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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 15, 2021 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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it's 8.59. this is bbc news with the latest headlines. mi5 and counter—terrorism police are investigating yesterday's explosion in a taxi in liverpool yesterday — which killed one man. detectives from counter terrorism police north west have arrested three men following the explosion which happened just before 11am on remembrance sunday. after borisjohnson admits he could have handled the row involving owen paterson better — the debate about parliamentary standards returns to the commons today. and at 09.30 today we'll bring you a government covid—19 data briefing live here on the news channel. a report by mps finds "serious failings" including avoidable deaths in the care for patients with sickle
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cell disease in england. a lockdown in austria for anyone who hasn't been vaccinated against covid comes into force. a nine—year—old boy has died after being injured during a crowd surge at the astroworld festival in texas after panic broke out during the performance by the rapper travis scott. assurances there will "definitely" be enough turkeys for christmas after fears there could be a shortage. and norwich city — rooted at the bottom of the premier league — confirm former aston villa boss, dean smith as their new manager.
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hello and welcome to bbc news. the security service, mi5, has been called in to assist counter terrorism police investigating yesterday's car explosion outside a hospital in liverpool. one man has been killed and another injured in the incident. three men have been arrested under the terrorism act after several houses were evacuated in the city. the explosion happened just before 11am on remembrance sunday. james reynolds�* report contains flashing images. the police say they are working at speed to establish the circumstances of this, the car explosion just outside the liverpool women's hospital in central liverpool. it happened shortly before 11 o'clock yesterday morning, at a time when remembrance day services were about to begin across the country. the driver survived the blast. the passenger, who has not been named, was killed. unfortunately, i can confirm that one person has died and another has been taken to hospital, where he is being treated for his injuries, which, thankfully,
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are not life—threatening. so far we understand that the car involved was a taxi, which pulled up at the hospital shortly before the explosion occurred. in the kensington area of liverpool, around a mile from the explosion, three men, aged 21, 26 and 29, were arrested under the terrorism act. this gives the authorities the power to hold detainees for up to m days without charge. and late at night a number of homes in liverpool's rutland avenue and nearby cumberland avenue were evacuated. they're reported to be close to a house raided by the police in the hours after the incident. counter terrorism police north west are leading the overall investigation. they're supported by officers from merseyside police, and the security service, mi5, is also assisting. investigators say they're
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keeping an open mind as to what caused the explosion. james reynolds, bbc news. our correspondent andy gill is in liverpool for us now. what is the latest from there? liverpool women's hospital remains largely sealed off this morning. it is a large area with a big footprint with police tape all around the perimeter and police officers standing guard at regular intervals around the perimeter. visiting is restricted but appointments are going ahead but people driving and are having their cars checked by the police before they go in. police haven't issued any significant updates this morning but the labour mayor of liverpooljoanne anderson has told the bbc the actions of the driver have saved many lives. the taxi driver is thought to have been the person who ran into the hospital from the taxi shortly before the
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explosion, the passenger in the taxi was the one who sadly died at the scene. the hospital, one of three locations in liverpool where this investigation is centred. the other, as james�*s report mentioned, to the north of the city where three men were arrested and another about a mile south of here warehouses being searched and a number of homes were evacuated. some families had to go into emergency accommodation provided by liverpool council. counterterrorism officers are keeping an open mind about what lies behind this. but as we know, the explosion took place just before 11 o'clock, and that was the time across the country, but also in liverpool, where the city's remembrance service was about to take place at the anglican cathedral which is a short walk from this hospital, and it is unusualfor the remembrance service here to take place at that location. it normally takes place in the city centre but it couldn't this year because of roadworks. the home secretary priti patel is being kept up—to—date with
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events. a government minister has told the bbc this morning that this is an emerging situation. merseyside police so people can expect to see more patrols and more officers on the street in liverpool today as part of a reassurance plan. thank you very much. let's get more now from our security correspondent frank. as has been indicated from what we were hearing there, so many questions yet to be answered and a swift police operation under way. yeah, there are essentially three bodies involved in the investigation, merseyside police, counter terrorism police north west leading the investigation, they are being supported by the security service mi5 which james mentioned. there are a number of different strands they are going down with this. one of the first lines of inquiry would normally be any forensic evidence that can be gathered from the scene of the explosion. that is going to be much harder to do because as you have
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seen from the pictures fire very quickly engulfed the taxi so there was this initial explosion, it seemed, which caused the driver to run out of the vehicle and it then simply caught fire. that would have destroyed a lot of the explosive residue that you would normally expect to be examined by the forensic explosives laboratory technicians. there may well be other forensic evidence they can gather from other locations in the city. but that bit is going to be harder. mis will but that bit is going to be harder. mi5 will be looking at their known list of suspects who could possibly be in any way connected to this. but they are not giving away anything at they are not giving away anything at the moment on this. they are unlikely to say anything publicly. counterterrorism policing do have a lot of resources at their disposal. there will be a lot of digital investigations going on into this, looking at any phone calls, any spikes in conversations. so far, they are keeping a completely open mind, as you heard, about what is the motivation behind this. yes,
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internationaljihad is in, or terrorism, is one of the lines but only one of the lines they are looking at and they are not coming down on one side or the other, not ruling it out or in at the moment which is frustrating for us because we are looking for answers but they are not giving them yet. —— jihadism. are not giving them yet. -- jihadism— are not giving them yet. -- 'ihadism. ,, , ., ~ , ., ., ~ jihadism. studio: thank you, frank. we can report _ jihadism. studio: thank you, frank. we can report that _ jihadism. studio: thank you, frank. we can report that the _ jihadism. studio: thank you, frank. we can report that the taxi _ jihadism. studio: thank you, frank. we can report that the taxi driver - we can report that the taxi driver has been named locally as david perry, that is all we have at the moment that he has been named locally as david perry. but we heard from our reporter at the scene that the mayor of liverpool has said that his actions may have saved many lives, that he ran into the hospital, locked the car behind him and that was when the explosion happened. let's go to baroness pauline neville—jones, former home office minister responsible for security and counterterrorism. thank you forjoining us. picking up from what frank was saying about the fact
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that there is an investigation that is being led by three strands, there, the counterterrorism police and mi5 also advising. how closely will they be working together? tell us more about how that operation will be being handled behind—the—scenes. will be being handled behind-the-scenes. , , behind-the-scenes. they will be workinu behind-the-scenes. they will be working closely _ behind-the-scenes. they will be working closely together, - behind-the-scenes. they will be working closely together, in - behind-the-scenes. they will be | working closely together, in fact, they will in effect be pulling most of the information they hold and their resources to use them efficiently. their preoccupation will be, i think, at an early stage to try to establish whether this man was acting alone or whether he had associates. very few people act entirely alone so the likelihood is there are associates somewhere. that means possibly on the basis of prior information, about people in whom they have an interest in the city, they have an interest in the city, they will be targets of interest
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now. we don't know whether the arrests that have been made are precautionary, or whether they are based on good information. all of this is speculative. but clearly, knowing the extent of the activity, the potential activity, is a very, very important part of the early investigation. apart from anything else, the authorities need to try and establish as best as they can whether there is likely to be any follow—up, or whether this is an incident which, in my view, probably went wrong, which is now closed and that will greatly determine the level of activity going forward. find level of activity going forward. and the fact that _ level of activity going forward. and the fact that this operation is being conducted under counterterrorism powers. what difference does that make in terms of the powers the authorities have here? figs of the powers the authorities have here? �* , ~ . ~ of the powers the authorities have here? �* , ~ ., ~ .,, of the powers the authorities have here? �* , ~ ., ~ , here? as i think frank has 'ust said, here? as i think frank has 'ust said. mi here? as i think frank hasjust said, under counterterrorism l said, under counterterrorism legislation the police have up to ia days when they can hold people while
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they investigate before they are obliged to charge or release someone. so that gives them scope which they wouldn't have under normal arrest powers. that's an important feature of the scene. if they establish this had nothing to do with terrorism, then of course their powers will have to follow normal lines. but i think that is certainly as things stand at the moment they are fully entitled to regard this as being a potential terrorist incident.— regard this as being a potential terrorist incident. when we hear the ma or of terrorist incident. when we hear the mayor of liverpool _ terrorist incident. when we hear the mayor of liverpool saying _ terrorist incident. when we hear the mayor of liverpool saying the - mayor of liverpool saying the actions of the taxi driver may have saved many lives, it brings home what we could have been looking at here. �* , , ~' what we could have been looking at here. absolutely. i think possibly the one conclusion _ here. absolutely. i think possibly the one conclusion one _ here. absolutely. i think possibly the one conclusion one can - here. absolutely. i think possibly the one conclusion one can draw| here. absolutely. i think possibly i the one conclusion one can draw at the one conclusion one can draw at the moment is that the likelihood that, with whatever motivation and whoever is involved, the likelihood that their target was to blow up a taxi in a car park, i think that is pretty negligible. so i do think that this operation, whoever has conducted it, probably went wrong,
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and it does look as if we owe a great deal to the quick wickedness and the savvy of the taxi driver, in which case he may have saved many lives. . ~ which case he may have saved many lives. ., ~' , ., , . lives. thank you very much, dame pauline neville-jones. _ lives. thank you very much, dame pauline neville-jones. just - lives. thank you very much, dame pauline neville-jones. just to - pauline neville—jones. just to repeat that we can report that the taxi driver has been named locally as david perry. borisjohnson has acknowledged that his handling of the row about the former conservative mp owen paterson could have been "better". the issue returns to the commons later, as a growing number of mps face criticism about their conduct. the government tried to block mr paterson's suspension ten days ago, then backed down. he's since resigned as an mp, but denied any wrongdoing. let's speak now to adam fleming, our chief political correspondent what happens today in the commons, adam? , ., ., ., ., adam? there is emotion in front of mps today which _ adam? there is emotion in front of mps today which basically - adam? there is emotion in front of mps today which basically signifies | mps today which basically signifies the end of the big government u—turn over this affair. it would censure
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owen paterson, it would approve the standards committee report that found he was guilty of egregious breaches of parliamentary rules when it came to lobbying the government on behalf of his private sector employers. it would also put to bed that new committee that was established to look at investigating changes to the rules in the standards process, perhaps introducing an appeals process. it is the last piece of the u—turn. it may get nodded through without a vote and there may not be time for it even to be debated, which i imagine would be a bit of a relief to the conservative party because it means the very visible divisions between conservative mps over this issue will not be visible potentially tonight. although to the opposition parties who want to make this another moment in the saga, we will have to wait until the close of parliamentary proceedings, which could be as late as ten o'clock tonight to see. in terms of the politics, i think no 10 will be hoping that thisjust
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politics, i think no 10 will be hoping that this just draws a line under the whole episode and the prime minister has now gone further than he has gone before to say that the government could have handled it a bit better. that was the message echoed this morning by the conservative party co—chair oliver dowden. in conservative party co-chair oliver dowden. , , . conservative party co-chair oliver dowden. ,, . i. conservative party co-chair oliver dowden. ,, . , ., dowden. in essence if you listen to what the prime _ dowden. in essence if you listen to what the prime minister _ dowden. in essence if you listen to what the prime minister has - dowden. in essence if you listen to what the prime minister has said, l dowden. in essence if you listen to i what the prime minister has said, he has said _ what the prime minister has said, he has said we — what the prime minister has said, he has said we have made mistakes and we regret— has said we have made mistakes and we regret that. we have accepted that and _ we regret that. we have accepted that and we are moving on. that's exactly— that and we are moving on. that's exactly what you are seeing with the motion _ exactly what you are seeing with the motion before parliament today, accepting — motion before parliament today, accepting that, accepting the censure _ accepting that, accepting the censure of owen paterson. but equally _ censure of owen paterson. but equally i — censure of owen paterson. but equally i really think what people want. _ equally i really think what people want, and i don't want to speak for your viewers, they can make their own ntinde— your viewers, they can make their own minds up, but many of the conversations i have as party chairman, _ conversations i have as party chairman, people are saying they want _ chairman, people are saying they want the — chairman, people are saying they want the government to be focused on the job— want the government to be focused on the job at— want the government to be focused on the job at hand. get on with the joh _ the job at hand. get on with the joh get — the job at hand. get on with the joh get on _ the job at hand. get on with the job. get on with what we voted you to do— job. get on with what we voted you to do and _ job. get on with what we voted you to do and sent to you to westminster for. to do and sent to you to westminster for~ that's _ to do and sent to you to westminster for. that's why i'm so hardened with the progress — for. that's why i'm so hardened with the progress we have made on climate change _ the progress we have made on climate change over— the progress we have made on climate change over the weekend.—
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change over the weekend. however, labour unsurprisingly _ change over the weekend. however, labour unsurprisingly will _ change over the weekend. however, labour unsurprisingly will not - change over the weekend. however, labour unsurprisingly will not let - labour unsurprisingly will not let the government move on from this. today angela rayner, labour's deputy leader, has written asking the independent adviser on the ministerial code to investigate the transport secretary grant shapps. that follows reports in the sunday times that grant shapps's love for flying his private plane may have influenced government policy and spending of public money. that's claim strenuously denied by the department for transport. but this morning, no 10 will have to say whether the prime minister wants that to be investigated or not because it's not up to the independent adviser on standards, it is up to the prime minister to tell the independent adviser to look into something, and also keir starmer is on lbc radio this morning. he is saying that on wednesday when labour have a bit of time in the parliamentary agenda, they are going to use that to debate the issue of standards and they will be calling for a ban on mps doing consultancies and also they are going to call for the government to publish all the
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minutes of meetings between government departments and the testing company ran docs who employed owen paterson. neither of those things may go anywhere when they happen on wednesday but it will be a little bit more pressure being applied by labour. —— ranox. be a little bit more pressure being applied by labour. -- ranox. studio: thank yom — applied by labour. -- ranox. studio: thank yom an — applied by labour. -- ranox. studio: thank you. an update _ applied by labour. -- ranox. studio: thank you. an update on _ applied by labour. -- ranox. studio: thank you. an update on our - thank you. an update on our headlines on bbc news. mi5 and counter—terrorism police are investigating yesterday's explosion in a taxi in liverpool yesterday — which killed one man. the taxi driver has been named locally as david perry. after borisjohnson admits he could have handled the row involving owen paterson better — the debate about parliamentary standards returns to the commons today. a report by mps has found "serious failings" including avoidable deaths — in the care for patients with sickle cell disease in england. just a reminder that we are expecting a news conference from
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jonathan van—tham at 9:30am on covid. professorjonathan van—tham covid. professor jonathan van—tham the covid. professorjonathan van—tham the deputy chief medical officer for england will bejoined the deputy chief medical officer for england will be joined by a the deputy chief medical officer for england will bejoined by a member of thejoint committee on vaccination and also a member of the health care products regulatory agency and we will bring you that news briefing when it happens at 9:30am. the prime minister says the climate deal reached at cop26 "sounds the death knell" for coal power, but says he was "tinged with disappointment" after china and india objected to tougher commitments on its use. after lengthy negotiations at the conference in glasgow, countries agreed to "phase down" rather than "phase out" coal. but it's the first time plans to reduce coal have been mentioned in this type of climate deal. critics say the move doesn't go far enough. joining me now is lord nicholas stern, professor of economics at the london school of economics. welcome and thank you forjoining
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us. what do you think? how does this sit for you? it us. what do you think? how does this sit for ou? ., , ., us. what do you think? how does this sit for ou? .,, ., , , us. what do you think? how does this sit for you?— sit for you? it was a pity we moved from phase — sit for you? it was a pity we moved from phase to _ sit for you? it was a pity we moved from phase to phase _ sit for you? it was a pity we moved from phase to phase down - sit for you? it was a pity we moved from phase to phase down but - sit for you? it was a pity we moved from phase to phase down but i - sit for you? it was a pity we moved i from phase to phase down but i don't think it is a huge significant thing. you have to look at the deal as a whole and look at the what happened in the first week and the deals that lead up to the last—minute negotiations. 130 trillion, the glasgow allowance for net—zero, 130 trillion of private money declaring for net—zero, that means they are going to move away from the dirty stuff of the last century to the much cleaner and sustainable technologies of the century. south africa, vietnam, india indicating very strong moves towards renewables, and in moving away from coal. technology agreements around power and transport and green hydrogen and so
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on. the meetings between, or the declaration of china and the united states, the first time they have really got together constructively for a very long time. so there were really quite a lot of positives there. the big worry, though, is if you add it all up, we are probably heading for a round about two celsius increase average global surface temperature. we really need 1.5. the challenge is to move quickly starting next year when we are going to convene again to try and raise ambition to try towards 1.5. shill and raise ambition to try towards 1.5. �* ., , ' and raise ambition to try towards 1.5.~ ., , , ., 1.5. all of the stuff you outlined there has been _ 1.5. all of the stuff you outlined there has been agreed, - 1.5. all of the stuff you outlined there has been agreed, how - 1.5. all of the stuff you outlined i there has been agreed, how does 1.5. all of the stuff you outlined - there has been agreed, how does it get policed anyway? how does it get enforced? , ., _, enforced? there is no court in juiter enforced? there is no court in jopiter or— enforced? there is no court in jupiter or police _ enforced? there is no court in jupiter or police force - enforced? there is no court in jupiter or police force from i enforced? there is no court in i jupiter or police force from mars. these are countries and sectors and financial institutions which have set out their own parts because they think that's the best thing to do, so encouragement, support, collaboration, pressure from their
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own people. that's the way these things are going to happen and it's the way they have been moving in recent years. the way they have been moving in recent years— the way they have been moving in recent years. thank you for 'oining us. professorfi recent years. thank you for 'oining us. professor lord * recent years. thank you for 'oining us. professor lord nicholash recent years. thank you forjoining us. professor lord nicholas stern. | the security service, m15, has been called in to assist counter terrorism police investigating yesterday's car explosion outside a hospital in liverpool. the taxi driver has been named locally as david perry joining me now is dr david lowe, counter terrorism expert and senior research fellow at leeds law school. welcome and thank you forjoining us. it seems on the face of it that that taxi driver potentially averted something much worse this morning and the mayor of liverpool saying he potentially saved many lives by his actions getting out of the car, locking the doors and going into the hospital. obviously there are a lot of questions, lots to be unpicked, but what are your thoughts this morning on what has potentially happened here?— morning on what has potentially happened here? morning on what has potentially ha ened here? , ., , , ., ., happened here? obviously we have to kee an happened here? obviously we have to keep an open — happened here? obviously we have to keep an open mind — happened here? obviously we have to keep an open mind as _ happened here? obviously we have to keep an open mind as the _ keep an open mind as the investigators will be doing right
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now. because we have got in improvised explosive device, a bomb that has been involved it is natural that has been involved it is natural that the counterterrorism officers are investigating this with merseyside police. it is as information is coming out where we are getting a little bit more of the picture of what has happened because one of the unusual ones is why the women's hospital in liverpool? that's where i'm located at the moment and the hospital would not really be a major target but it looks as if something else has happened. we will have to wait and see what happens there but the motive will be very important with the three individuals who are suspected of being involved in this, to see what the motive is, and if they have got a connection with this incident. ., ., ., , incident. from what we have seen, the investigation _ incident. from what we have seen, the investigation obviously - incident. from what we have seen, the investigation obviously went i the investigation obviously went very quickly, we have had the three arrests, we don't know the
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significance of those, but clearly the security services have moved quickly here. find the security services have moved quickly here-— quickly here. and also what is important _ quickly here. and also what is important is _ quickly here. and also what is important is sharing - quickly here. and also what is . important is sharing intelligence. what will be going on now is whether there is any connection between those three suspects in intelligence held by the security service, m15, and the counterterrorism police units. so that's an important one. and the other side during this stage of the investigation, searching properties that they have control of to see what evidence is there, looking at any electronic devices which they possess, their mobile phones, see who they have been communicating with. so it is a protracted inquiry. the advantage of having a terrorism investigation is it is not the police and criminal evidence act that is governing their detention in the police cell, because they have 2a hours and then they may have to apply for an extension, it is under the terrorism act 2000 giving them seven days
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because these investigations are protracted and require a lot of detailed examination of forensic evidence and the evidence i've just been talking about. haifa evidence and the evidence i've 'ust been talking abouti been talking about. how much will the diaital been talking about. how much will the digital monitoring _ been talking about. how much will the digital monitoring and - been talking about. how much will the digital monitoring and tracking help the police? there are things people can do which are encrypted which are difficult to follow. but inevitably there is a digital footprint, and also, as becomes increasingly clear whenever there is something in the headlines, the security cameras that are all around us are really helpful in unpicking what has happened.— what has happened. yes, it is brinuain what has happened. yes, it is bringing this _ what has happened. yes, it is bringing this all _ what has happened. yes, it is bringing this all together- what has happened. yes, it is bringing this all together and | what has happened. yes, it is - bringing this all together and you are quite right, when you look at organised criminals, and terrorists use the more deeply encrypted sites like telegram, whatsapp, there are a variety of them out there. but obviously as technology moves on, so our security services and police agencies, they also have to try and
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move on and keep abreast of the technology. with the deeply encrypted sites, you will struggle to get the content of communication initially, it is looking at who they are talking to, and of course that then leads you back to your intelligence. one of the issues they will be looking at is the device itself. you need to have some knowledge. i'm speaking hypothetically here, but there wasn't a great deal of blast with the taxi so it could be some form of incendiary, it could be a very crude device but you still need some knowledge and normally people when using improvised explosive devices they are not working on their own, so you can see how the investigators will be trying to make any connections there. that really is important. connections there. that really is important-— connections there. that really is imortant. ., ., important. the doctor david lowe, thank you- — the queen missed the remembrance sunday service at the cenotaph yesterday after spraining her back. buckingham palace previously
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said it was her 'firm intention' to attend, but she expressed 'great regret�* at being unable to. let's talk more about what this means. our correspondent helena wilkinson is in windsor. what is the latest, helena? jo-anne nadler, i think _ what is the latest, helena? jo-anne nadler, i think we _ what is the latest, helena? jo-anne nadler, i think we can _ what is the latest, helena? jo-anne nadler, i think we can expect - what is the latest, helena? jo-anne nadler, i think we can expect that i nadler, i think we can expect that certainly in the short term for it to be a quieter period for the queen. she is, we understand, at windsor castle continuing to rest. it was a very last minute decision for her to cancel her appearance at the cenotaph. she was meant to be going standing on the balcony and watching the service. significant engagement for the queen and one that she regards as one of the most important in her calendar. so it would not have been a decision that the palace and the queen and doctors would have taken lightly. we understand she doesn't need hospital treatment for this back strain. it
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happened very recently. but i think the idea of the queen who is 95 years old having to travel from here in windsor in a car to central london, stand on that balcony for a short while for the service with a back sprain, that would have been too much for her majesty. what we also know, which is completely unrelated to the rest that the doctors advised the queen to continue with, she did, as we know, spend a night in hospital on october the 20th, and all we were told at the 20th, and all we were told at the time was that was because of preliminary investigations. she has been resting since then. she had to cancel a number of public engagements but she has at the castle been continuing to carry out virtual audiences, for example. but it is significant because remembrance sunday, as i say, is one of the most significant engagements for the queen. we know that she was
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deeply disappointed and veterans too who would have been there yesterday and would have wanted to see the queen, very symbolic for her to be there. and they too would have been disappointed. we understand her majesty will continue to rest. she has had to already cancel an engagement this week, but it is hoped, we are told, that she will carry on with those light desk duties here at windsor castle in the coming week. duties here at windsor castle in the coming week-— austria has introduced a partial lockdown for the two million people there who haven't had two doses of a coronavirus vaccine. they've been told to stay at home except for work and essential shopping. the country has one of the highest infection rates in europe, but new restrictions are being brought in — or considered — across much of the continent. courtney bembridge has the more. there was a last—minute rush at vaccination centres in upper austria, on the eve of new restrictions for those not yet protected. unvaccinated austrians
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were already barred from visiting restaurants, hairdressers and cinemas, but they're now told to stay home except for work and food shopping. it'll be policed using spot checks with hefty fines for those caught breaking the rules. austria has one of the lowest vaccination rates in western europe — around 6a% of the population is fully vaccinated, which leaves two million people yet to get two doses. and the country has one of the highest infection rates in europe — more than 800 cases per 100,000 people. the icus are starting to fill up. it's already projected that within two weeks we will have reached the limit, and we know that the cases we see now will be those that fill up the icus in two weeks, so there's need for some measure right now. but not everyone agrees. crowds gathered over the weekend in salzburg and vienna to make
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their opposition clear. translation: i'm here today because i want to fight - for my rights. these measures are absolutely discriminatory. my body, our bodies, we have a right to decide about them. a fourth wave of infections is gripping much of europe and the continent is once again the epicentre of the virus. eastern european nations with lower vaccination rates like latvia and russia were among the first to bring back restrictions, but even the netherlands with a vaccination rate above 80% has reintroduced a partial lockdown for at least three weeks. and germany is also weighing up new restrictions. courtney bembridge, bbc news. people going to cinemas, theatres and concert halls in wales will be required to show a covid pass from today. it follows the introduction of passes for nightclubs and big events in the nation last month. covid case rates in wales are falling, but remain relatively high.
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major improvements in the care for sickle cell patients in england is being called for, after "serious failings", including unavoidable deaths were identified in an inquiry. the report by a cross—party group of mp's found there was evidence of substandard levels of care in a&e and a lack of awareness of the condition amongst staff. nhs england says ten new centres for sickle cell disease are being set up across the country. let's go live to downing street where the deputy chief medical officer for england is giving a press conference on covid booster jabs. it is being reported in the times today that covid booster shots will be rolled out for the under 50s to
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try to increase immunity amongst the under 50s once the over 50s are done to coronavirus, over the winter. that is what the expectation is going to be, so here they are. let's just wait a moment and we will listen. ,., ., ., _, ., , just wait a moment and we will listen. ., _, ., , ., listen. good morning, colleagues and welcome to this _ listen. good morning, colleagues and welcome to this morning's _ listen. good morning, colleagues and welcome to this morning's downing i welcome to this morning's downing street briefing which is a technical briefing on the covid—19 vaccination programme. iam briefing on the covid—19 vaccination programme. i amjonathan briefing on the covid—19 vaccination programme. i am jonathan van tam, deputy chief medical officer and i am joining you this morning from a clinical area. am joining you this morning from a clinicalarea. in am joining you this morning from a clinical area. in the room you have the chief executive officer of the m hra and the professor of the chair
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of the jcvi covid—19 vaccine subcommittee. without further ado i shall pass to the first of our technical experts to give an update from the perspective of the mhra. thank you and good morning. as the uk's independent regulator for all medicines, vaccines and medical devices. — medicines, vaccines and medical devices, our role is to ensure the public— devices, our role is to ensure the public have — devices, our role is to ensure the public have access to safe and effective — public have access to safe and effective vaccines. your safety is always _ effective vaccines. your safety is always our— effective vaccines. your safety is always our top priority. and we have continued _ always our top priority. and we have continued to — always our top priority. and we have continued to proactively monitor the safety— continued to proactively monitor the safety of— continued to proactively monitor the safety of all covid—19 vaccine since the roll-out — safety of all covid—19 vaccine since the roll—out began last year. our reguiatory— the roll—out began last year. our regulatory position remains that covid-19 — regulatory position remains that covid—19 vaccine is available for use in— covid—19 vaccine is available for use in the — covid—19 vaccine is available for use in the uk have an overwhelmingly positive _ use in the uk have an overwhelmingly positive benefit risk balance. you can he _ positive benefit risk balance. you can be confident that covid—19 vaccines— can be confident that covid—19 vaccines for use in the uk are very effective _ vaccines for use in the uk are very effective and acceptably safe. since
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the booster doses began to be rolled out in _ the booster doses began to be rolled out in people age 50 and over from september, we have identified no new safety— september, we have identified no new safety concerns. at the time of approval. — safety concerns. at the time of approval, data found that booster doses _ approval, data found that booster doses are — approval, data found that booster doses are effective and ongoing monitoring has found the majority of adverse _ monitoring has found the majority of adverse effects to be mild to moderate,
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relating to a sore arm or tiredness. when _ relating to a sore arm or tiredness. when you _ relating to a sore arm or tiredness. when you are cold for your booster in the _ when you are cold for your booster in the next — when you are cold for your booster in the next phase, you can come forward — in the next phase, you can come forward confident that the benefit in preventing serious covid—19 far outweigh— in preventing serious covid—19 far outweigh any risks. turning to younger— outweigh any risks. turning to younger people aged 16 to 17, our reguiatory— younger people aged 16 to 17, our regulatory advice remains in those over the _ regulatory advice remains in those over the age of 16 in december 2020. that is— over the age of 16 in december 2020. that is this _ over the age of 16 in december 2020. that is this vaccine is safe and effective — that is this vaccine is safe and effective in a two dose schedule. we've _ effective in a two dose schedule. we've closely monitored the safety of covid—19 vaccines in individuals under— of covid—19 vaccines in individuals under to — of covid—19 vaccines in individuals under18. our of covid—19 vaccines in individuals under 18. our review of reports of suspected — under 18. our review of reports of suspected side effects does not raise _ suspected side effects does not raise any— suspected side effects does not raise any additional safety issues specific— raise any additional safety issues specific to— raise any additional safety issues specific to this age group. as is set out — specific to this age group. as is set out in — specific to this age group. as is set out in our summary report there had been _ set out in our summary report there had been a — set out in our summary report there had been a small number of reports of suspected myocarditis heart information, associated with madonna—macro and pfizer vaccines in the uk _ madonna—macro and pfizer vaccines in the uk and _ madonna—macro and pfizer vaccines in the uk and internationally. it is a very rare — the uk and internationally. it is a very rare potential risk with these two vaccines. we are closely monitoring at importantly, now we have more — monitoring at importantly, now we have more experience of using the under— have more experience of using the under 30s— have more experience of using the under 30s in have more experience of using the under30s in the have more experience of using the under 30s in the uk, have more experience of using the under30s in the uk, we have more experience of using the under 30s in the uk, we are have more experience of using the under30s in the uk, we are not detecting — under30s in the uk, we are not detecting any increase in risk with the second — detecting any increase in risk with the second dose. so our message is to people _ the second dose. so our message is to people age 16 and 17, it is safe to people age 16 and 17, it is safe to have _ to people age 16 and 17, it is safe to have a — to people age 16 and 17, it is safe to have a second dose of the pfizer vaccine _ to have a second dose of the pfizer vaccine and — to have a second dose of the pfizer vaccine and if you are cold for your
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second _ vaccine and if you are cold for your second vaccination, please come forward — second vaccination, please come forward. this ensures you are further— forward. this ensures you are further protected against covid—19. i further protected against covid—19. i would _ further protected against covid—19. i would like to take this chance to thank— i would like to take this chance to thank everyone who has reported a suspected — thank everyone who has reported a suspected side effects associated with covid—19 vaccines, please continue — with covid—19 vaccines, please continue to report via our coronavirus yellow card. by reporting you help improve the safe use of— reporting you help improve the safe use of vaccines for everyone and it helps _ use of vaccines for everyone and it helps us _ use of vaccines for everyone and it helps us as— use of vaccines for everyone and it helps us as your independent regulator to take action if necessary. safety is always and continues — necessary. safety is always and continues to be up top priority. thank— continues to be up top priority. thank you _ continues to be up top priority. thank yon-— continues to be up top priority. thank ou. ., ,, ., , thank you. thank you, colleagues will have an _ thank you. thank you, colleagues will have an opportunity _ thank you. thank you, colleagues will have an opportunity to - thank you. thank you, colleagues will have an opportunity to ask . thank you. thank you, colleagues will have an opportunity to ask dr| will have an opportunity to ask dr raine any questions they wish at the end of the briefing. i am turning now to the professor to give us an update from the jcvi, which forms the main part of this briefing.
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thank you very much. today the jcvi is announcing — thank you very much. today the jcvi is announcing two _ thank you very much. today the jcvi is announcing two updates. - thank you very much. today the jcvi is announcing two updates. the - thank you very much. today the jcvi is announcing two updates. the first| is announcing two updates. the first update _ is announcing two updates. the first update relates— is announcing two updates. the first update relates to _ is announcing two updates. the first update relates to the _ is announcing two updates. the first update relates to the booster- update relates to the booster programme _ update relates to the booster programme. could _ update relates to the booster programme. could i- update relates to the booster programme. could i have - update relates to the booster programme. could i have thej update relates to the booster- programme. could i have the first slide _ programme. could i have the first slide please _ programme. could i have the first slide please. just _ programme. could i have the first slide please. just as _ programme. could i have the first slide please. just as a _ programme. could i have the first slide please. just as a reminder, i slide please. just as a reminder, the current— slide please. just as a reminder, the current advice _ slide please. just as a reminder, the current advice in _ slide please. just as a reminder, the current advice in the - slide please. just as a reminder, the current advice in the booster programme _ the current advice in the booster programme is _ the current advice in the booster programme is that _ the current advice in the booster programme is that persons - the current advice in the booster programme is that persons aged the current advice in the booster- programme is that persons aged over 50 years. _ programme is that persons aged over 50 years. those — programme is that persons aged over 50 years, those adults _ programme is that persons aged over 50 years, those adults in— programme is that persons aged over 50 years, those adults in a _ programme is that persons aged over 50 years, those adults in a clinical. 50 years, those adults in a clinical at risk— 50 years, those adults in a clinical at risk group, _ 50 years, those adults in a clinical at risk group, front _ 50 years, those adults in a clinical at risk group, front line _ 50 years, those adults in a clinical at risk group, front line health- 50 years, those adults in a clinical| at risk group, front line health and social— at risk group, front line health and social care — at risk group, front line health and social care workers _ at risk group, front line health and social care workers and _ at risk group, front line health and social care workers and close - social care workers and close contacts _ social care workers and close contacts of— social care workers and close contacts of persons - social care workers and close contacts of persons who - social care workers and close contacts of persons who arel contacts of persons who are immunosuppressed - contacts of persons who are immunosuppressed should i contacts of persons who are - immunosuppressed should have a booster— immunosuppressed should have a booster vaccine _ immunosuppressed should have a booster vaccine six _ immunosuppressed should have a booster vaccine six months- immunosuppressed should have a i booster vaccine six months following completion _ booster vaccine six months following completion after _ booster vaccine six months following completion after the _ booster vaccine six months following completion after the primary- booster vaccine six months following completion after the primary cause. i completion after the primary cause. you essentially— completion after the primary cause. you essentially have _ completion after the primary cause. you essentially have a _ completion after the primary cause. you essentially have a third - completion after the primary cause. you essentially have a third vaccine| you essentially have a third vaccine dosed _ you essentially have a third vaccine dosed six— you essentially have a third vaccine dosed six months— you essentially have a third vaccine dosed six months after— you essentially have a third vaccine dosed six months after their- you essentially have a third vaccine| dosed six months after their second dose _ dosed six months after their second dose can _ dosed six months after their second dose can i — dosed six months after their second dose can i have— dosed six months after their second dose. can i have the _ dosed six months after their second dose. can i have the next— dosed six months after their second dose. can i have the next slide - dose. can i have the next slide please — dose. can i have the next slide please we _ dose. can i have the next slide please we are _ dose. can i have the next slide please. we are advising - dose. can i have the next slide please. we are advising todayl dose. can i have the next slide - please. we are advising today that the booster— please. we are advising today that the booster programme _ please. we are advising today that the booster programme is- please. we are advising today that. the booster programme is extended please. we are advising today that - the booster programme is extended to persons _ the booster programme is extended to persons aged _ the booster programme is extended to persons aged 40 — the booster programme is extended to persons aged 40 to _ the booster programme is extended to persons aged 40 to a9 _ the booster programme is extended to persons aged 40 to a9 years _ the booster programme is extended to persons aged 40 to a9 years as - the booster programme is extended to persons aged 40 to a9 years as well. i persons aged 40 to a9 years as well. as previously, — persons aged 40 to a9 years as well. as previously, the _ persons aged ao to a9 years as well. as previously, the booster— persons aged 40 to a9 years as well.
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as previously, the booster dose - persons aged 40 to a9 years as well. as previously, the booster dose is. as previously, the booster dose is advised _ as previously, the booster dose is advised six — as previously, the booster dose is advised six months _ as previously, the booster dose is advised six months after- as previously, the booster dose is advised six months after the - as previously, the booster dose is. advised six months after the second dose and _ advised six months after the second dose and either— advised six months after the second dose and either the _ advised six months after the second dose and either the pfizer— advised six months after the second dose and either the pfizer vaccine . dose and either the pfizer vaccine or the _ dose and either the pfizer vaccine or the moderna _ dose and either the pfizer vaccine or the moderna vaccine _ dose and either the pfizer vaccine or the moderna vaccine can- dose and either the pfizer vaccine or the moderna vaccine can be . dose and either the pfizer vaccine . or the moderna vaccine can be used as the _ or the moderna vaccine can be used as the booster— or the moderna vaccine can be used as the booster dose _ or the moderna vaccine can be used as the booster dose regardless - or the moderna vaccine can be used as the booster dose regardless of l as the booster dose regardless of the type — as the booster dose regardless of the type of— as the booster dose regardless of the type of vaccine _ as the booster dose regardless of the type of vaccine that _ as the booster dose regardless of the type of vaccine that was - the type of vaccine that was received _ the type of vaccine that was received for _ the type of vaccine that was received for the _ the type of vaccine that was received for the first - the type of vaccine that was received for the first two . the type of vaccine that was - received for the first two doses. i would _ received for the first two doses. i would like — received for the first two doses. i would like to _ received for the first two doses. i would like to just _ received for the first two doses. i would like tojust mention- received for the first two doses. i would like to just mention the . received for the first two doses. i. would like tojust mention the dose use for— would like tojust mention the dose use for the — would like tojust mention the dose use for the moderna _ would like tojust mention the dose use for the moderna booster, - would like tojust mention the dose use for the moderna booster, the l use for the moderna booster, the dose _ use for the moderna booster, the dose used — use for the moderna booster, the dose used is _ use for the moderna booster, the dose used is 50 _ use for the moderna booster, the dose used is 50 micrograms, - use for the moderna booster, the dose used is 50 micrograms, half use for the moderna booster, the . dose used is 50 micrograms, half of the dose _ dose used is 50 micrograms, half of the dose used — dose used is 50 micrograms, half of the dose used in _ dose used is 50 micrograms, half of the dose used in the _ dose used is 50 micrograms, half of the dose used in the primary- dose used is 50 micrograms, half of the dose used in the primary cause, which _ the dose used in the primary cause, which was _ the dose used in the primary cause, which was 100, _ the dose used in the primary cause, which was 100, or— the dose used in the primary cause, which was 100, or is _ the dose used in the primary cause, which was 100, or is 100 _ the dose used in the primary cause, l which was 100, or is 100 micrograms. this use _ which was 100, or is 100 micrograms. this use of— which was 100, or is 100 micrograms. this use of a — which was 100, or is 100 micrograms. this use of a lower— which was 100, or is 100 micrograms. this use of a lower dose _ which was 100, or is 100 micrograms. this use of a lower dose of— which was 100, or is 100 micrograms. this use of a lower dose of vaccine - this use of a lower dose of vaccine for these _ this use of a lower dose of vaccine for these the — this use of a lower dose of vaccine for these the dosed _ this use of a lower dose of vaccine for these the dosed is— this use of a lower dose of vaccine for these the dosed is a _ this use of a lower dose of vaccine| for these the dosed is a recognised method _ for these the dosed is a recognised method of— for these the dosed is a recognised method of inducing _ for these the dosed is a recognised method of inducing immunity. - for these the dosed is a recognised method of inducing immunity. it. for these the dosed is a recognised. method of inducing immunity. it has been used _ method of inducing immunity. it has been used for — method of inducing immunity. it has been used for years _ method of inducing immunity. it has been used for years and _ method of inducing immunity. it has been used for years and is _ been used for years and is continuing _ been used for years and is continuing to— been used for years and is continuing to be _ been used for years and is continuing to be used - been used for years and is continuing to be used now been used for years and is . continuing to be used now in been used for years and is - continuing to be used now in other routine _ continuing to be used now in other routine immunisation— continuing to be used now in otherl routine immunisation programmes, such as _ routine immunisation programmes, such as the — routine immunisation programmes, such as the booster— routine immunisation programmes, such as the booster doses - routine immunisation programmes, such as the booster doses used - such as the booster doses used against — such as the booster doses used against diphtheria, _ such as the booster doses used against diphtheria, tetanus - such as the booster doses used against diphtheria, tetanus andj against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis _ against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. this— against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. this is— against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. this is not— against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. this is not an - against diphtheria, tetanus and| pertussis. this is not an unusual thing _ pertussis. this is not an unusual thing to— pertussis. this is not an unusual thing to do _ pertussis. this is not an unusual thing to do the _ pertussis. this is not an unusual thing to do. the lower— pertussis. this is not an unusual thing to do. the lower dose - pertussis. this is not an unusual thing to do. the lower dose for. pertussis. this is not an unusual.
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thing to do. the lower dose for the booster— thing to do. the lower dose for the booster dosed _ thing to do. the lower dose for the booster dosed is _ thing to do. the lower dose for the booster dosed is very— thing to do. the lower dose for the booster dosed is very usual - thing to do. the lower dose for thei booster dosed is very usual method of boosting — booster dosed is very usual method of boosting the _ booster dosed is very usual method of boosting the immune _ booster dosed is very usual method of boosting the immune for- booster dosed is very usual method of boosting the immune for the - of boosting the immune for the moderna — of boosting the immune for the moderna vaccine _ of boosting the immune for the moderna vaccine we _ of boosting the immune for the moderna vaccine we know - of boosting the immune for the . moderna vaccine we know studies of boosting the immune for the - moderna vaccine we know studies that have been— moderna vaccine we know studies that have been done — moderna vaccine we know studies that have been done, looking _ moderna vaccine we know studies that have been done, looking at _ moderna vaccine we know studies that have been done, looking at the - have been done, looking at the booster— have been done, looking at the booster dose _ have been done, looking at the booster dose of _ have been done, looking at the booster dose of moderna, - have been done, looking at the j booster dose of moderna, after have been done, looking at the - booster dose of moderna, after the third dose — booster dose of moderna, after the third dose the _ booster dose of moderna, after the third dose, the booster— booster dose of moderna, after the third dose, the booster dose, - booster dose of moderna, after the third dose, the booster dose, the i third dose, the booster dose, the immune — third dose, the booster dose, the immune response _ third dose, the booster dose, the immune response is— third dose, the booster dose, the immune response is far— third dose, the booster dose, the immune response is far higher. third dose, the booster dose, the l immune response is far higher than after the _ immune response is far higher than after the second _ immune response is far higher than after the second dose. _ immune response is far higher than after the second dose. so - immune response is far higher than after the second dose. so we - immune response is far higher than after the second dose. so we knowl after the second dose. so we know this half— after the second dose. so we know this half dose — after the second dose. so we know this half dose as _ after the second dose. so we know this half dose as a _ after the second dose. so we know this half dose as a booster- after the second dose. so we know this half dose as a booster works l this half dose as a booster works very well — this half dose as a booster works very well the _ this half dose as a booster works very well. the half _ this half dose as a booster works very well. the half dose - this half dose as a booster works very well. the half dose of - this half dose as a booster works very well. the half dose of the l very well. the half dose of the booster— very well. the half dose of the booster dose _ very well. the half dose of the booster dose is _ very well. the half dose of the booster dose is expected - very well. the half dose of the booster dose is expected to i very well. the half dose of the | booster dose is expected to be associated _ booster dose is expected to be associated with _ booster dose is expected to be associated with fewer- booster dose is expected to be associated with fewer adverse i associated with fewer adverse events — associated with fewer adverse events in _ associated with fewer adverse events. in the _ associated with fewer adverse events. in the uk, _ associated with fewer adverse events. in the uk, over- associated with fewer adverse events. in the uk, over12- associated with fewer adverse . events. in the uk, over12 million doses— events. in the uk, over12 million doses of— events. in the uk, over12 million doses of boosters _ events. in the uk, over12 million doses of boosters have _ events. in the uk, over12 million doses of boosters have now- events. in the uk, over12 million doses of boosters have now beenj doses of boosters have now been given _ doses of boosters have now been given and. — doses of boosters have now been given and. as— doses of boosters have now been given and. as you— doses of boosters have now been given and, as you have _ doses of boosters have now been given and, as you have heard - doses of boosters have now been. given and, as you have heard from mhra, _ given and, as you have heard from mhra, no— given and, as you have heard from mhra, no major— given and, as you have heard from mhra, no major adverse - given and, as you have heard fromj mhra, no major adverse reactions that are _ mhra, no major adverse reactions that are new— mhra, no major adverse reactions that are new have _ mhra, no major adverse reactions that are new have been _ mhra, no major adverse reactions that are new have been identified. that are new have been identified following — that are new have been identified following the _ that are new have been identified following the booster _ that are new have been identifiedl following the booster programme. that are new have been identified - following the booster programme. in addition _ following the booster programme. in addition today, — following the booster programme. in addition today, the _ following the booster programme. in addition today, the uk— following the booster programme. in addition today, the uk health - addition today, the uk health
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security— addition today, the uk health security agency _ addition today, the uk health security agency are _ addition today, the uk health| security agency are publishing addition today, the uk health - security agency are publishing data on the _ security agency are publishing data on the effectiveness _ security agency are publishing data on the effectiveness of— security agency are publishing data on the effectiveness of the - security agency are publishing data on the effectiveness of the booster dose _ on the effectiveness of the booster dose that — on the effectiveness of the booster dose. that shows _ on the effectiveness of the booster dose. that shows there _ on the effectiveness of the booster dose. that shows there has - on the effectiveness of the booster dose. that shows there has been l on the effectiveness of the boosterl dose. that shows there has been an increased _ dose. that shows there has been an increased protection _ dose. that shows there has been an increased protection against - increased protection against symptomatic— increased protection against symptomatic disease - increased protection against. symptomatic disease following increased protection against - symptomatic disease following the booster— symptomatic disease following the booster dose — symptomatic disease following the booster dose in _ symptomatic disease following the booster dose in those _ symptomatic disease following the booster dose in those who - symptomatic disease following the booster dose in those who have i booster dose in those who have already— booster dose in those who have already received _ booster dose in those who have already received it _ booster dose in those who have already received it so _ booster dose in those who have already received it so far. - booster dose in those who have already received it so far. and i booster dose in those who have . already received it so far. and the protection — already received it so far. and the protection that— already received it so far. and the protection that has _ already received it so far. and the protection that has been - already received it so far. and the protection that has been added, i already received it so far. and the| protection that has been added, it is over— protection that has been added, it is over 93% — protection that has been added, it is over 93% protection _ protection that has been added, it is over 93% protection against - is over 93% protection against symptomatic— is over 93% protection against symptomatic disease. - is over 93% protection against symptomatic disease. whilst i is over 93% protection against . symptomatic disease. whilst we is over 93% protection against - symptomatic disease. whilst we don't yet have _ symptomatic disease. whilst we don't yet have data — symptomatic disease. whilst we don't yet have data on — symptomatic disease. whilst we don't yet have data on protection _ symptomatic disease. whilst we don't yet have data on protection against i yet have data on protection against hospitalisation _ yet have data on protection against hospitalisation and _ yet have data on protection against hospitalisation and unfortunately . hospitalisation and unfortunately people _ hospitalisation and unfortunately people dying _ hospitalisation and unfortunately people dying from _ hospitalisation and unfortunately people dying from covid—19,- hospitalisation and unfortunately people dying from covid—19, wel hospitalisation and unfortunately i people dying from covid—19, we can expect— people dying from covid—19, we can expect the — people dying from covid—19, we can expect the protection _ people dying from covid—19, we can expect the protection to _ people dying from covid—19, we can expect the protection to be - people dying from covid—19, we can expect the protection to be even i expect the protection to be even higher— expect the protection to be even higher than— expect the protection to be even higher than a _ expect the protection to be even higher than a figure _ expect the protection to be even higher than a figure of _ expect the protection to be even higher than a figure of 93%, - expect the protection to be even - higher than a figure of 93%, because that is— higher than a figure of 93%, because that is what— higher than a figure of 93%, because that is what has _ higher than a figure of 93%, because that is what has happened _ higher than a figure of 93%, because that is what has happened so - higher than a figure of 93%, because that is what has happened so far- higher than a figure of 93%, because that is what has happened so far in. that is what has happened so far in the vaccine — that is what has happened so far in the vaccine programme. _ that is what has happened so far in the vaccine programme. so- that is what has happened so far inl the vaccine programme. so overall, we are _ the vaccine programme. so overall, we are advising _ the vaccine programme. so overall, we are advising now— the vaccine programme. so overall, we are advising now that _ the vaccine programme. so overall, we are advising now that the - the vaccine programme. so overall, we are advising now that the data . we are advising now that the data tells us _ we are advising now that the data tells us the — we are advising now that the data tells us the booster— we are advising now that the data tells us the booster dose - we are advising now that the data. tells us the booster dose markedly strengthens — tells us the booster dose markedly strengthens the _ tells us the booster dose markedly strengthens the existing _ tells us the booster dose markedlyj strengthens the existing protection and will— strengthens the existing protection and will extend _ strengthens the existing protection and will extend the _ strengthens the existing protection and will extend the duration - strengthens the existing protection and will extend the duration of- strengthens the existing protectionj
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and will extend the duration of that protection — and will extend the duration of that protection against _ and will extend the duration of that protection against serious - and will extend the duration of that protection against serious disease. | protection against serious disease. we therefore — protection against serious disease. we therefore urge _ protection against serious disease. we therefore urge people - protection against serious disease. we therefore urge people who - protection against serious disease. we therefore urge people who are | we therefore urge people who are eligible _ we therefore urge people who are eligible for — we therefore urge people who are eligible for a — we therefore urge people who are eligible for a booster— we therefore urge people who are eligible for a booster to _ we therefore urge people who are eligible for a booster to step - we therefore urge people who are eligible for a booster to step up. eligible for a booster to step up and have — eligible for a booster to step up and have your— eligible for a booster to step up and have your booster- eligible for a booster to step up and have your booster and - eligible for a booster to step up- and have your booster and maximise your protection _ and have your booster and maximise your protection. the _ and have your booster and maximise your protection. the second - and have your booster and maximise your protection. the second update. your protection. the second update to give _ your protection. the second update to give today — your protection. the second update to give today is _ your protection. the second update to give today is about _ your protection. the second update to give today is about 16 _ your protection. the second update to give today is about 16 to - to give today is about 16 to 17-year-olds _ to give today is about 16 to 17—year—olds. you - to give today is about 16 to 17—year—olds. you may- to give today is about 16 to - 17—year—olds. you may remember to give today is about 16 to _ 17—year—olds. you may remember that in early— 17—year—olds. you may remember that in early august — 17—year—olds. you may remember that in early august we _ 17—year—olds. you may remember that in early august we advised _ 17—year—olds. you may remember that in early august we advised a _ 17—year—olds. you may remember that in early august we advised a first - in early august we advised a first dose _ in early august we advised a first dose of— in early august we advised a first dose of the — in early august we advised a first dose of the pfizer— in early august we advised a first dose of the pfizer vaccine - in early august we advised a first dose of the pfizer vaccine for- in early august we advised a first dose of the pfizer vaccine for 16 i dose of the pfizer vaccine for 16 and 17—year—olds_ dose of the pfizer vaccine for 16 and 17—year—olds who _ dose of the pfizer vaccine for 16 and 17—year—olds who do - dose of the pfizer vaccine for 16 and 17—year—olds who do not i dose of the pfizer vaccine for 16 l and 17—year—olds who do not have dose of the pfizer vaccine for 16 - and 17—year—olds who do not have an underlying _ and17—year—olds who do not have an underlying health— and 17—year—olds who do not have an underlying health condition - and 17—year—olds who do not have an underlying health condition that - underlying health condition that puts them — underlying health condition that puts them at— underlying health condition that puts them at higher— underlying health condition that puts them at higher risk - underlying health condition that puts them at higher risk from . underlying health condition that - puts them at higher risk from severe covid-i9~ _ puts them at higher risk from severe covid-i9~ we — puts them at higher risk from severe covid—19. we said _ puts them at higher risk from severe covid—19. we said at _ puts them at higher risk from severe covid—19. we said at the _ puts them at higher risk from severe covid—19. we said at the time - puts them at higher risk from severe covid—19. we said at the time we - covid—19. we said at the time we would _ covid—19. we said at the time we would review— covid—19. we said at the time we would review the _ covid—19. we said at the time we would review the data _ covid—19. we said at the time we would review the data and - covid—19. we said at the time we . would review the data and anticipate a second _ would review the data and anticipate a second dose — would review the data and anticipate a second dose may— would review the data and anticipate a second dose may well— would review the data and anticipate a second dose may well be - would review the data and anticipate a second dose may well be advised. | a second dose may well be advised. that is— a second dose may well be advised. that is indeed — a second dose may well be advised. that is indeed the _ a second dose may well be advised. that is indeed the case, _ a second dose may well be advised. that is indeed the case, we - a second dose may well be advised. that is indeed the case, we have i that is indeed the case, we have reviewed — that is indeed the case, we have reviewed the _ that is indeed the case, we have reviewed the recent _ that is indeed the case, we have reviewed the recent informationl reviewed the recent information regarding — reviewed the recent information regarding the _ reviewed the recent information regarding the safety _ reviewed the recent information regarding the safety and - reviewed the recent information regarding the safety and the - regarding the safety and the benefits _ regarding the safety and the benefits of— regarding the safety and the benefits of a _ regarding the safety and the benefits of a second - regarding the safety and the benefits of a second dose i regarding the safety and the i benefits of a second dose and regarding the safety and the - benefits of a second dose and we are advising _ benefits of a second dose and we are advising that — benefits of a second dose and we are advising that 16— benefits of a second dose and we are advising that 16 and _ benefits of a second dose and we are advising that 16 and 17—year—olds - advising that 16 and 17—year—olds who have — advising that 16 and 17—year—olds who have had _ advising that 16 and 17—year—olds who have had a _ advising that 16 and 17—year—olds who have had a first _ advising that 16 and 17—year—olds who have had a first dose - advising that 16 and 17—year—olds who have had a first dose of- advising that 16 and 17—year—olds who have had a first dose of thel who have had a first dose of the pfizer— who have had a first dose of the pfizer vaccine _ who have had a first dose of the pfizer vaccine be _ who have had a first dose of the pfizer vaccine be offered -
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who have had a first dose of the pfizer vaccine be offered it - who have had a first dose of the . pfizer vaccine be offered it second dose _ pfizer vaccine be offered it second dose of _ pfizer vaccine be offered it second dose of the — pfizer vaccine be offered it second dose of the pfizer— pfizer vaccine be offered it second dose of the pfizer vaccine. - pfizer vaccine be offered it second dose of the pfizer vaccine. as - pfizer vaccine be offered it second dose of the pfizer vaccine. as a i dose of the pfizer vaccine. as a reminder— dose of the pfizer vaccine. as a reminder the _ dose of the pfizer vaccine. as a reminderthe first— dose of the pfizer vaccine. as a reminder the first vaccine - dose of the pfizer vaccine. as a reminder the first vaccine dose | reminder the first vaccine dose gives— reminder the first vaccine dose gives a — reminder the first vaccine dose gives a high— reminder the first vaccine dose gives a high level— reminder the first vaccine dose gives a high level protection i gives a high level protection against _ gives a high level protection against serious _ gives a high level protection against serious disease - gives a high level protection against serious disease and | gives a high level protection - against serious disease and that hi-h against serious disease and that high level— against serious disease and that high level protection _ against serious disease and that high level protection we - against serious disease and that high level protection we know . against serious disease and that. high level protection we know lasts for at _ high level protection we know lasts for at least — high level protection we know lasts for at least 12 — high level protection we know lasts for at least 12 to _ high level protection we know lasts for at least 12 to 16 _ high level protection we know lasts for at least 12 to 16 weeks. - high level protection we know lasts for at least 12 to 16 weeks. the - for at least 12 to 16 weeks. the second — for at least 12 to 16 weeks. the second dose _ for at least 12 to 16 weeks. the second dose, nonetheless - for at least 12 to 16 weeks. the - second dose, nonetheless reinforces that protection— second dose, nonetheless reinforces that protection from _ second dose, nonetheless reinforces that protection from the _ second dose, nonetheless reinforces that protection from the first - second dose, nonetheless reinforces that protection from the first dose . that protection from the first dose and it— that protection from the first dose and it is— that protection from the first dose and it is important— that protection from the first dose and it is important in— that protection from the first dose and it is important in extending i that protection from the first dose i and it is important in extending the duration— and it is important in extending the duration of— and it is important in extending the duration of protection. _ and it is important in extending the duration of protection. not - and it is important in extending the duration of protection. not just - and it is important in extending the duration of protection. not just forl duration of protection. not just for the winter— duration of protection. not just for the winter months _ duration of protection. not just for the winter months and _ duration of protection. not just for the winter months and christmas, | duration of protection. not just for. the winter months and christmas, but we're _ the winter months and christmas, but we're also _ the winter months and christmas, but we're also looking _ the winter months and christmas, but we're also looking into _ the winter months and christmas, but we're also looking into and _ the winter months and christmas, but we're also looking into and beyond. i we're also looking into and beyond. there _ we're also looking into and beyond. there is— we're also looking into and beyond. there is a _ we're also looking into and beyond. there is a question _ we're also looking into and beyond. there is a question about _ we're also looking into and beyond. there is a question about the - there is a question about the spacing — there is a question about the spacing and _ there is a question about the spacing and the _ there is a question about the spacing and the timing - there is a question about the spacing and the timing of- there is a question about the spacing and the timing of the there is a question about the - spacing and the timing of the second dosed _ spacing and the timing of the second dosed compared _ spacing and the timing of the second dosed compared to _ spacing and the timing of the second dosed compared to the _ spacing and the timing of the second dosed compared to the first - spacing and the timing of the second dosed compared to the first dose. i spacing and the timing of the second l dosed compared to the first dose. we are advising _ dosed compared to the first dose. we are advising that _ dosed compared to the first dose. we are advising that the _ dosed compared to the first dose. we are advising that the second - dosed compared to the first dose. we are advising that the second dose - dosed compared to the first dose. we are advising that the second dose is l are advising that the second dose is given— are advising that the second dose is given 12 _ are advising that the second dose is given 12 weeks _ are advising that the second dose is given 12 weeks after— are advising that the second dose is given 12 weeks after the _ are advising that the second dose is given 12 weeks after the first - are advising that the second dose is given 12 weeks after the first dose. i given 12 weeks after the first dose. you may— given 12 weeks after the first dose. you may remember— given 12 weeks after the first dose. you may remember that _ given 12 weeks after the first dose. you may remember that at - given 12 weeks after the first dose. you may remember that at the - given 12 weeks after the first dose. | you may remember that at the very start of— you may remember that at the very start of the — you may remember that at the very start of the vaccine _ you may remember that at the very start of the vaccine programme - you may remember that at the very start of the vaccine programme in. start of the vaccine programme in the uk, _ start of the vaccine programme in the uk, the — start of the vaccine programme in the uk, the jcvi _
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start of the vaccine programme in the uk, the w advised - start of the vaccine programme in the uk, the w advised that - start of the vaccine programme in. the uk, the jcvi advised that second doses— the uk, the jcvi advised that second doses of— the uk, the jcvi advised that second doses of vaccine _ the uk, the jcvi advised that second doses of vaccine to _ the uk, the jcvi advised that second doses of vaccine to be _ the uk, the jcvi advised that second doses of vaccine to be given - the uk, the jcvi advised that second doses of vaccine to be given 12 - doses of vaccine to be given 12 weeks. — doses of vaccine to be given 12 weeks. which _ doses of vaccine to be given 12 weeks, which was _ doses of vaccine to be given 12 weeks, which was an - doses of vaccine to be given 12j weeks, which was an extended interval. — weeks, which was an extended interval, after— weeks, which was an extended interval, after the _ weeks, which was an extended interval, after the first - weeks, which was an extended interval, after the first dose. l weeks, which was an extended i interval, after the first dose. we now have — interval, after the first dose. we now have quite _ interval, after the first dose. we now have quite a _ interval, after the first dose. we now have quite a lot _ interval, after the first dose. we now have quite a lot of- interval, after the first dose. we now have quite a lot of data - interval, after the first dose. we now have quite a lot of data to l interval, after the first dose. we - now have quite a lot of data to show that the _ now have quite a lot of data to show that the extended _ now have quite a lot of data to show that the extended interval— now have quite a lot of data to show that the extended interval increasesj that the extended interval increases the level— that the extended interval increases the level of— that the extended interval increases the level of protection _ that the extended interval increases the level of protection and - that the extended interval increases the level of protection and by- that the extended interval increases the level of protection and by doing | the level of protection and by doing so, probably— the level of protection and by doing so, probably extends _ the level of protection and by doing so, probably extends the _ the level of protection and by doing so, probably extends the level- the level of protection and by doing so, probably extends the level of. so, probably extends the level of protection — so, probably extends the level of protection we _ so, probably extends the level of protection. we also _ so, probably extends the level of protection. we also have - so, probably extends the level of protection. we also have a - so, probably extends the level of. protection. we also have a merging data to _ protection. we also have a merging data to show— protection. we also have a merging data to show that _ protection. we also have a merging data to show that the _ protection. we also have a merging data to show that the extended - data to show that the extended interval — data to show that the extended interval between _ data to show that the extended interval between dose - data to show that the extended interval between dose one - data to show that the extended interval between dose one and| interval between dose one and those two also _ interval between dose one and those two also results _ interval between dose one and those two also results in _ interval between dose one and those two also results in probably- interval between dose one and those two also results in probably less - two also results in probably less adverse — two also results in probably less adverse reactions. _ two also results in probably less adverse reactions. so— two also results in probably less adverse reactions. so there - two also results in probably less adverse reactions. so there arel adverse reactions. so there are overall— adverse reactions. so there are overall benefits _ adverse reactions. so there are overall benefits in _ adverse reactions. so there are overall benefits in keeping - adverse reactions. so there are overall benefits in keeping an. overall benefits in keeping an extended _ overall benefits in keeping an extended interval— overall benefits in keeping an extended interval between i overall benefits in keeping an. extended interval between dose overall benefits in keeping an- extended interval between dose one and dose _ extended interval between dose one and dose two~ — extended interval between dose one and dose two. therefore, _ extended interval between dose one and dose two. therefore, for- extended interval between dose one and dose two. therefore, for 16 - extended interval between dose one and dose two. therefore, for 16 and| and dose two. therefore, for 16 and 17-year-olds— and dose two. therefore, for 16 and 17-year-olds we _ and dose two. therefore, for 16 and 17—year—olds we are _ and dose two. therefore, for 16 and 17—year—olds we are advising - and dose two. therefore, for 16 and 17—year—olds we are advising the . 17—year—olds we are advising the second _ 17—year—olds we are advising the second dose _ 17—year—olds we are advising the second dose is— 17—year—olds we are advising the second dose is given _ 17—year—olds we are advising the second dose is given 12- 17—year—olds we are advising the second dose is given 12 weeks i 17—year—olds we are advising thej second dose is given 12 weeks or more _ second dose is given 12 weeks or more after— second dose is given 12 weeks or more after the _ second dose is given 12 weeks or more after the first _ second dose is given 12 weeks or more after the first dose. - second dose is given 12 weeks or more after the first dose. in- more after the first dose. in summary, _ more after the first dose. in summary, there _ more after the first dose. in summary, there are - more after the first dose. in summary, there are two- more after the first dose. in- summary, there are two updates we are giving _ summary, there are two updates we are giving today~ _ summary, there are two updates we are giving today. the _ summary, there are two updates we are giving today. the first _ summary, there are two updates we are giving today. the first is - summary, there are two updates we are giving today. the first is for - summary, there are two updates we are giving today. the first is for a i are giving today. the first is for a booster— are giving today. the first is for a booster dose _ are giving today. the first is for a booster dose for— are giving today. the first is for a booster dose for persons - are giving today. the first is for a booster dose for persons aged i are giving today. the first is for a | booster dose for persons aged 40 are giving today. the first is for a i booster dose for persons aged 40 to a9 booster dose for persons aged 40 to 49 years _ booster dose for persons aged 40 to 49 years old — booster dose for persons aged 40 to 49 years old and _ booster dose for persons aged 40 to a9 years old and a _ booster dose for persons aged a0 to
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a9 years old and a second _ booster dose for persons aged a0 to a9 years old and a second dose - booster dose for persons aged a0 to a9 years old and a second dose of. a9 years old and a second dose of the pfizer—biontech _ a9 years old and a second dose of the pfizer—biontech vaccine - a9 years old and a second dose of the pfizer—biontech vaccine for i a9 years old and a second dose of the pfizer—biontech vaccine for 16 to 17-year-olds _ the pfizer—biontech vaccine for 16 to 17—year—olds. both _ the pfizer—biontech vaccine for 16 to 17—year—olds. both of - the pfizer—biontech vaccine for 16 to 17—year—olds. both of these - to 17—year—olds. both of these updates— to 17—year—olds. both of these updates are _ to 17—year—olds. both of these updates are important - to 17—year—olds. both of these updates are important to - to 17—year—olds. both of these - updates are important to maximise our protection _ updates are important to maximise our protection against _ updates are important to maximise our protection against this - updates are important to maximise our protection against this virus - our protection against this virus and i_ our protection against this virus and i strongly— our protection against this virus and i strongly urge _ our protection against this virus and i strongly urge anyone - our protection against this virus and i strongly urge anyone who| our protection against this virus l and i strongly urge anyone who is eligible _ and i strongly urge anyone who is eligible for — and i strongly urge anyone who is eligible for these _ and i strongly urge anyone who is eligible for these vaccines - and i strongly urge anyone who is eligible for these vaccines to - and i strongly urge anyone who isi eligible for these vaccines to come and have _ eligible for these vaccines to come and have those _ eligible for these vaccines to come and have those vaccines. - eligible for these vaccines to come and have those vaccines. thank. eligible for these vaccines to come i and have those vaccines. thank you. thank— and have those vaccines. thank you. thank you _ and have those vaccines. thank you. thank you i— and have those vaccines. thank you. thank you iam _ and have those vaccines. thank you. thank you. i am now— and have those vaccines. thank you. thank you. i am nowjust _ and have those vaccines. thank you. thank you. i am nowjust going - and have those vaccines. thank you. thank you. i am nowjust going to i thank you. i am nowjust going to make a few overarching remarks to follow our two technical experts before we open for some questions. i think it is clear we are now moving at a considerable pace with the booster programme. the uk data shows so far that in adults aged over 60 after boosting with 30 micrograms of pfizer and 50 micrograms of moderna,
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we are achieving well in excess of 90% protection against symptomatic infection, irrespective of which vaccine people had as their primary course. and on the basis of those figures, i would therefore expect protection against hospitalisation and death to be even higher after boosting once we have the data here in the uk. for now, we look at the israeli data and some key publications they're showing that in people aged over 60 in israel, after a messenger booster and compared with simply having received the first two doses of pfizer, in the case of israel three to four weeks apart, they are observing a tenfold reduction against all covid infections and 18.7 fold reduction
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against hospitalisations and a 1a.7 fold reduction against mortality. and that is on top of the initial course of pfizer. so i believe therefore, if the booster programme is successful and with very high uptake, we can massively reduce the worry about hospitalisation and death due to covid at christmas and for the rest of this winter for literally millions of people. it really is as simple and decisive as that. now the jcvi really is as simple and decisive as that. now thejcvi is independent and it is thorough. it first showed its independence when it advised on the 12 week interval for vaccines at the 12 week interval for vaccines at the beginning of the uk programme. at the time it was publicly criticised for doing so by the british medical association and the world health organization but the data now shows that the jcvi was
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right and many nations have now followed the uk strategy. so whilst vaccines fundamentally change the course of the pandemic in the uk and the high uptake of the initial programme has saved countless lives and helped restore ourfreedoms in and helped restore ourfreedoms in an unprecedented way. it is also clear that protection will wane over time and that is after the first two doses of a primary course. that is especially so in older adults with risk conditions. that explains why we have already made the decisions we have already made the decisions we have already made the decisions we have made about the booster programme. but the waning signal, whilst smaller, is also beginning to show in the a0 to a9 age group and without boosting, i would not expect it to be static, i would expect it to increase. so thejcvi again has
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acted decisively and recommended that the booster programme is now extended to a0 to a9—year—olds. on 16 to 17—year—olds and the announcement today of the second dose, confidence has grown with time that two doses of the pfizer vaccine is the right choice for this age group. you have heard that confidence has grown over safety. in particular, the very low risks of suspected myocarditis compared with the long—term benefits of a life without covid illness and covid disruption. jcvi has used the data in an extra safety step of adding in that 12 week intervalfor in an extra safety step of adding in that 12 week interval for the second dosein that 12 week interval for the second dose in 16 to 17—year—olds without risk conditions. i have full confidence in both the decisions that have been announced today. the
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uk expects to have enough supplies of vaccine to implement these changes. the details of how to access the boosters for these extra two layers of protection will be announced in due course by the nhs. but in the meantime, i would say it is still a priority and a priority ordering for the booster doses. age is still the biggest risk factor. the elderly adults at risk and health and social care workers remained the top priority for boosters. we should never have a case where a0—year—old without risk conditions are vaccinated en masse whilst many 60 and 70—year—olds are waiting for their boosters. but the natural timing of when we implemented the initial programme should mean that in the main, there
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is a natural ordering to the time at which somebody becomes eligible for a booster at six months. i don't expect this to be a significant problem. so the nhs is moving at real pace now, boosting 300 to a00 people per day but all of this will still take some time to achieve. i want to make another plea to people who have not been vaccinated, or have only had one dose. it is now very clear indeed that one dose is not enough of any of the uk deployed vaccines and that no doses at all massively increases the risk of hospitalisation. the latest uk health security data show that for the age band 18 to 29, the rate of admission to hospital with covid is 1.a per100,000 if
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admission to hospital with covid is 1.a per 100,000 if double vaccinated. but 7.8 per 100,000 if unvaccinated, which is fivefold higher. foraged unvaccinated, which is fivefold higher. for aged 30 to 39, those similar rates of a.1 per 100,000 for the double vaccinated and 17.3 per 100,000 for the unvaccinated. which is four times higher. just to finally summarise, the uk covid programme is evolving as the data evolves. two further evolutionary steps are announced today. this is
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how we go forward, wait for the data, move the dial. wait again for more data, move the dial. develop confidence and certainty with every step. people keep asking me about christmas. i think for christmas and the winter period we can expect respiratory viruses to be around and we are particularly concerned the flu will come back and add to our problems. it could be quite a bumpy few months ahead. but everyone has a key role to play in achieving a safe and disruption free winter as possible. where face coverings in crowded places if it is practical to do so. increase indoor ventilation whenever you can. make sure you are vaccinated and like any medicine, make sure he finish the course. and when you are called for your booster, please come forward is a place so that we as a whole uk can get on and finish this job. thank you very much, i am now going to open this meeting for questions. the first of which i think is from fergus walsh at the bbc. thank you
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ve much fergus walsh at the bbc. thank you very much indeed. _ fergus walsh at the bbc. thank you very much indeed. can _ fergus walsh at the bbc. thank you very much indeed. can i— fergus walsh at the bbc. thank you very much indeed. can i ask - fergus walsh at the bbc. thank you very much indeed. can i ask firstly, | very much indeed. can i ask firstly, is it inevitable that we are heading towards third booster doses for adults of all ages? and also, is there an ethical question about giving booster doses in the uk and other richer nations whilst some poorer countries are struggling for first doses?— poorer countries are struggling for first doses? would you like to take the technical _ first doses? would you like to take the technical question _ first doses? would you like to take the technical question about - the technical question about consideration of boosters for lower ages than a0 and i will handle the other one? ages than 40 and i will handle the other one?— ages than 40 and i will handle the other one? ., , . other one? thanks very much. indeed, it ma be other one? thanks very much. indeed, it may be adults _ other one? thanks very much. indeed, it may be adults who _ other one? thanks very much. indeed, it may be adults who are _ other one? thanks very much. indeed, it may be adults who are under- other one? thanks very much. indeed, it may be adults who are under 40 - it may be adults who are under a0 years— it may be adults who are under a0 years might — it may be adults who are under a0 years might require _ it may be adults who are under a0 years might require at— it may be adults who are under a0 years might require at least- it may be adults who are under a0 years might require at least a - it may be adults who are under a0| years might require at least a dose or a third _ years might require at least a dose or a third dose _ years might require at least a dose or a third dose at _ years might require at least a dose or a third dose at some _ years might require at least a dose or a third dose at some point. - years might require at least a dose or a third dose at some point. wel or a third dose at some point. we don't _ or a third dose at some point. we don't know— or a third dose at some point. we don't know whether— or a third dose at some point. we don't know whether that - or a third dose at some point. we don't know whether that is - don't know whether that is definitely— don't know whether that is definitely the _ don't know whether that is definitely the case - don't know whether that is
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definitely the case yet. - don't know whether that isj definitely the case yet. we don't know whether that is - definitely the case yet. we are looking — definitely the case yet. we are looking very _ definitely the case yet. we are looking very closely _ definitely the case yet. we are looking very closely at - definitely the case yet. we are looking very closely at the - definitely the case yet. we are | looking very closely at the data definitely the case yet. we are - looking very closely at the data all the time _ looking very closely at the data all the time and — looking very closely at the data all the time and should _ looking very closely at the data all the time and should there - looking very closely at the data all the time and should there be - the time and should there be sufficient _ the time and should there be sufficient signal— the time and should there be sufficient signal to— the time and should there be sufficient signal to warrant i the time and should there be sufficient signal to warrant a i the time and should there be - sufficient signal to warrant a third dose, _ sufficient signal to warrant a third dose so — sufficient signal to warrant a third dose so a — sufficient signal to warrant a third dose, so a booster— sufficient signal to warrant a third dose, so a booster dose - sufficient signal to warrant a third dose, so a booster dose for- sufficient signal to warrant a third dose, so a booster dose for this i sufficient signal to warrant a third . dose, so a booster dose for this age group, _ dose, so a booster dose for this age group, then— dose, so a booster dose for this age group, then we— dose, so a booster dose for this age group, then we will— dose, so a booster dose for this age group, then we will announce - dose, so a booster dose for this age group, then we will announce that l group, then we will announce that and advise — group, then we will announce that and advise it — group, then we will announce that and advise it accordingly. - group, then we will announce that and advise it accordingly. as - and advise it accordingly. as regards _ and advise it accordingly. as regards the _ and advise it accordingly. as regards the remit _ and advise it accordingly. as regards the remit of - and advise it accordingly. as regards the remit ofjcvi, i and advise it accordingly. as| regards the remit ofjcvi, we and advise it accordingly. as - regards the remit ofjcvi, we are tasked _ regards the remit ofjcvi, we are tasked obviously— regards the remit ofjcvi, we are tasked obviously with _ regards the remit ofjcvi, we are tasked obviously with advising i regards the remit ofjcvi, we are . tasked obviously with advising what is best_ tasked obviously with advising what is best for— tasked obviously with advising what is best for the — tasked obviously with advising what is best for the uk _ tasked obviously with advising what is best for the uk population, - tasked obviously with advising what is best for the uk population, so i i is best for the uk population, so i will pass— is best for the uk population, so i will pass back_ is best for the uk population, so i will pass back with _ is best for the uk population, so i will pass back with regard - is best for the uk population, so i will pass back with regard to - is best for the uk population, so i will pass back with regard to the i will pass back with regard to the other_ will pass back with regard to the other part — will pass back with regard to the other part of _ will pass back with regard to the other part of your— will pass back with regard to the other part of your question. - will pass back with regard to the other part of your question. nobody workin: in other part of your question. nobody working in public _ other part of your question. nobody working in public health _ other part of your question. nobody working in public health would - working in public health would question for one second the ethos that until we are all safe from this virus, no one is fully safe. there is of course, a global public health concern about making sure that as many countries and as many people around the world have access to these vaccines. but equally, ourjob
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as advisers to the uk government is to give advice relevant to the uk and that is what we do. we advise the ministers and the uk has a massive programme of vaccine donation under way in parallel to our own vaccine programme, which is advised byjcvi. next question is from emily morgan at itv. advised by jcvi. next question is from emily morgan at itv.- advised by jcvi. next question is from emily morgan at itv. given that onl athird from emily morgan at itv. given that only a third of _ from emily morgan at itv. given that only a third of the _ from emily morgan at itv. given that only a third of the over— from emily morgan at itv. given that only a third of the over 50s _ from emily morgan at itv. given that only a third of the over 50s have - only a third of the over 505 have come forward for their boosterjab right now, do you think that extending it to the over 405 is going to make any real significant difference to hospital admissions this winter?— this winter? thank you for the question- _ this winter? thank you for the question. maybe _ this winter? thank you for the question. maybe you - this winter? thank you for the question. maybe you might i this winter? thank you for the i question. maybe you might start this winter? thank you for the - question. maybe you might start on talking about the rapidity of the response to the booster dose and help answer some of this question? i help answer some of this question? i want to remind everyone that we know
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increasing _ want to remind everyone that we know increasing age — want to remind everyone that we know increasing age is— want to remind everyone that we know increasing age is related _ want to remind everyone that we know increasing age is related with- increasing age is related with increasing _ increasing age is related with increasing risk— increasing age is related with increasing risk of— increasing age is related with increasing risk of severe - increasing age is related with. increasing risk of severe illness. increasing — increasing risk of severe illness. increasing age _ increasing risk of severe illness. increasing age is _ increasing risk of severe illness. increasing age is also _ increasing risk of severe illness. increasing age is also related i increasing risk of severe illness. increasing age is also related to| increasing age is also related to the rate — increasing age is also related to the rate of— increasing age is also related to the rate of waning _ increasing age is also related to the rate of waning of— increasing age is also related to the rate of waning of protection| the rate of waning of protection from _ the rate of waning of protection from the — the rate of waning of protection from the first _ the rate of waning of protection from the first two _ the rate of waning of protection from the first two doses. - the rate of waning of protection from the first two doses. and . the rate of waning of protection| from the first two doses. and so the rate of waning of protection - from the first two doses. and so the priority— from the first two doses. and so the priority must — from the first two doses. and so the priority must be _ from the first two doses. and so the priority must be that _ from the first two doses. and so the priority must be that we _ from the first two doses. and so the priority must be that we offer - priority must be that we offer vaccination _ priority must be that we offer vaccination and _ priority must be that we offer vaccination and we _ priority must be that we offeri vaccination and we encourage vaccination _ vaccination and we encourage vaccination in _ vaccination and we encourage vaccination in older— vaccination and we encourage vaccination in older people i vaccination in older people initially _ vaccination in older people initially. the _ vaccination in older people initially. the fact _ vaccination in older people initially. the fact that - vaccination in older people initially. the fact that a - vaccination in older people i initially. the fact that a third vaccination in older people - initially. the fact that a third of people — initially. the fact that a third of people who _ initially. the fact that a third of people who are _ initially. the fact that a third of people who are over _ initially. the fact that a third of people who are over 50 - initially. the fact that a third of people who are over 50 are - initially. the fact that a third of- people who are over 50 are eligible suggests— people who are over 50 are eligible suggests that — people who are over 50 are eligible suggests that we _ people who are over 50 are eligible suggests that we still _ people who are over 50 are eligible suggests that we still have - people who are over 50 are eligible suggests that we still have some i people who are over 50 are eligible l suggests that we still have some way to -o suggests that we still have some way to go to _ suggests that we still have some way to go to encourage _ suggests that we still have some way to go to encourage as _ suggests that we still have some way to go to encourage as many- suggests that we still have some way to go to encourage as many of- suggests that we still have some way to go to encourage as many of the i to go to encourage as many of the people _ to go to encourage as many of the people who — to go to encourage as many of the people who are _ to go to encourage as many of the people who are already _ to go to encourage as many of the people who are already eligible i to go to encourage as many of the| people who are already eligible for their booster — people who are already eligible for their booster dose _ people who are already eligible for their booster dose to _ people who are already eligible for their booster dose to be _ people who are already eligible for. their booster dose to be vaccinated, so that _ their booster dose to be vaccinated, so that they — their booster dose to be vaccinated, so that they can _ their booster dose to be vaccinated, so that they can have _ their booster dose to be vaccinated, so that they can have the _ their booster dose to be vaccinated, so that they can have the maximum | so that they can have the maximum protection _ so that they can have the maximum protection for — so that they can have the maximum protection for themselves. - so that they can have the maximum protection for themselves. by - protection for themselves. by extending _ protection for themselves. by extending the _ protection for themselves. by extending the booster- protection for themselves. by i extending the booster programme protection for themselves. by - extending the booster programme to 40 to 49—year—olds, _ extending the booster programme to 40 to 49—year—olds, we _ extending the booster programme to 40 to 49—year—olds, we are - extending the booster programme to 40 to 49—year—olds, we are not i 40 to 49—year—olds, we are not looking — 40 to 49—year—olds, we are not looking just _ 40 to 49—year—olds, we are not looking just to _ 40 to 49—year—olds, we are not looking just to this _ 40 to 49—year—olds, we are not looking just to this winter, i 40 to 49—year—olds, we are not looking just to this winter, but i looking just to this winter, but
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also _ looking just to this winter, but also looking _ looking just to this winter, but also looking to _ looking just to this winter, but also looking to the _ looking just to this winter, but also looking to the longer i looking just to this winter, but| also looking to the longer term protectioh _ also looking to the longer term protection. because _ also looking to the longer term protection. because there i also looking to the longer term protection. because there may| also looking to the longer term i protection. because there may well be evidence — protection. because there may well be evidence to _ protection. because there may well be evidence to suggest _ protection. because there may well be evidence to suggest in _ protection. because there may well be evidence to suggest in future i be evidence to suggest in future that the — be evidence to suggest in future that the third — be evidence to suggest in future that the third booster— be evidence to suggest in future that the third booster dose i be evidence to suggest in future i that the third booster dose pushes up that the third booster dose pushes up the _ that the third booster dose pushes up the immune _ that the third booster dose pushes up the immune response - that the third booster dose pushes up the immune response and i that the third booster dose pushes i up the immune response and pushes out the _ up the immune response and pushes out the immune _ up the immune response and pushes out the immune response _ up the immune response and pushes out the immune response so- up the immune response and pushes out the immune response so it - up the immune response and pushes out the immune response so it lasts| out the immune response so it lasts for much _ out the immune response so it lasts for much longer _ out the immune response so it lasts for much longer. when _ out the immune response so it lasts for much longer. when i— out the immune response so it lasts for much longer. when i talk- out the immune response so it lasts for much longer. when i talk abouti for much longer. when i talk about much _ for much longer. when i talk about much longer, — for much longer. when i talk about much longer, we _ for much longer. when i talk about much longer, we are _ for much longer. when i talk about much longer, we are hoping - for much longer. when i talk about much longer, we are hoping that i for much longer. when i talk about i much longer, we are hoping that the third trooster— much longer, we are hoping that the third booster dose _ much longer, we are hoping that the third booster dose will— much longer, we are hoping that the third booster dose will mean - much longer, we are hoping that the third booster dose will mean that i third booster dose will mean that protection — third booster dose will mean that protection does _ third booster dose will mean that protection does not _ third booster dose will mean that protection does not wane - third booster dose will mean that protection does not wane withini third booster dose will mean that i protection does not wane within six months. _ protection does not wane within six months. or— protection does not wane within six months. oriust_ protection does not wane within six months, orjust after— protection does not wane within six months, orjust after six _ protection does not wane within six months, orjust after six months, l protection does not wane within sixl months, orjust after six months, as we are _ months, orjust after six months, as we are estimating _ months, orjust after six months, as we are estimating now. _ months, orjust after six months, as we are estimating now. but- months, orjust after six months, as we are estimating now. but may- months, orjust after six months, as we are estimating now. but may be| we are estimating now. but may be pushed _ we are estimating now. but may be pushed out — we are estimating now. but may be pushed out too _ we are estimating now. but may be pushed out too much _ we are estimating now. but may be pushed out too much longer- we are estimating now. but may be pushed out too much longer than i pushed out too much longer than that, _ pushed out too much longer than that, so— pushed out too much longer than that, so many— pushed out too much longer than that, so many more _ pushed out too much longer than that, so many more months. i that, so many more months. studio: _ that, so many more months. srumo: said _ that, so many more months. srumo: said that _ that, so many more months. i studio: said that announcement that, so many more months. - studio: said that announcement from jonathan van tam, deputy chief medical officer and others they're confirming two important developments, boosterjabs will be rolled out to under 505, 40 to 49 age group can get boosters and i6 and i7—year—old5 can get two faxes
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of the vaccine rather than a single dose. let's get some thoughts from our health correspondent.— our health correspondent. really im ortant our health correspondent. really important announcement, i our health correspondent. really important announcement, it i our health correspondent. really important announcement, it had| our health correspondent. p,_ii important announcement, it had been rumoured and reported this morning we were going to hear about the expansion of the booster programme. a5 effective as vaccines can be, protecting people against serious illness and death, there is increasing evidence they do wane over time. so this announcement is expanding currently the booster programme for over 505, young adults with certain health conditions in front line health workers. this will expand to those between 40 and 49. we have got some interesting data, evidence from the first uk study by the uk health security agency shows after two weeks after a booster, protection against symptomatic infection for over 505 was 93%,
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between 93% and 94%, depending if you had astrazeneca or pfizer. it shows the power of the booster programme. fori6 shows the power of the booster programme. for 16 and i7—year—olds up programme. for 16 and i7—year—olds up until now they have been able to receive one dose, it is now being extended to two.— receive one dose, it is now being extended to two. thank you so much, and i. we extended to two. thank you so much, and i- we will— extended to two. thank you so much, and i. we will have _ extended to two. thank you so much, and i. we will have more _ extended to two. thank you so much, and i. we will have more on - extended to two. thank you so much, and i. we will have more on that i extended to two. thank you so much, and i. we will have more on that of. and i. we will have more on that of the hour, but first a catch up with the hour, but first a catch up with the weather. hello again. we have had some problems with five this morning which is lifting. parts of wales in the south—west, may be the odd spot in the south—east. a week by the front is going to bring rain, but behind that weak front for scotland and northern ireland a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine but the klau building towards the west and temperatures up to 13 degrees. a weather front and temperatures up to 13 degrees. a weatherfront sink and temperatures up to 13 degrees. a weather front sink southwards with some spots of rain. there will be some spots of rain. there will be some misty fog forming and a band of
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rain in the shape of a new weather front by the end of the night. temperatures falling to about five to 9 degrees. tomorrow it will be windy across the far north of scotland and the rain is slowly sinking southwards, tending to break up sinking southwards, tending to break up when doing so. the patchy mist and fog lifting across the south and and fog lifting across the south and a fair bit of cloud but some brighter breaks.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. m15 and counter—terrorism police are investigating yesterday's explosion in a taxi in liverpool yesterday which killed one man. the taxi driver has been named locally as david perry. detectives from counter terrorism police north west have arrested three men following the explosion, which happened just before 11am on remembrance sunday. uk government advisers recommend the covid—19 vaccine booster programme should be extended to include healthy 40— to 49—year—olds, and 16— and17—year—olds should come forward for a second dose. when you are called for your booster dosein when you are called for your booster dose in the next phase you can come
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forward confident that the benefits in

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