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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 15, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. mi5 and counter—terrorism police are investigating yesterday's explosion in a taxi in liverpool yesterday which killed one man. the taxi driver has been named locally as david perry. detectives from counter terrorism police north west have arrested three men following the explosion, which happened just before 11am on remembrance sunday. uk government advisers recommend the covid—19 vaccine booster programme should be extended to include healthy 40— to 49—year—olds, and 16— and17—year—olds should come forward for a second dose. when you are called for your booster dosein when you are called for your booster dose in the next phase you can come
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forward confident that the benefits in preventing serious covid—19 far outweigh any risks. belarus is warned it faces more sanctions, including a ban on airlines taking migrants into the country. rhe plight of migrants from afghanistan. we've a special report from the serbia—romania border. six months after a damning report into the bbc�*s handling of princess diana's 1995 panorama interview, her brother tells the corporation he believes there's more to come out. it's clear to me that there are certain people who were in the bbc who have behaved in a way that is truly abysmal, and possibly criminal. hello and welcome if you're watching
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in the uk, or around the world. the mayor of liverpool has praised the taxi driver, injured in yesterday's car explosion in the city, for his heroic efforts. joanne anderson said the man who's been named locally as david perry, had managed to divert what, she said, could have been an absolutely awful disaster at the liverpool women's hospital. the uk's security service, mi5, is assisting counter—terrorism police with the investigation. three men have been arrested. this report by our correspondent james reynolds contains flashing images. the police say they are working at speed to establish the circumstances of this, the car explosion just outside the liverpool women's hospital in central liverpool. it happened shortly before 11 o'clock yesterday morning, at a time when remembrance day services were about to begin across the country. the driver survived the blast. the passenger, who has not
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been named, was killed. unfortunately, i can confirm that one person has died and another has been taken to hospital, where he is being treated for his injuries, which, thankfully, are not life—threatening. so far we understand that the car involved was a taxi, which pulled up at the hospital shortly before the explosion occurred. in the kensington area of liverpool, around a mile from the explosion, three men, aged 21, 26 and 29, were arrested under the terrorism act. this gives the authorities the power to hold detainees for up to m days without charge. and late at night, a number of homes in liverpool's rutland avenue and nearby cumberland avenue were evacuated. they're reported to be close to a house which was raided by the police in the hours after the incident. counter terrorism police
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north west are leading the overall investigation. they're supported by officers from merseyside police, and the security service, mi5, is also assisting. investigators say they're keeping an open mind as to what caused the explosion. james reynolds, bbc news. earlier i spoke with our security correspondent frank gardner about the explosion. i spoke to our correspondent andy gill earlier. i spoke to our correspondent andy gill earlier-— gill earlier. liverpool women's hos - ital gill earlier. liverpool women's hospital remains _ gill earlier. liverpool women's hospital remains largely - gill earlier. liverpool women's| hospital remains largely sealed gill earlier. liverpool women's - hospital remains largely sealed off this morning, it's a large area with a big footprint and there is police table around the perimeter and police officers are standing guard at regular intervals around the perimeter. visiting is restricted but appointments are going ahead with people driving and having their cars checked by police before they go in. the hospital is one of three locations in liverpool where this investigation is centred, the other, as james's report mentioned, to the north of the city where three men were arrested and another about a mile south of here were a house is
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being searched and a number of homes were evacuated, some families had to go into emergency accommodation provided by liverpool council. counterterrorism officers are keeping an open mind about what lies behind this. but as we know the explosion took place just before 11 o'clock, and that was the time across the country but also here in liverpool where the city's remembrance service was about to take place at the anglican cathedral which was a short walk from this hospital, and it is unusualfor the remembrance service here to take place at that location. it normally takes place in the city centre but it couldn't this year because of roadworks. the home secretary priti patel is being kept up—to—date with events, a government minister told the bbc this morning that this is an emerging situation. merseyside police say people can expect to see more patrols and officers on the street in liverpool today as part of a reassurance plan. aslur
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street in liverpool today as part of a reassurance plan.— a reassurance plan. our security correspondent _ a reassurance plan. our security correspondent frank _ a reassurance plan. our security correspondent frank gardner . a reassurance plan. our security. correspondent frank gardner told a reassurance plan. our security - correspondent frank gardner told me more about how the security operation will be going on now, with police and mi5 working together. yeah, there are essentially three bodies involved in the investigation, merseyside police, counter terrorism police north west who are leading the investigation, they are being supported by the security service mi5 which james mentioned. there are a number of different strands they are going down with this. one of the first lines of enquiries would normally be any forensic evidence that can be gathered from the scene of the explosion. that is going to be much harder to do because as you have seen from the pictures fire very quickly engulfed the taxi so there was this initial explosion, it seemed, which caused the driver to run out of the vehicle and it then simply caught fire. that would have destroyed a lot of the explosive residue that you would normally expect to be examined by the forensic explosive laboratory technicians. there may well be other forensic evidence they can gather
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from other locations in the city. but that bit is going to be harder. mi5 will be looking at their known list of suspects who could possibly be in any way connected to this. but they are not giving away anything at the moment on this. they are unlikely to say anything publicly. counterterrorism policing do have a lot of resources at their disposal. there will be a lot of digital investigations going on into this, looking at any phone calls, any spikes in conversations. so far, they are keeping a completely open mind, as you heard, about what is the motivation behind this. yes, international jihadism, or terrorism, is one of the lines but only one of the lines they are looking at, and they are not coming down on one side or the other, not ruling it out or in at the moment which is frustrating for us because we are looking for answers but they are not giving them yet. frank gardner.
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the uk government's vaccine advisors say all over 40s should be offered a booster of a covid vaccine. thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation says a third jab would top up protection and help limit the spread of the virus overwinter. they've also advised that 16— and i7—year—olds, who were initially offered only a single dose, should now get chair of thejcvi, professor wei shen lim, announced the two updates to the booster programme. the first update relates to the booster programme. could i have the first slide, please? just as a reminder, the current advice in the booster programme is that persons aged over 50 years, those adults in aged over 50 years, those adults in a clinical at risk group, front line health and social care workers and close contacts of persons who are immunosuppressed should have a booster vaccine six months following completion of their primary course, essentially, have a third vaccine
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dose six months after the second dose. can i have the next slide, please? we are advising today that the booster programme is extended to persons aged 40—49 years as well. as previously, the booster dose is advised six months after the second dose, and either the pfizer biontech vaccine or the moderna vaccine can be used as the booster dose, regardless of the type of vaccine received for the first two doses in the primary course. you may remember that in early august we advised a first dose of the pfizer biontech vaccine for 16 and i7—year—olds who do not have an underlying health condition that puts them at higher risk from severe covid—i9. we said at the time and would review the data and that a second dose may well be advise command that is
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indeed the case. we have reviewed the recent information regarding the safety and benefits of a second dose, and we are advising that 16 and i7—year—olds who have had a first dose of the pfizer biontech vaccine be offered a second dose of the pfizer biontech vaccine. as a reminder, the first vaccine dose gives a high level of protection against serious disease, and that high level of protection we know lasts for at least 12—16 weeks. the second dose, nonetheless, reinforces that protection from the first dose and it is important in extending the duration of protection, notjust for the winter months and christmas, but we are also looking into 2022 and beyond. anna collinsonjoins us now. the booster programme being extended now to over 40s. what more do we
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hear this morning about the impact of the booster programme? illlul’liiile of the booster programme? while covid vaccine _ of the booster programme? while covid vaccine obviously _ of the booster programme? “lav"i ie covid vaccine obviously provide excellent protection, we have seen that in the data the level of hospitalisations from covid this year at this stage of the year compared to last year is much lower. their power can wane, that's why these booster programme has been brought in, initially for those over 50, young adults with health conditions and front line health care workers and so far more than 12 million people in that group have had that booster vaccine. now they are wanting to expand it further, saying that boosters are safe, they have identified no new safety concerns, the majority of side effects they have found, the sore arm or tiredness, they want to expand further based on some evidence that the uk health security agency has put forward suggesting boosters provide 90% protection to over 50s after two weeks. that“s
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over 50s after two weeks. that's just for symptomatic infections. so it is thought it is even higher protection from severe illness and from death. so the hope is by extending this booster programme it is going to provide even more protection this winter. the? is going to provide even more protection this winter. they have also announced _ protection this winter. they have also announced the _ protection this winter. they have also announced the extension i protection this winter. they have also announced the extension to| protection this winter. they have i also announced the extension to 16 and i7—year—olds who currently could only get one dose but they are now saying they can get two doses. yes. saying they can get two doses. yes, that decision _ saying they can get two doses. yes, that decision for _ saying they can get two doses. yes, that decision for the _ saying they can get two doses. yes, that decision for the first _ saying they can get two doses. 1&1: that decision for the first dose was made over the summer. the idea being that they wanted to protect a 16 and i7—year—olds from covid, and also reduce disruption in schools, preventing transmission amongst age groups, teachers, and then hopefully preventing transmission within society in general, but also preventing disruption in schools because that was having such a great impact on young people, including mental health and their education. so those were the big arguments for doing it. however, there were concerns about a very, very rare side effect, heart inflammation
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called myocarditis. which was shown to particularly affect young men, or young boys. so there has been a bit of sensitivity around that, wanting to get more data, because we have talked about a lot, joanna, there is that balancing act between when you are looking at the younger age groups of they are less likely to get covid, sorry, they are less likely to become seriously ill from covid, it is likely they will have very mild symptoms, or not have symptoms at all, so you are balancing that up. that was the thing that was holding that decision back. the mhra now say they have been closely monitoring heart inflammation and they are confident they have not noticed any increased risk, so thejcvi, the panel, the joint committee on vaccine and immunisation says they are now advising for that second dose to be given to that age group with a 12 week gap. given to that age group with a 12 week aa-. ., 4“ given to that age group with a 12 week aa-. . ~ _, let's get more on this from linda bauld, professor of public health
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at the university of edinburgh. the message loud and clear from the news conference this morning was that the advisers, the government want people to come forward for their booster vaccines or second doses, or as soon as they are called. what difference does it make? where are we currently in terms of uptake when people become eligible? iiii terms of uptake when people become eli . ible? terms of uptake when people become eliaible? , ., eligible? if we start with the second doses, _ eligible? if we start with the second doses, we _ eligible? if we start with the second doses, we have - eligible? if we start with the j second doses, we have seen phenomenal uptake in older age groups. as you go down the age ranges, i do vary slightly between the devolved nations, you can see those of us in our 50s, not all of us have had our second dose, slightly fewer in their 40s and 30s, and i'm particularly concerned about the 18-29 and i'm particularly concerned about the 18—29 —year—old age group we kind of stalled at the 70, 70 5% uptake, so we need to make our efforts there and communicate to people that for the second dose and probably the boosters, this is an evergreen offer. in terms of the boosters they will make a significant difference. a couple of pieces of key evidence, i wasn't able to listen to the press
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briefing. the pfizer trial randomised people to boosters showing they were over 90% effective, even when the mean gap between the second dose and the booster was a far longer duration than what we are recommending and there is also compelling evidence from israel with tens of thousands of individuals receiving a booster that the risks of hospitalisation and mortality are significantly less when people have that and we are beginning to see those data picked up beginning to see those data picked up in our uk data. so really important that we both take up our second doses and when it is our opportunity to do so take up the booster. , ., ., ., ., ., booster. jonathan van-tham said if the booster— booster. jonathan van-tham said if the booster programme _ booster. jonathan van-tham said if the booster programme is - booster. jonathan van-tham said if. the booster programme is successful it will take away concerns for covid around christmas and for the whole of winter. he said it really is that simple. what do you think is going on with what has been happening with some in terms of the immunisation, not taking up even the second dose, as you have is that? you would have thought of summary takes up the
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first dose they would automatically have the second and go on. yes. first dose they would automatically have the second and go on. yes, it's an interesting _ have the second and go on. yes, it's an interesting thing. _ have the second and go on. yes, it's an interesting thing. i _ have the second and go on. yes, it's an interesting thing. i think- have the second and go on. yes, it's an interesting thing. i think there i an interesting thing. i think there are we are not looking at anti—vax sentiment, i think that is an issue for small numbers for taking up any doses at all. we are looking at, i think, people's complex lives getting in the way of taking up that second appointment. may be some misunderstanding of the protection thatis misunderstanding of the protection that is provided by first dose, which is definitely partial, and people just not having a chance to do it. i think complacency or lack of convenience is there. and people do need to come forward. and also we need to give an emphasis in our system on that convenience. we need to maintain droppings for those groups, not having people relying just on appointments, and we need to continue to emphasise, back to young people, for our students, when we come back, even in the next centre, we need to have those vaccination clinics and links to the nhs on campus to really pick up everybody who has not had the second dose. ——
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drop ins. i think convenience and may be some complacency has been the main feature for that gap between first and second. the main feature for that gap between first and second.— main feature for that gap between first and second. the experts were asked at the _ first and second. the experts were asked at the news _ first and second. the experts were asked at the news conference - first and second. the experts were - asked at the news conference whether boosters will inevitably roll out to more adults. the answer was may be. does it make sense? because if immunity starts to wane after six months, that happens to everybody, obviously, and the decision was taken to give all over eighteens and now 16 and i7—year—olds another dose anyway. now 16 and 17-year-olds another dose an a . , ., now 16 and 17-year-olds another dose an a . , . now 16 and 17-year-olds another dose an a. _, ., ., anyway. they are looking at relative risks and that's _ anyway. they are looking at relative risks and that's what _ anyway. they are looking at relative risks and that's what they _ anyway. they are looking at relative risks and that's what they have - risks and that's what they have changed now for approval over a0. we know the age gradient and those with underlying conditions for the risk of disease severity, hospitalisation and mortality is so much greater the older you are. so it does make sense to move back down through the age ranges, plus those with underlying conditions and the extremely clinically vulnerable. but going back to israel and number of other countries, boosters have been made available to adults as a whole, and i think you are right that if the
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supply is there and the evidence continues to build, it may be that other age groups become eligible. and the final point, the key priority now is to get through this winter. the boosters are going to make a huge difference as professor jonathan van—tham has said. looking ahead we have questions about when we would need to receive a covid—i9 vaccine in the longer term, and there are still many scientific questions about that. professor linda bauld, _ questions about that. professor linda bauld, thank _ questions about that. professor linda bauld, thank you. - people going to cinemas, theatres and concert halls in wales will be required to show a covid pass from today. it follows the introduction of passes for nightclubs and big events in the nation last month. covid case rates in wales are falling, but remain relatively high. the headlines on bbc news — m15 and counter—terrorism police are investigating yesterday's explosion in a taxi in liverpool yesterday — which killed one man. the taxi driver has been named locally as david perry. uk government advisers have recommended the covid—i9 vaccine
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booster programme should be extended to include healthy a0— to a9—year—olds and i6— and i7—year—olds should come forward for a second dose. belarus is warned that it faces more sanctions — including a ban on airlines taking migrants into the country. austria has introduced a partial lockdown for the two austria has announced a partial lockdown for the two million people there who haven't had two doses of a coronavirus vaccine. they've been told to stay at home except for work and essential shopping. the country has one of the highest infection rates in europe, but new restrictions are being brought in, or considered, across much of the continent. courtney bembridge has more. there was a last—minute rush at vaccination centres in upper austria, on the eve of new restrictions for those not yet protected. unvaccinated austrians were already barred from visiting restaurants, hairdressers and cinemas,
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but they're now told to stay home except for work and food shopping. it'll be policed using spot checks with hefty fines for those caught breaking the rules. austria has one of the lowest vaccination rates in western europe — around 6a% of the population is fully vaccinated, which leaves two million people yet to get two doses. and the country has one of the highest infection rates in europe — more than 800 cases per 100,000 people. the icus are starting to fill up. it's already projected that within two weeks we will have reached the limit, and we know that the cases we see now will be those that fill up the icus in two weeks, so there's need for some measure right now. but not everyone agrees. crowds gathered over the weekend in salzburg and vienna to make their opposition clear. translation: i'm here today because i want i to fight for my rights.
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these measures are absolutely discriminatory. my body, our bodies, we have a right to decide about them. a fourth wave of infections is gripping much of europe and the continent is once again the epicentre of the virus. eastern european nations with lower vaccination rates like latvia and russia were among the first to bring back restrictions, but even the netherlands with a vaccination rate above 80% has reintroduced a partial lockdown for at least three weeks. and germany is also weighing up new restrictions. courtney bembridge, bbc news. teachers in new zealand will now be banned from the classroom if they have not been vaccinated against covid—19. the measure is part of the country's zero covid policy, but critics warn it could see some schools forced to return to online lessons as there will not be enough staff on site. the authorities in new zealand have ramped up efforts to get people vaccinated since the delta variant got into the largely covid—free country in august.
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90% of new zealanders have had their first dose. around four—fifths are fully vaccinated. the european union says it could impose sanctions against anyone involved in the transportation of migrants to the belarus border with poland. it comes as eu countries are holding their first high level talks since the crisis began. the eu“s foreign policy chief, said such sanctions would also apply to airlines and travel agencies. 0ur moscow correspondent steve rosenberg is in bruzgi, on the border between poland and belarus. tell us what is happening there. tense scenes this morning in the migrant camp on the belarusian — polish border. hundreds of migrants have just pushed their way through the gate right up to the checkpoint here on the belarusian side of the
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border. from what we saw, belarusian forces made no attempt at all to stop them. as you can see, there are hundreds here. they are sitting down, they are determined to get what they want, in other words to be allowed into poland into the european union. and so you have this stand—off, the migrants on one side, and on the other side of the razor wire the lines of polish police, polish troops. there is a polish helicopter monitoring the situation. i think this is a water cannon here, and we have been hearing in the last few minutes announcements from polish forces telling people to obey orders. it is quite a tense situation here. now, the european union has been saying all along that belarus is using these migrants as a political weapon, encouraging people to come to belarus, facilitating illegal migration to europe to put
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pressure on the european union. that is something that the belarusian authorities deny. but we know that the eu is about to announce more sanctions on belarus. alexander lukashenko says he will respond. and as i say, this hasjust happened minutes ago. this flood of migrants from the campjust minutes ago. this flood of migrants from the camp just up the road right up from the camp just up the road right up to the razor wire here. and it is unclear how this is going to end. we are just hearing, you mentioned arejust hearing, you mentioned sanctions, we arejust arejust hearing, you mentioned sanctions, we are just hearing that ursula von der leyen has said the eu will sanction airlines that support transport of migrants. so the detailsjust coming transport of migrants. so the details just coming through. she says there will be further sanctions on belarus this afternoon. so, some detail coming through. more later. it is extraordinary to see these scenes where you are. it looks pretty peaceful at the moment. but
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obviously, as we are hearing, the backdrop to this is very tense indeed and the stakes are very high. yes, absolutely. we were in the camp last night and lots of people were coming up to us and saying, "what“s coming up to us and saying, "what's the news? when is poland going to let us through? will the european union let us through?" there was a rumour swirling through the camp yesterday that on monday everything would be ok and the eu would open its doors to the migrants. there was no... nothing to actually prove that, but clearly tensions were running high. and this morning there has been a rush, a flood of people who after a week of living out in the cold here, have decided that this is the moment. and as i say, no evidence that they were being stopped here by the belarusian forces. quite the opposite. we saw soldiers standing around and just
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watching as the crowd came up to the razor wire. watching as the crowd came up to the razorwire. how long watching as the crowd came up to the razor wire. how long people will stay here it's not clear, and it's not clear what action the polish forces are going to take. but poland has made it clear in recent days it is determined not to let the migrants through because it believes that belarus is using migrants to wage hybrid warfare, not only against poland but also against the european union. can against poland but also against the european union.— european union. can you give us a sense of how _ european union. can you give us a sense of how many _ european union. can you give us a sense of how many people - european union. can you give us a sense of how many people are - european union. can you give us a i sense of how many people are there, and also we can see children directly behind you. how long have they been there for? what resources do they have while they are there? well, for many of these people this is day eight camping out in the cold. the temperature is close to freezing. people have been trying to build shelters for themselves in the camp using branches and logs and foliage. but really that has given
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little protection against the cold, people have been lighting bonfires to try and keep warm. some humanitarian aid has got through. but clearly a decision has been taken somewhere that this is the moment to actually move things up a level. and in many ways, this is the kind of picture that the belarusian authorities would welcome, i think. because they have been accused by europe of trying to create, trying to engineer a humanitarian crisis on the border with europe. so as i say, it is unclear how this is going to end. men, women and children here, yes. we heard some very distressing stories in the camp about the conditions people have been living in. many people said they were determined to get through to the eu. a lot of people here from northern iraq, a lot of people from kurdistan. and in fact, everyone we
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have spoken to said they are not going back. they are not going to go back to minsk, the belarusian capital, they are not going to go back to their home countries. they want to get through. but no sign so far that the eu is about to let them through. far that the eu is about to let them throu~h. . ., far that the eu is about to let them throu~h. ., ~ i. , far that the eu is about to let them throu~h. . ,, , . far that the eu is about to let them throu~h. . ,, ,, , . ,, through. thank you very much, steve rosenber: through. thank you very much, steve rosenberg in — through. thank you very much, steve rosenberg in bruzgi _ through. thank you very much, steve rosenberg in bruzgi on _ through. thank you very much, steve rosenberg in bruzgi on the _ through. thank you very much, steve rosenberg in bruzgi on the border . rosenberg in bruzgi on the border between poland and belarus. many of the migrants stranded on the border between poland and belarus, are from iraq and afghanistan. between poland and belarus are from iraq and afghanistan. others are trying to enter europe on the border between northeast serbia and romania. 0ur correspondent nick thorpe sent this special report from the area. it doesn't look like fortress europe. there are no walls or fences, more like an observation post on the long road from afghanistan into the european union. this is a thermal vision team of the romanian border police. the land border is 260 kilometres long. 6,500 people are known to have crossed it so far this year.
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the real number is certainly much higher. the cameras can see for five kilometres in the dark. the most important thing is to identify all people who try to enter europe. because we are the main gate to europe. if they ask for asylum they will go in the procedure, what comes with this form of protection. or if they don't want asylum they are going to be taken back to serbia. the police insist they never use force to push migrants back. those who ask for protection or who get through undetected end up here in timisoara. most are afghans and reached the balkans before the taliban took power. this ngo offers clothes, showers and the first kindness most have met for a long time. we want to help them with sleeping
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bags, they sleep outside. and it is so cold. i think more people, they are on the road and they come here to timisoara. this is the field in timisoara where asylum seekers traditionally congregate. and in five years coming here, i have never seen so many people. almost all of them are in transit. you are afghani? 0k. around 500 people are accommodated in the official refugee camp and at least 100 more sleep rough. this man and his volunteers try to ease their aches and pains. romania seems less hostile than other countries. what we are seeing now, that is an increase, we are seeing supportive messages. we are seeing people saying, hey, we should help and remember how we used to be migrants all over europe and we were so happy when someone was at least notjudging us. maybe they couldn't help us
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but at least they weren't throwing stones. afghans reaching europe now hope the situation back home means their asylum requests will be looked on more favourably. this field is just one more oasis on thatjourney. nick thorpe, bbc news, timisoara. the headlines on bbc news: the mayor of liverpool has praised the taxi driver, who was injured in yesterday's car explosion in the city, for his heroic efforts. joanne anderson said the man named locally as david perry, had managed to divert what, she said, could have been an absolutely awful disaster at the liverpool women's hospital. the security service, m15, is assisting counter—terrorism police with the investigation. three men have been arrested. uk government advisers have recommended the covid—19 vaccine booster programme should be extended to include healthy a0 to a9—year—olds and 16 and 17—year—olds should come forward for a second dose. belarus is warned that it faces more sanctions, including a ban on airlines taking migrants into the country. a lockdown in austria for anyone
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who hasn't been vaccinated against covid comes into force. six months after a damning report into the bbc“s handling of princess diana's 1995 parorama interview, her brother tells the corporation he believes there's more to come out. more now on our top story — that one person has been killed and another injured following an explosion outside liverpool women's hospital on sunday. the mayor of liverpool has praised the injured man, who is a taxi driver, for his heroic efforts. 0ur correspondent fiona trott is at the hospital in liverpool for us now. still a lot of unanswered questions but increasingly the story seems to be the taxi driver potentially was quite a hero?—
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quite a hero? that is right. investigations _ quite a hero? that is right. investigations around - quite a hero? that is right. investigations around that| quite a hero? that is right. - investigations around that part of this are still continuing. let me describe where the police activity is concentrated this morning. it is here at liverpool women's hospital. the cord and behind me has dozens of officers patrolling the grounds separately. there are offices at the sefton park area and there are a dozen police officers on the street and a mobile command unit has been set up. 0fficers and a mobile command unit has been set up. officers are outside the property, which we understand is where police went at the start of this investigation. they returned their last night. there appear to be somebody inside a house, trained negotiators were seen on the streets and homes have been evacuated. the third area of police investigation is the kensington area, where three men were arrested yesterday under the terrorism act. they are 21, 26
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and 29 years old. two streets remain cordoned off in that part the city. all those streets are less than two miles from the women's hospital where the blast occurred. what is the focus of this investigation? you have the car at the hospital grounds completely burnt out. one expert has told the bbc it looks like a lot of fire damage, little blast damage. of course, that fire killed a passenger inside. his identity... iam course, that fire killed a passenger inside. his identity... i am going to continue as best as i can. this is a joint investigation. studio: i can see that we are unable
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to hear you right now, unfortunately. there are police at the scene surrounding fiona. she is absolutely fine but someone was drowning out what she was saying so we are unable to continue with that particular broadcast. we will be back with her a little bit later. major improvements in the care for sickle cell patients in england is being called for, after "serious failings", including avoidable deaths, were identified in an inquiry. the report by a cross—party group of mp“s found there was evidence of substandard levels of care and a lack of awareness of the condition amongst staff. here's our community affairs correspondent adina campbell. a life cut short caused by failures in his care. he was a loving and charming guy. he always wanted to help people. he was a very clever and brilliant boy. 21—year—old evan smith developed sepsis after having gall bladder stent removed. he also lived with sickle cell disease and experienced a painful episode while in hospital in london
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known as a sickle cell crisis. a coroner ruled he may have survived if he was offered a blood transfusion sooner. things were happening so fast. he was scared... i mean, i could imagine the state he was in, and each time i think of it it's something else. i can't believe we just lost him like that. evan smith because my death was the cause of this new report. it found a number of serious concerns, including substandard care for sickle cell patients admitted on general wards or in a&e. inadequate training among health care staff. and racism experienced by some patients. people living with sickle—cell feel there is inequality in the way that they are being treated here. no one wants to put one community above anyone else. but they do want equality in treatment. and right now with sickle—cell, we don't have that.
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nhs england says it has overhauled the way treatment is delivered to patients, with ten new centres for sickle cell disease being set up across the country. sickle—cell patients live with the long term, often excruciating pain. it's an inherited condition from both parents, predominantly affecting people with african or caribbean heritage. and that's why some senior health campaigners feel it is not given the attention it deserves. if these failures affected the general anglo—saxon population, there would be an outcry. there would be an outcry and an immediate we must do something about this. and what we are saying is that this has gone on far too long for people who live with sickle—cell and action, and urgent action must be taken now. the report has made a number of recommendations, including more funding for sickle cell research, and better training for health care staff to help save lives and avoid painful tragic deaths.
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adina campbell, bbc news. let's talk now to aisatu beadford king and sumaiya mahmoud, who are both in their early 20s and both have sickle cell. welcome, thank you forjoining us. if you could tell us first of all, how often you find yourself in hospital with sickle cell disease and the impact it has on your life? i think for me recently over the past couple of years i have found myself in hospital, i would say about 20 times, may more? i currently am in sickle cell crisis as well now, just a very mild one but i am in pain pretty much every other week. but i am in pain pretty much every otherweek. itjust but i am in pain pretty much every other week. itjust depends on how severe the pain is, if it is bearable or if it is not. could you
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'ust bearable or if it is not. could you just describe _ bearable or if it is not. could you just describe for _ bearable or if it is not. could you just describe for us _ bearable or if it is not. could you just describe for us exactly - bearable or if it is not. could you just describe for us exactly what| just describe for us exactly what that means? what is happening to your body and where are you feeling it, could you describe what the feeling is like? it it, could you describe what the feeling is like?— it, could you describe what the feeling is like? it is always really hard to describe _ feeling is like? it is always really hard to describe a _ feeling is like? it is always really hard to describe a crisis, - feeling is like? it is always really hard to describe a crisis, but - feeling is like? it is always really hard to describe a crisis, but it i feeling is like? it is always reallyj hard to describe a crisis, but it is almost like a stabbing pain, but it is a bit more than that. i had a crisis about two weeks ago and it was from my neck straight through to my chest. every time i breathed, it hurt. every time i moved, i was in pain. and when i went to a&e i was in hospitalfor about a pain. and when i went to a&e i was in hospital for about a week. pain. and when i went to a&e i was in hospitalfor about a week. then i was sent home and since then i have been recovering from that one crisis. it has been two weeks since i have been in hospital and i am still recovering and going through the crisis a little bit. with the chess crisis for me, it is more of a
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sharp, stabbing pain. almost like if you take a breath, someone is stabbing you while you are breathing so it is kind of hard. but that is kind of the pain i am going through. but it is a lot less than it was a couple of weeks ago. so but it is a lot less than it was a couple of weeks ago.— but it is a lot less than it was a couple of weeks ago. so it is blood vessels to that _ couple of weeks ago. so it is blood vessels to that part _ couple of weeks ago. so it is blood vessels to that part of _ couple of weeks ago. so it is blood vessels to that part of the - couple of weeks ago. so it is blood vessels to that part of the body - vessels to that part of the body basically becoming blocked, is it? yes. ~ . basically becoming blocked, is it? yes. . ., basically becoming blocked, is it? yes. ~ ., ., yes. what impact could it have, potentially? _ yes. what impact could it have, potentially? it _ yes. what impact could it have, potentially? it is _ yes. what impact could it have, potentially? it is pretty - yes. what impact could it have, potentially? it is pretty much i potentially? it is pretty much life-threatening. _ potentially? it is pretty much life-threatening. it _ potentially? it is pretty much life-threatening. it is - potentially? it is pretty much life-threatening. it is quite i potentially? it is pretty much - life-threatening. it is quite hard. life—threatening. it is quite hard. it is scary almost but when you are used to something you kinda don“t used to something you kinda don't think about it, it's generally when you down and understand how life—threatening it really is. you take a step back from everything and thatis take a step back from everything and that is when you just kind of value life a bit more. you that is when you 'ust kind of value life a bit more._ that is when you 'ust kind of value life a bit more. you have the same thin , life a bit more. you have the same thing. how —
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life a bit more. you have the same thing, how often _ life a bit more. you have the same thing, how often do _ life a bit more. you have the same thing, how often do you _ life a bit more. you have the same thing, how often do you end - life a bit more. you have the same thing, how often do you end up - life a bit more. you have the same thing, how often do you end up in| thing, how often do you end up in hospital with it? itruiith thing, how often do you end up in hospital with it?— hospitalwith it? with me, i go in reuularl hospitalwith it? with me, i go in regularly so _ hospitalwith it? with me, i go in regularly so i _ hospitalwith it? with me, i go in regularly so i am _ hospitalwith it? with me, i go in regularly so i am there _ hospitalwith it? with me, i go in regularly so i am there every - hospitalwith it? with me, i go in i regularly so i am there every other day. regularly so i am there every other day it_ regularly so i am there every other day it is— regularly so i am there every other day. it is very hard for us because this is_ day. it is very hard for us because this is a _ day. it is very hard for us because this is a chronic illness so it impacts— this is a chronic illness so it impacts us on our day—to—day life. with— impacts us on our day—to—day life. with us, _ impacts us on our day—to—day life. with us, whatever we do, it is likely— with us, whatever we do, it is likely have _ with us, whatever we do, it is likely have to take a step back and think— likely have to take a step back and think about our health. that's how it is with _ think about our health. that's how it is with us — think about our health. that's how it is with us— think about our health. that's how it is with us. and today we have the re ort it is with us. and today we have the report that — it is with us. and today we have the report that says _ it is with us. and today we have the report that says they _ it is with us. and today we have the report that says they need - it is with us. and today we have the report that says they need to - it is with us. and today we have the report that says they need to be - report that says they need to be major improvements in their careful sickle cell patients in england after serious failings, including avoidable deaths were identified in an enquiry. how do you about that? in my opinion i feel like there needs— in my opinion i feel like there needs to _ in my opinion i feel like there
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needs to be more education with the health— needs to be more education with the health care — needs to be more education with the health care. the reason being is because — health care. the reason being is because there has been many experiences where i have gone into a&e, _ experiences where i have gone into a&e, admitted into hospital and have experienced really horrible treatment. like, they are not following _ treatment. like, they are not following my care plan. they are prescribing any medication that i could _ prescribing any medication that i could easilyjust take at home. and it is like _ could easilyjust take at home. and it is like you — could easilyjust take at home. and it is like you explained these things— it is like you explained these things to _ it is like you explained these things to them and it is very hard for them — things to them and it is very hard for them to— things to them and it is very hard for them to understand. haste things to them and it is very hard for them to understand. have you encountered _ for them to understand. have you encountered similar? _ for them to understand. have you encountered similar? you - for them to understand. have you encountered similar? you would l for them to understand. have you - encountered similar? you would think you are both in and out of hospital frequently, you know what is going on, it seems unbelievable that the treatment isn“t on, it seems unbelievable that the treatment isn't always efficient? yes, i would say definitely the health care needs to, the health secretary needs to educate nurses and doctors a lot more, especially
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in a&e. when you come into a crisis the first place you go is a&e, you expect a level of care. you expect them to provide you with the medication and the care that you need. i think sometimes you don't get that. i have also encountered experiences where i have gone into a&e and i have not received the right amount of care and i am waiting for god knows how long and i am sitting in sickle cell crisis for ten hours in the most uncomfortable bed. asking for the medication that should be given. it is very frustrating and at times you sit there in a&e and think, am i going to die right now? is this the end for mejust because to die right now? is this the end for me just because doctors and nurses, who you trust with your life don“t nurses, who you trust with your life don't really know what sickle cell is an don“t don't really know what sickle cell is an don't know how to treat it or just have misconceptions about sickle cell, or about you as a
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person coming in, thinking the painkillers is too much and thinking you don't need what you are asking for. there is so many different stories i have heard, notjust with me but other people with sickle cell that i know have told me so many different stories. something that needs to be worked on and, yeah, something that really needs to be worked on. we something that really needs to be worked on. ~ ., ,, . ., something that really needs to be worked on-— something that really needs to be worked on. ~ ., ,, .., worked on. we appreciate you both takin: time worked on. we appreciate you both taking time to _ worked on. we appreciate you both taking time to tell— worked on. we appreciate you both taking time to tell us _ worked on. we appreciate you both taking time to tell us about - worked on. we appreciate you both taking time to tell us about your. taking time to tell us about your experiences. i have the crisis you are currently feeling passes soon. thank you. the prime minister says the climate deal reached at cop26 "sounds the death knell" for coal power, but says he was "tinged with disappointment" after china and india objected to tougher commitments on its use. after lengthy negotiations at the conference in glasgow, countries agreed to "phase down" rather than "phase out" coal. but it's the first time plans to reduce coal have been mentioned in this type of climate deal. critics say the move doesn't go far enough.
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earlier i spoke to lord nicholas stern, professor of economics at the london school of economics who gave this reaction to the deal. well, it was a pity that we moved from phase—out to phase—down, but i don't think it's a huge significance. you've got to look at the deal as a whole and you've got to look at all the things that happened in the first weekend leading up to the last—minute negotiations. for example, 130 trillion, that's the glasgow financial allowance of a00, 130 trillion private money declaring for net zero and that means they are going to move away from the dirty stuff of the last century to the much cleaner, sustainable technologies of this century. south africa, vietnam, india indicating very strong moves towards renewables and in moving
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away from coal. technology agreements around power and transport and green hydrogen and so on. the meetings between, or the declaration of china and the united states, the first time they've got together constructively for a very long time. so there were really quite a lot of positives there. the big worry though, if you add it all up, we“re probably heading for around two celsius increase average global surface temperature. we really need 1.5, so the challenge is to move quickly starting next year when we are going to convene again to try to raise ambition to drive towards 1.5. joining me now is kai saunders from the uk youth climate coalition. thank you forjoining us, what is your view of what cop26 achieved? some of the positives, there has been some incremental improvements.
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it is incrementally significant the fact that china and america came together to speak. the whole deal about deforestation and the commitments that so many countries came together. however, it just came together. however, itjust isn“t came together. however, itjust isn't enough. it looks like closer to 2.a and that 1.5, which many countries need to stay alive. what countries need to stay alive. what more would _ countries need to stay alive. what more would you — countries need to stay alive. what more would you have _ countries need to stay alive. what more would you have liked - countries need to stay alive. what more would you have liked to have seen achieved?— more would you have liked to have seen achieved? every single cop we no in seen achieved? every single cop we go in wanting _ seen achieved? every single cop we go in wanting to _ seen achieved? every single cop we go in wanting to see _ seen achieved? every single cop we go in wanting to see the _ seen achieved? every single cop we go in wanting to see the action - go in wanting to see the action plans and the ndc, to have a concrete plan towards 1.5. and a full commitment to phase out fossil fuels by 2030. that have been kicked down the road to the next cop. the fact this is the _ down the road to the next cop. the fact this is the first agreement to mention coal in the way that it has
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been is extraordinary in itself and shows how slow and incremental evolution is on this path. it is not obviously the last of the summits like this, there will be another one like this, there will be another one like this, there will be another one like this next year and there after. do you sort of understand why it is a process that although you would like to see progress much more quickly, inevitably takes the time it does because of the nature of it and the number of countries involved?— and the number of countries involved? , ., , , ., involved? yes, of course it is to. but we involved? yes, of course it is to. itut we need _ involved? yes, of course it is to. but we need to _ involved? yes, of course it is to. but we need to be _ involved? yes, of course it is to. but we need to be sprinting - involved? yes, of course it is to. | but we need to be sprinting when involved? yes, of course it is to. - but we need to be sprinting when we arejogging. but we need to be sprinting when we are “or in. ~ but we need to be sprinting when we are “oin. ~ ., but we need to be sprinting when we are'onin~.~ but we need to be sprinting when we are'oaaina.~ ., but we need to be sprinting when we are'oaaian.~ ., ., are jogging. where do you go from here? now — are jogging. where do you go from here? now that _ are jogging. where do you go from here? now that we're _ are jogging. where do you go from here? now that we're coming - are jogging. where do you go from | here? now that we're coming home from cop, everybody _ here? now that we're coming home from cop, everybody is _ here? now that we're coming home from cop, everybody is a _ from cop, everybody is a well—deserved rest to start with but after that we will be keeping the
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governments to their word and make sure they match the pledges they are making. sure they match the pledges they are makina. ., ~ sure they match the pledges they are makina. ., ,, i. the headlines on bbc news: the mayor of liverpool has praised a taxi driver as "heroic" for his efforts to limit the impact of an explosion in his vehicle yesterday. m15 and counter—terrorism police continue to investigate the incident. uk government advisers have recommended the covid—19 vaccine booster programme should be extended to include healthy a0 to a9—year—olds and 16 and 17—year—olds should come forward for a second dose. belarus is warned that it faces more sanctions, including a ban on airlines taking migrants into the country. more than 300,000 people are getting a pay boost of up to a0p an hour from today. the real living wage,
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which is a voluntary scheme for employers, is increasing from today to £9.90 outside of london and to £11.05 in the capital. almost 9,000 employers across the uk are now signed up to the scheme, which aims to ensure all staff earn a wage that meets the real cost of living. ryan elder says he used to struggle on the minimum wage, but now works at a frozen food supplier which is part of the real living wage scheme. i used to work at the pub and i was working more and more just so i could get by. basically paying for rent, you know, any bills i had to pay and at the end of the month i would try and put a little better way to save and it would end up just coming back out of my account. every day i was feeling down and i was thinking about money all the time. joining me now is kim coles, the finance director at cosmetics company lush, which is a member of the scheme.
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thanks forjoining us. what difference will it make to your wage packets? for us staff it will make a significant difference. it is important to keep up to date with what the real living wage costs are. for a business it will cost about 1.7 million but for an individual member of staff it is about £800, i think nationally. it is important to know everyone has enough to live on by having it calculated this way by the living wage foundation they can calculate the cost of living without working two jobs or crazy hours to make ends meet. how important is this for you as a business? it is massively _ this for you as a business? it is massively important. _ this for you as a business? it is massively important. it - this for you as a business? it 3 massively important. it is a modern form of capitalism that you can operate high standards in business and act responsibly and still make a profit. we never think it's right for a business to be taking out at the top and knowing there are people at the lower end is not earning
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enough money to live on. it is the moral compass point so it is tremendously important the staff are paid properly. d0 tremendously important the staff are paid properly-— paid properly. do the staff feedback on it on how — paid properly. do the staff feedback on it on how much _ paid properly. do the staff feedback on it on how much it _ paid properly. do the staff feedback on it on how much it matters - paid properly. do the staff feedback on it on how much it matters to - on it on how much it matters to them? because obviously, not all businesses do it. we them? because obviously, not all businesses do it.— businesses do it. we first did it in 2011 in london _ businesses do it. we first did it in 2011 in london first, _ businesses do it. we first did it in 2011 in london first, because - businesses do it. we first did it in 2011 in london first, because thatj 2011 in london first, because that is where the most hardship was happening. the feedback was about people being able to eat healthily, but the heating on and not having to work two jobs to be able to make ends meet. it was practical that the biggest part of the feedback. that must rive biggest part of the feedback. that must give you _ biggest part of the feedback. that must give you then, knowing when you have those open conversations with your employees, what their lives are like and it gives you a connection between you as the boss and them as the workers?— the workers? absolutely and that is wh we the workers? absolutely and that is why we are — the workers? absolutely and that is why we are so _ the workers? absolutely and that is why we are so grateful _ the workers? absolutely and that is why we are so grateful for - the workers? absolutely and that is why we are so grateful for the - why we are so grateful for the living wage foundation for calculating this rate for us. to have the experts calculating it for you, it makes the whole flow of
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earnings so much easier to work out. we are in a8 markets and the uk is the only place, although new zealand is pretty good, that has a way of working this out for you.- is pretty good, that has a way of working this out for you. thank you for “oinina working this out for you. thank you forjoining us- _ working this out for you. thank you forjoining us. thank _ working this out for you. thank you forjoining us. thank you _ working this out for you. thank you forjoining us. thank you very - working this out for you. thank you | forjoining us. thank you very much for “oining us. thank you very much forjoining us. thank you very much for havina forjoining us. thank you very much for having me. _ forjoining us. thank you very much for having me, thank _ forjoining us. thank you very much for having me, thank you. - turkey farmers across the uk have spent several months worrying about christmas supply, following staffing shortages caused by the pandemic and brexit. to ease pressure on the supply chain, last month, the government introduced a temporary visa scheme for seasonal poultry workers. with more than 3,000 of them already on their way to the uk, the industry is now confident that turkey will still be on the festive menu — as our business correspondent emma simpson reports.
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go christmas is coming and the turkeys are nice and fat. turkeys gobble. after months of worry, paul kelly“s now got his seasonal workers, including 22 of them, through the temporary visa scheme. it's about 20% of our workforce so it was very touch and go for us. we had many sleepless nights up until the last week in september when we got the green light when we could get some visas. christmas has been saved. christmas has been saved — at this point in time. more than 2,500 and three workers will be arriving in the uk in the coming days. that's about half as many as the industry originally was asking for. turkeys gobble. but it should be enough, partly because a few birds have been reared this year because some farmers were worried about getting enough staff. so will there be enough turkeys to go round? there will definitely be enough turkeys for christmas. i think there will be a focus on whole birds and very simple crowns and roasts. this streamlining of our product choice has helped us in terms of overall volume.
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amid all the supply chain problems, turkeys at least are now back on track, but the industry's calling for a permanent solution to ensure it gets the seasonal workers its needs. emma simpson, bbc news, chelmsford. the son of the former libyan leader muammar gaddafi has registered as a presidential candidate. saif al—islam gaddafi is one of the most prominent figures expected to run in december“s presidential election. he was once the heir apparent to his father, but his support for a brutal crackdown on protesters ten years ago tarnished his image. his father, muammar gaddafi, was swept from power in 2011 after a nato—backed uprising — which made way for a decade of chaos and violence. this is what his son, said about his presidential bid. translation: may god bring truth between us and _ translation: may god bring truth between us and our _
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translation: may god bring truth between us and our people - translation: may god bring truth between us and our people and - translation: may god bring truth between us and our people and let| between us and our people and let the vulnerable. god makes the decision, even if the infidels hate it. you“re watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carole. hello again. we have had some dense fog patches across parts of england and wales this morning. and most of that now lifting. we also have a weather front bumping into an area high pressure so it is weakening. still some rain in it, though. and later we have another front coming our way. so for england and wales we will see some brighter breaks develop in this cloud but it will be thick enough for some drizzle in some western and south—western parts. meanwhile, here is our band of rain. but behind it for scotland and northern ireland, a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine, but the cloud building out towards the west with temperatures between 10—13 c. as we head on through the evening and overnight, our weak weather front continues its journey moving south, with some spots of rain. there will be some patchy mist and fog forming, not as widespread as last night.
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and at the same time, another weather front comes on across the north west bringing strengthening winds and also some rain. overnight lows of between 6—9 c. so tomorrow, we do still have that weather front coming in across the north west. one look at those isobars tells you it's going to be windy here. but we also still have a ridge of high pressure in the southern areas. so things fairly quiet in the south. any patchy mist and fog that is formed overnight should lift. there will still be the remnants of a weather front producing a cloud, the odd spot of rain, but the heaviest rain will be coming on across the north west, with gusts to gale force in the northern and western isles and the far north of mainland scotland. but you can see how the weather front starts to fragment through the course of the day. temperatures very similar to today, we are looking at about ten — 13 north to south. as we had from tuesday into wednesday, our weather friend into wednesday, our weather front eventually pushes down towards the south—east
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and clears away. you can see too from the isobars across the far north of scotland it's going to be windy here, and there will also be some showers. some of those on the tops of the mountains are likely to be wintry. but there will be a lot of dry weather around as well, and a decent amount of sunshine across parts of england and wales, and also eastern scotland. a few showers and some drizzle getting into the west. temperatures are lower in the north. we are looking at eights and nines. but as we come further south, 10—13 will be the order of the day. then as we head on into the latter part of the week, still a fair bit of cloud around, still some rain at times across the north and the west, or showers, but still mild. it's as we go into the early part of next week it turns colder.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11... borisjohnson pays tribute to the taxi driver — named locally as david perry — after his efforts to limit the impact of an explosion in his vehicle yesterday. m15 and counter—terrorism police continue to investigate the incident. it does look as though the taxi driver in question did behave with incredible presence of mind and bravery. detectives from counter terrorism police north west have arrested three men following the explosion, which happened just before 11 am on remembrance sunday. we will hear the very latest at a news conference by the police in liverpool in a few moments.
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the prime minister has been visiting a gp surgery as government advisers recommend the covid—19 vaccine booster programme should be extended to include healthy a0 to a9—year—olds and 16 and 17—year—olds should come forward for a second dose. when you are cold for your booster dosein when you are cold for your booster dose in the next phase, you can come forward confident that the benefits in preventing serious covid—19 far outweigh any risks. after borisjohnson admits he could have handled the row involving owen paterson better, the debate about parliamentary standards returns to the commons today. a report by mps finds "serious failings" including avoidable deaths in the care for patients with sickle cell disease in england. a lockdown in austria for anyone who hasn't been vaccinated against covid comes into force. assurances there will "definitely" be enough turkeys for christmas after fears there could be a shortage.
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borisjohnson has praised the efforts of the taxi driver — saying it appears he behaved with incredible presence of mind and bravery. the uk security service m15 is a list assisting the police with the investigation. the explosion happened just before 11am on remembrance sunday as a national two—minute silence was about to begin. borisjohnson has been speaking about it and says it appears the driver acted with incredible presence of mind and
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bravery. incredible presence of mind and brave . , ., ., , , incredible presence of mind and brave . , ., ., , bravery. first of all this is an onaoain bravery. first of all this is an ongoing investigation - bravery. first of all this is an ongoing investigation so - bravery. first of all this is an ongoing investigation so i i bravery. first of all this is an i ongoing investigation so i can't comment on the details of exactly what type of incident it was or what type of crime it may have been. but it does look as though the taxi driver in question did behave with incredible presence of mind and bravery. but i have got to say this is something that is an ongoing investigation. the is something that is an ongoing investigation.— is something that is an ongoing investigation. is something that is an ongoing investiaation. ~ , ., investigation. the prime minister on the taxi driver _ investigation. the prime minister on the taxi driver and _ investigation. the prime minister on the taxi driver and what _ investigation. the prime minister on the taxi driver and what he - investigation. the prime minister on the taxi driver and what he did - investigation. the prime minister on the taxi driver and what he did has l the taxi driver and what he did has also been praised by the mayor of liverpool. we are expecting to hear from the police news conference shortly. but firstly this video by james reynolds which contains flashing images. the police say they are working at speed to establish the circumstances of this, the car explosion just outside the liverpool women's hospital in central liverpool. “it happened shortly before 11 o'clock yesterday morning, at a time when remembrance day
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services were about to begin across the country. the driver survived the blast. the passenger, who has not been named, was killed. unfortunately, i can confirm that one person has died and another has been taken to hospital, where he is being treated for his injuries, which, thankfully, are not life—threatening. so far we understand that the car involved was a taxi, which pulled up at the hospital shortly before the explosion occurred. in the kensington area of liverpool, around a mile from the explosion, three men, aged 21,26 and 29, were arrested under the terrorism act. this gives the authorities the power to hold detainees for up to 1a days without charge. and late at night, a number of homes in liverpool's rutland avenue a and nearby cumberland avenue were evacuated. they“re reported to be close to a house which was raided by the police in the hours
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after the incident. counter terrorism police north west are leading the overall investigation. they“re supported by officers from merseyside police, and the security service, m15, is also assisting. investigators say they're keeping an open mind as to what caused the explosion. james reynolds, bbc news. the mayor of liverpool has also thanked the taxi driver for managing to avert what she said could have been an awful disaster. obviously, the taxi driver in his heroic efforts has managed to divert what could have been an absolutely awful disaster at the hospital. our thanks go to him. and our emergency services and authorities have worked through the night to divert anything further. we are waiting to hear from police
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at a news conference. there is a bit of activity there but no one sitting in the chairs at the news conference just yet. there is nothing happening there right now. so we will go there as soon as things begin. here with me now is kim johnson who is a labour member of parliament for liverpool riverside. thank you very much forjoining us. there has been quite a lot of praise for the taxi driver and what looked to be some quite heroic actions there yesterday. l to be some quite heroic actions there yesterday.— to be some quite heroic actions there yesterday. i believe so. i've not had the _ there yesterday. i believe so. i've not had the full _ there yesterday. i believe so. i've not had the full details _ there yesterday. i believe so. i've not had the full details yet. - there yesterday. i believe so. i've not had the full details yet. i'm i not had the full details yet. i'm expecting a briefing at one o'clock. i“d expecting a briefing at one o'clock. i'd like to say the emergency services and the authorities need to be commending for responding so quickly and professionally to the explosion at the hospital yesterday morning. explosion at the hospital yesterday mornina. ., ., ., , morning. you said that he would be aettina morning. you said that he would be getting briefed _ morning. you said that he would be getting briefed at _ morning. you said that he would be getting briefed at one _ morning. you said that he would be getting briefed at one o'clock. - morning. you said that he would be getting briefed at one o'clock. how| getting briefed at one o'clock. how does that process work? councillors, the rolice
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does that process work? councillors, the police will _ does that process work? councillors, the police will be _ does that process work? councillors, the police will be updating _ does that process work? councillors, the police will be updating us - does that process work? councillors, the police will be updating us in - the police will be updating us in terms of what has been happening because as you've heard, it is an ongoing investigation. there has not been a declaration that it was a terrorist incident. merseyside police, counterterrorism and the mfi, not mfi, anyway, the security officers are working together collaboratively to look at all of the information to see what happened yesterday. bhd the information to see what happened esterda . �* ., ., yesterday. and when we hear what the ma or of yesterday. and when we hear what the mayor of liverpool _ yesterday. and when we hear what the mayor of liverpool says _ yesterday. and when we hear what the mayor of liverpool says in _ yesterday. and when we hear what the mayor of liverpool says in terms - yesterday. and when we hear what the mayor of liverpool says in terms of - mayor of liverpool says in terms of something so much worse being averted here it seems, it really does bring home that it could have been a very different situation. l been a very different situation. i agree. it was a shocking incident, and things could have been a lot worse. but the car did receive a lot of fire damage but there is little evidence to suggest that there was a
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lot of bomb damage related to the damage to that vehicle. stand lot of bomb damage related to the damage to that vehicle.— lot of bomb damage related to the damage to that vehicle. and so, what are our damage to that vehicle. and so, what are your thoughts _ damage to that vehicle. and so, what are your thoughts today _ damage to that vehicle. and so, what are your thoughts today for _ damage to that vehicle. and so, what are your thoughts today for your - are your thoughts today for your constituents? i are your thoughts today for your constituents?— are your thoughts today for your constituents? i think my thoughts for my constituents _ constituents? i think my thoughts for my constituents is _ constituents? i think my thoughts for my constituents is that - constituents? i think my thoughts for my constituents is that it - constituents? i think my thoughts for my constituents is that it wasl constituents? i think my thoughts | for my constituents is that it was a very concerning and a very scary incident, collaborating with coinciding with the remembrance events yesterday at the town hall. again, there is lots of speculation about what happened, and i think we need to allow the services to conduct their investigations and not get involved with bits of misinformation. ~ , , ~ get involved with bits of misinformation. ~ , ~ misinformation. absolutely. and as we have been _ misinformation. absolutely. and as we have been discussing _ misinformation. absolutely. and as we have been discussing there, - misinformation. absolutely. and as l we have been discussing there, there are the police, the local police, they counterterrorism police and the mis they counterterrorism police and the m15 working together. there are so many unanswered questions, and we don't know the significance obviously of the arrests that have been made. it does look like they
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have been moving very quickly in terms of gathering what they need to do. i terms of gathering what they need to do. ., �* terms of gathering what they need to do. ., ~ , . , ., do. i agree. all the services that have responded _ do. i agree. all the services that have responded very _ do. i agree. all the services that have responded very efficiently l do. i agree. all the services that i have responded very efficiently and very quickly in terms of ensuring no further damage could be undertaken. and i think the arrest of the three under counterterrorism act will provide those services the information that they need going forward. ., ~ information that they need going forward. ., ,, , ., information that they need going forward. ., ~' , ., , information that they need going forward. ., ,, i. , . information that they need going forward. ., ,, , . . information that they need going forward. ., ~' , . . ., forward. thank you very much. we are waitina to forward. thank you very much. we are waiting to hear — forward. thank you very much. we are waiting to hear from _ forward. thank you very much. we are waiting to hear from police _ forward. thank you very much. we are waiting to hear from police news - waiting to hearfrom police news briefing. there are, i think, four seats at that news conference. i“m seats at that news conference. i'm not entirely sure that will be sitting on those. we“ll bring you up to date as far as we are able to share a what has happened here. but obviously, there are many unanswered questions. we don't know yet the name of the person who died in that taxi. there have been three arrests and there was also a building that
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was being staked out yesterday by police. so there has been a lot of movement in terms of the police investigation under county counter terror laws. they have 1a days to hold suspects because of the law is the counterterrorism are strong in terms of police powers it means they do have that time to question any suspects. of course there is much being said about the role of the taxi driver. he is named locally as david perry. he was described by the mayor of liverpool, joanne anderson, as potentially having managed to divert what could have been a disaster. there has been a lot of focus on what happened yesterday, how it unfolded, and it seems that he perhaps saw something that raised the suspicion and which led to him locking the doors of the taxi with the person left in the back seat. he
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went into the hospital and he was substance subsequently injured in the explosion that killed the passenger in that taxi. we are yet to hear officially from police about the sequence of events but this was just happening moments before the two—minute silence for remembrance sunday. still no movement on the news conference but we will go back to it as soon as it happens. the government's vaccine advisers sa a third athird jab would top up protection and help to limited third wave of the virus for winter. it also says those. chair of thejcvi, professor wei shen lim, announced the two updates to the booster programme. the first update relates to the booster programme. could i have the first slide, please? just as a reminder, the current advice in the
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booster programme is that persons aged over 50 years, those adults in a clinical at risk group, front line health and social care workers and close contacts of persons who are immunosuppressed should have a booster vaccine six months following completion of their primary course, essentially, have a third vaccine dose six months after the second dose. can i have the next slide, please? we are advising today that the booster programme is extended to persons aged a0—a9 years as well. as previously, the booster dose is advised six months after the second dose, and either the pfizer biontech vaccine or the moderna vaccine can be used as the booster dose, regardless of the type of vaccine received for the first two doses in the primary course. you may remember that
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in early august we advised a first dose of the pfizer biontech vaccine for 16 and 17—year—olds who do not have an underlying health condition that puts them at higher risk from severe covid—19. we said at the time and would review the data and that a second dose may well be advise command that is indeed the case. we have reviewed the recent information regarding the safety and benefits of a second dose, and we are advising that 16 and 17—year—olds who have had a first dose of the pfizer biontech vaccine be offered a second dose of the pfizer biontech vaccine. as a reminder, the first vaccine dose gives a high level of protection against serious disease, and that high level of protection we know lasts for at least 12—16 weeks. the second dose, nonetheless, reinforces that protection from
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the first dose and it is important in extending the duration of protection, not just for the winter months and christmas, but we are also looking into 2022 and beyond. the prime minister has also welcomed this latest advice on boosterjabs. mrjohnson highlighted the need for everyone to get vaccinated in the first place. i think it is very good news that the jvc vi has today authorised the booster to be rolled out to everybody a0 plus. when you look at what is happening in the pandemic at the moment, just hearing in europe that sadly there are people in a t you who are suffering badly from covid—19, and they are all the unvaccinated. what is happening is that if you can get your booster, then your immunity goes right back up then your immunity goes right back up to 95%. so far, we have got 75%
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of everybody over 70 getting a booster. that is a huge number of people, but it is that further 25% that will make all the difference to the winter, to christmas, to our plans going forward, because it is that extra level of protection that we really need. so the messages, over 70, come forward and get your booster, anybody over 50 come forward and get your booster and from the next week or so, anybody over a0 come forward and get your booster. we are also doing a second dose for 16 and 17—year—olds. last dose for 16 and 17-year-olds. last ear we dose for 16 and 17-year-olds. last year we had _ dose for 16 and 17-year-olds. last year we had to — dose for 16 and 17—year—olds. last year we had to introduce last—minute restrictions at christmas. if we don't see this happening, could we see restrictions again? we don't see this happening, could we see restrictions again?— don't see this happening, could we see restrictions again? we don't see an hina see restrictions again? we don't see an him in see restrictions again? we don't see anything in their— see restrictions again? we don't see anything in their data _ see restrictions again? we don't see anything in their data at _ see restrictions again? we don't see anything in their data at the - see restrictions again? we don't see | anything in their data at the moment to suggest we need to go to plan b. we are sticking with plan a, but we certainly have got to recognise that
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there is a stall of infection out there is a stall of infection out there in parts of europe. you can see those numbers ticking up very sharply in some of our continental friends, and we havejust sharply in some of our continental friends, and we have just got to recognise that there is always a risk that a blizzard could come from the east again as the months get colder. the best protection for our country is everybody to go forward and get their booster. back to the explosion in liverpool. we are awaiting a new some from police. our correspondent fiona trott is there now. we are expecting to hear from police, but i understand there is going to be some that they will say. actually, we are going to leave you for an alpha because the police have just arrived for the conference. let“s listening. just arrived for the conference. let's listening.—
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let's listening. assistant chief constable russ _ let's listening. assistant chief constable russ jackson - let's listening. assistant chief constable russ jackson from | let's listening. assistant chief i constable russ jackson from the actu~ _ constable russ jackson from the actu. they are going to give a brief overview— actu. they are going to give a brief overview and update on where we are up overview and update on where we are up to— overview and update on where we are up to at— overview and update on where we are up to at the _ overview and update on where we are up to at the moment. that will be on camera _ up to at the moment. that will be on camera and _ up to at the moment. that will be on camera and suitable for recording. once _ camera and suitable for recording. once she — camera and suitable for recording. once she has finished her talk we will go _ once she has finished her talk we will go to— once she has finished her talk we will go to un—camera. if you could please _ will go to un—camera. if you could please switch the cameras offer after _ please switch the cameras offer after that. please switch the cameras offer afterthat. i please switch the cameras offer after that. i will hand you over. thank — after that. i will hand you over. thank you _ after that. i will hand you over. thank you. good morning. i after that. i will hand you over. thank you. good morning. lam thank you. good morning. iam merseyside chief constable serena kennedy, and at my side is assistant chief constable russ jackson. acc jackson will be giving an update on the investigation, and i will be updating you on the involvement of merseyside police.— merseyside police. good morning. investigations _ merseyside police. good morning. investigations into _ merseyside police. good morning. investigations into the _ merseyside police. good morning. investigations into the explosion l merseyside police. good morning. | investigations into the explosion at liverpool— investigations into the explosion at liverpool women's hospital led by counterterrorism policing is continuing at pace. the circumstances as we understand them to be, _ circumstances as we understand them to be, other—
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circumstances as we understand them to be, other yesterday, circumstances as we understand them to be, otheryesterday, shortly before — to be, otheryesterday, shortly before 11am, a local taxi driver picked — before 11am, a local taxi driver picked up _ before 11am, a local taxi driver picked up a fare in a rutland avenue area of— picked up a fare in a rutland avenue area of liverpool. the fair, a man, had asked — area of liverpool. the fair, a man, had asked to — area of liverpool. the fair, a man, had asked to be taken to liverpool women's _ had asked to be taken to liverpool women's hospital which was about ten minutes— women's hospital which was about ten minutes away. as the taxi approach the drop—off point at the hospital, an explosion occurred from within the car~ _ an explosion occurred from within the car~ this _ an explosion occurred from within the car. this quickly engulfed in flames — the car. this quickly engulfed in flames. remarkably, the taxi driver escaped _ flames. remarkably, the taxi driver escaped from the cab. he is being treated _ escaped from the cab. he is being treated for— escaped from the cab. he is being treated for his injuries. he has now been _ treated for his injuries. he has now been released from hospital. emergency services quickly attended the scene, _ emergency services quickly attended the scene, and merseyside fire and rescue _ the scene, and merseyside fire and rescue extinguish the flames. it quickly— rescue extinguish the flames. it quickly became apparent then that the passenger remained in the vehicle — the passenger remained in the vehicle and was deceased. army ordnance — vehicle and was deceased. army ordnance disposal officer had examined the scene at the hospital and made — examined the scene at the hospital and made the area safe. following discussions at army ordnance and disposal— discussions at army ordnance and disposal we are able to confirm that
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this is— disposal we are able to confirm that this is to _ disposal we are able to confirm that this is to be — disposal we are able to confirm that this is to be treated as the ignition— this is to be treated as the ignition of an explosive device. our inquiries _ ignition of an explosive device. our inquiries also indicate that it was brought— inquiries also indicate that it was brought into the cab by the passenger. we believe we know the identity— passenger. we believe we know the identity of— passenger. we believe we know the identity of the passenger but we cannot— identity of the passenger but we cannot confirm it at this time. our enquiries — cannot confirm it at this time. our enquiries have led us to two addresses. the first was sutcliffe street _ addresses. the first was sutcliffe street in — addresses. the first was sutcliffe street in the kensington area of liverpoot — street in the kensington area of liverpool. at this location, three men _ liverpool. at this location, three men 21. — liverpool. at this location, three men 21. 26. _ liverpool. at this location, three men 21, 26, and 29 were arrested yesterday— men 21, 26, and 29 were arrested yesterday under section 21 of the terrorism — yesterday under section 21 of the terrorism act. a short while ago, again— terrorism act. a short while ago, again in— terrorism act. a short while ago, again in the _ terrorism act. a short while ago, again in the kensington area, a further— again in the kensington area, a further man aged 20 was arrested under— further man aged 20 was arrested under section a1 of the terrorism act. under section a1 of the terrorism act~ they— under section a1 of the terrorism act. they will be interviewed later today— act. they will be interviewed later today by— act. they will be interviewed later today by counterterrorism detectives. the sutcliffe street address — detectives. the sutcliffe street address was searched overnight and further— address was searched overnight and further searches will take place today — further searches will take place today a — further searches will take place today. a second address has also been _ today. a second address has also been searched at rutland avenue in
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sefton _ been searched at rutland avenue in sefton park. at this location, significant items have been found. further— significant items have been found. further searches will be necessary today, _ further searches will be necessary today, and — further searches will be necessary today, and potentially into the coming — today, and potentially into the coming days. according is in place at this— coming days. according is in place at this location and eight families have been— at this location and eight families have been evacuated at this time. the scene — have been evacuated at this time. the scene at the hospital remains in place _ the scene at the hospital remains in place with— the scene at the hospital remains in place with specialist examinations ongoing — place with specialist examinations ongoing. it is not clear what the motivation _ ongoing. it is not clear what the motivation of this incident is. aaron— motivation of this incident is. aaron crow ? our enquiries indicate that n _ aaron crow ? our enquiries indicate that n explosive device has been manufactured and that it was built by the _ manufactured and that it was built by the passenger in the taxi. the reason _ by the passenger in the taxi. the reason why— by the passenger in the taxi. the reason why he then took it to the women's — reason why he then took it to the women's hospital is unknown, as is the reason — women's hospital is unknown, as is the reason for its sudden explosion. we are _ the reason for its sudden explosion. we are of— the reason for its sudden explosion. we are of course aware that the remembrance eventsjust we are of course aware that the remembrance events just a we are of course aware that the remembrance eventsjust a short distance — remembrance eventsjust a short distance away from the hospital, and that the _ distance away from the hospital, and that the ignition occurred shortly before _ that the ignition occurred shortly before 11am. we cannot at this time draw any—
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before 11am. we cannot at this time draw any connection with this, but it is a _ draw any connection with this, but it is a line — draw any connection with this, but it is a line of— draw any connection with this, but it is a line of enquiry which we are pursuing — it is a line of enquiry which we are pursuing. although the motivation for this— pursuing. although the motivation for this incident is yet to be understood, given all the circumstances, it has been declared a terrorist _ circumstances, it has been declared a terrorist incident and counterterrorism policing are continuing with the investigation. our enquiries will now seek to understand how the device was built, the motivation for the incident and to understand if anyone else was involved — to understand if anyone else was involved in— to understand if anyone else was involved in it. thank you. | involved in it. thank you. i completely understand that communities in the seaside may be concerned. i can assure you that my offices are out and about on the ground providing high visibility and reassurance. there is no specific threat to the area, but i have asked for patrols to be increased right across merseyside. incidents such as this are very rare. but i would ask people to remain calm, but also be
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vigilant and alert. there has also been lots of speculation on social media and false reports of further incidents. forthat media and false reports of further incidents. for that reason, media and false reports of further incidents. forthat reason, i media and false reports of further incidents. for that reason, i would urge members of the public to rely on official information which will be released on our twitter feed at mersey police and the merseyside police website for information, or at gnp police. the people of liverpool and merseyside are well known for supporting each other, and at a time like this, this is needed more than ever. officers from counterterrorism policing north—west are leading the investigation, supported by officers and staff from merseyside police, and we are continuing to work with our partners from merseyside fire and rescue service and the liverpool women's hospital to establish what has taken place. merseyside police will continue to liaise with community groups and leaders, partner agencies
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and individuals in the coming days and individuals in the coming days and weeks to make sure that any concerns are addressed and ensuring that we provide the best possible service to our people here in merseyside. it is also important that people do not speculate about what has happened, but we will endeavour to update our communities as soon as we are able. i would continue to advise people to be vigilant, and if they have any concerns to contact the police on 101 or 999 in an emergency. thank you. 101 or 999 in an emergency. thank ou. ., ~' 101 or 999 in an emergency. thank ou. ., ~ , ., ., 101 or 999 in an emergency. thank ou. ., ~ ., 101 or 999 in an emergency. thank ou. ., ~ i., ., .,, ., you. thank you, that was the end of the statements. _ you. thank you, that was the end of the statements. now— you. thank you, that was the end of the statements. now q _ you. thank you, that was the end of the statements. now q and - you. thank you, that was the end of the statements. now q and day - you. thank you, that was the end of the statements. now q and day and you. thank you, that was the end of. the statements. now q and day and i would _ the statements. now q and day and i would ask— the statements. now q and day and i would ask that you use this q&a. gk, would ask that you use this q&a. ok, that is the moment they would ask that you use this q&a. ii, that is the moment they are going would ask that you use this q&a. ok, that is the moment they are going to turn off the cameras. journalists can stay and question them, but that is now an off the record briefing.
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what we learned there is that there have been for force arrest after that explosion. we were reporting three men were arrested yesterday under the counter terrorism act, there was subsequently for the rest. a bit more detail about the passenger in that taxi. they said that they believe they know the identity of the passenger, but they cannot confirm it at the moment. advice was brought into the camp by the passenger who had called for a taxi to take him to the women's hospital in liverpool. we were hearing there from merseyside chief constable serena kennedy saying it is not clear what the motivation of this incident is but there is an assumption that it was, the device was built by their passenger. it is unknown why the passenger wanted to go to the women's hospital all by
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the device decimated when it did. they are also looking at the timing of it, just before the two—minute silence before on remembrance sunday. that is a line of enquiry. let“s sunday. that is a line of enquiry. let's go to vienna trott, our corrupt correspondent at the hospital. there was a bit more detail on that briefing as we try to build up a picture of what happened. yes, and of course the striking thing coming from that news conference just now is that this has been declared a terror incident now. just to recap on what we were hearing, it was very interesting that we have learned that the taxi driver picked up the passenger from rutland avenue, that is less than two miles away from the hospital itself, and who has asked to be taken to the hospital. the explosion occurred inside the car, amazingly,
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the driver himself escape that explosion. we can talk more about him shortly. he sustained injuries. he has now been released from hospital, we have been told. emergency services quickly came to the scene, we knew that yesterday. set up this cording and dozens of police officers still here while the investigation is sentence here. on the ordinance, we have now learned they have made the area safe. we are also hearing just now that there is this understanding that the device was brought into the taxi by the passenger, and they believe they know his identity, but they can't confirm it. this led to more investigations on sutcliffe street investigations on sutcliffe street in the kensington area. that is where those three men in their 20s were arrested yesterday under the terrorism act, and we have now learned today a further man has been
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arrested. that is for people now. second address on rutland avenue, significant items were found there, we have been told, and also getting a sense really that we know they have been working very quickly on this investigation. it has been a very fast—moving investigation with lots of developments and we are hearing that further developments will be continuing in the coming days. we are also hearing they are not yet clear on what the motivation was. there is an assumption that the explosive was built by the passenger. why they were coming to the hospital is unknown, but the reason for the sudden explosion. just to recap what we're hearing from the news conference that of course that has been declared a terror incident now. as you can see
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behind me, investigations very much centred here. also those residential streets that i've been talking about where armed police yesterday were involved in searching those properties. what they are looking at, we have the car here, which has been burnt out. any potential evidence destroyed. amazingly, of course, that taxi driver escaped that explosion. it is notjust the friends governance it is a joint investigation involving merseyside police and m15 is well no doubt sharing intelligence and communications they will be showing too. just to recap all so we know the passenger that was asked to be brought to the hospital died in this explosion. his identity is still yet
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to be revealed, but investigators do believe they know who that was. now, the taxi driver. there have been a lot of reports this morning about his role in all of this, but certainly, he has been given a lot of praise. investigations are still ongoing on exactly what happened, but he survived the explosion. he has been named locally as david perry. the mayor of liverpool, joanne anderson, has played tribute to him this morning saying his heroic efforts managed to divert what could have been an awful disaster. he has been treated for his injuries as we have heard in the news conference a short while ago. he has now been released from hospital. in fact, a fundraising page has been set up for him on social media. we have also heard from the prime minister this morning as well, saying it does appear that
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he did behave with an incredible presence of mind. just to recap what we've heard from that news conference in the past few minutes, this is now being treated as a terror incident. we have an investigation continuing here at the hospital itself where the explosion took place. you can see dozens of police officers surrounding the site here. there are two other parts of the city, less than two miles from liverpool women's hospital where the explosion took place, to residential areas where there is also focus of police investigation, properties have been searched there, some houses have also been evacuated. negotiators were on a residential street last night. we know that three men were arrested yesterday under the terrorism act. they are in their 20s and were arrested in the kensington area. we have learned from the news conference that
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another man has been arrested. hs2 we hear the government is to ditch the eastern leg of hs2. it“s we hear the government is to ditch the eastern leg of hs2. it's a really big deal to sell about how the public sees public transport outside london and elsewhere in england working over the next coming decades. as part of that plan, there will be a lot of money, about £96 billion allocated to various projects, around a0 billion of that we are told will be money we have not heard about in the past. one thing that is not happening is that part of hs2 which was designed to go all the way up to leeds from
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birmingham. it had been a big part of the government real plan until now. my understanding is that will be scrapped in the coming days. —— railway plan. what i'm getting from whitehall is they will upgrade a number of other railway lines and put money into other projects and the idea is that they will be able to deliver quicker. hs2 as a long—term project and it would be another 20 years before that line to leeds was realised in the argument you will hear from the government later this week as they are going for faster and later this week as they are going forfaster and basically later this week as they are going for faster and basically quicker routes. things that they can get in place right away. the scrapping of that part of hs2 is going to raise the questions about what it means for the government levelling up agenda. the government always talks
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about wanting to distribute opportunity better across the uk, this was seen as part of it and there will be some mps this morning and parts of the north of england, some of those red wall seats the conservatives won from labour at the last election for the first time who will be really nervous about the message this sends out. we have not seen the full package it in the message we are going to get from the government is that you need to look at this integrated railway plan as a whole, there is a whole lot of money going into it and there will be significant upgrades that are really good, particularly for people outside cities so part of the case ministers will make is that getting to other parts of the high—speed rail network will be easier for people who do not live in some of the big transport hubs but the top line at the moment is that he eastern leg of hs2 between
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birmingham and leeds is not going to happen. hello, this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines: police declare yesterday's explossion in liverpool as a terrorst incident. borisjohnson has praised the brave liverpool taxi driver — named locally as david perry — after his efforts to limit the impact of an explosion in his vehicle yesterday. uk government advisers have recommended the covid—19 vaccine booster programme should be extended to include healthy a0 to a9—year—olds and 16 and 17—year—olds should come forward for a second dose. after borisjohnson admits he could have handled the row involving owen paterson better, the debate about parliamentary standards returns to the commons today. a report by mps has found "serious failings" including avoidable deaths — in the care for patients with sickle cell disease in england.
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a lockdown in austria for anyone who hasn't been vaccinated against covid has come into force. more than 300,000 people are getting a pay boost of up to a0p an hour from today. the real living wage, which is a voluntary scheme for employers, is increasing from today to nine pounds and ninety pence outside of london and to eleven pounds and five pence in the capital. almost 9,000 employers across the uk are now signed up to the scheme, which aims to ensure all staff earn a wage that meets the real cost of living. which aims to ensure all staff earn a wage that meets the real cost of living. ryan elder says he used to struggle on the minimum wage, but now works at a frozen food supplier which is part of the real living wage scheme. supplier which is part when i used to work at the pub and i was working more and more just so i could get by. basically paying for rent, you know, any bills i had to pay and at the end of the month
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i will try and put a little better way to save and it would end up just coming back out of my account. every day i was feeling down and i was thinking about money all the time. joining me now is director of the living wage foundation, katherine chapman. how is it worked out? the real living wage is the only rate calculated at actual what a cause celebre such as food and childcare and these are decided by members of the public and that's how we get to uk rates which are about a0p an hour and the london living wage which £11 and the london living wage which £11 and this makes a real difference to peoples lives and means not having to worry about money or putting food on the table and pay bills at the end of the month. it is great we have seen so many employers lining up have seen so many employers lining up for it. about 9000 across the uk
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including companies and thousands of smaller as this is like coffee shops and florists and it means 300,000 employees will get a pay rise. in the scheme of things what proportion is that of businesses in the uk? about one inch 13 jobs with living wage employers but we have seen about a third sign up since the pandemic and seeing the fastest growth on record of employers wanting to peoples rates. when i speak to businesses they want to do the right thing by workers now and time to be difficult for businesses and everyone and a lot of the roles that kept us going through the pandemic —like cleaners and security guards and shop workers are on the wages so we see more businesses wanting to sign up to payment rates and we hear about some labour
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shortages in those sectors saw the incentives are there and it is good for families incentives are there and it is good forfamilies but incentives are there and it is good for families but also for businesses. what market is really interesting one third of companies have signed up since the pandemic. i know you said it is because the message coming to you is they want to do the right thing by their employers but what you think it was in particular about the pandemic that made them understand the difficulties employers were facing? is one employer puts it, suddenly the security team and the cleaning team while we were locked and at home were the most important people in the organisation and we have found one of the biggest barriers to signing up with the real living wage rate is the organisation is so that was a real step to action in highlighting how important the roles are and they overlooked a human face of low pay and that was a spur to action for many employers. it is making a huge difference to thousands of lives across the country. do you go to companies? you
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do not have to name and shame anyone but there must be companies you look at that are not doing it when you think, why are you not doing it? do you knock on the door and try to persuade them? i you knock on the door and try to persuade them?— persuade them? i think it's interesting _ persuade them? i think it's interesting this _ persuade them? i think it's interesting this week - persuade them? i think it's interesting this week we i persuade them? i think it's i interesting this week we have finally reached the tipping point on the ftse100 sea you are in a minority if you do not sign up and is one of our business leader said it is our real rest not to pay the real living wage rates now and it is really great to see people go from strength to strength because as we know the cost of living will be going up over the next year with food and fuel prices so it is more important than ever we get as many companies as we can to sign up. more now on our top story — that one person has been
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killed and another injured following an explosion outside liverpool women's hospital on sunday. the mayor of liverpool has praised the injured man, who is a taxi driver, for his heroic efforts. what let's talk to the mayor of liverpool, joanne anderson. we just need to support our emergency services in making sure we remain calm and vigilant after this incident. , ., , ., , ., , incident. this morning you praise the actions _ incident. this morning you praise the actions of _ incident. this morning you praise the actions of the _ incident. this morning you praise the actions of the taxi _ incident. this morning you praise the actions of the taxi driver i incident. this morning you praise the actions of the taxi driver and | the actions of the taxi driver and said it was potentially could have been worse. he was actually in the car when the explosion went off, it must be quite terrifying. {iii car when the explosion went off, it must be quite terrifying. of course, what an awful _ must be quite terrifying. of course, what an awful experience _ must be quite terrifying. of course, what an awful experience and i must be quite terrifying. of course, i what an awful experience and jumping out the taxi he was lucky in the way that he did but it doesn't bear thinking about what could have
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happened. thinking about what could have ha- rened. ., ,, thinking about what could have happened-— thinking about what could have harrened. ., , , ., thinking about what could have ha rened. ., y., ., ., ., ,, ., ~ happened. have you managed to speak to him? i happened. have you managed to speak to him? i know — happened. have you managed to speak to him? i know he _ happened. have you managed to speak to him? i know he is _ happened. have you managed to speak to him? i know he is out _ happened. have you managed to speak to him? i know he is out of _ happened. have you managed to speak to him? i know he is out of hospital- to him? i know he is out of hospital and i'm sure there are lots of people want to speak to him. i think it is really important _ people want to speak to him. i think it is really important we _ people want to speak to him. i think it is really important we support i it is really important we support him in recovering. our communications team will have been in touch but it is really important this man is able to recover from what much of been such an horrific shop yesterday. == what much of been such an horrific shop yesterday-— what much of been such an horrific shop yesterday. -- shock. we heard from the chief _ shop yesterday. -- shock. we heard from the chief constable _ shop yesterday. -- shock. we heard from the chief constable saying i from the chief constable saying there is no direct threat but they are stepping up police patrols to reassure people. i are stepping up police patrols to reassure people.— are stepping up police patrols to reassure people. i drove past the hos-ital reassure people. i drove past the hospital this _ reassure people. i drove past the hospital this morning, _ reassure people. i drove past the hospital this morning, there i reassure people. i drove past the hospital this morning, there is i hospital this morning, there is plenty of police presence and visibility and at the address as well. to reassure the community the police are doing everything they can make sure are all safe. it police are doing everything they can make sure are all safe.— make sure are all safe. it seems that the police _ make sure are all safe. it seems that the police operation - make sure are all safe. it seems that the police operation has i make sure are all safe. it seems i that the police operation has moved very quickly from what we hear. i
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can't thank our emergency services enough, fire service and police on the scene within minutes and arrests have been made so quickly all day yesterday and overnight, working through the night with our emergency service but also other authorities, everyone is on standby ready to take action and give support whenever it is needed. ~ ., action and give support whenever it is needed. . ., , , ., action and give support whenever it is needed. . ., , i. ., action and give support whenever it is needed. . ., , ., ., is needed. what is your role now? obviously to _ is needed. what is your role now? obviously to assure _ is needed. what is your role now? obviously to assure our _ is needed. what is your role now? obviously to assure our residents | obviously to assure our residents and get the information they need and get the information they need and make sure everyone remains calm and make sure everyone remains calm and deal with any issues or queries you may have and do everything we can to follow the instructions given to us by the police and the counterterrorism unit. irate to us by the police and the counterterrorism unit. we had in the news conference _ counterterrorism unit. we had in the news conference that _ counterterrorism unit. we had in the news conference that some - counterterrorism unit. we had in the| news conference that some residents in particular have been disrupted by the police operation and i think they said eight households have been evacuated because of the searches they have been doing. i evacuated because of the searches they have been doing.— evacuated because of the searches they have been doing. i was aware we had provided — they have been doing. i was aware we had provided to _ they have been doing. i was aware we had provided to tell— they have been doing. i was aware we had provided to tell accommodation i had provided to tell accommodation
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last night —— hotel accommodation but most people are able to get about their business in the city and the police are doing everything they can to keep sol one the police are doing everything they can to keep so— the police are doing everything they can to keep sol one of the things we can to keep sol one of the things we can sort of take _ can to keep sol one of the things we can sort of take in _ can to keep sol one of the things we can sort of take in a _ can to keep sol one of the things we can sort of take in a positive - can to keep sol one of the things we can sort of take in a positive sense l can sort of take in a positive sense is just to look at how it could have been, the concerns around the fact that as you say this morning it could have been a worse situation we were looking at. it could have been a worse situation we were looking at— were looking at. it doesn't bear thinkina were looking at. it doesn't bear thinking about _ were looking at. it doesn't bear thinking about and _ were looking at. it doesn't bear thinking about and what - were looking at. it doesn't bear thinking about and what an i were looking at. it doesn't beari thinking about and what an heroic effort from the taxi driver, how quickly he coped to lock the taxi and get out of the taxi.- quickly he coped to lock the taxi and get out of the taxi. thank you so much for— and get out of the taxi. thank you so much forjoining _ and get out of the taxi. thank you so much forjoining us. _ six months after a damning report into the bbc“s handling of princess diana“s1995 parorama interview, her brother says he believes there's "still more to come out". speaking exclusively to bbc breakfast, earl spencer said "big questions" remain, after former bbcjournalist martin bashir was found to have used "deceitful behaviour" to help
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secure her consent. he made the comments while showing sally nugent around the althorp estate, which is the subject of a new documentary. i've known forever that there was a lost village in the park here. that block around the tree, that's just not natural. there's always something new to find with this house and the park, there's so much history contained in these walls and we've just scraped the surface with this one. the archaeologists have uncovered evidence of an iron age roundhouse and now, where they thought there might be a buried road, they're finding signs of ancient earthworks. it's very historic.
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i reckon all of england was like this with so much underneath it. but so much has been developed or farmed that it's been lost. but because this park is unspoiled, it's still here. is it right that the crown wanted to use this as a location? they did, they applied, they wanted to shoot here. i don't really do that stuff. so, yeah, these are all sort of members of the family here. down the bottom here is more generals and all that sort of thing. but it used to be an open courtyard this, within the tudor times. and are you constantly repairing it? yes, there's a lot going on. we are sitting here on this magnificent staircase, surrounded by lots of pairs of eyes looking at us. how aware of all of these people are you? i took over running this place 30 years ago when i was 27. and i remember when i first walked through here as the sort of nominal owner, as it were,
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i really was nervous. you look at these people, they've lived here many hundreds of years ago and i did feel, my goodness, they“rejudging how i'm going to play this hand. you were really young! i was really young but when you're 27 you don't know you are really young. there's a picture of you at the top of the staircase, what are you holding in your hand? so there's a painting of diana up there, which was painted by an american artist called nelson shanks and he came to view it in situ here. and then he said he'd like to do one of me and link the two together. so that's actually the notes i made when writing the eulogy for diana's funeral. it“s several months now since the bbc was found to have been woefully inadequate in its handling of the interview that martin bashir did with your late sister, the princess of wales, at the time. now you've had some time to reflect on that and think about what happened, how do you feel about that finding?
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actually, lord dyson did a very good job. his brief was tiny, it was to look at a very specific area and there's still so much more to look at in the broader terms of who was responsible for what and how did it come to this? did documents get hidden from view and all sorts of really important stuff which is yet to come out. so i see the lord dyson report as a very welcome development, but there's still a very long way to go with this. how far is there to go, what more can be done? i've been doing quite a lot behind the scenes. but it's clear to me that there are certain people who were in the bbc who have behaved in a way that is truly abysmal and possibly criminal. how far can you take that now yourself, personally?
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that's the question and i've got people looking at that and we'll see. but it's not going to end now, i'm not saying that as some ugly threat, itjust can't stop here because there's still more to come out. when you look back on your childhood in this house, what are the things that stay in your mind now? this staircase, of course it's very grand, but for the children in my family it's where you can get a lot of speed up on a tray, coming down on it like a toboggan, really. no, i look in this hallway and i actually look forward to christmas. so in a month or so we will put up a christmas tree that's been grown especially on the estate each year. we do a very traditional english christmas here and it just looks right. today a flintshire mum—of—two who was left relying on a wheelchair after having her legs amputated ? will see her specially adapted home for the first time after more than 70 volunteer builders from across the uk answered charity band of builders call to help
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transform her house. cher little contracted meningococcal septicaemia this time last year — a rare and often fatal bloodstream infection — shejoins us now, along with kevin cox who is the project manager at band of builders. cher, you have been through an awful experience. tell us the impact it has had on you. it experience. tell us the impact it has had on you.— experience. tell us the impact it has had on you. it had a massive im act has had on you. it had a massive impact on _ has had on you. it had a massive impact on my — has had on you. it had a massive impact on my life, _ has had on you. it had a massive impact on my life, my _ has had on you. it had a massive impact on my life, my whole i has had on you. it had a massive impact on my life, my whole life | impact on my life, my whole life changed in a matter of months and it was a struggle. you changed in a matter of months and it was a struggle-— was a struggle. you were given, or our was a struggle. you were given, or your family — was a struggle. you were given, or your family were — was a struggle. you were given, or your family were told _ was a struggle. you were given, or your family were told there - was a struggle. you were given, or your family were told there was i was a struggle. you were given, or. your family were told there was only a 20% chance of you surviving. i was onl aiven a 2096 chance of you surviving. i was only given a — a 2096 chance of you surviving. i was only given a 2096 _ a 2096 chance of you surviving. i was only given a 2096 chance _ a 2096 chance of you surviving. i was only given a 2096 chance of - a 20% chance of you surviving. i —" only given a 20% chance of surviving because all my organs had actually failed at that point so i am very lucky to be here. but failed at that point so i am very lucky to be here.— failed at that point so i am very lucky to be here. but it has been life changing _ lucky to be here. but it has been life changing for— lucky to be here. but it has been life changing for you, _ lucky to be here. but it has been
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life changing for you, hasn't i lucky to be here. but it has been life changing for you, hasn't it? | life changing for you, hasn't it? tell people about that and how your needs have changed. it tell people about that and how your needs have changed.— tell people about that and how your needs have changed. it has been life chanaian needs have changed. it has been life changing not — needs have changed. it has been life changing not only — needs have changed. it has been life changing not only for— needs have changed. it has been life changing not only for myself- needs have changed. it has been life changing not only for myself but i needs have changed. it has been life changing not only for myself but for| changing not only for myself but for my family as well just having changing not only for myself but for my family as welljust having band of builders come and do the most amazing transformation on my home is just unbelievable.— just unbelievable. explain what needed to be _ just unbelievable. explain what needed to be done _ just unbelievable. explain what needed to be done in _ just unbelievable. explain what needed to be done in order i just unbelievable. explain what needed to be done in order to. just unbelievable. explain what i needed to be done in order to enable you to live there. we needed to be done in order to enable you to live there.— you to live there. we needed the whole of the _ you to live there. we needed the whole of the kitchen _ you to live there. we needed the whole of the kitchen opened i you to live there. we needed the whole of the kitchen opened out| you to live there. we needed the i whole of the kitchen opened out and we needed a wet room installation and a ground floor transformation with a bed in as well. stand and a ground floor transformation with a bed in as well.— with a bed in as well. and so the team of angels, _ with a bed in as well. and so the team of angels, as _ with a bed in as well. and so the team of angels, as i _ with a bed in as well. and so the team of angels, as i assume i with a bed in as well. and so the team of angels, as i assume you with a bed in as well. and so the i team of angels, as i assume you see them, stepped up? thea;r team of angels, as i assume you see them. stepped up?— them, stepped up? they really did. absolutely amazing _ them, stepped up? they really did. absolutely amazing what _ them, stepped up? they really did. absolutely amazing what they i them, stepped up? they really did. absolutely amazing what they have | absolutely amazing what they have done, absolutely outstanding. kevin, tell us more — done, absolutely outstanding. kevin, tell us more about _ done, absolutely outstanding. kevin, tell us more about what _ done, absolutely outstanding. kevin, tell us more about what it _ done, absolutely outstanding. kevin, tell us more about what it is - done, absolutely outstanding. kevin, tell us more about what it is that i tell us more about what it is that you do with band of builders. irate
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tell us more about what it is that you do with band of builders. we are a charity set — you do with band of builders. we are a charity set up _ you do with band of builders. we are a charity set up by — you do with band of builders. we are a charity set up by tradesmen - you do with band of builders. we are a charity set up by tradesmen to i a charity set up by tradesmen to help tradesmen in their time of need be that— help tradesmen in their time of need be that through medical necessity or hardship, _ be that through medical necessity or hardship, we will go and adapt homes and do _ hardship, we will go and adapt homes and do changesjust improve peoples lives _ and do changes 'ust improve peoples lives. ., . ., ., and do changes 'ust improve peoples lives. ., . , ., ., lives. how much satisfaction do you aet from lives. how much satisfaction do you get from doing _ lives. how much satisfaction do you get from doing that _ lives. how much satisfaction do you get from doing that work? - lives. how much satisfaction do you get from doing that work? so i lives. how much satisfaction do you get from doing that work? so much i get from doing that work? so much everything we do, all the hardships are worth it to see the persons face when we do it and give it back to them. cher, how did you feel when you saw the grand unveiling? i was 'ust you saw the grand unveiling? i was just absolutely _ you saw the grand unveiling? i was just absolutely amazed _ you saw the grand unveiling? i was just absolutely amazed and - you saw the grand unveiling? i —" just absolutely amazed and couldn't believe how much work it actually been done. i did not picture the amount of work needing done in my mind amount of work needing done in my mina , , ., ., , mind this is what we have been waitina mind this is what we have been waiting to _ mind this is what we have been waiting to see, _ mind this is what we have been
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waiting to see, i _ mind this is what we have been waiting to see, i think - mind this is what we have been waiting to see, i think this i mind this is what we have been waiting to see, i think this is i mind this is what we have been l waiting to see, i think this is the before and after here we go. i don't know if you can see what we are seeing. is that you? i cannot really see, kevin. that is not you. you cannot see what i can see. it is walking through midway through the building work here and it is often not finished that it looks like it has been opened out at this point. the kitchen. i am hoping that as the video goes on, i do not know how long there is to run on it. maybe we will see the fully finished job. there is the wet room you mentioned there, cher. we are going along a green corridor. that leads to what? it leads to the new bedroom. that is where we are _ it leads to the new bedroom. that is where we are now. _ it leads to the new bedroom. that is where we are now. that _ it leads to the new bedroom. that is where we are now. that was - it leads to the new bedroom. that is where we are now. that was a i it leads to the new bedroom. that is i where we are now. that was a massive project and an amazing gift, kevin,
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for you and all the others who worked on this for nothing. we do not work alone, _ worked on this for nothing. we do not work alone, we _ worked on this for nothing. we do not work alone, we have - worked on this for nothing. we do | not work alone, we have corporate sponsors _ not work alone, we have corporate sponsors that donate massive amounts in monetary— sponsors that donate massive amounts in monetary terms and materials to our projects — in monetary terms and materials to our projects and without them we would _ our projects and without them we would not — our projects and without them we would not be able to do half as much as we _ would not be able to do half as much as we are _ would not be able to do half as much as we are able to do. | would not be able to do half as much as we are able to do.— as we are able to do. i was wondering _ as we are able to do. i was wondering about _ as we are able to do. i was wondering about the i as we are able to do. i was - wondering about the materials and everything needed. how does that work? it is alternated? yes. everything needed. how does that work? it is alternated?— everything needed. how does that work? it is alternated? yes, we have ve small work? it is alternated? yes, we have very small budgets _ work? it is alternated? yes, we have very small budgets out _ work? it is alternated? yes, we have very small budgets out of _ work? it is alternated? yes, we have very small budgets out of our - work? it is alternated? yes, we have very small budgets out of our own i very small budgets out of our own finances _ very small budgets out of our own finances and rely on the generosity of large _ finances and rely on the generosity of large companies and even some of the small_ of large companies and even some of the small independent companies donated _ the small independent companies donated materials to us. the time comes— donated materials to us. the time comes from — donated materials to us. the time comes from the volunteers but every person _ comes from the volunteers but every person who _ comes from the volunteers but every person who gives an hour moves the project _ person who gives an hour moves the project on _ person who gives an hour moves the project on an — person who gives an hour moves the project on an hour. everything works in harmony— project on an hour. everything works in harmony together.—
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project on an hour. everything works in harmony together. cher, f band of builders had — in harmony together. cher, f band of builders had not _ in harmony together. cher, f band of builders had not stepped _ in harmony together. cher, f band of builders had not stepped up - in harmony together. cher, f band of builders had not stepped up and - in harmony together. cher, f band of| builders had not stepped up and done this for you, what would life of been light? ads, this for you, what would life of been light?— this for you, what would life of been liaht?�* . ,, , been light? a massive struggle, i could not have _ been light? a massive struggle, i could not have got _ been light? a massive struggle, i could not have got around - been light? a massive struggle, i could not have got around that i been light? a massive struggle, i | could not have got around that the property and it would have been really difficult and physically difficult as well.— really difficult and physically difficult as well. what have you said? ithink— difficult as well. what have you said? i think my _ difficult as well. what have you said? i think my face _ difficult as well. what have you said? i think my face said - difficult as well. what have you said? i think my face said it - difficult as well. what have you | said? i think my face said it all. kevin, said? i think my face said it all. kevin. this _ said? i think my face said it all. kevin, this is _ said? i think my face said it all. kevin, this is honestly - said? i think my face said it all. kevin, this is honestly really . kevin, this is honestly really importantjob, they are all obviously life changing for the people you work with. how often are you actually doing the sort of work? we try to do as many projects within a year— we try to do as many projects within a year as— we try to do as many projects within a year as we — we try to do as many projects within a year as we can but it takes a lot of planning — a year as we can but it takes a lot of planning and obviously in most instances — of planning and obviously in most instances we have to have planning permission — instances we have to have planning permission which takes time, so i
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think— permission which takes time, so i think for— permission which takes time, so i think for the last two years we have averaged _ think for the last two years we have averaged five or six projects per year— averaged five or six projects per year which — averaged five or six projects per year which is pretty good going but obviously— year which is pretty good going but obviously we hope to improve on that and streamline and get more done. thank— and streamline and get more done. thank you _ and streamline and get more done. thank you so much forjoining us. turkey farmers across the uk have spent several months worrying about christmas supply, following staffing shortages caused by the pandemic and brexit. to ease pressure on the supply chain, last month, the government introduced a temporary visa scheme for seasonal poultry workers. with more than 3,000 of them already on their way to the uk, the industry is now confident that turkey will still be on the festive menu — as our business correspondent emma simpson reports. christmas is coming and the turkeys are nice and fat. turkeys gobble.
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after months of worry, paul kelly's now got his seasonal workers, including 22 of them, through the temporary visa scheme. it's about 20% of our workforce so it was very touch and go for us. we had many sleepless nights up until the last week in september when we got the green light when we could get some visas. christmas has been saved. christmas has been saved — at this point in time. more than 2,500 temporary workers will be arriving in the uk in the coming days. that's about half as many as the industry originally was asking for. turkeys gobble all at once. but it should be enough, partly because a few birds have been reared this year because some farmers were worried about getting enough staff. so will there be enough turkeys to go round? there will definitely be enough turkeys for christmas. i think there will be a focus on whole birds and very simple crowns and roasts. this streamlining of our product
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choice has helped us in terms of overall volume. amid all the supply chain problems, turkeys at least are now back on track, but the industry's calling for a permanent solution to ensure it gets the seasonal workers its needs. emma simpson, bbc news, chelmsford. hello again. we have had some dense fog patches across parts of england and wales this morning. and most of that now lifting. we also have a weather front bumping into an area of high pressure so it is weakening. still some rain in it, though. and later we have another front coming our way. so for england and wales we will see some brighter breaks develop in this cloud but it will be thick enough for some drizzle in some western and south—western parts. meanwhile, here is our band of rain. but behind it for scotland and northern ireland, a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine, but the cloud building out towards the west with temperatures between 10—13 c. as we head on through the evening and overnight, our weak weather front continues its journey moving south, with some spots of rain.
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there will be some patchy mist and fog forming, not as widespread as last night. and at the same time, another weather front comes on across the north west bringing strengthening winds and also some rain. overnight lows of between 6—9 c. so tomorrow, we do still have that weather front coming in across the north west. one look at those isobars tells you it's going to be windy here. but we also still have a ridge of high pressure in the southern areas. so things fairly quiet in the south. any patchy mist and fog that is formed overnight should lift. there will still be the remnants of a weather front producing a cloud, the odd spot of rain, but the heaviest rain will be coming on across the north west, with gusts to gale force in the northern and western isles and the far north of mainland scotland. but you can see how the weather front starts to fragment through the course of the day. temperatures very similar to today, we are looking at about ten — 13 north to south. as we had from tuesday into wednesday, our weather front eventually pushes down towards the south—east and clears away. you can see too from the isobars across the far north of scotland it's going to be windy here, and there will also be some showers.
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some of those on the tops of the mountains are likely to be wintry. but there will be a lot of dry weather around as well, and a decent amount of sunshine across parts of england and wales, and also eastern scotland. a few showers and some drizzle getting into the west. temperatures are lower in the north. we are looking at eights and nines. but as we can further south, 10—13 will be the order of the day. then as we head on into the latter part of the week, still a fair bit of cloud around, still some rain at times across the north and the west, or showers, but still mild. it's as we go into the early part of next week it turns colder.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... an explosion outside liverpool women's hospital on remembrance sunday is declared a terror incident by police. we are able to confirm that this is being treated at the ignition of an explosive device. our enquiries also indicate that the device was brought into the cab by the passenger. we believe we know the identity of the passenger but we cannot confirm this at this time. borisjohnson has praised the �*brave' liverpool taxi driver — named locally as david perry — after his efforts to limit the impact of an explosion in his vehicle yesterday. it does look as though the taxi driver in question did behave with incredible presence of mind and bravery.
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the prime minister has been visiting a gp surgery as government advisers recommend the covid—i9 vaccine booster programme should be extended to include healthy a0 to a9—year—olds and 16 and i7—year—olds should come forward for a second dose. when you are called for your booster dose in the next phase, you can come forward confident that the benefits in preventing serious covid—i9 far outweigh any risks. the bbc understands that the integrated rail plan, to be published in just a few days' time, is expected to reveal cuts to the eastern leg of hs2 between the west midlands and leeds. after borisjohnson admits he could have handled the row involving owen paterson better, the debate about parliamentary standards returns to the commons today. a report by mps finds "serious failings" including avoidable deaths in the care for patients with sickle cell disease in england. assurances there
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will "definitely" be enough turkeys for christmas after fears there could be a shortage. an explosion in a taxi outside liverpool women's hospital yesterday has been declared a terrorist incident. a fourth person has been arrested under the terrorism act in connection with the explosion. a male passenger in the cab was killed in the blast. there has been praise for the taxi driver, david perry, who was injured in yesterday's car explosion in the city, for his heroic efforts. we're about to show you pictures of the moment that the car exploded. just a warning that some viewers may find it distressing and so may wish
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to turn away for a few moments. here the car enters the liverpool women's hospital car park. and then this security camera footage shows the device being detonated. it shows that exact moment of the explosion. a short time later the driver, mr perry, can be seen getting out of the taxi. people running as they obviously realise what has happened and the fire starting, that huge amount of smoke is the explosion happened just... it was so quick. the vehicle had to stop the moving and then the explosion happened. the driver managed to get out and run away from
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that vehicle. it happened just before iiam that vehicle. it happened just before 11am on remembrance sunday is a national two—minute silence was about to begin. within the last hour, merseyside police have given an update on their investigations. russ jackson, head of counter terrorism north west, explained how events unfolded yesterday. yesterday, shortly before 11am, a yesterday, shortly before iiam, a locat— yesterday, shortly before 11am, a local taxi — yesterday, shortly before 11am, a local taxi driver picked up a fare in the _ local taxi driver picked up a fare in the rutland area of liverpool. the fair, — in the rutland area of liverpool. the fair, a — in the rutland area of liverpool. the fair, a man, had asked to be taken _ the fair, a man, had asked to be taken to— the fair, a man, had asked to be taken to liverpool women's hospital which _ taken to liverpool women's hospital which was _ taken to liverpool women's hospital which was about ten minutes away. as the taxi _ which was about ten minutes away. as the taxi approach the drop—off point at the _ the taxi approach the drop—off point at the hospital, and explosion occurred — at the hospital, and explosion occurred from within the car. this quickly— occurred from within the car. this quickly engulfed in flames. remarkably, the taxi driver escaped from the _ remarkably, the taxi driver escaped from the cab. he is being treated for his— from the cab. he is being treated for his injuries and has been released _ for his injuries and has been released from hospital. emergency services _ released from hospital. emergency services quickly attended the scene, and merseyside fire and rescue
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extinguish the flames. it quickly became — extinguish the flames. it quickly became apparent then that the passenger remained in the vehicle and was _ passenger remained in the vehicle and was deceased. the army ordnance and was deceased. the army ordnance and explosion officers have examined the area _ and explosion officers have examined the area at— and explosion officers have examined the area at the hospital and made it safe _ the area at the hospital and made it safe from — the area at the hospital and made it safe. from discussions with army ordnance — safe. from discussions with army ordnance disposal, we are able to confirm _ ordnance disposal, we are able to confirm that this is being treated as the _ confirm that this is being treated as the ignition of us an explosive device _ our inquiries also indicate that it was brought into the cab by the passenger. we believe we know the identity of the passenger but we cannot confirm it at this time. our enquiries have led us to two addresses. the first was sutcliffe street in the kensington area of liverpool. at this location, three men 21,26, and 29 were arrested yesterday under section 41 of the terrorism act. a short while ago, again in the kensington area, a further man aged 20 was arrested under section 41 of the terrorism
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act. they will be interviewed later today by counterterrorism detectives. the sutcliffe street address was searched overnight and further searches will take place today. a second address has also been searched at rutland avenue in sefton park. at this location, significant items have been found. further searches will be necessary today, and potentially into the _ coming days. borisjohnson says the taxi driver involved in the incident behaved with incredible presence of mind and bravery. this is an ongoing investigation so i can't comment on the details of exactly what type of incident it was, what type of crime it may have been, but it does look as though the taxi driver in question did behave with incredible presence of mind and bravery. but i have to say this is something that is an ongoing
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investigation and it would be premature to say much more of that. and the mayor of liverpool, joanne anderson has also given her reaction to what happened. we need to support our emergency services and ensure we remain calm and vigilant at the incident. this mornin: and vigilant at the incident. this morning you _ and vigilant at the incident. this morning you braves the actions of the taxi driver and said it could have been much worse. we now have more of a picture of what happened. he was actually in the car when the explosion went off. it he was actually in the car when the explosion went off.— he was actually in the car when the explosion went off. it must've been terri inc. explosion went off. it must've been terrifying- of _ explosion went off. it must've been terrifying. of course, _ explosion went off. it must've been terrifying. of course, what - explosion went off. it must've been terrifying. of course, what an - explosion went off. it must've been terrifying. of course, what an awful experience. jumping of the taxi in the way that he did. obviously, it doesn't bear thinking about what could have happened. hague doesn't bear thinking about what could have happened.— could have happened. have you manaued could have happened. have you managed to _ could have happened. have you managed to speak _ could have happened. have you managed to speak to _ could have happened. have you managed to speak to him? - could have happened. have you managed to speak to him? i - could have happened. have you i managed to speak to him? i know could have happened. have you - managed to speak to him? i know he is out of hospital and i'm sure there are a lot of people who will want to speak to him. i there are a lot of people who will
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want to speak to him.— there are a lot of people who will want to speak to him. i think it is very important — want to speak to him. i think it is very important we _ want to speak to him. i think it is very important we support - want to speak to him. i think it is very important we support him i want to speak to him. i think it is very important we support him in recovering. our communications team has been in touch, but it's really important this man is able to recover work from what must have been a horrific shop yesterday. irate been a horrific shop yesterday. we heard in terms of security the chief constable saying there is no direct threat, but they are stepping up police patrols to reassure people. yes, i've driven past the hospital this morning and there was plenty of police presence and visibility in the address at egg as well, and pretty sure to reassure the community that the police are doing everything they can to make sure we are all safe. everything they can to make sure we are all safe-— are all safe. and it seems the olice are all safe. and it seems the police operation _ are all safe. and it seems the police operation has - are all safe. and it seems the police operation has moved i are all safe. and it seems the i police operation has moved very quickly from what we hear. i police operation has moved very quickly from what we hear. i can't thank our emergency _ quickly from what we hear. i can't thank our emergency services - quickly from what we hear. i can't - thank our emergency services enough, you know, fire and police on the scene within minutes. arrests have been made. so quickly all day
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yesterday and overnight, working through the night with our emergency services, but also our own authorities. everyone is on standby ready to take action and give support wherever it is needed. 50 support wherever it is needed. so what is your role now? support wherever it is needed. so| what is your role now? obviously, support wherever it is needed. so i what is your role now? obviously, to ensure our— what is your role now? obviously, to ensure our residents _ what is your role now? obviously, to ensure our residents and _ what is your role now? obviously, to ensure our residents and give - what is your role now? obviously, to ensure our residents and give them l ensure our residents and give them information that they need and make sure everyone remains calm and answer queries or issues that they may have. make sure we do everything we can to follow the instructions that are given to us by the police on the counter terrorism unit. in on the counter terrorism unit. in terms of residence, we heard in the news conference that some in particular have been disrupted by the police operation. they said that eight households have been evacuated because of the searches they have been doing. i because of the searches they have been doing-— been doing. i was aware that we rovided been doing. i was aware that we provided some _ been doing. i was aware that we provided some hotel— been doing. i was aware that we i provided some hotel accommodation last night. most people are able to go about with their business today in the city and as you are aware from the press conference, the police are doing everything they can
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to keep us all safe. fine police are doing everything they can to keep us all safe.— to keep us all safe. one of the thins to keep us all safe. one of the things obviously _ to keep us all safe. one of the things obviously that - to keep us all safe. one of the things obviously that we i to keep us all safe. one of the things obviously that we can i to keep us all safe. one of the i things obviously that we can take on a positive senses thatjust to look at how it could have been. the concerns around the fact that as you said this morning it could have been a worse situation we were looking at. it a worse situation we were looking at. ., , �* , ., ~' a worse situation we were looking at. ., ,�* ,., ,, at. it doesn't bear thinking about and what heroic _ at. it doesn't bear thinking about and what heroic effort _ at. it doesn't bear thinking about and what heroic effort from i at. it doesn't bear thinking about and what heroic effort from the l at. it doesn't bear thinking about i and what heroic effort from the taxi driver and quick thinking to lock the taxi and get out of the taxi. the mayor of liverpool, joanna december. the only trotters in liverpool at the hospital where the explosion happened. what liverpool at the hospital where the explosion happened.— explosion happened. what is happening — explosion happened. what is happening there _ explosion happened. what is happening there now? i explosion happened. what is happening there now? we i explosion happened. what is. happening there now? we can explosion happened. what is i happening there now? we can see investigation _ happening there now? we can see investigation is _ happening there now? we can see investigation is continuing - happening there now? we can see investigation is continuing very i investigation is continuing very much here at the site. dozens of officers patrolling the area and a mobile indications unit has been set “p mobile indications unit has been set up in the grounds. we understand the car itself, the centre of that explosion isjust car itself, the centre of that explosion is just behind that yellow police van. investigation centred
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around that, of course a lot of forensic evidence would have been destroyed in that blaze. also, police activity centred in two separate residential areas of the city, as we heard during that news conference, that we were playing earlier. one of those areas is the kensington area. that is where three men were arrested yesterday under the terrorism act. all three of them in their 205. we have also learned today that another man in his 205 was arrested in the kensington area. a second addre55 was arrested in the kensington area. a second address in the sefton park area, the police have told us, significant items have been found there. that is where trained negotiators were seen on the street last night. police have also told us that further searches will be continuing their today, and potentially in the coming days,
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eight families have been from their homes while investigations continue there. of course, we have learned about these further arrests. we know this is being treated as a terror incident. the question still remains as to why this happened here at liverpool women's hospital. that is something that they are still working on. they are also asking questions about why this sudden explosion. of course, it happened just one minute before 11 o'clock. people gathering for the silence on remembrance sunday, so probe questions have been raised about that. the anglican cathedral not far from liverpool women's hospital here and officers investigating the incident says they can't draw any connection between that and the explosion itself but it is a line of enquiry. thank you very much, fiona.
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let's go to nick old joining me now is nick aldworth, former counter terrorism national co—ordinator. what will be what will he being done to ascertain how the device was made, what was in it and try to pick who may have been involved? , ., ., ., , ., , involved? first of all, as it has already been _ involved? first of all, as it has already been indicated - involved? first of all, as it has already been indicated in i involved? first of all, as it has already been indicated in the l involved? first of all, as it has i already been indicated in the news media, bomb disposal experts will have examined the scene to ensure it is safe, and from there they would have probably taken an initial view of what that device was. certainly from having just seen the explosion myself, i think there are a couple of assumptions that might be drawn around that which is one, that it was a low yield explosive, possibly an intent chanel ee incendiary device, or much greater explosive that i have failed to detonate. i'm
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sure the taxi driver feels very differently. as to it being a small powered explosion. it is differently. as to it being a small powered explosion.— differently. as to it being a small powered explosion. it is time for us to say goodbye _ powered explosion. it is time for us to say goodbye to — powered explosion. it is time for us to say goodbye to anybody - powered explosion. it is time for us | to say goodbye to anybody watching on bbc two. thank you for coming on good afternoon. sorry about that, nick. if you don't mind picking up on where you wear.— nick. if you don't mind picking up on where you wear. sure. despite the intense fire — on where you wear. sure. despite the intense fire following _ on where you wear. sure. despite the intense fire following on _ on where you wear. sure. despite the intense fire following on from - on where you wear. sure. despite the intense fire following on from that i intense fire following on from that explosion, there are likely to be residual items of evidence, for example if the device was built with shrapnel all of that will have survived, nuts and bolts which with the pass exposes of 2017, cutlery. there may well be other evidence. certainly what we found, post the
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manchester arena bombing was evidence of what chemicals had been used to make the device, and from those you can conclude what the size of that device would have been and from that you can also conclude whether there are any devices that are outstanding. all that will be done as a matter of priority. alongside intelligent work to ascertain whether it was individuals alone or others.— ascertain whether it was individuals alone or others. when you said there are a couple — alone or others. when you said there are a couple of— alone or others. when you said there are a couple of assumptions - alone or others. when you said there are a couple of assumptions on the i are a couple of assumptions on the scale of the device, it could have been a low yield explosive or something bigger that failed to detonate, there was that fire, so evenif detonate, there was that fire, so even if it did not detonate initially, would there be an expectation that the fire would have led to any explosives they're going off. in other words, led to any explosives they're going off. in otherwords, it led to any explosives they're going off. in other words, it would indicate that it was on the smaller scale of device. hat indicate that it was on the smaller scale of device.— scale of device. not necessarily. some of their _
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scale of device. not necessarily. some of their home-made i scale of device. not necessarily. some of their home-made high | some of their home—made high explosives are quite unstable and they can react either way, actually. they can actually be detonated relatively easily and because the scale of explosion that they were intended to cause, or they can just burn and viewers will perhaps recall some of the footage from the failed parsons green attack in 2017 where the device failed to detonate properly but they continued to burn away after the initial flash. properly but they continued to burn away after the initialflash. of course, there is a lot inside the vehicle that is flammable as well, and it may well have brought more than one form of device, may be more ricks events with them. and what we don't know at the moment what their motive is and the attentions of the incident actually was. it is motive is and the attentions of the incident actually was.— incident actually was. it is now officially been _ incident actually was. it is now officially been declared - incident actually was. it is now officially been declared a i incident actually was. it is now i officially been declared a terrorism incident. it took a little bit of time. is thatjust normal procedure? i think what commonly happens as you
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start treating wit it is a terrorism incident to start with because it is much easier to scale down an investigation once it has started rather than to scale up. you want to be producing evidence. they are quite wise by to not declaring it to be something they are not sure about. when the attacker or person seemingly responsible for creating this as died, you have probably got fairly low level of intelligence and information with which to start. so they will have been exploring that picture over the last 2a hours, working on developing their intelligence picture and what they know trying to figure out what their motivations for it might actually be. , ., ., , motivations for it might actually be. , ., ., be. investigators obviously have a very helpful _ be. investigators obviously have a very helpful witnessing _ be. investigators obviously have a very helpful witnessing that - be. investigators obviously have a very helpful witnessing that the i very helpful witnessing that the other person in the car, the taxi driver who had been called to an address to take the passenger to the hospital, survived, which is
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extraordinary. he was in the car when that device into off and managed to get off. i when that device into off and managed to get off.— when that device into off and managed to get off. i can't imagine how horrific — managed to get off. i can't imagine how horrific that _ managed to get off. i can't imagine how horrific that must _ managed to get off. i can't imagine how horrific that must have - managed to get off. i can't imagine how horrific that must have been i how horrific that must have been for the gentleman concerned. he has responded in the way that we as the great british public to respond and it is interesting to reflect on so much of our in information intelligence before events come to the public witnesses. 10,000 pieces of information come to a counterterrorism police every year. the fifth of them we can't use. a key message to everybody out there is to be vigilant and be risked supporting the things that we see and feel uncomfortable about. we are moving towards christmas which is traditionally a time where we run a vigilance campaign and clearly yesterday's incident i hope is sharpened peoples memories about these things happening. an attack is likely, the second attack in weeks
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as we move towards christmas. people need to be vigilant and report what they see and never forget that if you do find yourself caught up in something like this, just as the taxi driver has done, is to run, hide and tell.— hide and tell. the police news conference, _ hide and tell. the police news conference, they _ hide and tell. the police news conference, they said - hide and tell. the police news conference, they said several| hide and tell. the police news - conference, they said several times it is not clear what the motivation is. it's obviously not known either whether this person acted alone. how easy or otherwise is it for somebody to have the wherewithal to get an explosive device together like this without any help?— without any help? unfortunately, there is a lot _ without any help? unfortunately, there is a lot of _ without any help? unfortunately, there is a lot of advice _ without any help? unfortunately, there is a lot of advice on - without any help? unfortunately, there is a lot of advice on the - there is a lot of advice on the internet for making all manner of explosive items, firearms to bombs. we know from historic attacks that simple chemicals that are bought for domestic purposes can be used to make explosive devices, but over
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time the authorities have become very good at managing suspicious purposes of such materials. if we go back to the days of the 70s in the 80s in the 90s and the ira bombings and the really large explosive devices, thousands of pounds of explosive devices using farm fertilisers, there are no rules around storage of such items so they don't fall into the wrong hands. the same is true now and some of the more common chemicals but not exclusively so. some of the other explosive bombs, what we have seen as it has taken a number of people to go by small volumes to bring them togetherfor to go by small volumes to bring them together for a to go by small volumes to bring them togetherfor a much higher volumes. together for a much higher volumes. thank togetherfor a much higher volumes. thank you very much forjoining us.
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more developments in the yorkshire racism story. with england's adil rashid issuing a statement backing up his former team—mate azeem rafiq's claim that he heard michael vaughan make a racist coment. rafiq, seen here, has alleged vaughan told him and a group of asian players in 2009 "there are too many of you lot, we need to do something about it." michael vaughan says he "completely and categorically denies the allegation." in a statement, he said he could confirm rafiq's version of events — rashid is now the third player to claim he heard it, though a fourth , ajmal shahzad, previously said he had no recollection. rashid went on to say he's encouraged by the fact a parliamentary committee is now looking into the matter. that committee meets tomorrow. after being sacked as aston villa manager little over a week ago, dean smith is back in the premier league — he's the new man in charge at norwich.
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he is replacing daniel farke who was sacked just a day before smith lost his job at villa. smith has called it a whirlwind seven days. his first game in charge will be at home to southampton on saturday. but how excited are norwich fans? i've been speaking to jack reeve from the talk norwich city podcast. yeah, really excited about him. he comes with a proven track record and thatis comes with a proven track record and that is really exciting for norwich city funds. the work he has done as walsall, brentford and most recently aston villa, he has left the club and a better position than when he took over. that is all you can ask from the coach. that is what our sporting director is aware of. he tried to recruit him when he was at huddersfield but it didn't work. he has finally got his man now. he brings fresh ideas. this is an exciting time for norwich city. and england should secure their place at next year's world cup finals in qatar later when they face san marino. they need just a point from tonight's game to qualify as group winners.
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harry kane will be keen to start — he is just nine goals short of wayne rooney's all time england goalscoring record. scotland are also in action tonight against denmark, with a place in the play offs already guaranteed. northern ireland play too, at home to the european champions italy. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. borisjohnson has acknowledged that his handling of the row about the former conservative mp owen paterson could have been "better". the issue returns to the commons today, as a growing number of mps face criticism about their conduct. the government tried to block mr paterson s suspension ten days ago, then backed down. he's since resigned as an mp, but denied any wrongdoing. joining me now is dr liz david—barrett, director of the centre for the study of corruption. at the university of sussex, she also advises the committee on standards. thank you forjoining us.
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later, the commons will effectively be asked to turn back the clock, to overturn the vote that was to set up the new standards process, and also to approve the new standards committee report on owen paterson. what did that process unleash? figs what did that process unleash? sis you what did that process unleash? is you said, this tidies up a piece of parliamentary business that was left hanging by the amendment and the government u—turn on that. in a sense, this is a vote of confidence in the existing system and in the way that the owen paterson case was handled by the standards committee and the committee on standards. obviously, it was a u—turn, but when you talk about it now as being a vote of confidence in the system, how does that square with what happened previously, and does it and do any of the damage? i happened previously, and does it and do any of the damage?— do any of the damage? i think there are definitely _ do any of the damage? i think there are definitely many _ do any of the damage? i think there are definitely many implications - do any of the damage? i think there are definitely many implications of i are definitely many implications of the fact there was a u—turn, but this puts in place some vote of confidence and legitimacy of the
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existing system for that decision, but also in terms of going forward. the standards committee is also reviewing the conduct and the whole system at the moment. it puts back a little bit more confidence in that system. having said that, there are a lot of implications over the way the government handled this process. it really looked like it was trying to change the rules in the middle of the game as it were.— the game as it were. since then, a lot of sleaze _ the game as it were. since then, a lot of sleaze stories _ the game as it were. since then, a lot of sleaze stories have - the game as it were. since then, a lot of sleaze stories have emerged that have previously been looked at or looked at again or other things have been looked at under the microscope. we have borisjohnson wallpaper holidays, and how many mps have second jobs. contracts that have second jobs. contracts that have been given without tender. these are all things that have been looked at but have been looked at more closely since what happened. do you think going forward, when you talk of the vote of confidence in the existing system which is something you looked at, there is
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much that can be salvaged or does everything need to be looked at again? i everything need to be looked at auain? ~ ., .,, everything need to be looked at auain? ~ ., , again? i think what has been exposed as a pattern — again? i think what has been exposed as a pattern of _ again? i think what has been exposed as a pattern of transactional- as a pattern of transactional relationships which look like corruption. owen paterson's original misconduct in abusing his position to lobby for companies that were paying him as something that was certainly problematic. we seen evidence of party members giving peerages in response to donations to the conservative party. even in the past year or two, some favourable government decisions the particular party donors. then we have the procurement contracts. so i think what this is done is coalesce attention around the whole phenomenon that has previously looked like just a set of transactions and patterns. 50 looked like just a set of transactions and patterns. so what should the mechanism _ transactions and patterns. so what should the mechanism for - transactions and patterns. so whatj should the mechanism for deciding what mps are allowed to do and what the rules governing government
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behaviour should be going forward? mps in particular, the parliamentary standards committee is carrying out a review and is due to report very soon. that will provide a moment to look at those rules see what problems do see up to the surface based on the wide consultation and information gathering from the experts. but also from recent events, i think they can now be factored in. more broadly, some of theseissues factored in. more broadly, some of these issues are not about parliamentary standards but other aspects of the system. so meetings and public life are different body. recommendations about how we regulate appointments that ministers and mps go to after leaving office when they get to work in the private sector, appointments to public bodies and keeping and making sure they stay independent, and also being more transparent about lobbying and meetings between ministers and civil servants and businesses. so actually there is a whole lot of work that has been done in the background here, and what we
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have seen now as there is some interest from the public in trying to make sure the systems are robust, and a real urgency to get this one is in place. and a real urgency to get this one is in place-— and a real urgency to get this one is in lace. ., ~ ,, , . ., is in place. thank you very much for 'oinin: is in place. thank you very much for joining us- — is in place. thank you very much for joining us- we _ is in place. thank you very much for joining us. we have _ is in place. thank you very much for joining us. we havejust _ is in place. thank you very much for joining us. we havejust heard - is in place. thank you very much for joining us. we have just heard that| joining us. we havejust heard that borisjohnson is going to be chairing an emergency cobra meeting this afternoon in response to the terror attack at liverpool women's hospital in downing street. that will be happening this afternoon. now, a time for a time for a look at the weather. mild for november in some outbreaks of rain out there today. that will be the story for the next few days. mild, quite a lot of cloud around, but a lot of dry weather on the cards as well. a few spots of drizzly light rain through the afternoon, spots of northern england and wales, is adding and two. that isjust a week and wales, is adding and two. that is just a week rent that is fiddling orfiddling away to
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is just a week rent that is fiddling or fiddling away to the rest of the day. 1213 degrees to the north west, 12 degrees or so and some sunshine for scotland and northern ireland. into the evening hours, quite a lot of pride for the bulk of england and wales. the odd spot of drizzle around. where we get the clear spells on the east, there will be a bit of messiness and perhaps a touch of frost in the most rural spots, but mostly thrust free to start the day tomorrow. quite breezy here, followed by sunshine and showers. quite a bit of pride for england and wales, but some brighter spells and top temperatures ten to 13 celsius.
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hello, this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines: an explosion outside liverpool women's hospital on remembrance sunday is declared a terror incident by police. borisjohnson has praised the brave
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liverpool taxi driver — named locally as david perry — after his efforts to limit the impact of an explosion in his vehicle yesterday. borisjohnson will chair an emergency cobra meeting this afternoon. meanwhile, the prime minister has been visiting a gp surgery as government advisers recommend the covid—19 vaccine booster programme should be extended to include healthy a0 to a9—year—olds and 16 and 17—year—olds should come forward for a second dose. a report by mps has found "serious failings" including avoidable deaths — in the care for patients with sickle cell disease in england. there have been assurances there will "definitely" be enough turkeys for christmas after fears there could be a shortage. the government's vaccine advisers say everyone over 40s should be offered a booster dose of a coronavirus vaccine. thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation says a third jab would top up protection and help limit the spread of the virus overwinter.
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they've also advised that 16 and 17 year olds, who were initially offered only a single dose, should now get a second. chair of thejcvi, professor wei shen lim, announced the two updates to the vaccine programme. the first update relates to the booster programme. could i have the first slide, please? just as a reminder, the current advice in the booster programme is that persons aged over 50 years, those adults in a clinical at—risk group, front line health and social care workers and close contacts of persons who are immunosuppressed should have a booster vaccine six months following completion of their primary course, essentially, have a third vaccine dose six months after the second dose. can i have the next slide, please? we are advising today that the booster programme is extended to
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as previously, the booster dose is advised six months after the second dose, and either the pfizer biontech vaccine or the moderna vaccine can be used as the booster dose, regardless of the type of vaccine received for the first two doses in the primary course. you may remember that in early august we advised a first dose of the pfizer biontech vaccine for 16 and 17—year—olds who do not have an underlying health condition that puts them at higher risk from severe covid—19. we said at the time and would review the data and that a second dose may well be advised, and that is indeed the case. we have reviewed the recent information regarding the safety and benefits of a second dose, and we are advising that 16
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and 17—year—olds who have had a first dose of the pfizer biontech vaccine be offered a second dose of the pfizer biontech vaccine. as a reminder, the first vaccine dose gives a high level of protection against serious disease, and that high level of protection we know lasts for at least 12—16 weeks. the second dose, nonetheless, reinforces that protection from the first dose and it is important in extending the duration of protection, not just for the winter months and christmas, but we are also looking into 2022 and beyond. following that announcement, the scottish government has confirmed that people in scotland aged between a0 and 50 will be able to get a booster dose of the covid—19 vaccine. young people aged 16 and 17 years old will also be eligible for a second dose of the vaccine. and wales will also follow the advice released by thejcvi to extend the booster vaccination programme to the over—40s and offer a second dose to 16 to 17—year—olds
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not in the "at risk" group. the prime minister welcomed this latest advice on boosterjabs. mrjohnson highlighted the need for everyone to get vaccinated in the first place. i think it is very good news that the jcvi has today authorised the booster to be rolled out to everybody 40—plus. when you look at what is happening in the pandemic at the moment, just hearing in europe that sadly there are people in icu who are suffering badly from covid—19, and they are all the unvaccinated. what is happening is that if you can get your booster, then your immunity goes right back up to 95%. so far, we have got 75% of everybody over 70 getting a booster. that is a huge number of people, but it is that further 25% that will make all the difference to the winter, to christmas,
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to our plans going forward, because it is that extra level of protection that we really need. so the message is, anybody over 70, come forward and get your booster, anybody over 50 come forward and get your booster and from the next week or so, anybody over a0 come forward and get your booster. last year you had to introduce last—minute restrictions at christmas. if we don't see this happening, could we see restrictions again? we don't see anything in the data at the moment to suggest we need to go to plan b. we are sticking with plan a, but we certainly have got to recognise that there is a storm of infection out there in parts of europe. you can see those numbers ticking up very sharply in some
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of our continental friends, and we have just got to recognise that there is always a risk that a blizzard could come from the east again as the months get colder. the best protection for our country is everybody to go forward and get their booster. some breaking news. a number of children have been taken to hospital after a ceiling collapsed at a school in dulwich, london fire brigade said about 20 firefighters were called to the school about 22 minutes past nine after a ceiling collapsed in the second floor. a number of people were treated on the scene for minor injuries and a number of people taken to hospital and london ambulance saying the situation was over by 11 o'clock. major improvements in the care for sickle cell patients in england is being called for, after "serious failings", including avoidable deaths,
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were identified in an inquiry. the report by a cross—party group of mp's found there was evidence of substandard levels of care and a lack of awareness of the condition amongst staff. here 5 our community affairs correspondent adina campbell. a life cut short caused by failures in his care. he was a loving and charming guy. he always wanted to help people. he was a very clever and brilliant boy. 21—year—old evan smith developed sepsis after having a gall bladder stent removed. he also lived with sickle cell disease and experienced a painful episode while in hospital in london known as a sickle cell crisis. a coroner ruled he may have survived if he was offered a blood transfusion sooner. things were happening so fast. he was scared... i mean, i could imagine the state he was in, and each time i think of it it's something else. i can't believe we just
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lost him like that. evan smith's death was the cause of this new report. it found a number of serious concerns, including substandard care for sickle cell patients admitted on general wards or in a&e. inadequate training among health care staff. and racism experienced by some patients. people living with sickle—cell feel there is inequality in the way that they are being treated here. no—one wants to put one community above anyone else. but they do want equality in treatment. and right now with sickle—cell, we don't have that. nhs england says it has overhauled the way treatment is delivered to patients, with ten new centres for sickle cell disease being set up across the country. sickle—cell patients live with long—term, often excruciating pain. it's an inherited condition from both parents, predominantly affecting people with african or caribbean heritage. and that's why some senior health
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campaigners feel it is not given the attention it deserves. if these failures affected the general anglo—saxon population, there would be an outcry. there would be an outcry and an immediate we must do something about this. and what we are saying is that this has gone on far too long for people who live with sickle—cell and action, and urgent action must be taken now. the report has made a number of recommendations, including more funding for sickle cell research, and better training for health care staff to help save lives and avoid painful tragic deaths. adina campbell, bbc news. sources have told the bbc that the government will ditch the eastern leg of hs2 between birmingham and leeds. the department for transport will announce an update on the rail plan on thursday.
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we can talk now to gareth dennis now we have had cop26 reaching a close, the only way we're going to achieve our targets by 2050 is to build hs2 and develop northern powerhouse rhyl. and develop northern powerhouse rh l. . , , rhyl. railway. this is partly the roblem rhyl. railway. this is partly the problem with — rhyl. railway. this is partly the problem with people _ rhyl. railway. this is partly the problem with people thinking . rhyl. railway. this is partly the l problem with people thinking h52 problem with people thinking hs2 it's all about speeds and journey times. in actualfact it's all about speeds and journey times. in actual fact it is the least important part of hs2, the most important part is you get the fast trains of the existing network and free up more capacity for regional and local services and
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freight. so a big hit.— regional and local services and freight. so a big hit. what about what the government _ freight. so a big hit. what about what the government says - freight. so a big hit. what aboutj what the government says it will freight. so a big hit. what about. what the government says it will do instead which is upgrading existing lines and looking at her tram system to leeds, will that mitigated? leads has been needing _ to leeds, will that mitigated? leads has been needing a _ to leeds, will that mitigated? leads has been needing a mass _ to leeds, will that mitigated? li—r" has been needing a mass transit system for decades and it was promised one which was cancelled and another one which was cancelled. suggesting this is somehow a replacement for massive improvements in regional services are just false. upgrading railway lines is fundamentally the discussion we have been having and all the arguments about hs2 its why do we not upgrade the existing rail network? hs2 should be an upgrade. if you look at the west coast main it was upgraded in the 2000 is between in today's money 15 million to £20 billion and those benefits were absorbed within
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three years. we have these mixtures of fast and slow trains, stopping and nonstop services alljumbled together and you do not get the best of capacity. the best railway is where you have it dedicated to doing the same thing so an existing network get rid of the fast trains that force everything to get on the way and put them on other lines and on the existing network you get more local and regional services. you may get similar levels ofjourney local and regional services. you may get similar levels of journey time but with the current proposal is the real capacity in the east midlands and north will be worse when this line opens then it is now. —— rail. our political correspondent nick eardley has said that the government will argue the new plans will give better
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access to the high—speed network to people outside major cities and the source said the package would deliver a quicker and cheaper programme including the upgrades to existing lines and the source said the plans which show an enormous amount of common sense and mentioning that tram service for leeds. you were shaking your head. common sense is not a replacement for steel rails on a piece of infrastructure dedicated to improving capacity across the whole country. i am afraid the line being fed by governmentjust does not match the engineering and planning reality. the idea this is anything other than a consolation and a massive reduction in rail capacity, the government is bandying about the £100 billion figure which is all projects previously announced and i look forward to seeing anything new in the government announcement that all of it is stuff previously announced the government appears to
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be reneging on. it is very disappointing in the levelling up agenda at the government consciously talk about, the point of hs2 his the new services, not the hs2, the chance of regional connections into cities like nottingham and derby and leicester and mansfield, places like newark and grantham and peterfor —— peterborough not to mention places like doncaster and sheffield and leeds, hs2 enables many more services and if you do not build a new segregated infrastructure you just don't get those benefits in those cities.— just don't get those benefits in those cities. ., ,, , ., , . those cities. thank you very much for 'oinin: those cities. thank you very much forjoining us- _ the headlines on bbc news:
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an explosion outside liverpool women's hospital on remembrance sunday is declared a terror incident by police. the actions of the liverpool taxi driver, named locally as david perry, have been hailed by the prime minister. borisjohnson will chair an emergency cobra meeting this afternoon. meanwhile, the prime minister has been visiting a gp surgery as government advisers recommend the covid—19 vaccine booster programme should be extended to include healthy a0 to a9—year—olds and 16 and 17—year—olds should come forward for a second dose. several hundred migrants have moved from a camp in belarus to one of the main border crossings into poland, causing a tense stand—off with border guards. the migrants, who spent more than a week in freezing temperatures, said they would not turn back. as the crisis escalates, eu foreign ministers have been planning further sanctions against belarus, which may also target airlines. they could also be extended to include anybody helping migrants move through belarus to the eu border. earlier we spoke to our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg, who is in bruzgi, on the border
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between poland and belarus. tense scenes this morning in the migrant camp on the belarusian — polish border. hundreds of migrants have just pushed their way through the gate right up to the checkpoint here on the belarusian side of the border. from what we saw, belarusian forces made no attempt at all to stop them. as you can see, there are hundreds here. they are sitting down, they are determined to get what they want, in other words to be allowed into poland and into the european union. and so you have this stand—off, the migrants on one side, and on the other side of the razor wire the lines of polish police, polish troops. there is a polish helicopter monitoring the situation. i think this is a water cannon here, and we have been hearing in the last few minutes announcements from polish forces telling
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people to obey orders. it is quite a tense situation here. now, the european union has been saying all along that belarus is using these migrants as a political weapon, encouraging people to come to belarus, facilitating illegal migration to europe to put pressure on the european union. that is something that the belarusian authorities deny. but we know that the eu is about to announce more sanctions on belarus. alexander lukashenko says he will respond. and as i say, this hasjust happened minutes ago. this flood of migrants from the camp just up the road right up to the razor wire here. and it is unclear how this is going to end. we are just hearing, you mentioned sanctions, we are just hearing that ursula von der leyen has said the eu will sanction airlines that support transport of migrants. so the details just coming through.
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she says there will be further sanctions on belarus this afternoon. so, some detail coming through. more later, it looks like. it is extraordinary to see these scenes where you are. it looks pretty peaceful at the moment. but obviously, as we are hearing, the backdrop to this is very tense indeed and the stakes are very high. yes, absolutely. we were in the camp last night and lots of people were coming up to us and saying, "what's the news? when is poland going to let us through? will the european union let us through?" there was a rumour swirling through the camp yesterday that on monday everything would be ok and the eu would open its doors to the migrants. there was no... nothing to actually prove that, but clearly tensions were running high. and this morning there has been a rush, a flood of people
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who after a week of living out in the cold here, have decided that this is the moment. and as i say, no evidence that they were being stopped here by the belarusian forces. quite the opposite. we saw soldiers standing around and just watching as the crowd came up to the razor wire. how long people will stay here, it's not clear, and it's not clear what action the polish forces are going to take. but poland has made it clear in recent days it is determined not to let the migrants through because it believes that belarus is using migrants to wage hybrid warfare, not only against poland but also against the european union. six months after a damning report into the bbc�*s handling of princess diana's1995 parorama interview, her brother
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says he believes there's "still more to come out". speaking to bbc breakfast, earl spencer said "big questions" remain, after former bbcjournalist martin bashir was found to have used "deceitful behaviour" to help secure her consent. he made the comments while showing sally nugent around the althorp estate, which is the subject of a new documentary. i've known forever that there was a lost village in the park here. that block around the tree, that's just not natural. there's always something new to find with this house and the park, there's so much history contained in these walls and we've just scraped the surface with this one. the archaeologists have uncovered evidence of an iron age roundhouse and now, where they thought there might be a buried road, they're finding signs of ancient earthworks.
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it's very historic. i reckon all of england was like this with so much underneath it. but so much has been developed or farmed that it's been lost. but because this park is unspoiled, it's still here. is it right that the crown wanted to use this as a location? they did, they applied, they wanted to shoot here. but i don't really do that stuff. so, yeah, these are all sort of members of the family here. down the bottom here is more generals and all that sort of thing. but it used to be an open courtyard this, in the tudor times. and are you constantly repairing it? yes, there's a lot going on. we are sitting here on this magnificent staircase, surrounded by lots of pairs of eyes looking at us. how aware of all of these people are you? i took over running this place 30 years ago when i was 27.
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and i remember when i first walked through here as the sort of nominal owner, as it were, i really was nervous. you look at these people, they've lived here many hundreds of years ago and i did feel, my goodness, they'rejudging how i'm going to play this hand. you were really young! i was really young but when you're 27 you don't know you are really young. there's a picture of you at the top of the staircase, what are you holding in your hand? so there's a painting of diana up there, which was painted by an american artist called nelson shanks and he came to view it in situ here. and then he said he'd like to do one of me and link the two together. so that's actually the notes i made when writing the eulogy for diana's funeral. it's several months now since the bbc was found to have been woefully inadequate in its handling of the interview that martin bashir did with your late sister, the princess of wales, at the time. now you've had some time to reflect on that and think about what happened, how do you feel about that finding?
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actually, lord dyson did a very good job. his brief was tiny, it was to look at a very specific area and there's still so much more to look at in the broader terms of who was responsible for what and how did it come to this? did documents get hidden from view and all sorts of really important stuff which is yet to come out. so i see the lord dyson report as a very welcome development, but there's still a very long way to go with this. how far is there to go, what more can be done? i've been doing quite a lot behind the scenes. but it's clear to me that there are certain people who were in the bbc who have behaved in a way that is truly abysmal and possibly criminal. how far can you take that now yourself, personally? that's the question and i've got people looking at that and we'll see. but it's not going to end now, i'm not saying that as some ugly
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threat, itjust can't stop here because there's still more to come out. when you look back on your childhood in this house, what are the things that stay in your mind now? this staircase, of course it's very grand, but for the children in my family it's where you can get a lot of speed up on a tray, coming down on it like a toboggan, really. no, i look in this hallway and i actually look forward to christmas. so in a month or so we will put up a christmas tree that's been grown especially on the estate each year. we do a very traditional english christmas here and it just looks right. in a moment, the bbc news at one with victoria derbyshire, but first it's time for a look at the weather with we have had a little rain this morning across some parts of the uk, particularly scotland and northern england. that way turning to
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fizzling out at most places still cloud out there, this is the picture in oxford earlier but it will brighten up in the north—west behind at this mornings rain. over the next few days this theme of quite mild weather was quite a bit of cloud and things looking largely dry because high pressure is dominating our weather. an area of high pressure towards the south—west and another towards the south—west and another towards the south—west and another towards the east. weather fronts trying to push on from the north—west but not making many inroads. this evening at the weak remnants of upfront, wrestle for northern england and wales and the west as well. clear skies for scotland and northern ireland are but a few showers through this evening and overnight. some clear spells for southern and eastern areas but a few spots of drizzle here and there across england and wales. overnight under clear skies at some places getting down to three degrees four degrees but most of us looking at a frost free start to tuesday morning. clear spells in the south and east and could be the odd patch of frost. tomorrow cloud
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moving in from the west will bring wet ear and windier weather to scotland and northern island. england and wales should stay largely dry it was perhaps a shout for east anglia and sunny spells behind the weaker weather front. across the far north of england during the afternoon. temperatures 10 degrees to 30 degrees and some sunshine for like of belfast in the afternoon. as that clear to the east are different air mass with us so a brief window of colder weather through the day on wednesday so i fresher feel to the weather but more sunshine compared to monday and tuesday. still a few showers working in on the breeze conditions for north and west of scotland and northern ireland. eastern scotland and england and wales should stay dry on wednesday and still not as mild as recent days but fresher than
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lately. the milder air returns by the end of the week so thursday and friday largely dry and cloudy and mild for this stage in november.
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police declare yesterday's explosion in a taxi at liverpool women's hospital a terrorist incident. they also say a fourth man has been arrested and will be questioned by counterterrorism officers today. we are able to confirm that this is being treated as the ignition of an explosive device. our enquiries also indicate that the device was brought into the cab by the passenger. we believe we know the identity of the passenger but we cannot confirm this at this time. meanwhile the taxi driver who escaped has been named locally as david perry. he's been described as a hero and praised by the prime minister. we'll bring you the latest from liverpool. also in the programme... the bbc is told the government will scrap plans for a high
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speed train line between the east midlands and leeds.

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