and 15. predominantly dry and the outlook with mainly light winds. cold weather on the way for the end of the month.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. the explosion outside a liverpool hospital yesterday is being treated as a terrorist incident. the passenger who died, who's believed to have built the device, has been named as 32 year old emad al swealmeen. the driver of the taxi was injured but has now been released from hospital as police continue their investigation. our inquiries will now seek to understand how the device was built, the motivation for the incident and to understand if anyone else was involved in it. the covid booster programme is to be extended — it'll now be offered to people over forty. the government is accused of reneging on its promises as it abandons plans to build the eastern leg of hs2.

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