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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 15, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. the fatal car explosion outside a liverpool hospital — mi5 are called in to help with the investigation after one man died. liverpool women's hospital remains cordoned off this morning. properties are still being searched at several locations here in liverpool. in one area some homes had to be evacuated. three people have been arrested under the terrorism act. six months after a damning report into the bbc�*s handling of princess diana's 1995 panorama interview, her brother tells this programme he believes there's more to come out. it's clear to me that there are
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certain people who were in the bbc who have behaved in a way that is truly abysmal and possibly criminal. how much is a fair salary? the rate of the so—called real living wage goes up today. i'll explain what difference it can make to low—paid workers. it's being called one of the greatest drives of his career. from ten places back on the grid, lewis hamilton wins in brazil to keep a thrilling formula one title race alive. owain's drumathon is officially recognised as the most successful 2a hour challenge in children in need's 41 year history yesterday the temperature in the highlands reached nearly 16 degrees. this week it is going to state mild, mostly dry. any heavy rain in the
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north and west, especially of scotland. next we get is turning much colder. details coming up. it's monday, 15th november. our main story. the security service, m15, has been called in to assist counter terrorism police investigating yesterday's car explosion outside a hospital in liverpool. one man has been killed and another injured in the incident. three men have been arrested under the terrorism act, after several houses were evacuated in the city. james reynolds' report contains flashing images. the police say they are working at speed to establish the circumstances of this, the car explosion just outside the liverpool women's hospital in central liverpool. it happened shortly before 11 o'clock yesterday morning, at a time when remembrance day services were about to begin across the country. the driver survived the blast. the passenger, who has not
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been named, was killed. unfortunately, i can confirm that one person has died and another has been taken to hospital, where he is being treated for his injuries, which, thankfully, are not life—threatening. so far we understand that the car involved was a taxi, which pulled up at the hospital shortly before the explosion occurred. in the kensington area of liverpool, around a mile from the explosion, three men, aged 21, 26 and 29, were arrested under the terrorism act. this gives the authorities the power to hold detainees for up to 1a days without charge. and late at night a number of homes in liverpool's rutland avenue and nearby cumberland avenue were evacuated. they're reported to be close to a house raided by the police in the hours after the incident. counter—terrorism police north—west are leading the overall investigation. they're supported by officers from merseyside police, and the security service,
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m15, is also assisting. investigators say they're keeping an open mind as to what caused the explosion. james reynolds, bbc news. our reporter, andy gill, is outside liverpool women's hospital this morning. good morning, andy. good morning. yes, good morning, andy. good morning. yes. liverpool— good morning, andy. good morning. yes, liverpool women's _ good morning, andy. good morning. yes, liverpool women's hospital - yes, liverpool women's hospital remains — yes, liverpool women's hospital remains cordoned off this morning. it is a _ remains cordoned off this morning. it is a large — remains cordoned off this morning. it is a large site and there is police — it is a large site and there is police tape around the entire perimeter. police still patrolling the grounds. the hospital has said that untii— the grounds. the hospital has said that until further notice visiting will be — that until further notice visiting will be restricted. yesterday people were being diverted. we are told appointments will go ahead as normal today _ appointments will go ahead as normal today but _ appointments will go ahead as normal today. but people can expect delays and have _ today. but people can expect delays and have been told they will see significant security increased around — significant security increased around the site. this is one of
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three — around the site. this is one of three locations across liverpool at the centre — three locations across liverpool at the centre of this investigation. to the centre of this investigation. to the north— the centre of this investigation. to the north of— the centre of this investigation. to the north of here come around sutciiffe — the north of here come around sutcliffe avenue and bold street, is where _ sutcliffe avenue and bold street, is where three men were arrested yesterday, aged 29, 26 and where three men were arrested yesterday, aged 29,26 and 21. to the south — yesterday, aged 29,26 and 21. to the south of here, around rutland avenue. _ the south of here, around rutland avenue, again police presence there yesterday _ avenue, again police presence there yesterday. some homes were evacuated. counter—terrorism police are keeping — evacuated. counter—terrorism police are keeping an open mind about what may be _ are keeping an open mind about what may be behind these. they were told also that _ may be behind these. they were told also that priti patel, the home secretary, is being kept updated about— secretary, is being kept updated about developments. yesterday the prime _ about developments. yesterday the prime minister, horacejohnson, said his thoughts were with the people of liverpooi _ his thoughts were with the people of liverpool. this happened just before 11 liverpool. this happened just before it o'clock _ liverpool. this happened just before 11 o'clock. as we've heard, just before — 11 o'clock. as we've heard, just before remembrance services were due to take _ before remembrance services were due to take place across the country. yesterday, — to take place across the country. yesterday, the liverpool memorial service _ yesterday, the liverpool memorial service was— yesterday, the liverpool memorial service was at the anglican cathedral, which is a short walk from _ cathedral, which is a short walk from here _ cathedral, which is a short walk from here. that is unusual. the location — from here. that is unusual. the location where it normally happens is more _ location where it normally happens is more in — location where it normally happens is more in the city centre, but because — is more in the city centre, but because of— is more in the city centre, but because of roadworks it wasn't
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happening there. so one person died in the _ happening there. so one person died in the exploding car, another person believed _ in the exploding car, another person believed to — in the exploding car, another person believed to be the taxi driver was injured _ believed to be the taxi driver was injured. and police have also said that generally across liverpool there — that generally across liverpool there will be an increased police presence — there will be an increased police presence today. there will be more batrois _ presence today. there will be more patrols. that is in an effort to reassure _ patrols. that is in an effort to reassure people. andy, thank you for the update. we will speak to you later. buckingham palace says the queen is disappointed to have missed the annual remembrance sunday service at the cenotaph yesterday, after spraining her back. it's the first time in 22 years that she's missed the event. helena wilkinson is in windsor this morning. good morning, helena. this is another public engagement the queen has missed. what does this tell us about her health? well, we know that buckingham palace say that— well, we know that buckingham palace say that she missed the remembrance service _ say that she missed the remembrance service yesterday, and that is significant given that it is the most — significant given that it is the most significant engagement in the queen— most significant engagement in the queen pass my calendar. but she missed _ queen pass my calendar. but she missed it — queen pass my calendar. but she
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missed it because of that back sbraim — missed it because of that back sprain. we know that she suffered at the back— sprain. we know that she suffered at the back sprain fairly recently because — the back sprain fairly recently because on the had said the queen would _ because on the had said the queen would be _ because on the had said the queen would be attending remembrance sunday— would be attending remembrance sunday yesterday. so it was a very last minute — sunday yesterday. so it was a very last minute cancellation. in fact, a couple _ last minute cancellation. in fact, a couple of— last minute cancellation. in fact, a couple of hours before that service took place — couple of hours before that service took place yesterday at the cenotaph in took place yesterday at the cenotaph ih lohdom _ took place yesterday at the cenotaph in london. what we also know is that she is— in london. what we also know is that she is hot— in london. what we also know is that she is not expected to need hospital treatment— she is not expected to need hospital treatment for that back sprain. but don't _ treatment for that back sprain. but don't forget, the queen was resting after that— don't forget, the queen was resting after that overnight hospital stay in central— after that overnight hospital stay in central london in the middle of october — in central london in the middle of october. she had been resting for three _ october. she had been resting for three weeks. it had been hoped, it was the _ three weeks. it had been hoped, it was the queen's firm intention to attend _ was the queen's firm intention to attend remembrance service yesterday. she is resting in winter. we are _ yesterday. she is resting in winter. we are told — yesterday. she is resting in winter. we are told by buckingham palace that she _ we are told by buckingham palace that she is expected to continue carrvihg — that she is expected to continue carrying out those light duties. but ithink— carrying out those light duties. but i think probably in the minds of the palace _ i think probably in the minds of the palace officials around her, doctors as well, _ palace officials around her, doctors as well, and — palace officials around her, doctors as well, and the queen, who is 95
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years— as well, and the queen, who is 95 years old. — as well, and the queen, who is 95 years old, don't forget, whether she will have _ years old, don't forget, whether she will have to — years old, don't forget, whether she will have to come at some stage, scaled _ will have to come at some stage, scaled back those public engagements. but for the moment she is in windsor resting on doctor's advice — advice. thank you. the case of the former conservative minister, owen paterson, which sparked debate over mp's behaviour, is back in the commons today. the government tried to block mr paterson's suspension ten days ago, then made a u—turn after a huge backlash. let's speak to our chief political correspondent, adam fleming, now. good morning. what latest development are we expecting today? well, this represents, this motion, the final— well, this represents, this motion, the final stage of that u—turn. it is the _ the final stage of that u—turn. it is the last— the final stage of that u—turn. it is the last bit of the u—turn. it will reverse completely what the government's initial position was an 0weh _ government's initial position was an owen paterson. they wanted to pause the disciplinary process against them — the disciplinary process against them. this will now end it by endorsing _ them. this will now end it by endorsing the report by the standards committee in parliament, which _ standards committee in parliament, which found him guilty of an
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egregious breach of parliament's rules, _ egregious breach of parliament's rules, for— egregious breach of parliament's rules, for which mps's second jobs interact— rules, for which mps's second jobs interact with parliamentary business and interact with parliamentary business ahd how— interact with parliamentary business and how mps interact with the government. it will also end the special— government. it will also end the special committee of the government was going _ special committee of the government was going to set up, which was going to look— was going to set up, which was going to look at— was going to set up, which was going to look at changing the rules overall— to look at changing the rules overall as to how mps are disciplined, by looking at how you can introduce an appeals process. it is another— can introduce an appeals process. it is another example of where number 10 kihd _ is another example of where number 10 kind of— is another example of where number 10 kind of got it wrong in this because _ 10 kind of got it wrong in this because they initially refused to even _ because they initially refused to even have this motion saying, why do you need _ even have this motion saying, why do you need to _ even have this motion saying, why do you need to censure owen paterson when _ you need to censure owen paterson when he — you need to censure owen paterson when he is _ you need to censure owen paterson when he is no longer an mp? lots of mps said. _ when he is no longer an mp? lots of mps said, well, otherwise you have -ot mps said, well, otherwise you have got a _ mps said, well, otherwise you have got a report— mps said, well, otherwise you have got a report that is left dangling and there is no finality to the process _ and there is no finality to the process. also, it might mean there isn't enough — process. also, it might mean there isn't enough time tonight in parliament for mps to actually debate — parliament for mps to actually debate this, so the cracks in the tory— debate this, so the cracks in the tory party— debate this, so the cracks in the tory party and the disagreements among _ tory party and the disagreements among conservative mps, may not be so on _ among conservative mps, may not be so on display tonight as they have been _ so on display tonight as they have been in _ so on display tonight as they have been in other parts of this process.
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i been in other parts of this process. i also _ been in other parts of this process. i also think— been in other parts of this process. i also think number 10 will be relieved — i also think number 10 will be relieved that if you look at the papers — relieved that if you look at the papers today there aren't really any stories _ papers today there aren't really any stories about mps's second job or ministers — stories about mps's second job or ministers lobbying, or mps lobbying, or mpss— ministers lobbying, or mps lobbying, or mps's expenses. labour are still trying _ or mps's expenses. labour are still trying to— or mps's expenses. labour are still trying to stir— or mps's expenses. labour are still trying to stir that pot. thank— trying to stir that pot. thank you. a nine—year—old boy who was placed in an induced coma after a crowd surge at the astroworld festival in texas, has died. ezra blount had been on life support in hospital due to severe brain and organ trauma since the show on the 5th of november. he is the youngest of 10 concert—goers to have been killed during rapper travis scott's headline performance. major improvements in the care for sickle cell patients in england is being called for, after "serious failings", including unavoidable deaths, were identified in an inquiry. the report, by a cross—party group of mps, found there was evidence of substandard levels of care in a&e and a lack of awareness of the condition amongst staff. nhs england says ten new centres
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for sickle cell disease are being set up across the country. around two million unvaccinated people in austria have been placed under lockdown measures from this morning, as the country faces a surge in infection levels. anyone over the age of 12 who hasn't received two doses of a covid jab will only be allowed to leave home for limited reasons, like working or buying food. the measures will initially last for ten days. monday morning, time for our first visit to are michael o'carroll. she is on the river. morning. walking on water this morning! good morning. this morning if you are stepping out early on there is quite a bit of fog across parts of england and wales. it is quite dense as well, especially across the midlands and, if you are driving on the m6 bear that in and, if you are driving on the m6 bearthat in mind. and, if you are driving on the m6 bear that in mind. the other thing you will notice it is it is a mild
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start. it is going to be staying mild this week. there will be rain around but mainly in the north. we have had a quick look at about —— at what is looking like next week. temperatures are going to plunge. make the most of this week. we have had rain coming in through the night. it has been heavy but it is moving south, intending to fragment. through the course of this morning it will eventually clear southern scotland, continue across northern england into wales and eventually into the south—west. behind the breeze will pick up. we will see a fair bit of sunshine, cloud in the west. eventually we will lose the mist and low fog from england and wales. we will start to see some holes develop. a few brighter spells. temperatures ten to 13 degrees. roughly speaking the average at this time of the year, seven to 12, north to south. as we head on through this evening and overnight here is the weak front still producing this band of cloud and also some spots of rain. mist
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and also some spots of rain. mist and fog patches forming. not nearly as widespread as this morning. we have this next system bringing in some rain in strengthening winds. that will sink southwards through the course of tomorrow. quite a bit of cloud around. there will be sunny breaks. very windy across the far north and the west. ten breaks. very windy across the far north and the west. ten to breaks. very windy across the far north and the west. ten to 13 breaks. very windy across the far north and the west. ten to 13 degrees. breaks. very windy across the far north and the west. ten to 13 degrees. thank breaks. very windy across the far north and the west. ten to 13 degrees. thank you. despite the government's plans to raise the minimum wage, there are still claims its too low to cover the increased cost of living. the so—called real living wage is independently calculated, and today will rise to above minimum wage level. nina's here to explain more. it is complicated, isn't it? explain it. it is. businesses are looking at a way of treating staff fairly by protecting their margins as well. good morning. we are talking about what a minimum amount is for people to arran in order to simply live, to pay their bills and keep their heads above water. the government sets the national living
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wage, the smallest hourly rate that employers can legally pay to those aged 23 or over. from april that goes up to £9 50 an hour. if you are on a salary full—time you would earn just over £18,500 a year. there is a different lower minimum wage for apprentices and those younger than 23. but there is also what is called the real living wage. that is based on what the low pay commission think people need, factoring in fuel and rental costs increasing. from today, that is £9.90 per hour. 40p more per hour than the government level. on that the same full—time worker would get nearly £8 a year more. just over £19,000 in total. a bit more if you live in london. you might be thinking, what difference does that make? well, a lot, is the answer. we spoke with ryan. he used to struggle on
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the minimum wage. we also spoke to his boss and why he chooses to pay his boss and why he chooses to pay his staff more. i was working more and more just to -et i was working more and more just to get bv~ _ i was working more and more just to get by. basically pay for rent and any bills— get by. basically pay for rent and any bills i— get by. basically pay for rent and any bills i had to pay. and at the end of— any bills i had to pay. and at the end of the — any bills i had to pay. and at the end of the month i would try to put a little _ end of the month i would try to put a little bit — end of the month i would try to put a little bit away to save and would end up _ a little bit away to save and would end up coming back out of my account — end up coming back out of my account i_ end up coming back out of my account. i was thinking about money all the _ account. i was thinking about money all the time — all the time. for- all the time. for us, a real living wage is at the time. — for us, a real living wage is part of giving people work with dignity and purpose. ithink of giving people work with dignity and purpose. i think we have to ask,... , ., ., , and purpose. i think we have to ask,... ., ,., ask,... everyone worries about mone . ask,... everyone worries about money- but — ask,... everyone worries about money- but i — ask,... everyone worries about money. but i have _ ask,... everyone worries about money. but i have savings - ask,... everyone worries about money. but i have savings now ask,... everyone worries about - money. but i have savings now thanks to being _ money. but i have savings now thanks to being paid a better wage. to where — to being paid a better wage. to where i— to being paid a better wage. to where i don't have to think about, where _ where i don't have to think about, where is _ where i don't have to think about, where is my— where i don't have to think about, where is my bill going to come from and so _ where is my bill going to come from and so on _ where is my bill going to come from and so on and so forth? before that was a _ and so on and so forth? before that was a major— and so on and so forth? before that was a major concern in my life. now,
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i was a major concern in my life. now, i don't _ was a major concern in my life. now, i don't feel— was a major concern in my life. now, i don't feel like i have to save all the extra — i don't feel like i have to save all the extra hoursjust so i can live. so, the extra hoursjust so i can live. so. what — the extra hoursjust so i can live. so, what happens is if you are an employer you choose whether or not to opt into paying more. what is really interesting is there has been a spike in business is registering on the scheme since the start of the pandemic. more than 3000 businesses were credited in that period. that is possibly because the jobs market is possibly because the jobs market is changing and the number of vacancies are going up. answer those behind the scheme think it would become even more appealing to employers. we have seen record numbers of employers signing up to pay the real living wage in the last 18 months. this is because employers are wanting to reward and value their staff and many other staff who were perhaps in those roles that were critical during lockdown, cleaners, security guards, and ultimately, what the real living wage is about is signalling that long—term commitment to the sort of wellbeing and value of your staff, so
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employers sign up with us to pay wage increases every year, it is recalculated every year to reflect those increased living costs. we are expecting living costs to also rise. for some businesses if you do have those margins, if you do, it does increase loyalty. not every business can afford to do it, especially those who have struggled over the last 18 months. tomorrow we get the latest job figures. they will tell is about the number of vacancies, the numbers unemployed. it is a peculiar situation at the moment. we think the number of vacancies is going up by the number of people claiming benefit is also going up. possibly it is an employee is's market when it comes to finding a job. is's market when it comes to finding ajob. more is's market when it comes to finding a job. more businesses will be choosing to pay more, which is quite unusual. thank you. 17 minutes past six. researchers working on a cure for motor neurone disease say they're waiting for more detail on how a game changing £50 million of government funding will be spent. it comes two months after a petition was delivered to downing street by some of those living
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with the terminal illness, including former rugby stars doddie weir and rob burrow, whose stories we've followed closely here on breakfast. here's how they reacted to the news. i'd like to thank everyone who's been involved. it's going to make a huge difference, not only to the patients, but to the mnd family as well. thanks again to everyone, but the hard work starts here. when you when you have a disease which has no cure, all you want is for people to try and find a reasonable treatment for the worst, cruel disease imaginable. with the government pledging £50 million for research to find a positive treatment and a possible cure, means that all sufferers have hope in the future and a hope of living a longer life expectancy. i feel on top of the world. it is like playing great in the game knowing that someone is listening to us. the hard work starts now to find
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an effective treatment. you can see from rob's face there! and the wink at the end. with good reason after this news at the weekend. professor chris mcdermott is one of the mnd researchers who's been leading the campaign for more funding, and joins us now. good morning. it is great to see you this morning. the money is coming. £50 million sounds like a huge amount but actually, it is 10 million per year over five years. what does that mean that you can do now? it what does that mean that you can do now? , :: ., ., , now? it is 50 million. that will be a catalyst — now? it is 50 million. that will be a catalyst. there _ now? it is 50 million. that will be a catalyst. there are _ now? it is 50 million. that will be a catalyst. there are partners - now? it is 50 million. that will be l a catalyst. there are partners from industry _ a catalyst. there are partners from industry who will also come in. what we will— industry who will also come in. what we will be _ industry who will also come in. what we will be able to do is much more thanjust_ we will be able to do is much more thanjust that core we will be able to do is much more than just that core 50 million. we will be able to do is much more thanjust that core 50 million. of course, — thanjust that core 50 million. of course, this— thanjust that core 50 million. of course, this is going to be transformative in how we approach bringing _ transformative in how we approach bringing treatments much faster for patients— bringing treatments much faster for patients with motor neurone disease. mnd has—
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patients with motor neurone disease. mnd has been sitting behind this impenetrable wall. but over the past few years _ impenetrable wall. but over the past few years chinks have been appearing. what this money is going to allow— appearing. what this money is going to allow us— appearing. what this money is going to allow us to do is to really break in to— to allow us to do is to really break in to those — to allow us to do is to really break in to those chinks, rip them apart, -et in to those chinks, rip them apart, get in— in to those chinks, rip them apart, get in there — in to those chinks, rip them apart, get in there and begin to develop meaningful treatments for patients with motor neurone disease. practically, what does that money actually mean? you talk about the difference in obviously research. is that more staff, more equipment, better facilities, that more staff, more equipment, betterfacilities, which that more staff, more equipment, better facilities, which enables you to find out more, does it? i better facilities, which enables you to find out more, does it?- to find out more, does it? i think it is going _ to find out more, does it? i think it is going to _ to find out more, does it? i think it is going to be _ to find out more, does it? i think it is going to be all— to find out more, does it? i think it is going to be all of— to find out more, does it? i think it is going to be all of those - it is going to be all of those things _ it is going to be all of those things. we have been making progress _ things. we have been making progress. the progress has been slow, _ progress. the progress has been slow, it — progress. the progress has been slow, it has _ progress. the progress has been slow, it has not been fast enough. we have _ slow, it has not been fast enough. we have had snail's paste discoveries. we would have got there but we _ discoveries. we would have got there but we would have got there in decades — but we would have got there in decades. now i think we will get there _ decades. now i think we will get there within years. that is because we have _ there within years. that is because we have used the building blocks that have — we have used the building blocks that have been established within the last— that have been established within the last decade, that have been reliant— the last decade, that have been reliant on—
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the last decade, that have been reliant on short—term, often charity funding, _ reliant on short—term, often charity funding, which is insecure. this allows— funding, which is insecure. this allows us— funding, which is insecure. this allows us to meet the demands that people _ allows us to meet the demands that people living with motor neurone disease _ people living with motor neurone disease made from us. to years ago to individuals living with mnd went to individuals living with mnd went to a colleague of mine and said, you need _ to a colleague of mine and said, you need to— to a colleague of mine and said, you need to be _ to a colleague of mine and said, you need to be doing more, you need to be more _ need to be doing more, you need to be more ambitious. what can you do? we put _ be more ambitious. what can you do? we put together a programme of work that we _ we put together a programme of work that we have gone to the government with, that we have gone to the government with. which— that we have gone to the government with, which details there is. it details — with, which details there is. it details how we are going to screen hundreds— details how we are going to screen hundreds of thousands of new compounds, old compounds, identify which— compounds, old compounds, identify which showed the most promise, rapidly— which showed the most promise, rapidly pulled into a pipeline where we validate at the drugs are working _ we validate at the drugs are working. take them into nimble experimental medicine trials using new readouts which tell us if a drug is likely— new readouts which tell us if a drug is likely to — new readouts which tell us if a drug is likely to work within months. and then fast—track them into clinical
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trials _ then fast—track them into clinical trials and — then fast—track them into clinical trials. and the clinical trials which — trials. and the clinical trials which will be very different. in which will be very different. in what which will be very different. what way which will be very different. in what way will they be which will be very different. i“! what way will they be different? they will be inclusive. so, anyone in the _ they will be inclusive. so, anyone in the country who wants to participate in the trial will be able — participate in the trial will be able to— participate in the trial will be able to do so. they will be of low burden~ — able to do so. they will be of low burden~ so — able to do so. they will be of low burden. so the burden of taking part in research _ burden. so the burden of taking part in research is huge for people facing — in research is huge for people facing the day—to—day challenges of motor _ facing the day—to—day challenges of motor neurone disease. we are designing — motor neurone disease. we are designing trials now where people can participate in their homes. we are using — can participate in their homes. we are using measures which are not sort of— are using measures which are not sort of abstract, just figures. but measures— sort of abstract, just figures. but measures which mean something to patients, _ measures which mean something to patients, mean that they can do more, _ patients, mean that they can do more. they— patients, mean that they can do more, they can have a better quality of life _ more, they can have a better quality of life we _ more, they can have a better quality of life. ~ ., , , more, they can have a better quality of life. . ., , , , . , of life. we have 'ust seen pictures of life. we have 'ust seen pictures of rob and — of life. we have 'ust seen pictures of rob and his — of life. we have just seen pictures of rob and his dad, _ of life. we have just seen pictures of rob and his dad, stephen - of life. we have just seen pictures i of rob and his dad, stephen derby, of life. we have just seen pictures . of rob and his dad, stephen derby, a huge amount of publicity has been given for this campaign. how important have rob and steven and doddie, and people like them, raising the profile of motor neurone disease, how important has that been for this moment?—
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for this moment? essential. i think boris johnson _ for this moment? essential. i think boris johnson himself— for this moment? essential. i think boris johnson himself said - for this moment? essential. i think boris johnson himself said that - for this moment? essential. i think boris johnson himself said that the | boris johnson himself said that the campaign — boris johnson himself said that the campaign has been a success. he has noticed _ campaign has been a success. he has noticed the _ campaign has been a success. he has noticed the campaign. sajid javid has noticed the campaign. that is why we _ has noticed the campaign. that is why we are — has noticed the campaign. that is why we are here. the tireless efforts — why we are here. the tireless efforts of— why we are here. the tireless efforts of doddie weir, stephen derby, — efforts of doddie weir, stephen derby, rob burrow and others have really _ derby, rob burrow and others have really raised awareness, their friends — really raised awareness, their friends running marathons. yourselves on bbc breakfast, the sunday— yourselves on bbc breakfast, the sunday is— yourselves on bbc breakfast, the sunday is week after week raising motor— sunday is week after week raising motor neurone disease in the sunday express _ motor neurone disease in the sunday express. with a guarantee that the editor— express. with a guarantee that the editor made that he would continue to do— editor made that he would continue to do that _ editor made that he would continue to do that until the government listened — to do that until the government listened and here we are. i got a phone _ listened and here we are. i got a phone call— listened and here we are. i got a phone call on saturday from the director— phone call on saturday from the director of research, brian dickie, of the _ director of research, brian dickie, of the motor neurone disease association, telling me it was going to be _ association, telling me it was going to be in— association, telling me it was going to be in the — association, telling me it was going to be in the sunday papers. if i was from _ to be in the sunday papers. if i was from a _ to be in the sunday papers. if i was from a different walk of life that
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news _ from a different walk of life that news would probably fill me with fear _ news would probably fill me with fear i_ news would probably fill me with fear. i said, what do you mean? he said, _ fear. i said, what do you mean? he said. the _ fear. i said, what do you mean? he said, the government are going to -ive said, the government are going to give the _ said, the government are going to give the 50 — said, the government are going to give the 50 million. i was stunned. so after— give the 50 million. i was stunned. so after the — give the 50 million. i was stunned. so after the phone call i think the feeling _ so after the phone call i think the feeling i— so after the phone call i think the feeling i had them wasjust one of relief— feeling i had them wasjust one of relief that— feeling i had them wasjust one of relief that we might be, well, we will be _ relief that we might be, well, we will be able to do something about this, and _ will be able to do something about this, and the government have listened — this, and the government have listened. �* , , ., this, and the government have listened. �*, , ., . ., listened. it's brilliant. we are auoin to listened. it's brilliant. we are going to be — listened. it's brilliant. we are going to be speaking - listened. it's brilliant. we are going to be speaking to - listened. it's brilliant. we are. going to be speaking to doddie listened. it's brilliant. we are - going to be speaking to doddie weir lie. i think you are going to be back with us as well at ten past eight, and also to geoff burrow to see about the impact of that money and how much impact it will make. thank you for talking to us.- thank you for talking to us. thank ou. do i thank you for talking to us. thank you- do i even _ thank you for talking to us. thank you. do i even need _ thank you for talking to us. thank you. do i even need to _ thank you for talking to us. thank you. do i even need to tell - thank you for talking to us. thank you. do i even need to tell you? l you. do i even need to tell you? spoiler alert. our king of the ballroom just keeps on going. dan made it through week eight of strictly last night, with his highest score so far. what is going on? i don't know. week nine now. we'll chat about it in just a minute. but first, let's remind ourselves of some of those showstopping routines from saturday night. strictly theme.
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cheering. this has to be the charleston of the season. authentic energy. you have every single move in the book in there. i don't know how you do it. it is absolutely incredible. # so if you want the truth. that's the greatest thing i've ever seen on the show. oh, my goodness.
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congratulations. # ah, but two hours of pushing broom # buys and eight by 12 two—bit room # i'm a man of means by no means # king of the road.# some beautiful footwork. give yourself permission to enjoy it, dan, because you sure are representing all the men who've never danced before. thank you, shirley. i really appreciate that. all the men who have never danced before. , ., , ,, ., , ., all the men who have never danced before. , ., , ,, ., i. ., before. unbelievable. i know you ask me questions — before. unbelievable. i know you ask me questions about _ before. unbelievable. i know you ask me questions about me. _ before. unbelievable. i know you ask me questions about me. but - before. unbelievable. i know you ask me questions about me. but rose i before. unbelievable. i know you ask. me questions about me. but rose and giovanni... ., ., ., . ., giovanni... that moment, watching at home wasjust. _ giovanni... that moment, watching at home wasjust. l _ giovanni... that moment, watching at home wasjust, i cried. _ giovanni... that moment, watching at home wasjust, i cried. it _ giovanni... that moment, watching at home wasjust, i cried. it was - giovanni... that moment, watching at home wasjust, i cried. it was a - home was 'ust, i cried. it was a real home wasjust, i cried. it was a real privilege — home wasjust, i cried. it was a real privilege to _ home wasjust, i cried. it was a real privilege to be _ home wasjust, i cried. it was a real privilege to be sat - home wasjust, i cried. it was a real privilege to be sat there i home wasjust, i cried. it was a real privilege to be sat there in| real privilege to be sat there in the studio watching that. when she put her hands over giovanni's ears and the musicjust cut. i don't know what you are like at home but i stopped breathing for a bit. it was so powerful. it stopped breathing for a bit. it was
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so powerful-— so powerful. it was hugely emotional. _ so powerful. it was hugely emotional. just _ so powerful. it was hugely emotional. just such - so powerful. it was hugely emotional. just such a - so powerful. it was hugely i emotional. just such a clever so powerful. it was hugely - emotional. just such a clever way of showin: emotional. just such a clever way of showing what _ emotional. just such a clever way of showing what it _ emotional. just such a clever way of showing what it is _ emotional. just such a clever way of showing what it is like _ emotional. just such a clever way of showing what it is like for _ emotional. just such a clever way of showing what it is like for so - emotional. just such a clever way of showing what it is like for so many i showing what it is like for so many people who watch the programme. what she said afterwards about being deaf being a joy. i was sat next to nadiya, whojust being a joy. i was sat next to nadiya, who just started sobbing. being a joy. i was sat next to nadiya, whojust started sobbing. i nadiya, whojust started sobbing. i could see nadiya crying and that made me cry. to be in the room must have been amazing for that moment? obviously silence is so powerful. the way that they beautifully kept dancing, then it kicks back in, and afterwards we were talking to giovanni and rosejust afterwards we were talking to giovanni and rose just before the sort of dance—off thing yesterday, andandy are said to her —— and nadiya said to her, watching that just makes me appreciate music more than ever before, but also the way that you have been able to communicate that to so many people is just incredible. communicate that to so many people isjust incredible. i communicate that to so many people is just incredible. ijust give them the whole thing now. she isjust incredible. ijust give them the whole thing now.— isjust incredible. ijust give them the whole thing now. she makes it look so effortless. _ the whole thing now. she makes it look so effortless. we _ the whole thing now. she makes it look so effortless. we don't - the whole thing now. she makes it| look so effortless. we don't realise sometimes how well she is doing. she can't hear. sometimes how well she is doing. sue can't hear. dancing sometimes how well she is doing. 5i;e: can't hear. dancing is sometimes how well she is doing. 5“i9:
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can't hear. dancing is hard sometimes how well she is doing. 5“i9 can't hear. dancing is hard enough when you can hear everything. loafers. when you can hear everything. was an bod when you can hear everything. was anybody injured during your dance on saturday night?— saturday night? well, the issue was, there was a — saturday night? well, the issue was, there was a fellow _ saturday night? well, the issue was, there was a fellow stood _ saturday night? well, the issue was, there was a fellow stood by - saturday night? well, the issue was, there was a fellow stood by the - saturday night? well, the issue was, there was a fellow stood by the side | there was a fellow stood by the side of the stage and i was meant to throw the cane at him. i got a bit excited. iflung it so throw the cane at him. i got a bit excited. i flung it so far i nearly took out a woman on the back row. look at this. wait for it. i meant to throw direct. but nadiya said, don't look at the cane when you throw it, throw it with complete disregard to where it goes. oh! if you listen really carefully you can hear it fall about five seconds later. i went and apologised to the lovely lady. i offered her all sorts but she said, i have a claim to fame now. i really enjoyed it. i hardly trained last week. eight hours of training. i couldn't put my toe down monday, tuesday or wednesday. trained on thursday and it was great. can ijust quickly clarify something? i had quite a few painkillers. i said on saturday, i
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think i said that dancing should be about people who have not danced before. what i meant to say was it shouldn't exclude people if not danced before. there are some brilliant people in the programme. there are so many talented dancers. they are fantastic to watch. and as a strictly fan, i love watching people who are brilliant and fantastic from day one. i also think there is room in the programme for people learning. it is there is room in the programme for people learning-— people learning. it is also for --eole people learning. it is also for people who _ people learning. it is also for people who haven't - people learning. it is also for people who haven't dance i people learning. it is also for- people who haven't dance before. that is the beauty of the programme. i like what shirley said. it is i like what shirley said. it is ureat i like what shirley said. it is treat to i like what shirley said. it is great to do _ i like what shirley said. it is great to do what _ i like what shirley said. it is great to do what you - i like what shirley said. it is great to do what you learn. fantastic. great to do what you learn. fantastic-— time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. thousands of londoners who work for employers who have voluntarily signed up to the real living wage will be paid an extra 20p an hourstop living wage will be paid an extra 20p an hour stop here in the b
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hourly rate is rising to £11 five p. like the compulsory national living wage, it is independently calculated based on the cost of fuel, rent and food. forfull—time workers in london it is worth an extra £4000 a year. new measures which could mean incy led britain demonstrators face a six—month jail terms if they cause major disruption will be unveiled in parliament later. the amendments to the police crime sentencing and courts bill will also give officers greater powers to target anyone suspected to be planning to block or glue themselves to roads, trains or planes. i don't how well you recall your chemistry lessons from school, but one teacher in north—west london may have helped make it much more memorable for her pupils. she spent seven years completing a tapestry of the periodic table. 500,000 stitches later, she has finally been able to show off her work. i have essentiallyjust finished making the entirety of the elements
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that make up the periodic table. it has evolved as i was selling it. it stuck to the original pattern. that is something i try to convey as much as possible, ultimately we are not learning lots of little factoids, we are learning the general pattern of how things behave and seeing how they apply in the real world and what the exceptions are. let's look at how the tube is running. now the weather. good morning. it is looking mostly dry and still mild for the time of the year across the capital for for the time of the year across the capitalfor much of for the time of the year across the capital for much of the rest of this week. high—pressure dominates. there will be a few very weak weather front at times. they can give us spots of rain and there. we are
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starting off the morning with some mist and fog patches. poor visibility on many of the roads for a time. they were left unclear slowly as we head through the morning. lifting into low cloud. we will keep those cloudy conditions for much of the rest of the day. brighter spells here and they are developing. maybe some sunshine. it should stay dry today. we do stand a chance of seeing some spots of rain as we head through to the end of the day, to the late afternoon, from a weak cold front moving south eastwards. the winds staying light, temperatures peaking at 12 degrees. overnight tonight, a bit more of a breeze. mist and fog should not be so much of an issue. there will be lows of around five to seven celsius. it is a little windy. tomorrow again, brighterspells. tomorrow again, brighter spells. always tomorrow again, brighterspells. always plenty of cloud. temperature is peaking between ten and 12 degrees. more sunshine on wednesday. claudia conditions, but again milder air on thursday and friday. that is all for now. i am back in half an hour. bye—bye.
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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. coming up on breakfast this morning... fresh from completing the most successful 24—hour challenge in children in need's history, we'll catch up with our very own owain following his spectacular drumathon, which has raised a record—breaking £2.7 million so far. he earned himself the title of the singing astronaut, after his version of david bowie's space oddity went viral. but, after retiring from orbit, chris hadfield has written a new thriller based on the famous space race. he'lljoin us in the studio just before eight. after being diagnosed with a brain tumour in october last year, the wanted singer tom parker has told fans the cancer has been
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brought "under control". all five members of the band will be here in the studio just before nine, to tell us about getting back together, and the impact the six months after a damning report into the bbc�*s handling of princess diana's 1995 panorama interview, her brother says he believes there's "still more to come out". speaking exclusively to bbc breakfast, earl spencer said big questions remain, afterformer bbcjournalist martin bashir was found to have used "deceitful behaviour" to help secure her consent. he made the comments while showing me around the althorp estate, which is the subject of a new documentary.
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i'v e i've known forever there was a lost village in the park there. that block around the tree, that is just not natural. we know there is something under there. there is always something new to find with this house and the park. there is so much history contained in these walls. wejust much history contained in these walls. we just scrape the surface with this one. the archaeologists have uncovered _ with this one. the archaeologists have uncovered evidence - with this one. the archaeologists have uncovered evidence of- with this one. the archaeologists have uncovered evidence of an i with this one. the archaeologists l have uncovered evidence of an iron age roundhouse and now where they thought there might be a buried road, they are finding signs of ancient earthworks. it is very historic. i reckon all of england was like this. with so much underneath it. but so much has been developed or formed that it has been lost. and because this park is unspoiled, it is still here. it is unspoiled, it is still here. it is riaht unspoiled, it is still here. it is ri . ht of unspoiled, it is still here. it is right of the — unspoiled, it is still here. it is right of the crown _ unspoiled, it is still here. it is right of the crown wanted to use this location?— this location? they did. they a - lied. this location? they did. they applied- they _ this location? they did. they applied. they wanted - this location? they did. they applied. they wanted to i this location? they did. they. applied. they wanted to shoot this location? they did. they - applied. they wanted to shoot here. but i don't really do that stuff, so... :, :, �* m
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so... you wouldn't let them in? well actuall , so... you wouldn't let them in? well actually. to — so... you wouldn't let them in? well actually. to be _ so... you wouldn't let them in? well actually, to be honest, _ so. .. you wouldn't let them in? well actually, to be honest, i _ so... you wouldn't let them in? well actually, to be honest, i don't - actually, to be honest, i don't watch the ground. so ijust said, thank you but no thank you. so these are all members of the family here. and down the bottom here is more generals and that sort of thing. but it used to be an open courtyard, this, in the tudor times. so there was no roof? _ this, in the tudor times. so there was no roof? no. _ this, in the tudor times. so there was no roof? no. take _ this, in the tudor times. so there was no roof? no. take a - this, in the tudor times. so there was no roof? no. take a seat. i this, in the tudor times. so there l was no roof? no. take a seat. are ou was no roof? no. take a seat. are you constantly _ was no roof? no. take a seat. are you constantly repairing _ was no roof? no. take a seat. are you constantly repairing it? - was no roof? no. take a seat. are you constantly repairing it? yes! l was no roof? no. take a seat. are l you constantly repairing it? yes! we are sittin: you constantly repairing it? 93! we are sitting here on you constantly repairing it? i93i we are sitting here on this you constantly repairing it? i93i we are sitting here on this magnificent staircase, surrounded by lots of pairs of eyes looking at us. how aware of all of these people are you? aware of all of these people are ou? ~ �* aware of all of these people are ou? 9 �* ., :, .. aware of all of these people are ou? 9 �* ., :, 4' :, you? well, i've took over running this lace you? well, i've took over running this place 30 _ you? well, i've took over running this place 30 years _ you? well, i've took over running this place 30 years ago _ you? well, i've took over running this place 30 years ago when i i you? well, i've took over running | this place 30 years ago when i was 27. i rememberwhen i this place 30 years ago when i was 27. i remember when i first walked through here is the nominal owner, as it were. i really was nervous. you look at these people, they have lived here many hundreds of years ago, and i did feel, my goodness, they arejudging how i'm going to
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play this hand. you were really young? i was really young but when young? i was really young but when you are 27 you don't know you're really young. i'm incredibly lucky because i love history. so, yeah, it is a responsibility but it is one that i see as a privilege, not a burden. . . 9 that i see as a privilege, not a burden. , , . :, ,., that i see as a privilege, not a burden. , , . :, ., burden. this picture of you at the to of burden. this picture of you at the top of the — burden. this picture of you at the top of the staircase, _ burden. this picture of you at the top of the staircase, what - burden. this picture of you at the top of the staircase, what are i burden. this picture of you at the | top of the staircase, what are you holding in your hand? 50. top of the staircase, what are you holding in your hand?— top of the staircase, what are you holding in your hand? so, there is a aintin: of holding in your hand? so, there is a painting of diana _ holding in your hand? so, there is a painting of diana up _ holding in your hand? so, there is a painting of diana up there, - holding in your hand? so, there is a painting of diana up there, painted| painting of diana up there, painted by an american artist. he came to view it in situ here. and he said he would like to do one of me and link the to together. so that is actually the to together. so that is actually the notes i made when writing the eulogy for diana's funeral. thea;r eulogy for diana's funeral. they reflect each _ eulogy for diana's funeral. they reflect each other? _ eulogy for diana's funeral. they reflect each other? i _ eulogy for diana's funeral. they reflect each other? i suppose i eulogy for diana's funeral. they i reflect each other? i suppose they do, es. reflect each other? i suppose they do. yes- my _ reflect each other? i suppose they do. yes- my main _ reflect each other? i suppose they do, yes. my main memory- reflect each other? i suppose they do, yes. my main memory of- reflect each other? i suppose they do, yes. my main memory of it i reflect each other? i suppose they do, yes. my main memory of it is| do, yes. my main memory of it is having to stand for three weeks posing. it is not something you are used to doing, eight hours a day for three weeks. but the paintings to hang as a pair. and that piece of paper in my hand is whatjoins the to themes. it paper in my hand is what 'oins the to themes.—
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paper in my hand is what 'oins the to themes. , , ., :, , :, to themes. it is several months now since the bbc _ to themes. it is several months now since the bbc was _ to themes. it is several months now since the bbc was found _ to themes. it is several months now since the bbc was found to - to themes. it is several months now since the bbc was found to have i to themes. it is several months now. since the bbc was found to have been woefully inadequate in its handling of the interview that martin bashir did with your late sister, the princess of wales, at the time. now you have had some time to reflect on that and think about what happened, how do you feel about that finding? actually lord dyson did a very good job. his brief was tiny. it was to look at a very specific area. there is still so much more to look at in the broader terms of who was responsible for what and how did it come to this? and did documents getting hidden from view? all sorts of really important stuff which has yet to come out. so i see the lord dyson report as a very welcome development, but there is still a long way to go with this. i've been doing quite a lot behind—the—scenes. quite soon we will find out. there are very big
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question is still out there for me as to the broader picture of how something like this could have happened. something like this could have happened-— something like this could have happened. something like this could have ha ened. : 9. 9. it's happened. and what are they? it's clear to me _ happened. and what are they? it's clear to me that _ happened. and what are they? it's clear to me that there _ happened. and what are they? it's clear to me that there are - happened. and what are they? it's clear to me that there are certain l clear to me that there are certain people who were in the bbc who have behaved in a way that is truly abysmal and possibly criminal. hagar abysmal and possibly criminal. how far can ou abysmal and possibly criminal. how far can you take _ abysmal and possibly criminal. how far can you take that now yourself personally?— far can you take that now yourself ersonall ? :, �*, , :, ., personally? that's the question and i not personally? that's the question and i got people — personally? that's the question and i got people looking _ personally? that's the question and i got people looking at _ personally? that's the question and i got people looking at that - personally? that's the question and i got people looking at that and i i got people looking at that and we'll see, but it's not going to end now. i'm not saying that as an ugly threat. you just can't stop you because there's still more to come out. ~ 9. because there's still more to come out. ~ ., , because there's still more to come out. ~ :, , ., ., out. might that be a private case, a leual out. might that be a private case, a legal matter— out. might that be a private case, a legal matter that _ out. might that be a private case, a legal matter that you _ out. might that be a private case, a legal matter that you will _ out. might that be a private case, a legal matter that you will take i legal matter that you will take yourself? legal matter that you will take ourself? �* . , yourself? there's everything ossible yourself? there's everything possible at _ yourself? there's everything possible at this _ yourself? there's everything possible at this stage - yourself? there's everything possible at this stage and i l yourself? there's everything i possible at this stage and ijust possible at this stage and i just wouldn't want to box myself into a corner here. but i'm quite determined really. and i'm really
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sure that there are some very wrong things here. the sure that there are some very wrong things here-— sure that there are some very wrong thins here. �* �* ., :, , things here. the bbc has apologised, martin bashir— things here. the bbc has apologised, martin bashir has _ things here. the bbc has apologised, martin bashir has apologised, - things here. the bbc has apologised, martin bashir has apologised, has i martin bashir has apologised, has he? is martin bashir has apologised, has he? , 9, martin bashir has apologised, has he? , :, ., :, , ., martin bashir has apologised, has he? , ., ., :, , :, would he? is not apologised to me. would that make a — he? is not apologised to me. would that make a difference _ he? is not apologised to me. would that make a difference to _ he? is not apologised to me. would that make a difference to now? it's| that make a difference to now? it's difficult that make a difference to now? it�*s difficult to deal with specifics but i would say on a general basis everything is being looked at very clearly, not in a... ijust think there is right and wrong in this case and although wrong cases and rightly flagged up by lord dyson, there's another level that has to looked into. there's another level that has to looked into-— looked into. and why is that important — looked into. and why is that important to _ looked into. and why is that important to you _ looked into. and why is that important to you now? i looked into. and why is that| important to you now? what looked into. and why is that - important to you now? what changed do things you can make or contribute to? i do things you can make or contribute to? 9, �* do things you can make or contribute to? ., �* ~ :, do things you can make or contribute to? 9. i ” 9. 9 i do things you can make or contribute to? ., �* ~ :, :, �* ~ :, do things you can make or contribute to? :, �* ,, :, :, �* ,, :, ., to? i don't know. i don't know what i'm able to? i don't know. i don't know what l'm able to — to? i don't know. i don't know what l'm able to do _ to? i don't know. i don't know what i'm able to do but _ to? i don't know. i don't know what i'm able to do but i _ to? i don't know. i don't know what i'm able to do but i know— to? i don't know. i don't know what i'm able to do but i know what i'm. i'm able to do but i know what i'm going to try to do. i'm able to do but i know what i'm going to try to do— going to try to do. when you look back on your _ going to try to do. when you look back on your childhood _ going to try to do. when you look back on your childhood in - going to try to do. when you look back on your childhood in this i back on your childhood in this house, what are the things that stay
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in your mind now?— in your mind now? well, this staircase. — in your mind now? well, this staircase, of _ in your mind now? well, this staircase, of course - in your mind now? well, this staircase, of course it's i in your mind now? well, this staircase, of course it's very | in your mind now? well, this i staircase, of course it's very grand but for the children and my family it is where you can get a lot of speed up coming down on it like a toboggan, so it's very lucky that they start break halfway down because otherwise over the generations i think a lot of spencer children would have broken a lot of bones. i look in this hallway and i actually look forward to christmas, so in a month or so we will put up a christmas tree that's been grown especially on the estate each year and it's about 20 foot high and you need something like that to look to scale in a room like this, actually. we do a very traditional english christmas here. itjust looks right. in a statement, the bbc said... "today 5 bbc has aimed to be as open and transparent as possible about the events of 25 years ago. we held an independent, judge—led investigation, which was concluded within six months and, separately,
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bbc news commissioned an edition of panorama in which journalists robustly investigated their own employer. while the bbc cannot turn back the clock after a quarter of a century, we made a full and unconditional apology the day lord dyson 5 report was published." ancient secrets of althorp with charles spencer airs on channel 4 tonight at 9pm. i tell you this, the house, the grounds, it's a fascinating place to be. it looks amazing. it's absolutely beautiful and that staircase was pretty impressive, imagine going down that on a tea tray. you would definitely do that. yes, if i had a staircase like that i probably would. it's monday morning and john is reflecting, one of the best drives ever? that's what people are calling it an even lewis hamilton himself said it's probably the hardest race weekend he's ever had. the odds were completely stacked against him. at a crucial point in the season with three races
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remaining. he'd been penalised heavily across the weekend, but came back to win in brazil. amazing. that's what the fans want to see, isn't it? good morning. lewis hamilton with one of his greatest victories in the sao paulo grand prix and kept his hopes of retaining his title alive. battling back from tenth — to pass title rival max verstappen with just three races left. andy swiss reports he is no stranger to the extraordinary but even by lewis hamilton standards, this was a win which almost defied belief. it had seemed mission: impossible while max verstappen charged into an early lead, and hamilton began way down in tenth after being penalised in qualifying. but soon he was blazing through the field in a flash up to second where the max verstappen in his sights. could he get past him? he tried once and the result was nearly a collision, both cars briefly off the track. with 12 laps left, another chance for hamilton,
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and this time there was no stopping him. 9 9, and this time there was no stopping him. . :, :, , ., ., :, him. the crowd go wild explanation u . him. the crowd go wild explanation u- from him. the crowd go wild explanation up from tenth _ him. the crowd go wild explanation up from tenth to _ him. the crowd go wild explanation up from tenth to triumph _ him. the crowd go wild explanation up from tenth to triumph against i him. the crowd go wild explanation| up from tenth to triumph against all the odds, somehow he had done it. what a victory for lewis hamilton. yes, come on, guys. it’s what a victory for lewis hamilton. yes, come on, guys.— what a victory for lewis hamilton. yes, come on, guys. it's a win which revives hamiltons _ yes, come on, guys. it's a win which revives hamiltons title _ yes, come on, guys. it's a win which revives hamiltons title hopes. i yes, come on, guys. it's a win which revives hamiltons title hopes. he i revives hamiltons title hopes. he still trails max the statin but, as he proved here, anything is possible. andy smith, bbc news. what a win. australia are the new t20 world champions — winning the title for the first time — after beating new zealand by eight wickets. new zealand made 172 from their 20 overs — captain kane williamson top scoring with 85. but it wasn't enough — glen maxwell hitting the winning runs after half centuries from both mitchell marsh and david warner helped australia chase their target down with an over to spare. warner was named player of the tournament. talk about match winning performances, take a look at this from wales wing louis rees zammet in yesterday's autumn international against fuji. with his side trailling in cardiff, he picked the ball up on the wing,
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chipped it behind the their defence before thundering after it to score. an incredible moment of individual brilliance. it was one of a late flurry of tries helping them to a 38—23 win. what a feeling that must have been in front of a home crowd who'll be hoping for more of the same against australia next weekend. another statement victory from england who remain the dominant force in women's rugby thrashing canada 51—12 and it was a debut to remember for heather cowell as she crossed over twice for the roses on her home ground. despite the high scoring, canada made them work for it. scotland beatjapan 36—12 — rhona lloyd diving over the line for their final try of the game, the scots playing in front of a crowd in edinburgh for the first time in two years. chelsea are just a point behind leaders arsenal in the women's super league after beating manchester city 4—0. the pick of the goals came from fran kirby as the blues dealt city another heavy loss.
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chelsea are now unbeaten in their last six matches. and the end of an era for a motrocycling legend. after 432 races, 115 wins and nine world titles it's arrividerci to italian valentino rossi, the 42—year—old bringing his career to a close with a victory lap in valencia. multiple world champion taking all the applause from the 75 thousand crowd as he rode an ovation lap in spain. he started his career back in 1996. i covered motogp in spain a few years ago and the love every fan has four valentino rossi is unbelievable. the world over. just following him around, possessed with pictures, autographs, everything about him. i absolutely adore him. yes, i think you can always tell the fame of the famous sportsman or woman if they got their own computer game. do you know what i mean? he
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has got one. he is in that kind of level. i'm telling you now, it's only a matter of time until carroll has her very own computer game. talk about fans everywhere, that's a bit like life for carroll. playing the weather, how do you make about? your weather, how do you make about? your weather is amazing but a computer game? anyway, i'm sure there's something in it, good morning. good morning, everyone. sally is my agent, by the way. it's a mile start to the day for most of us this morning. most of us are in the high single figures or no double figures. where we've got some clear skies that's where the temperature is a bit lower but as well as a fair bit of mild weather at this morning, we've also got a fair bit of rain. it's sinking southwards and weakening and a lot of cloud is ahead of it. across england and wales, it's notjust low cloud but some mist and fog, some of which is dense, but through the morning the rain will push out of southern scotland, brighten up with some
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sunshine behind it and it's exactly the same for northern ireland. the rain moving away with sunshine coming through. but still, a fair bit of cloud and still some mist and some fog to lift across the rest of england and also wales. now that will happen slowly through the course of the day. a weather front continues to advance slowly sinking southwards, not much rain in it, some drizzle across wales and the south—west to start with. temperatures roughly 10— 13 . the average of this time of year in mid—november is roughly 7— 12. now here is our weatherfront mid—november is roughly 7— 12. now here is our weather front for this evening and overnight. sinking southwards, still a fair bit of cloud and some spots of rain. some mist and fog patches forming as well, but nowhere near as widespread as this morning. at the same time the wind will pick up and we will say hello to a new weather front bringing some rain across the north west. it's not going to be a cold
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night for most. overnight lows between 5— ten. we pick up this band of rain tomorrow coming in across scotland and northern ireland. gusty winds with it, particularly gusty across the far north and west. ahead of this, when we lose the mist and fog patches there will still be some cloud around but equally some breaks so we will see a little bit of sunshine or at worst, bright spells. temperatures, 10— 13. wednesday, we do have this weather front. it is cooler. some of the showers will be producing some snow but on the tops of the mountains, that's all. quite a bit of dry weather and sunshine particularly across central and eastern parts of the country. temperatures, 8— 13. overnight wednesday into thursday, a new weather front coming our way and it will be with us first thing on thursday with rain on and off through the north of scotland. more cloud in some western areas thick enough for some drizzle here and there, but some bright skies across
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there, but some bright skies across the south and east. ijust there, but some bright skies across the south and east. i just want to quickly show you this chart, because into the weekend, we stay with the mild air but look at what happens on monday. eight, nine, eight, nine, the temperature next week looks like it's really going to drop. warm coats, back out again. thank you very much for that. i would like to play a weather computer game with carol. i'm going to make one. you would be thrashed, damn, you would be thrashed. you would never beat carol. no chance. he certainly raised the roof with his spectacular drumathon — but our very own weather man owain has also smashed a children in need record. i found it quite emotional. ifound it quite emotional. did i found it quite emotional. did you cry? 50 drum is going crazy was amazing. after hundreds of songs, multiple costume changes and countless pep talks, owain has raised more than two point seven million pounds so far — the most successful 24—hour challenge in the charity's history. let's take a look back
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at the highlights. three, two, one... cheering it's official. the drumathon is now the most successful 24—hour challenge in the history of bbc children in need. i challenge in the history of bbc children in need.— children in need. i 'ust can't believe it. ii children in need. i 'ust can't believe it. ijust i children in need. ijust can't believe it. i just can't i children in need. ijust can'tl believe it. ijust can't believe children in need. ijust can't i believe it. ijust can't believe it. sorry, i can't believe that we've done it, you know, the generosity of people. it'sjust been incredible. applause this is how it all began. thank you, everyone. cheering # i love you, baby, like the flower loves the spring... i # i love you, baby, like the flower loves the spring. . ._ loves the spring... i first started -la in: loves the spring... i first started playing drums — loves the spring... i first started playing drums when _ loves the spring... i first started playing drums when i _ loves the spring... i first started playing drums when i was i loves the spring... i first started playing drums when i was about| loves the spring... i first started i playing drums when i was about six orseven playing drums when i was about six or seven may be. i playing drums when i was about six or seven may be.— or seven may be. i actually meant toda .
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today. # soon turned out, heart of glass... what is the time now? it's going well. i promise not to ask that ever again. yes! it was never going to be easy. i don't suffer in silence and you are right. i suffer in full decibel! i right. i suffer in full decibel! i shouldn't be laughing. i actually thought i was going to vomit on my drums. which is not what we want because they are electric and they could short—circuit. # you can go your own way
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# you can go your own way # go your own way... # you can go your own way # go your own way. . .- # you can go your own way # go your own way... you are doing amazinu. # go your own way... you are doing amazing- i'm — # go your own way... you are doing amazing. i'm impressed. _ # go your own way... you are doing amazing. i'm impressed. you - # go your own way... you are doing amazing. i'm impressed. you are i amazing. i'm impressed. you are brilliant — amazing. i'm impressed. you are brilliant. you are absolutely doing it. brilliant. you are absolutely doing it an _ brilliant. you are absolutely doing it. an absolute legend. | brilliant. you are absolutely doing it. an absolute legend.— it. an absolute legend. i think presenting — it. an absolute legend. i think presenting for _ it. an absolute legend. i think presenting for 13 _ it. an absolute legend. i think presenting for 13 hours, - it. an absolute legend. i think| presenting for 13 hours, you're it. an absolute legend. i think - presenting for13 hours, you're not presenting for 13 hours, you're not just drumming, it's a 24—hour chat show. hello, everyone. # before we come undone. how are you doing? i’m # before we come undone. how are you doin: ? �* . . ~ # before we come undone. how are you doin: ? �* ., ., ~ i, ., doing? i'm great, thank you, owain. macro-gayle — doing? i'm great, thank you, owain. macro-gayle you _ doing? i'm great, thank you, owain. macro-gayle you look— doing? i'm great, thank you, owain. macro-gayle you look sensational i macro—gayle you look sensational tonight _ macro—gayle you look sensational tonight. thank you, i did just for you _ you. # you. - # tragedy, you. — # tragedy, no one to love you... johnny— # tragedy, no one to love you... johnny quinn _ # tragedy, no one to love you... johnny quinn from snow patrol. i can't believe you've done it. you haven't pulled _ can't believe you've done it. you haven't pulled a _ can't believe you've done it. you haven't pulled a drummer face yet. # the _ haven't pulled a drummer face yet. # the final— haven't pulled a drummer face yet. # the final countdown... | haven't pulled a drummer face yet. # the final countdown. . ._ haven't pulled a drummer face yet. # the final countdown... i was going to say something _ # the final countdown... i was going to say something than _ # the final countdown... i was going
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to say something than of _ # the final countdown... i was going to say something than of high - to say something than of high importance, ifelt. still here drumming away. j importance, i felt. still here drumming away.— importance, i felt. still here drumming away. i think this is ro er drumming away. i think this is preper hard — drumming away. i think this is proper hard work. _ drumming away. i think this is proper hard work. i _ drumming away. i think this is proper hard work. i enjoyed i drumming away. i think this is i proper hard work. i enjoyed that, proper hard work. i en'oyed that, chat, proper hard work. i en'oyed that, chat. mark. * proper hard work. i en'oyed that, chat, mark. me i proper hard work. i en'oyed that, chat, mark. me too. i proper hard work. i enjoyed that, chat, mark. me too. one - proper hard work. i enjoyed that, chat, mark. me too. one of- proper hard work. i enjoyed that, chat, mark. me too. one of the l chat, mark. me too. one of the highlights _ chat, mark. me too. one of the highlights had _ chat, mark. me too. one of the highlights had to _ chat, mark. me too. one of the highlights had to be _ chat, mark. me too. one of the highlights had to be this. i chat, mark. me too. one of the highlights had to be this. bbc. chat, mark. me too. one of the i highlights had to be this. bbc news theme plays. did highlights had to be this. bbc news theme plays-— theme plays. did you feel it here? the most amazing _ theme plays. did you feel it here? the most amazing piece _ theme plays. did you feel it here? the most amazing piece of- theme plays. did you feel it here? the most amazing piece of music i theme plays. did you feel it here? | the most amazing piece of music i've played _ the most amazing piece of music i've played |t— the most amazing piece of music i've -la ed. the most amazing piece of music i've .la ed. . , , played. it was incredible. he is sunerhuman- _ played. it was incredible. he is superhuman. how— played. it was incredible. he is superhuman. how was - played. it was incredible. he is superhuman. how was he i played. it was incredible. he is| superhuman. how was he doing played. it was incredible. he is i superhuman. how was he doing it? played. it was incredible. he is - superhuman. how was he doing it? the su ort superhuman. how was he doing it? support was overwhelming. as were the donations which grew... £1.23 the donations which grew... £1.6 million. i the donations which grew. .. £1.6 million. i can't— the donations which grew... £1.6 million. i can't believe _ the donations which grew... £1.6 million. i can't believe that. i the donations which grew... £1.6 million. i can't believe that. and | million. i can't believe that. and crew. million. i can't believe that. and grew- over— million. i can't believe that. and grew. over 2,000,000. - grew. over 2,000,000.
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cheering _ cheering all hail, owain evans, king of the drums. , all hail, owain evans, king of the drums.- wow! _ all hail, owain evans, king of the drums. yes! wow! he is amazing. so impressive. — drums. iesi wow! he is amazing. so impressive, wasn't it? i drums. iesi wow! he is amazing. so impressive, wasn't it? i go around now and make everybody watch that. have you seen this? on strictly come dancing on saturday, obviously everybody is in their own bubble. have you seen this? i know it's two minutes long, but it's really, so impressive. powerful. we will speak to owain late and also mark you put it all together and he explains why drumming is so powerful because basically it involves all of you, the most primal physical thing you can do. he talks about how important that is. we have about how important that is. we have a nice thing lined up for you before eight o'clock. what we thought we were due to date is about a 758, we will play the entire bbc news theme
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drummed by owain and we will do that for you so if you want to see the whole thing and you would like to build up to the headlines in a spectacularfashion we build up to the headlines in a spectacular fashion we will do that before eight o'clock. if you'd like to donate to bbc breakfast�*s drumathon for children in need, here's how. if you would like to support their bbc breakfast drumathon attempt and donate to bbc children in need you can donate £5...
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who was that awful woman doing the voice—over? what time of the morning did you do that? that was about 4:50 am. can you read this please, sally? yes, all right. i can't see at the moment! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. thousands of londoners who work for employers who have voluntarily signed up to the real living wage will be paid an extra 20p an hour. here in the capital the hourly rate is rising to £11.05. unlike the compulsory national living wage, it is independently calculated based on the cost of fuel, rent and food. forfull—time workers in london
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it is worth an extra £4000 a year. new measures which could mean insulate britain six—month jail terms if they cause major disruption will be unveiled in parliament later. the amendments to the police crime sentencing and courts bill will also give officers greater powers to target anyone suspected to be planning to block or glue themselves to roads, trains or planes. the legislation has been criticised by some for setting disproportionate controls on the right to protest. i don't how well you recall your chemistry lessons from school, but one teacher in north—west london may have helped make it much more memorable for her pupils. she spent seven years completing a tapestry of the periodic table. 500,000 stitches later, she has finally been able to show off her work. i have essentiallyjust finished making the entirety of the elements that make up the periodic table. it has evolved as i was sewing it. it stuck to the original pattern.
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that is something i try to convey as much as possible, ultimately we are not learning lots of little factoids, we are learning the general patterns of how things behave and seeing how they apply in the real world and what the exceptions are. now the weather. good morning. it is looking mostly dry and still mild for the time of the year across the capital of the rest of this week. high—pressure dominates. there will be a few very weak weather front at times. they could give us spots of rain and there. we are starting off the morning with some mist and fog patches. poor visibility on many of the roads for a time. they were left unclear slowly as we head through the morning. lifting into low cloud. we will keep those cloudy conditions for much of the rest of the day. brighter spells here and they are developing. maybe some sunshine. it should stay dry today.
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we do stand a chance of seeing some spots of rain as we head through to the end of the day, to the late afternoon, from a weak cold front moving south eastwards. the winds staying light, temperatures peaking at 12 degrees. overnight tonight, a bit more of a breeze. mist and fog should not be so much of an issue. there will be lows of around five to seven celsius. it is a little windy. tomorrow again, brighter spells. always plenty of cloud. temperature is peaking between ten and 12 degrees. more sunshine on wednesday. cloudier conditions, but again milderair if you are a fan of adele, you can catch up with oprah interview on the website. i am back in half an hour. bye— bye.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. the fatal car explosion outside a liverpool hospital — mi5 are called in to help with the investigation after one man died. liverpool women's hospital remains cordoned off this morning with police officers on guard around the
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perimeter. homes have been searched and other homes evacuated. three men have been arrested under the terrorism act. the queen expresses her disappointment at missing yesterday's remembrance sunday service for the first time in 22 years. sleaze and parliamentary standards are back on the agenda for mp's as they get another chance to debate the issue. it's being called one of the greatest drives of his career — from ten places back on the grid, lewis hamilton wins in brazil to keep a thrilling fromula one title race alive. # this is ground control to major tom...# astronaut, author and singer chris hadfield tells how he's using his experience in space to write thrillers. good morning. yesterday we reached nearly 16 degrees in the highlands. the mild theme will continue this week. it will be mainly dry, most of the rain will be mainly dry, most of the rain will be mainly dry, most of the rain will be in the north and west, but next week is much colder.
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details coming up. good morning. it's monday, 15th november. the security service mi5 has been called in to assist counter terrorism police investigating yesterday's car explosion outside a hospital in liverpool. one man has been killed and another injured in the incident. three men have been arrested under the terrorism act after several houses were evacuated in the city. james reynolds' report contains flashing images. the police say they are working at speed to establish the circumstances of this, the car explosion just outside the liverpool women's hospital in central liverpool. it happened shortly before 11 o'clock yesterday morning, at a time when remembrance day services were about to begin across the country. the driver survived the blast. the passenger, who has not been named, was killed. unfortunately, i can confirm that one person has died and another has
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been taken to hospital, where he is being treated for his injuries, which, thankfully, are not life—threatening. so far we understand that the car involved was a taxi, which pulled up at the hospital shortly before the explosion occurred. in the kensington area of liverpool, around a mile from the explosion, three men, aged 21,26 and 29, were arrested under the terrorism act. this gives the authorities the power to hold detainees for up to 14 days without charge. and late at night a number of homes in liverpool's rutland avenue and nearby cumberland avenue were evacuated. they're reported to be close to a house raided by the police in the hours after the incident. counter—terrorism police north—west are leading the overall investigation. they're supported by officers from merseyside police, and the security service, mi5, is also assisting. investigators say they're
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keeping an open mind as to what caused the explosion. james reynolds, bbc news. our reporter, andy gill is outside liverpool women's hospital this morning. what are the latest developments? well, the women's hospital here remains — well, the women's hospital here remains cordoned off this morning. it is a _ remains cordoned off this morning. it is a large — remains cordoned off this morning. it is a large site and there is police — it is a large site and there is police tape around the perimeter. police _ police tape around the perimeter. police officers started at regular intervals — police officers started at regular intervals keeping guard. this is one of three _ intervals keeping guard. this is one of three locations in liverpool at the centre — of three locations in liverpool at the centre of this investigation. to the centre of this investigation. to the north— the centre of this investigation. to the north of— the centre of this investigation. to the north of the city, around sutcliffe _ the north of the city, around sutcliffe street, it is where the three _ sutcliffe street, it is where the three men aged... those men arrested under— three men aged... those men arrested under counterterrorism law. to the south _ under counterterrorism law. to the south of _ under counterterrorism law. to the south of the — under counterterrorism law. to the south of the city, around rutland avenue. — south of the city, around rutland avenue, that is —— street remained sealed _ avenue, that is —— street remained sealed off — avenue, that is —— street remained sealed off a— avenue, that is —— street remained sealed off. a number of homes were evacuated~ _ sealed off. a number of homes were evacuated. counter—terrorism police
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are keeping — evacuated. counter—terrorism police are keeping an open mind about the reasons— are keeping an open mind about the reasons behind all this. but it is worth— reasons behind all this. but it is worth noting that the car exploded 'ust worth noting that the car exploded just before 11 o'clock yesterday morning. — just before 11 o'clock yesterday morning, when remembrance services were getting under way. liverpool's remembrance service yesterday was at the anglican cathedral, which is a short— the anglican cathedral, which is a short walk— the anglican cathedral, which is a short walk from the liverpool women's _ short walk from the liverpool women's hospital. it is unusual for liverpool's — women's hospital. it is unusual for liverpool's service to be held at the anglican cathedral. it is what normally— the anglican cathedral. it is what normally held at a war memorial closer— normally held at a war memorial closer to — normally held at a war memorial closer to the centre of the city. the prime _ closer to the centre of the city. the prime minister has expressed his sympathy— the prime minister has expressed his sympathy for people affected by this on social— sympathy for people affected by this on social media. merseyside police say people — on social media. merseyside police say people can expect to see more patrols — say people can expect to see more patrols on— say people can expect to see more patrols on the streets of liverpool today— patrols on the streets of liverpool today as _ patrols on the streets of liverpool today as a — patrols on the streets of liverpool today as a reassurance. thank _ today as a reassurance. thank you very much, andy gill. the case of the former conservative minister owen paterson, which sparked debate over mp's behaviour, is back in the commons today. the government tried to block mr paterson's suspension ten days ago, then made a u—turn after a huge backlash. let's speak to our chief political correspondent adam fleming now. good morning.
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what is on the menu for today? hello. there is going to be emotion debated _ hello. there is going to be emotion debated in— hello. there is going to be emotion debated in parliament later tonight. when _ debated in parliament later tonight. when i _ debated in parliament later tonight. when i say— debated in parliament later tonight. when i say debated, it might run out of time _ when i say debated, it might run out of time to— when i say debated, it might run out of time to debate it. it mayjust -et of time to debate it. it mayjust get nodded through, which is when it doesn't _ get nodded through, which is when it doesn't even get to a vote because nobody— doesn't even get to a vote because nobody objects to it. it may not be a particularly dramatic moment, but it does— a particularly dramatic moment, but it does and — a particularly dramatic moment, but it does end a pretty dramatic u—turn from _ it does end a pretty dramatic u—turn from the _ it does end a pretty dramatic u—turn from the government. remember ten, 12 days _ from the government. remember ten, 12 days ago. _ from the government. remember ten, 12 days ago, they wanted to pause the disciplinary case against owen paterson — the disciplinary case against owen paterson. this will bring it to an end and — paterson. this will bring it to an end and endorsed the report that found _ end and endorsed the report that found he — end and endorsed the report that found he was guilty of egregious breaches— found he was guilty of egregious breaches of parliamentary rules. ten to 12 days _ breaches of parliamentary rules. ten to 12 days ago, the government wanted — to 12 days ago, the government wanted to— to 12 days ago, the government wanted to set up a new committee looking _ wanted to set up a new committee looking at— wanted to set up a new committee looking at the standards process in parliament. this motion tonight would _ parliament. this motion tonight would wind down that committee before _ would wind down that committee before it — would wind down that committee before it even met, or even properly existed _ before it even met, or even properly existed and — before it even met, or even properly existed. and also, number10 before it even met, or even properly existed. and also, number 10 didn't initially— existed. and also, number 10 didn't initially want to do this motion at all because they said owen paterson had quit— all because they said owen paterson had quit as _ all because they said owen paterson had quit as an mp, so we didn't really— had quit as an mp, so we didn't really need it. lots of mps said,
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no, we — really need it. lots of mps said, no, we need to draw a line under this _ no, we need to draw a line under this having _ no, we need to draw a line under this. having said that phrase, i think— this. having said that phrase, i think that _ this. having said that phrase, i think that is how the government would _ think that is how the government would like — think that is how the government would like to see it, labour have other— would like to see it, labour have other ideas. their deputy leader, angela _ other ideas. their deputy leader, angela rayner, has this morning written _ angela rayner, has this morning written to— angela rayner, has this morning written to the independent adviser on ministerial standards, the report to the _ on ministerial standards, the report to the prime minister, asking him to investigate _ to the prime minister, asking him to investigate the transport secretary grant _ investigate the transport secretary grant shapps after reports in the sunday— grant shapps after reports in the sunday times over the weekend that his love _ sunday times over the weekend that his love of— sunday times over the weekend that his love of flying his private plane may have — his love of flying his private plane may have influenced decisions about government policy and the spending of public— government policy and the spending of public money. labour say that could _ of public money. labour say that could be — of public money. labour say that could be a — of public money. labour say that could be a potential breach of the rules _ could be a potential breach of the rules the — could be a potential breach of the rules. the department for transport strenuously, very strongly, deny that is— strenuously, very strongly, deny that is the — strenuously, very strongly, deny that is the case. thank— that is the case. thank you very much for that detail. more than 300,000 workers on the so—called real living wage are set to get a pay rise today. the new hourly rate will be £9.90 outside of london. unlike the compulsory
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national living wage, it's independently calculated based on the costs of fuel, rent and food. the government's minimum wage levels will also increase from april. around two million unvaccinated people in austria have been placed under lockdown measures from this morning, as the country faces a surge in infection levels. anyone over 12 who hasn't received two doses of a covid jab will only be allowed to leave home for limited reasons, like working or buying food. let's speak now to our foreign correspondent, bethany bell. morning. bethany, what's the mood like in austria this morning? complicated. there are many of the vaccinated _ complicated. there are many of the vaccinated austrians who are very keen _ vaccinated austrians who are very keen to _ vaccinated austrians who are very keen to avoid another lockdown for everybody — keen to avoid another lockdown for everybody. they think this is a good measure _ everybody. they think this is a good measure. there are many people protesting — measure. there are many people protesting it, saying it is against their— protesting it, saying it is against their civil— protesting it, saying it is against their civil liberties, it is against their— their civil liberties, it is against their right _ their civil liberties, it is against their right to choose whether or not
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they want _ their right to choose whether or not they want to be vaccinated. there are some — they want to be vaccinated. there are some austrians are saying, is this constitutional? then there are other— this constitutional? then there are other austrians, this constitutional? then there are otheraustrians, including this constitutional? then there are other austrians, including the far-right— other austrians, including the far—right vaccine sceptical freedom party, _ far—right vaccine sceptical freedom party, which say this will create a class _ party, which say this will create a class of _ party, which say this will create a class of second—class citizens and they promised to try to take legal and other— they promised to try to take legal and other measures, including protest — and other measures, including protest against this move. so, a very— protest against this move. so, a very mixed _ protest against this move. so, a very mixed picture. the government has said _ very mixed picture. the government has said that the rate of vaccination here in austria is shamefully low at around 65%. it is one of— shamefully low at around 65%. it is one of the — shamefully low at around 65%. it is one of the lowest in western europe. thank— one of the lowest in western europe. thank you _ one of the lowest in western europe. thank you very much. bethany bell in vienna. thank you very much. bethan bell in vienna. ,, . bethany bell in vienna. shall we get some weather? _ bethany bell in vienna. shall we get some weather? yes, _ bethany bell in vienna. shall we get some weather? yes, definitely. i bethany bell in vienna. shall we get some weather? yes, definitely. she| some weather? yes, definitely. she has got a rainbow for us this morning. good morning. morning. good morninu. _, ., morning. good morninu. ., , good morning. good morning. this mornin: it good morning. good morning. this morning it is _ good morning. good morning. this morning it is a _ good morning. good morning. this morning it is a minor— good morning. good morning. this morning it is a minor start - good morning. good morning. this morning it is a minor start to i good morning. good morning. this morning it is a minor start to the l morning it is a minor start to the day for most of us. the exception to thatis day for most of us. the exception to that is where we have had some broken cloud overnight. the temperatures are a little bit lower. this week is looking like it will
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state mild. any rain will mostly be in the north. any rain sinking further south will be fairly light and patchy. this is what we have got at the moment. rain in the north and west. it will move out of southern scotland, getting out of northern ireland and crossing northern england and wales. we will also have some drizzle in wales, south—west england and the south—east. first thing this morning there were some dense fog to watch out for across parts of england and wales as well as low cloud. that will slowly lift. some of us will see brighter breaks this afternoon. on the other side of that weather front, for scotland and northern ireland, it will brighten up northern ireland, it will brighten up quite nicely with a fair bit of sunshine. through the day a little bit more cloud coming in across the north west. temperatures ranging from ten in the north to 13 in the south. through this evening and overnight here is the weather front. it is bringing cloud and spots of rain as it moves down towards the south—east. the mist and fog that forms the night will be as widespread as last night. at the same time we have a new weather
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front coming in across the north west and it's going to be accompanied by strengthening winds. that will be the forecast in the north—west tomorrow. some heavy rain to start with, some gusty winds, especially in the far north west, plus the rain will not be as heavy for us as it sinks southwards, and ahead of it it will be largely dry, still some cloud around, brighter breaks, highs of still some cloud around, brighter breaks, highs of ten still some cloud around, brighter breaks, highs of ten to still some cloud around, brighter breaks, highs of ten to 13. thank you, carol. campaigners are seeking a change in the law, which would lead to tougher sentences for hit—and—run drivers. a petition, started by the family of ryan saltern, who was killed whilst walking to a party in 2019, has received more than 167,000 signatures and will be debated in parliament today. breakfast�*sjohn maguire has more. ryan salter and was married with a young son. i5 ryan salter and was married with a ounu son. , young son. is 31st birthday was his
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last. god, i miss him. it will never be the same. _ god, i miss him. it will never be the same, dad. _ god, i miss him. it will never be the same, dad. when _ god, i miss him. it will never be the same, dad. when his i god, i miss him. it will never be the same, dad. when his father| god, i miss him. it will never be i the same, dad. when his father and sister visit the _ the same, dad. when his father and sister visit the narrow _ the same, dad. when his father and sister visit the narrow -- _ the same, dad. when his father and sister visit the narrow -- narrow i sister visit the narrow —— narrow cornish road where ryan was killed while walking to a party late one night, they think of his final moments. mr; night, they think of his final moments-— night, they think of his final moments. g , , ., u, moments. my wife struggles to come here, to be honest. _ moments. my wife struggles to come here, to be honest. she _ moments. my wife struggles to come here, to be honest. shejust - moments. my wife struggles to come here, to be honest. shejust sees i here, to be honest. shejust sees pictures in her head. but the bench is really important. we put in place as a reminder of what happened. but michael saw a reminder that ryan is not forgotten. he will also ? what might always be remembered. he had so many friends.— so many friends. hopefully it will make people _ so many friends. hopefully it will make people slow— so many friends. hopefully it will make people slow down. - so many friends. hopefully it will i make people slow down. hopefully. even after a — make people slow down. hopefully. even after a trial— make people slow down. hopefully. even after a trial and _ make people slow down. hopefully. even after a trial and an _ make people slow down. hopefully. even after a trial and an inquest, i even after a trial and an inquest, it is not clear exactly what happened that night, but the driver who ran him over admitted failing to stop and report an accident and was
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given a four—month suspended sentence for the hit and run. given a four-month suspended sentence for the hit and run. you've aot sentence for the hit and run. you've not to sentence for the hit and run. you've got to live — sentence for the hit and run. you've got to live it — sentence for the hit and run. you've got to live it to _ sentence for the hit and run. you've got to live it to actually _ sentence for the hit and run. you've got to live it to actually realise i got to live it to actually realise what it's like. people always say, i don't know how you do it. i mean, we haven't got a choice. we do what we can. yes, we've been in the darkest places, to be honest. and we pulled ourselves out of that. it’s places, to be honest. and we pulled ourselves out of that.— ourselves out of that. it's been touch. ourselves out of that. it's been tough- ryan — ourselves out of that. it's been tough. ryan has _ ourselves out of that. it's been tough. ryan has pulled - ourselves out of that. it's been tough. ryan has pulled us i ourselves out of that. it's been tough. ryan has pulled us out| ourselves out of that. it's been i tough. ryan has pulled us out of that _ tough. ryan has pulled us out of that with— tough. ryan has pulled us out of that. with ryan's law, that is what has got _ that. with ryan's law, that is what has got us — that. with ryan's law, that is what has got us through. that drive to make _ has got us through. that drive to make a _ has got us through. that drive to make a change and make sure nobody else suffers _ make a change and make sure nobody else suffers like this. i've watched my family— else suffers like this. i've watched my family fall apart.— my family fall apart. ryan's law would mean — my family fall apart. ryan's law would mean a _ my family fall apart. ryan's law would mean a hit _ my family fall apart. ryan's law would mean a hit and _ my family fall apart. ryan's law would mean a hit and run i my family fall apart. ryan's law would mean a hit and run been| would mean a hit and run been classified as dangerous driving. a proposed law change currently going through parliament would increase the maximum sentence for causing death by dangerous driving from 14 years to life in prison. the petition has more than 167,000 signatures. brute
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petition has more than 167,000 signatures-— petition has more than 167,000 siunatures. ~ ., ,., ., signatures. we wanted something that was auoin to signatures. we wanted something that was going to last _ signatures. we wanted something that was going to last longer— signatures. we wanted something that was going to last longer than - signatures. we wanted something that was going to last longer than all- signatures. we wanted something that was going to last longer than all of- was going to last longer than all of us. . was going to last longer than all of us, ., ., , was going to last longer than all of us. ., ., , ., , us. helen and louise have been friends for— us. helen and louise have been friends for many _ us. helen and louise have been friends for many years. - us. helen and louise have been friends for many years. but i us. helen and louise have been friends for many years. but in l friends for many years. but in recent times their bond has been strengthened by tragedy as, in separate collisions, both lost sons to hit—and—run drivers. on the day that he died, matt and his girlfriend had received a scan of their unborn baby. he was heading home when the collision happened. the most horrific thing for me at that point was the fact that my child was alone. he was left there like a piece of meat. i couldn't get my head around that. the fact that my head around that. the fact that my son was dead hadn't even come into it at that point. it was the fact someone had left my child there like they had hit a deer or a wild animal. a . like they had hit a deer or a wild animal. n, ., ., , animal. matt and paul were friends from school- _ animal. matt and paul were friends from school. fellow _ animal. matt and paul were friends from school. fellow chefs - animal. matt and paul were friends from school. fellow chefs and i from school. fellow chefs and motorcyclists. paulwas from school. fellow chefs and motorcyclists. paul was hit by a
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disqualified driverjust nine months after his friends death. the disqualified driverjust nine months after his friend's death.— after his friend's death. the guy who ran him _ after his friend's death. the guy who ran him over— after his friend's death. the guy who ran him over got _ after his friend's death. the guy who ran him over got out - after his friend's death. the guy who ran him over got out of- after his friend's death. the guy who ran him over got out of his| after his friend's death. the guy - who ran him over got out of his car, had a _ who ran him over got out of his car, had a cigarette and disappeared. the hit and _ had a cigarette and disappeared. the hit and run. — had a cigarette and disappeared. the hit and run, the guidelines at the moment, — hit and run, the guidelines at the moment, six months, but they were brought— moment, six months, but they were brought out— moment, six months, but they were brought out years and years ago. this needs — brought out years and years ago. this needs to stop. matt could have survived _ this needs to stop. matt could have survived. thousands of people's loved _ survived. thousands of people's loved ones could have survived. h0pefully — loved ones could have survived. hopefully it will stop people from leaving the scene if there is something a heavier sentence was that makes them stop from perhaps leaving and then maybe encourage them to help rather thanjust walking away or driving away in some cases. mps will debate the issues later today. ben bradshaw sits on the transport select committee and says change is long overdue. six. change is long overdue. six months ma be change is long overdue. six months may be ok — change is long overdue. six months may be ok if _ change is long overdue. six months may be ok if you — change is long overdue. six months may be ok if you leave _ change is long overdue. six months may be ok if you leave a _ change is long overdue. six months may be ok if you leave a scratch . change is long overdue. six months may be ok if you leave a scratch on i may be ok if you leave a scratch on somebody because my leave the scene
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of an accident. if you leave somebody seriously injured or dying on the road, and leave that scene without informing the police or emergency services, that is intent. and i think it deserves a lot more than the maximum six—month jail term. in than the maximum six-month 'ail term. . , . than the maximum six-month 'ail term. ., , ., term. in a statement, the government sa s its term. in a statement, the government says its thoughts — term. in a statement, the government says its thoughts remains _ term. in a statement, the government says its thoughts remains with - term. in a statement, the government says its thoughts remains with the - says its thoughts remains with the families and that it understands the concerns. it is exploring options as part of long—term and wider work on road safety. the families will attend today's debate. compelled by the grief they live with, they are desperate to see the law and to change the behaviour of drivers, in the hope that no other family will suffer the pain that they continue to endure. john maguire, bbc news. a huge thank you to everybody who spoke tojohn for that piece. we're joined now by mary williams, the chief executive of the road safety charity, brake. thank you very much for spending a bit of time with us this morning. i
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wonder how you feel today knowing that mps are going to debate this, and potentially could make a difference? it’s and potentially could make a difference?— difference? it's an incredibly important — difference? it's an incredibly important debate. _ difference? it's an incredibly important debate. and - difference? it's an incredibly important debate. and the l difference? it's an incredibly - important debate. and the timing is no coincidence. it is the first day of national— no coincidence. it is the first day of national road safety week today. and the _ of national road safety week today. and the theme of road safety week is to look_ and the theme of road safety week is to look at— and the theme of road safety week is to look at the work and celebrate the work— to look at the work and celebrate the work of road safety heroes across — the work of road safety heroes across the nation. that includes our emergency— across the nation. that includes our emergency services, paramedics, police _ emergency services, paramedics, police and — emergency services, paramedics, police and fire services who attend road _ police and fire services who attend road crisis — police and fire services who attend road crisis. there is nothing more heartbreaking for them, and for the families, _ heartbreaking for them, and for the families, to — heartbreaking for them, and for the families, to know that road crisis could _ families, to know that road crisis could not— families, to know that road crisis could not be attended in time, that people _ could not be attended in time, that people were left dying because of self—interested criminal drivers who fled the _ self—interested criminal drivers who fled the scene. of course, the biggest — fled the scene. of course, the biggest road safety heroes are all standing — biggest road safety heroes are all standing up for this cause and campaigning for changes to the law.
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there _ campaigning for changes to the law. there certainly are changes needed in this— there certainly are changes needed in this case — there certainly are changes needed in this case with this despicably low penalty that applies to leaving the scene of a crash. we low penalty that applies to leaving the scene of a crash.— low penalty that applies to leaving the scene of a crash. we have spoken to so many — the scene of a crash. we have spoken to so many families _ the scene of a crash. we have spoken to so many families of _ the scene of a crash. we have spoken to so many families of victims. - the scene of a crash. we have spoken to so many families of victims. whatl to so many families of victims. what unites them all is they all talk about how heartbreaking it is to use —— lose their loved ones. they don't want anybody else to go through that pain. i can see you nodding along. the sentences should be harsher to make people think again. is that overwhelmingly what you hear from people? overwhelmingly what you hear from --eole? �* , ~ overwhelmingly what you hear from --eole? �* , . ., people? absolutely. we run a national road _ people? absolutely. we run a national road victim _ people? absolutely. we run a national road victim service i people? absolutely. we run a - national road victim service which works— national road victim service which works with — national road victim service which works with police to provide on support— works with police to provide on support to families who have been bereaved — support to families who have been bereaved or seriously injured. and the trauma — bereaved or seriously injured. and the trauma of facing the situation of your— the trauma of facing the situation of your child being killed, your parent— of your child being killed, your parent or— of your child being killed, your parent or sibling being killed, is absolutely compounded by the later trauma _ absolutely compounded by the later trauma of— absolutely compounded by the later trauma of finding out that there is
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no appropriate charge that reflects the gravity of what has happened. and the _ the gravity of what has happened. and the government, i believe, isn't interested _ and the government, i believe, isn't interested in— and the government, i believe, isn't interested in addressing this issue. they are _ interested in addressing this issue. they are looking at their road safety — they are looking at their road safety strategic approach. we have proposed _ safety strategic approach. we have proposed in the report that was submitted this month —— this summer, that part _ submitted this month —— this summer, that part of— submitted this month —— this summer, that part of the renewal of the strategic— that part of the renewal of the strategic approach includes a review of all— strategic approach includes a review of all traffic laws and sentencing guidelines. that would include most definitely— guidelines. that would include most definitely the issue of hit and run. it is absolutely insulting to victims. _ it is absolutely insulting to victims, and shocking to victims, to find that— victims, and shocking to victims, to find that summary can walk away from court with _ find that summary can walk away from court with just find that summary can walk away from court withjust a find that summary can walk away from court with just a few months in prison— court with just a few months in prison when lives have been lost, lives _ prison when lives have been lost, lives have — prison when lives have been lost, lives have been devastated, injuries have turned victims... there could
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be have turned victims... there could he100 _ have turned victims... there could he100 hit— have turned victims... there could be 100 hit and runs a day happening across— be 100 hit and runs a day happening across the _ be 100 hit and runs a day happening across the uk. and even if one life is saved _ across the uk. and even if one life is saved as— across the uk. and even if one life is saved as a — across the uk. and even if one life is saved as a result of an increase in penalty— is saved as a result of an increase in penalty as— is saved as a result of an increase in penalty as part of road safety improvements, that is a life that matters — improvements, that is a life that matters and it has been worth doing. the government says it is increasingly maximum sentence for those convicted of death by dangerous driving, or careless driving, from iii years to life, but more generally, other offences, do you think that if there were larger sentences, orsignificant you think that if there were larger sentences, or significant sentences, i don't if you can gauge this from conversations else from people involved and thought about it afterwards, that if the sentences were longer it would make a real impact? were longer it would make a real imact? , , ., , impact? road safety requires so many different approaches. _ impact? road safety requires so many different approaches. it _ impact? road safety requires so many different approaches. it is _ impact? road safety requires so many different approaches. it is a _ different approaches. it is a package _ different approaches. it is a package of approaches. it means that we have _ package of approaches. it means that we have slower speeds on our roads, we have slower speeds on our roads, we take _ we have slower speeds on our roads, we take care — we have slower speeds on our roads, we take care as drivers. it means that we _ we take care as drivers. it means that we have effective roads policing _ that we have effective roads policing. every part of road safety
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matters~ _ policing. every part of road safety matters. and if we have appropriate penalties _ matters. and if we have appropriate penalties at the very least it sends a message — penalties at the very least it sends a message to society that deaths and injuries— a message to society that deaths and injuries on— a message to society that deaths and injuries on roads matter enormously. they are _ injuries on roads matter enormously. they are as— injuries on roads matter enormously. they are as important to to tackle as homicide, as terrorism, and the punishments that can be incurred are as serious _ punishments that can be incurred are as serious. that is the change that needs— as serious. that is the change that needs to _ as serious. that is the change that needs to happen. there is a public education — needs to happen. there is a public education message there by improving penalties _ education message there by improving penalties. it is a matter for the attorney— penalties. it is a matter for the attorney general. it is a matter for central— attorney general. it is a matter for central government. and it needs to be addressed in the round along with other measures to help us on that road _ other measures to help us on that road towards zero casualties and zero deaths, zero serious injuries in the _ zero deaths, zero serious injuries in the future. we can't say what lives _ in the future. we can't say what lives have — in the future. we can't say what lives have been saved as a result of penalties _ lives have been saved as a result of penalties being increased, but we do know that _ penalties being increased, but we do know that a — penalties being increased, but we do know that a number of hit and run incidents— know that a number of hit and run incidents every year are, of course, caused _ incidents every year are, of course, caused by— incidents every year are, of course, caused by criminal drivers who are fleeing _ caused by criminal drivers who are fleeing the — caused by criminal drivers who are fleeing the scene because they are
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hiding _ fleeing the scene because they are hiding evidence, because they are going _ hiding evidence, because they are going away to sober up, they are drunk, _ going away to sober up, they are drunk, they— going away to sober up, they are drunk, they are drugged, and one would _ drunk, they are drugged, and one would hope that if there was a knowledge that there is a high likelihood they're going to be caught, — likelihood they're going to be caught, they are going to be reprimanded, and the penalty for fleeing _ reprimanded, and the penalty for fleeing the scene of the collision is going — fleeing the scene of the collision is going to be very serious indeed, that might — is going to be very serious indeed, that might change their minds. it is a change _ that might change their minds. it is a change that needs doing. and we must _ a change that needs doing. and we must remember that other drivers simply— must remember that other drivers simply understand that it's really important, and it is the law, that we have — important, and it is the law, that we have to — important, and it is the law, that we have to stop at the scene of collisions, _ we have to stop at the scene of collisions, we have to call the emergency services. and we can offer very real— emergency services. and we can offer very real help. so it's important for us _ very real help. so it's important for us all— very real help. so it's important for us all to— very real help. so it's important for us all to do it, no matter the severity— for us all to do it, no matter the severity of— for us all to do it, no matter the severity of the crash.— severity of the crash. mary williams. _ severity of the crash. mary williams, the _ severity of the crash. mary williams, the chief - severity of the crash. mary i williams, the chief executive severity of the crash. mary - williams, the chief executive of break. thank you. for the first time in 22 years, the queen missed yesterday's remembrance day service at the cenotaph, after spraining her back. buckingham palace said she was disappointed not to be able to attend what would have
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been her first public engagement for more than three weeks. we're joined now by the royal commentator, jennie bond. morning to you. not that long since we were talking, just a couple of weeks ago, by this very same subject, the queen's health. how disappointed will she have been to have had to do council yesterday's appearance?— have had to do council yesterday's appearance? yes, i'm sure she was extremely disappointed. _ appearance? yes, i'm sure she was extremely disappointed. this - appearance? yes, i'm sure she was extremely disappointed. this and i extremely disappointed. this and most _ extremely disappointed. this and most sacred day the year for her. the remembrance day service at the cenotaph _ the remembrance day service at the cenotaph. you have to remember she is head _ cenotaph. you have to remember she is head of— cenotaph. you have to remember she is head of the armed forces, you have _ is head of the armed forces, you have to _ is head of the armed forces, you have to remember that service men and women — have to remember that service men and women go to work for a queen and country _ and women go to work for a queen and country and _ and women go to work for a queen and country. and that she actually is the only— country. and that she actually is the only senior surviving member of the only senior surviving member of the royal— the only senior surviving member of the royal family to have served herself— the royal family to have served herself in— the royal family to have served herself in the second world war, albeit— herself in the second world war, albeit right at the end in the auxiliary— albeit right at the end in the auxiliary territorial services. for all those — auxiliary territorial services. for all those reasons yesterday was a most _ all those reasons yesterday was a most important day in her calendar. normally— most important day in her calendar. normally we would have seen her on the ttalcony— normally we would have seen her on the balcony where yesterday we saw
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the balcony where yesterday we saw the duchess of cornwall, the duchess of cambridge and the countess of wessex — of cambridge and the countess of wessex. and she would have been looking _ wessex. and she would have been looking down, as prince charles on her ttehalf— looking down, as prince charles on her behalf laid a wreath, as she has in recent— her behalf laid a wreath, as she has in recent years because of her old age _ in recent years because of her old age but— in recent years because of her old age but of— in recent years because of her old age. but of course she wanted to be there _ age. but of course she wanted to be there and _ age. but of course she wanted to be there. and this decision was taken really— there. and this decision was taken really at _ there. and this decision was taken really at the last minute, it seems, because _ really at the last minute, it seems, because it — really at the last minute, it seems, because it was only on thursday that buckingham palace were being very positive _ buckingham palace were being very positive but the fact that she was going _ positive but the fact that she was going to — positive but the fact that she was going to be there. but something happened. going to be there. but something ha ened. . ~ , going to be there. but something ha--ened. . ,, , , going to be there. but something ha--ened. . ~ _ happened. yes, key phrase, something ha ened. happened. yes, key phrase, something happened- we — happened. yes, key phrase, something happened. we know _ happened. yes, key phrase, something happened. we know she _ happened. yes, key phrase, something happened. we know she had _ happened. yes, key phrase, something happened. we know she had an - happened. we know she had an overnight stay in hospital recently, but this latest situation is a back injury. what do we know about that? well, i'm not going to pretend i know— well, i'm not going to pretend i know exactly what is going on with the queen's health because i don't. but i do _ the queen's health because i don't. but i do not — the queen's health because i don't. but i do not as you grow older your body— but i do not as you grow older your body becomes more fragile and your bones— body becomes more fragile and your bones take _ body becomes more fragile and your bones take a bit more of a bashing doing _ bones take a bit more of a bashing doing things which may seem quite normal _ doing things which may seem quite normal i_ doing things which may seem quite normal. i think you can sprain your self guite — normal. i think you can sprain your self quite easily as you get older. i know—
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self quite easily as you get older. i know how— self quite easily as you get older. i know how easily it can be done. we must _ i know how easily it can be done. we must take _ i know how easily it can be done. we must take what the palace say at face value — must take what the palace say at face value. she hasjust had a little — face value. she hasjust had a little mishap and she has sprained her back — little mishap and she has sprained her back. this is separate to the element — her back. this is separate to the element and we don't know what that is that— element and we don't know what that is that caused her to stay in hospital— is that caused her to stay in hospital and for which she had tests~ — hospital and for which she had tests. she seems to have been well recovered _ tests. she seems to have been well recovered from that. boris johnson himself— recovered from that. boris johnson himself said he saw her on wednesday and she _ himself said he saw her on wednesday and she was— himself said he saw her on wednesday and she was very well. she flew to sandringham a week ago in a helicopter, spent a week in sandringham. we have seen her driving _ sandringham. we have seen her driving around windsor estate, probably — driving around windsor estate, probably walking her dogs. so she has been — probably walking her dogs. so she has been quite reasonably active. i think— has been quite reasonably active. i think something just happened at the last minute. find think something 'ust happened at the last minute. �* ., think something 'ust happened at the last minute. . ., .., , think something 'ust happened at the last minute. . ., , , ., last minute. and of course she has a bi ear last minute. and of course she has a big year next — last minute. and of course she has a big year next year. _ last minute. and of course she has a big year next year, the _ last minute. and of course she has a big year next year, the platinum - big year next year, the platinum jubilee, with a huge amount of planning that has gone into that. are we just planning that has gone into that. are wejust going planning that has gone into that. are we just going to see in the run—up to big events next year her stepping back a little bitjust to rest 20 needs to? well stepping back a little bit 'ust to rest 20 needs twfi stepping back a little bit 'ust to rest 20 needs to? well i think, yes, eve one rest 20 needs to? well i think, yes, everyone at — rest 20 needs to? well i think, yes, everyone at the _ rest 20 needs to? well i think, yes, everyone at the palace _ rest 20 needs to? well i think, yes,
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everyone at the palace now- rest 20 needs to? well i think, yes, everyone at the palace now will- rest 20 needs to? well i think, yes, everyone at the palace now will be i everyone at the palace now will be very carefully calculating, probably recalculating, what can be done with the platinum jubilee. the priority has got _ the platinum jubilee. the priority has got to— the platinum jubilee. the priority has got to be the queen's health and her safety _ has got to be the queen's health and her safety i— has got to be the queen's health and her safety. i think what we are seeing — her safety. i think what we are seeing now is a gradual transition of responsibility from the queen to prince _ of responsibility from the queen to prince charles, prince william and other— prince charles, prince william and other senior members of the royal family _ other senior members of the royal family. they are taking on more responsibilities and therefore will be responsibilities and therefore will he at _ responsibilities and therefore will he at the — responsibilities and therefore will be at the forefront of celebrations and the _ be at the forefront of celebrations and the theme will pop up here and therefore _ and the theme will pop up here and therefore the big days. —— the queen — therefore the big days. —— the queen a_ therefore the big days. —— the queen. a lot of care will taken, of course _ queen. a lot of care will taken, of course. lt— queen. a lot of care will taken, of course. . ~' , . course. it is likely we will see other members _ course. it is likely we will see other members of— course. it is likely we will see other members of the - course. it is likely we will see other members of the family | course. it is likely we will see - other members of the family taking a more central role over the coming months may be just to give her that little bit more of a break? i months may be just to give her that little bit more of a break?— little bit more of a break? i think the treat little bit more of a break? i think the great thing — little bit more of a break? i think the great thing is _ little bit more of a break? i think the great thing is that _ little bit more of a break? i think the great thing is that we - little bit more of a break? i think the great thing is that we have . little bit more of a break? i think the great thing is that we have a | the great thing is that we have a monarch— the great thing is that we have a monarch in— the great thing is that we have a monarch in a very modern age, modern a-e monarch in a very modern age, modern age of— monarch in a very modern age, modern age of technology, where she doesn't really— age of technology, where she doesn't really have _ age of technology, where she doesn't really have to take a decision which he would _ really have to take a decision which he would hate to do, to step down entirely— he would hate to do, to step down entirely from royal duties, because she believes it is her god—given
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duty— she believes it is her god—given duty to — she believes it is her god—given duty to serve as long as she can for the rest _ duty to serve as long as she can for the rest of— duty to serve as long as she can for the rest of her life, but we have all this— the rest of her life, but we have all this modern technology, we can see her. _ all this modern technology, we can see her, she can work remotely. and ithink— see her, she can work remotely. and i think that _ see her, she can work remotely. and i think that is — see her, she can work remotely. and i think that is what she will hold onto— i think that is what she will hold onto in— i think that is what she will hold onto in the _ i think that is what she will hold onto in the coming months and years while _ onto in the coming months and years while other— onto in the coming months and years while other members of the royal family— while other members of the royal family go— while other members of the royal family go out to tread the pavements and do _ family go out to tread the pavements and do the _ family go out to tread the pavements and do the handshaking. great family go out to tread the pavements and do the handshaking.— family go out to tread the pavements and do the handshaking. great to see ou. jennie and do the handshaking. great to see you- jennie bond _ and do the handshaking. great to see you. jennie bond live _ and do the handshaking. great to see you. jennie bond live from _ and do the handshaking. great to see you. jennie bond live from devon. . you. jennie bond live from devon. thank you. if you. jennie bond live from devon. thank yon-— you. jennie bond live from devon. thank ou. . . . . thank you. if you have 'ust switched on, 'ust thank you. if you have 'ust switched just before h thank you. if you have 'ust switched on, just before eight _ thank you. if you have just switched on, just before eight o'clock- thank you. if you have just switched on, just before eight o'clock this - on, just before eight o'clock this morning we will be playing the entirety of owain's and his 50 drumming friends, the bbc news theme in the build—up to the headlines. if you need a lift, that will provide it. if you need a lift, that will provide it. , ., ., ., ., you need a lift, that will provide it. if you are heading out to school, work, _ it. if you are heading out to school, work, running - it. if you are heading out to school, work, running for i it. if you are heading out to i school, work, running for the it. if you are heading out to - school, work, running for the bus, watch it, it will put a spring in your step. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. thousands of londoners who work
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for employers who have voluntarily signed up to the real living wage will be paid an extra 20p an hour stop here in the b hourly rate is rising to £115p. like the compulsory national living wage, it is independently calculated based on the cost of fuel, rent and food. new measures which could mean insulate britain demonstrators face a six—month jail terms if they cause major disruption will be unveiled in parliament later. the amendments to the police crime sentencing and courts bill will also give officers greater powers to target anyone suspected to be planning to block or glue themselves to roads, trains or planes. the legislation has been criticised for setting disproportionate controls on the right to protest. following the announcement 0verby was putting its price is up, now the ride hailing app bolt says it will let its driver set their own charges. it says is aiming to cut waiting times and produce cancellations amid surging demand
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for minicabs. i don't how well you recall your chemistry lessons from school, but one teacher in north—west london may have helped make it much more memorable for her pupils. she spent seven years completing a tapestry of the periodic table. 500,000 stitches later, she has finally been able to show off her work. i have essentiallyjust finished making the entirety of the elements that make—up the periodic table. it has evolved as i was sewing it. it stuck to the original pattern. that is something i try to convey as much as possible. ultimately we are not learning lots of little factoids. we are learning the general pattern of how things behave and seeing how they apply in the real world and what the exceptions are. the problems on the piccadilly line have cleared but both the circle line, anticlockwise, and the hammersmith and city line, have minor delays, not enough trains are running. time now for a look at the weather. good morning. it looking
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mostly dry and mild for this time of year across the capital for much of the rest of this week. high pressure dominates. a few very weak weather fronts at times. they could give us a few spots of rain here and there. we are starting off the morning with some mist and fog patches are so poor visibility on many of our roads for a time lifting and clearing slowly as we head through the morning, lifting into low cloud, and we will keep the cloud for much of the rest of the day. brighter spells at times developing, may be a bit of sunshine but it should stay dry today. we do stand a chance of seeing some spots of rain through to the end of the day into the late afternoon. a weak cold front moving south eastwards. the wind is light. top temperatures, 10—12. overnight tonight, more of a breeze, mist and fog will not be an issue on tuesday morning but some clear spells and lows of 5— seven. it is a little windier tomorrow. lows of 5— seven. it is a little windiertomorrow. brighter lows of 5— seven. it is a little windier tomorrow. brighter spells but almost plenty of cloud. top
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temperatures, 10—12. more sunshine on wednesday. cloudier conditions but again milderair on on wednesday. cloudier conditions but again milder air on thursday and friday. that's it. we're back in an hour. bye bye. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. borisjohnson has acknowledged that his handling of the row over former mp owen paterson, who resigned after breaking lobbying rules "could have been "better". the issue is expected to return to the commons today, with a growing number of mps facing criticism about their conduct. let's speak now to the co—chair of the conservative party — oliver dowden. thank you very much for being with us. not to talk to about this morning. can i start with the news many of our viewers are waking up this morning, what happening in liverpool, what's happening there, and we know one person has been killed with a bomb outside the women's hospital, so what more do we know this morning? yes. women's hospital, so what more do we know this morning?— know this morning? yes, it's a very
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wor int know this morning? yes, it's a very worrying situation, _ know this morning? yes, it's a very worrying situation, clearly - know this morning? yes, it's a very worrying situation, clearly there - know this morning? yes, it's a very worrying situation, clearly there is| worrying situation, clearly there is an ongoing police investigation and the home secretary and the prime minister are being kept constantly up—to—date on it. you will have seen there have been three arrests under counter terrorism offences and we are continuing to take a very close interest in it. my thoughts and prayers go out to the victims of this cowardly attack. [30 prayers go out to the victims of this cowardly attack.— prayers go out to the victims of this cowardly attack. do you know if there are any _ this cowardly attack. do you know if there are any plans _ this cowardly attack. do you know if there are any plans to _ this cowardly attack. do you know if there are any plans to adjust - this cowardly attack. do you know if there are any plans to adjust the . there are any plans to adjust the threat level at all? there are any plans to ad'ust the threat level at alwh threat level at all? well, the government _ threat level at all? well, the government keeps _ threat level at all? well, the government keeps the - threat level at all? well, the| government keeps the threat threat level at all? well, the - government keeps the threat level under constant review. there is the joint intelligence committee that reviews and will make adjustments as appropriate. i think this is probably consistent with the current terror threat level but this will be a matterfor the terror threat level but this will be a matter for the committee and the home secretary and the prime minister. irate home secretary and the prime minister. ~ ~ . home secretary and the prime minister. ~ ,, , ., , ., minister. we will keep an eye on that closely _ minister. we will keep an eye on that closely over _ minister. we will keep an eye on that closely over the _ minister. we will keep an eye on that closely over the course - minister. we will keep an eye on that closely over the course of i minister. we will keep an eye on i that closely over the course of this programme of the rest of the day as i'm sure you will too. we mentioned in the introduction of the ongoing debate around owen paterson what happened and what didn't happen and what could have been done
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differently and we spoke about the fact the prime minister admitted yesterday it could have been handled better. how? i yesterday it could have been handled better- how?— better. how? i think the prime minister. _ better. how? i think the prime minister, the _ better. how? i think the prime minister, the pointy _ better. how? i think the prime minister, the pointy was - better. how? i think the prime i minister, the pointy was making, there a conflation between two separate issues. one was of the appeals process and there was an argument for having a proper appeals system as part of the process for determining misconduct and the second one was the specific case of owen paterson where there had been a breach of the rules. now that motion will come back before parliament today and it's likely with government support mps will vote in favour of the committee report that censures owen paterson. clearly, is no longer a member of parliament. i have to say to you, whilst dealing with that, our big focus of the government is actually getting on with the job of government and that's why you've seen the prime minister focused on the climate change talks this weekend with some good progress and help secure the planet for our children and
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grandchildren and that's my later today you'll be seeing further updates on the booster programme for the bouts with the focus of the government is the prime minister has accepted and we accept there were mistakes made during that period. irate mistakes made during that period. we will come to cop26. i want to talk to talk about the agreements made on that issue. you said the prime minister admitted mistakes. do politicians say sorry any more? would sorry go a way of the prime minister was to say we got it wrong with regards to owen paterson? there's been a lot of allegations about sleaze and questions that have about sleaze and questions that have a government runs itself and all that was avoidable if it hadn't happened in the first place and i'm sure you will agree it sorry goes a long way sometimes?— sure you will agree it sorry goes a long way sometimes? yes, i agree and indeed, i long way sometimes? yes, i agree and indeed. ithink— long way sometimes? yes, i agree and indeed, i think you _ long way sometimes? yes, i agree and indeed, i think you would _ long way sometimes? yes, i agree and indeed, i think you would have - long way sometimes? yes, i agree and indeed, i think you would have heard i indeed, i think you would have heard me say sorry in respect of some of the what happened over the early stages of the coronavirus. i think in essence if you listen to what the prime minister said, he said we've made mistakes and we regret that. we have accepted that. we are moving
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on. that's exactly what you are seeing with a motion before parliament today, accepting the centre of owen paterson. but equally, i think what people want, i don't want to speak for your viewers, they can make their own minds up, but many of the conversations i have as party chairman, people are saying they want the government to be focused on the job at hand, getting want the government to be focused on thejob at hand, getting on want the government to be focused on the job at hand, getting on with a job, getting on with what we voted you to do, send you to westminster for, that's why i'm so heartened with the progress we've made on climate change over the weekend, protecting the planet, and why we are focused on coronavirus and i have to say, as party chairman, i speak to the prime minister pretty much every day and his focus is exactly that. much every day and his focus is exactly that-— much every day and his focus is exactl that. ., ., , exactly that. you say to my getting on the iob- — exactly that. you say to my getting on the iob- lt _ exactly that. you say to my getting on the job. it is _ exactly that. you say to my getting on the job. it is related _ exactly that. you say to my getting on the job. it is related to - exactly that. you say to my getting on the job. it is related to that - on the job. it is related to that because one of the things, i know you mentioned our viewers, but what they have been contacting us about some of the jobs ministers doing and those in the tory party are doing. labour are calling for investigation
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into conservative mp sir geoffrey cox and they said he used his office to conduct private business. you say getting on with a job, that's getting on with a job, that's getting on with a job, that's getting on thejob he getting on with a job, that's getting on the job he shouldn't be using that office four. can i ask you, have you ever done that, use your private office to do something outside of your parliamentary work? what do you say to your viewers this morning who are wondering about that use of time and that use of a space which should be used for a specific job? which should be used for a specific 'ob? ~ ., ., ., ., , which should be used for a specific 'ob? ., ., ., ., , . , job? well, our parliamentary offices are there to — job? well, our parliamentary offices are there to enable _ job? well, our parliamentary offices are there to enable us _ job? well, our parliamentary offices are there to enable us to _ job? well, our parliamentary offices are there to enable us to carry - job? well, our parliamentary offices are there to enable us to carry out i are there to enable us to carry out our work as members of parliament and that's certainly what i use my parliamentary office four and the prime minister has been very clear that members of parliament should be focused with getting on with their dayjob. if the allegations and in relation to geoffrey cox, that those rules have not been abided by then thatis rules have not been abided by then that is a matter for the parliamentary commissioner for standards and there is an appropriate mechanism for those investigations.— appropriate mechanism for those investigations. your advice to mps
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would be investigations. your advice to mps would he don't _ investigations. your advice to mps would be don't use _ investigations. your advice to mps would be don't use a _ investigations. your advice to mps would be don't use a zoom - investigations. your advice to mps would be don't use a zoom call- investigations. your advice to mps would be don't use a zoom call forj would be don't use a zoom call for private business from your office, basically? private business from your office, basicall ? ~ basically? well, the guiding - rinci - le basically? well, the guiding principle is _ basically? well, the guiding principle is that _ basically? well, the guiding principle is that your - basically? well, the guiding - principle is that your parliamentary office is there for you to conduct your business as a member of parliament and the rules are set out there. i parliament and the rules are set out there. ., ., , ~ ., there. i mentioned cop26 and i said i wanted to — there. i mentioned cop26 and i said i wanted to talk _ there. i mentioned cop26 and i said i wanted to talk to _ there. i mentioned cop26 and i said i wanted to talk to you _ there. i mentioned cop26 and i said i wanted to talk to you about - there. i mentioned cop26 and i said i wanted to talk to you about that. i i wanted to talk to you about that. how do you see what happened in glasgow because it got people like greta sandberg saying it's a case of blah blah blah and other people saying there is an important outcome to these talks so how do you assess what we have been speaking about for quite a few weeks now and the point we got to yesterday and some of the prime minister is comments on that? well, i think it's a really important and significant step forward, clearly with negotiations they go up and down and you don't get all you want to achieve but for me, a couple of things stand out. first of all, if you think back towards the paris climate talks, the planet is on course for a wholly
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unsustainable warming of 4. post— paris it was three, post this, it is too, clearly we need to go a bit further to get to 1.5, but that is really substantial progress. the second thing is on the key targets we set out, we've got: on the agenda for the first time with the aim of reducing cola use and be phased out pretty much in the uk. huge commitment on deforestation, 90% of the wells forest are now covered by the wells forest are now covered by the commitment that by 2030 will end deforestation. of course, there's more to do. i think we should celebrate that progress and indeed, if you look at some of the comments from the ngos, the non— government organisations like greenpeace and so on, they say of course there's more to be done but they accept we've made progress. to be done but they accept we've made progress-— to be done but they accept we've made progress. to be done but they accept we've made -iroress. ., . ., ., , ., , made progress. how much of a blow is it that india and _ made progress. how much of a blow is it that india and china _ made progress. how much of a blow is it that india and china change - made progress. how much of a blow is it that india and china change those i it that india and china change those words from phase out coal to face down: because this huge difference between those, isn't it? riff
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down: because this huge difference between those, isn't it?— between those, isn't it? of course, we made no _ between those, isn't it? of course, we made no secret _ between those, isn't it? of course, we made no secret he _ between those, isn't it? of course, we made no secret he wanted - between those, isn't it? of course, | we made no secret he wanted them between those, isn't it? of course, i we made no secret he wanted them to say and that's what we have done in the uk. about ten years ago, slightly more than that, we had a0%: use generation before that it was 80% and now we are down to 1% and it will be zero x 2024, but the fact we've got that commitment for the first time to phase down:, at least it shows that a tractor and we are one and i think and i think countries like the uk can so that has been done and i hope that all of the countries which have signed up to that take that seriously and see us is going on that trajectory and i think the fact you got that for the first time, it's big progress. with international negotiations, but it is sometimes painfully slow but that is sometimes painfully slow but that is a real shift in terms of attitudes towards: which of course is one of the big contributors to global warming. mi is one of the big contributors to global warming.— is one of the big contributors to global warming. all of the doubt and, global warming. all of the doubt and. thank _ global warming. all of the doubt and. thank you _ global warming. all of the doubt and, thank you for _ global warming. all of the doubt and, thank you for your - global warming. all of the doubt and, thank you for your time. i global warming. all of the doubt i and, thank you for your time. good to talk to you. john is here after
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an incredible driver from to talk to you. john is here after an incredible driverfrom lewis hamilton. good morning. this was a weekend builder is potentially the beginning of the end for lewis hamilton. that was the way was being looked. look at his face. i did a good job. when you put some hard work is no wonder he's the number one, he absolutely brilliant. it's been called one of his greatest ever wins. penalised twice for technical problems, he was forced to drop down the grid, starting from tenth, but battled back to pass title rival and championship leader max verstappen who he now trails by 14 points with three races of the season remaining. success always feel sweeter when you face adversity and when you start first and have success, there is a journey to get there, of course, but it's far, far greater. this is one of the most beautiful feelings i've had in a win, knowing that i've had all of those push backs, setbacks. it was going to take something truly
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remarkable to turn that round around and he duly delivered. former world champion damon hill said it was one of the best drives i've seen in f1 by anyone. utterly flawless. george russell who will link up with hamilton next season, said, "you're an absolute beast". and billy monger labelled it unreal. australia are the new t20 world champions winning the title for the first time after beating new zealand by eight wickets. new zealand made 172 from their 20 overs. captain kane williamson top scoring with 85. but it wasn't enough — glen maxwell hitting the winning runs after half centuries from both mitchell marsh and david warner helped australia chase down their target. spare a thought for some of england's ashes squad who've got to share a 15 hour flight back with some of the australian team from dubai today. that could be entertaining. can you imagine? it's going to drag, isn't
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it? talk about match winning performances, take a look at this from wales wing louis rees zammet in yesterday's autumn international against fuji. with his side trailling in cardiff, he picked the ball up on the wing, chipped it behind the their defence before thundering after it to score. an incredible moment of indivicual brilliants. of individual brilliance. it was one of a late flurry of tries helping them to a 38—23 win. what a feeling that must have been in front of a home crowd who'll be hoping for more of the same against australia next weekend. another statement victory from england who remain the dominant force in women's rugby thrashing canada 51—12. and it was a debut to remember for heather cowell as she crossed over twice for the roses on her home ground. despite the high scoring, canada made them work for it. scotland beat japan 36—12. rhona lloyd diving over the line for their final try of the game. the scots playing in front of a crowd in edinburgh for the first time in two years.
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chelsea are just a point behind leaders arsenal in the women's super league after beating manchester city 4—0. the pick of the goals came from fran kirby as the blues dealt city another heavy loss. chelsea are now unbeaten in their last six matches. could cristiano ronaldo's portugal miss out on a world cup spot? they'll have to qualify through the play—offs. it's after fulham's aleksandar mitrovic scored a dramatic late winner as serbia pipped them to top spot in the group. that sent the team and the serbian bench crazy. disappointment obviously for the portuguese players. cristiano ronaldo also there. harry kane might be wondering how many he'll score if picked to face san marino later. england have scored a total of 24 goals in their last four games against them. conceeding none. kane is just nine goals short of wayne rooney's all time england goal—scoring record. a draw�*s all they need to qualify. scotland in action, guaranteed a place in the play offs.
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northern ireland play too. it isa it is a game he will be desperate to play in, won't he? after a hat—trick the other night and without goal—scoring record in his sights, he will be thinking, you know, he could have had full again tonight, couldn't he? it has moments where he looks amazing and then like many great strikers, goes through a period movie doesn't score many goals against criticism and comes back with a goes again. it's difficult how that pressure, everybody piling the pressure on you and then just coming out and performing. i rememberspeaking and then just coming out and performing. i remember speaking to alan shearer about this. due member before euro 96 he went through the longest drought of his international career where he had not scored and terry venables the manager sat down before the tournament and said, you will be my striker. you will be the leader of this team and i will never change that and i'm confident you will score goals and he went out there and did that and won the golden boot. it's all about man management. he might not be doing it for tottenham necessarily at the moment but when it comes to the international stage, like the other night, isjust brilliant. thank you
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very much for that. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. how she got a rainbow this time? good morning. good morning, everyone. quite a mild start to the date if you haven't yet ventured outside. temperatures are easily in high single figures or indeed just into double figures. this mild theme is going to continue with us as we go through the course of this week. some rain in the forecast but most of it is going to be in the north of the country and that is what we have at the moment. rain pouring down across scotland and northern ireland overnight. sinking slowly southward through the course of today. as it bumps into high pressure, the band of rain will start to break up but ahead of it, some dense fog across england and also wales. especially around the midlands, so if you are travelling, bearthat around the midlands, so if you are travelling, bear that in mind. slowly it will lift on one or two of us will see brighter breaks and even the odd glimmer of sunshine. more sunshine for scotland and northern ireland behind this weather front. the cloud building in the west. the
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arrival of another weather front will arrive later on. 10— 13, north to south. overnight, the weather front continuing to sink southwards taking some spots of rain with it. patchy mist and fog forming once again but not as widespread as this morning. the wind will strengthen in the north—west and here comes the rain. 5— ten. tomorrow, we start off with this weather front. the odd spot of drizzle on it as it pushes into the south—east. this weather front bringing heavier rain and it will break up as we go through the course of the day but we are looking at gusty winds, especially in the northern and western isles and the far north of mainland scotland where it will be gusting to gale force. temperatures tomorrow, 10— 13, so very similar to what we are looking at today. and then, as we move into wednesday, there will still be drizzle coming across south—west scotland, north—west england, a few showers coming in here on the
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westerly wind as well and a bit more cloud in the west compared to central and eastern parts where we will see more sunshine. but temperatures just slipping across northern and central scotland, but hanging on as we push across england, wales and northern ireland to roughly 10— 13. as we are into thursday, still some drizzle and cloud in western areas. and we got rain on and off through the course of the day across the north of scotland. the far south—east likely to hang on to the sunshine for the longest with temperatures north to south, 8— 13. the mild theme continuing. i will show you something in a minute which will show you how it will change. friday, still some showers across the north west. a lot of dry and bright weather with some central sunshine. this cloud in the west some drizzle. north—west england into wales, the south—west, 16 in aberdeen. even 17.
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take a quick look at this. this is the temperature for friday. the yellow showing you must come to be mild and it stays mild on do on the saturday starting to down from the north. sunday cooler for all of us and then on monday cool once again. a strip of yellow sees a weather front coming our way. into saturday and sunday, a lot of dry weather, not of cloud, still mild, any rain more likely in the north and west. carroll, thank you very much. we will see you in half an hour. i'm delighted to say chris hadfield is with us now. you might recognise him as the "singing astronaut" — a title chris hadfield earned himself when his zero gravity rendition of david bowie's space oddity went viral. after retiring from orbit, the former commander of the international space station is now focusing on writing fiction, and hasjust released his fourth novel. good morning to you. incredible to see you. are you happy with the screams behind you? it’s see you. are you happy with the screams behind you?— screams behind you? it's very reminiscent. _ screams behind you? it's very reminiscent. is _ screams behind you? it's very reminiscent. is this _ screams behind you? it's very reminiscent. is this an - screams behind you? it's very. reminiscent. is this an accurate representation _ reminiscent. is this an accurate representation of _ reminiscent. is this an accurate representation of space? - reminiscent. is this an accurate representation of space? we i reminiscent. is this an accurate i representation of space? we have reminiscent. is this an accurate - representation of space? we have no red couches — representation of space? we have no red couches on _ representation of space? we have no red couches on the _ representation of space? we have no red couches on the space _ representation of space? we have no red couches on the space station. -
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red couches on the space station. you just float around. tell us about the book. the apollo murders. you got me the title. it is the book. the apollo murders. you got me the title.— got me the title. it is a thriller, alternative _ got me the title. it is a thriller, alternative history _ got me the title. it is a thriller, alternative history fiction - got me the title. it is a thriller, alternative history fiction which j alternative history fiction which takes a crew of the apollo 18 mission, which almost happened, and goes to a secret soviet space station, that did happen for real, and eventually went to the surface of the moon with a mixture of astronauts and cosmonauts, and the various things happened and eventually it ends up splashing down just north of hawaii but it is so closely timed with the truth and real things that happened, you will have a hard time picking out what is fact and fiction. you have a hard time picking out what is fact and fiction.— fact and fiction. you are the right man with all _ fact and fiction. you are the right man with all your— fact and fiction. you are the right man with all your knowledge - fact and fiction. you are the right man with all your knowledge and j man with all your knowledge and famously, people will remember in space no one can hear you scream, and also you don't have much help out there. ., ., ., ., out there. you got to do it yourself- _ out there. you got to do it yourself. you _ out there. you got to do it yourself. you are - out there. you got to do it | yourself. you are hundreds out there. you got to do it. yourself. you are hundreds of thousands of miles from home for short and, as the book says, hundreds of thousands of miles away from help. hundreds of thousands of miles away from hel. . v hundreds of thousands of miles away from hel. . �*, ,., from help. that's so true. the thing which strikes _
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from help. that's so true. the thing which strikes me _ from help. that's so true. the thing which strikes me when _ from help. that's so true. the thing which strikes me when i _ from help. that's so true. the thing which strikes me when i look- from help. that's so true. the thing which strikes me when i look at - from help. that's so true. the thing | which strikes me when i look at your book as it would make a brilliant film. surely one day i'll be going to see this?— film. surely one day i'll be going to see this? a . , ., , ., to see this? actually, many movie houses have _ to see this? actually, many movie houses have already _ to see this? actually, many movie houses have already contacted - to see this? actually, many movie houses have already contacted us| to see this? actually, many movie . houses have already contacted us and we are talking to one here in the uk and one in america and james cameron loves the book. $5 and one in america and james cameron loves the book-— loves the book. as in the titanic director. and _ loves the book. as in the titanic director. and avatar _ loves the book. as in the titanic director. and avatar and - loves the book. as in the titanic director. and avatar and all - loves the book. as in the titanic| director. and avatar and all that. he is super— director. and avatar and all that. he is super busy _ director. and avatar and all that. he is super busy dam _ director. and avatar and all that. he is super busy dam in - director. and avatar and all that. he is super busy dam in new- director. and avatar and all that. - he is super busy dam in new zealand making movies right now but he won't to get made into a movie as well so, yeah, i think it will probably. lanthem yeah, i think it will probably. when ou were yeah, i think it will probably. when you were in — yeah, i think it will probably. when you were in space, _ yeah, i think it will probably. when you were in space, recording - yeah, i think it will probably. when you were in space, recording your fantastic music video, did you think one day i am going to write fiction about this and make this into a plot in my head? i was commanding the spaceship in addition to recording david barry. i spaceship in addition to recording david ltarry-— spaceship in addition to recording david bar . ., , ., , david barry. i thought you were 'ust sinaiin! i david barry. i thought you were 'ust singing! r ne_ david barry. i thought you were 'ust singing! i never thought i david barry. i thought you were 'ust singing! i never thought i i david barry. i thought you were 'ust singing! i never thought i wouldh singing! i never thought i would write a fiction _ singing! i never thought i would write a fiction book— singing! i never thought i would write a fiction book ? _ singing! i never thought i would write a fiction book ? david - singing! i never thought i would i write a fiction book ? david bowie. i thought would be an interesting challenge and to do. it's another way to, you know, when you make a video like this one, people can get a visceral sense of life there. the
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sort of serenity organ, the peacefulness of it, and the tune was so beautiful. to be able now to not just like factual books but to write fiction, you know, to let people in on how does it feel, what are the visceral feelings of it, that gives me the freedom of it? i remember a programme i did with you, radio show when we did a piece in the science and technology museum in manchester and technology museum in manchester and there were so many questions from children who were so excited by what you did in the pictures you sent back and your experience of your time and space. the thing which struck me from that day and the amazing thing about that video is you're so busy up there, just about everybody, it was experiment after experiment. zoo everybody, it was experiment after experiment-— everybody, it was experiment after exeriment. :: :: , , ., experiment. 200 experiments and we have to do some _ experiment. 200 experiments and we have to do some things _ experiment. 200 experiments and we have to do some things outside - experiment. 200 experiments and we have to do some things outside the i have to do some things outside the regular space station, so there were vehicles coming from europe and japan and russia and the usa, so it's a bit of a union station with vehicles coming and going and stuff breaks all the time. the russians
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were doing a space walk and i was getting them dressed and have a toilet break sol getting them dressed and have a toilet break so i was fixing the toilet break so i was fixing the toilet and then getting them dressed in their spaces and affixing the toilet and when they got outside perhaps, i got back and i put the last connection to the switch and the toilet powered up and it was like, all right, another successful day in space. like, all right, another successful day in space-— like, all right, another successful day in space. you are the father of the whole thing. _ day in space. you are the father of the whole thing. it's _ day in space. you are the father of the whole thing. it's a _ day in space. you are the father of the whole thing. it's a little - day in space. you are the father of the whole thing. it's a little bit - the whole thing. it's a little bit like the millennium _ the whole thing. it's a little bit like the millennium falcon - the whole thing. it's a little bit like the millennium falcon in i the whole thing. it's a little bit i like the millennium falcon in star wars i think. it's a spaceship and takes a lot of maintenance but we've been living there for 21 years and it's our first great outpost from the world in one of my crewmates just launched a couple of days ago, he's back upon the space station now come it's an amazing laboratory and it's kind of ourfirst come it's an amazing laboratory and it's kind of our first put away from earth. �* it's kind of our first put away from earth. . , ., it's kind of our first put away from earth. �* , ., , it's kind of our first put away from earth. , earth. are you entirely, physically, remind me — earth. are you entirely, physically, remind me how— earth. are you entirely, physically, remind me how long _ earth. are you entirely, physically, remind me how long it _ earth. are you entirely, physically, remind me how long it takes i earth. are you entirely, physically, remind me how long it takes to i earth. are you entirely, physically, | remind me how long it takes to get back to normal when you come down? are there any lasting effects? you have to grow _ are there any lasting effects? you have to grow your _ are there any lasting effects? you. have to grow your skeleton back to its original intensity. ? density. we have osteoporosis in space. it
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takes about a young have to get your bone back. we've had a couple of astronauts tripped and break their head within a few months of getting home so you have to be careful but i think i'm normal. laughter has dancing left you normal? it has opened my eyes to a world i didn't know existed at all. yes, i'm enjoying that i'm far more interested in your time and space which is far more exciting. the apollo murders is this book and you are already researching the next one. �* . . . are already researching the next one. �* , . . ., one. i'm researching, when i wrote this, i one. i'm researching, when i wrote this. i lost— one. i'm researching, when i wrote this. i lost of— one. i'm researching, when i wrote this, i lost of it — one. i'm researching, when i wrote this, | lost of it | _ one. i'm researching, when i wrote this, i lost of it i knew— one. i'm researching, when i wrote this, i lost of it i knew and - one. i'm researching, when i wrote this, i lost of it i knew and i - one. i'm researching, when i wrote this, i lost of it i knew and i knew i this, i lost of it i knew and i knew the guy is a and sol this, i lost of it i knew and i knew the guy is a and so i could talk to them of this next one, it goes a little different and takes some of the main characters but there some parts of it i had to literally physically go and research are not what i'm doing right now. the main character in — what i'm doing right now. the main character in the _ what i'm doing right now. the main character in the book— what i'm doing right now. the main character in the book is _ what i'm doing right now. the main character in the book is based i what i'm doing right now. the main character in the book is based on? | character in the book is based on? he is a test pilot, an engineer, and
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an astronaut, and has a guitar, and... ., , an astronaut, and has a guitar, and... .,, , ., and... to be recognising from anywhere? — and... to be recognising from anywhere? he's _ and... to be recognising from anywhere? he's a _ and... to be recognising from anywhere? he's a very i and... to be recognising from anywhere? he's a very good i and... to be recognising from i anywhere? he's a very good guy. he does not have _ anywhere? he's a very good guy. he does not have a _ anywhere? he's a very good guy. he does not have a moustache. - anywhere? he's a very good guy. he does not have a moustache. it i anywhere? he's a very good guy. he does not have a moustache. it can'tl does not have a moustache. it can't be ou does not have a moustache. it can't be you then- _ does not have a moustache. it can't be you then. talk— does not have a moustache. it can't be you then. talk about _ does not have a moustache. it can't be you then. talk about travelling i be you then. talk about travelling to space, you are on a whistle—stop tour of the world at the moment, monastery or last 24 hours. the next book has a piece _ monastery or last 24 hours. the next book has a piece of— monastery or last 24 hours. the next book has a piece of it, _ monastery or last 24 hours. the next book has a piece of it, it's _ monastery or last 24 hours. the next book has a piece of it, it's out i monastery or last 24 hours. the next book has a piece of it, it's out in i book has a piece of it, it's out in 1973, so you look at the fantastic events, interesting human events, and one of them was the more of course and so there was the yom kippur war war so i've been in israel for the last several days when i came here to visit with the two of you, on the way home and i would back in canada this evening. i'm deeply honoured you stopped in to talk to us on that busy schedule. have you been watching the cop26 climate change conference? having seen our world from that perspective, you must watch what's going on there really closely? ltilul’eii. going on there really closely? well, the facts are — going on there really closely? well, the facts are clear. _
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going on there really closely? well, the facts are clear. there _ going on there really closely? well, the facts are clear. there is - going on there really closely? well, the facts are clear. there is no i the facts are clear. there is no real informed dispute of that. we are changing the chemistry of our atmosphere which affects the world. but the reaction to it is so slow, it's very difficult to integrate into decision making, it's not easy, it's hard, and we need things like cop26 but the same are already at 26, it would have been nice if the first one had sold the whole problem but i hope you don't get into three digits but we have to keep working on it and it's going to be delayed process. several of my friends were there and i work on multiple businesses trying to address the understanding of the health of our world because without the information, then we can't really decide what to do next but it's a big part of what i do know in addition to writing thriller fiction. ,., ,, addition to writing thriller fiction. ,., , ., ,, fiction. do you think the conversation _ fiction. do you think the conversation is - fiction. do you think the | conversation is changing fiction. do you think the i conversation is changing and fiction. do you think the _ conversation is changing and hasn't changed dramatically in the few years? it changed dramatically in the few ears? , a a, , 2 changed dramatically in the few ears? , �*, a, years? it is changing but it's more evolutionary _ years? it is changing but it's more evolutionary change, _ years? it is changing but it's more evolutionary change, it's - years? it is changing but it's more evolutionary change, it's not - evolutionary change, it's not radicalfaster evolutionary change, it's not radical faster change. evolutionary change, it's not radicalfaster change. people have radical faster change. people have to radicalfaster change. people have to shift their fundamental thinking and i think change is hard. everybody saw that in the pandemic,
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even something as black—and—white as a pandemic, it's hard for people just to accept the scientific thought and change what they would normally do and climate is even slower and less apparent than that, so, yeah, it's not an easy thing. eventually we will muddle along and do the right thing, but this going to be a lot of damage before we get there. , , ., i, to be a lot of damage before we get there. , , ., ., , ., . ., there. give us an idea, is a change is made in — there. give us an idea, is a change is made in your— there. give us an idea, is a change is made in your life, _ there. give us an idea, is a change is made in your life, something - is made in your life, something everybody could do that make a difference?— everybody could do that make a difference? ., ., , difference? fundamentally, we need to chance difference? fundamentally, we need to change our— difference? fundamentally, we need to change our energy _ difference? fundamentally, we need to change our energy source, - difference? fundamentally, we need to change our energy source, we - to change our energy source, we can't still be generating steam by burning coal. we are evolving away from that quickly. i address the technological side and work with multiple companies to try and change how we are generating energy, how we store energy, and then how we use energy so we are not affecting the climate so badly. we energy so we are not affecting the climate so badly.— energy so we are not affecting the climate so badly. we are running out of time but — climate so badly. we are running out of time but i — climate so badly. we are running out of time but i have _ climate so badly. we are running out of time but i have to _ climate so badly. we are running out of time but i have to ask— climate so badly. we are running out of time but i have to ask you, - climate so badly. we are running out of time but i have to ask you, you i of time but i have to ask you, you have got a new dog. tell me about henry. i have got a new dog. tell me about hen . ~ ., , ., ., henry. i think charles cavalier saniel henry. i think charles cavalier spaniel and — henry. i think charles cavalier spaniel and he's _ henry. i think charles cavalier spaniel and he's as _ henry. i think charles cavalier spaniel and he's as cute - henry. i think charles cavalier spaniel and he's as cute as i
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henry. i think charles cavalier| spaniel and he's as cute as can henry. i think charles cavalier- spaniel and he's as cute as can be. henry! spaniel and he's as cute as can be. hen ! , i i, spaniel and he's as cute as can be. hen! ,. ., ., henry! here such a happy little dog. 0h, m henry! here such a happy little dog. on. my goodness! _ henry! here such a happy little dog. oh, my goodness! he _ henry! here such a happy little dog. oh, my goodness! he is— henry! here such a happy little dog. oh, my goodness! he is right - henry! here such a happy little dog. oh, my goodness! he is right king l henry! here such a happy little dog. | oh, my goodness! he is right king of thejungle, king of the oh, my goodness! he is right king of the jungle, king of the world. oh, my goodness! he is right king of thejungle, king of the world. that little tale is the most exercised part of this body and moves constantly. he would love to lick you awake at every opportunity. he's a terrific dog. we you awake at every opportunity. he's a terrific dog-— a terrific dog. we should get our do . s a terrific dog. we should get our dogs together- _ a terrific dog. we should get our dogs together. next _ a terrific dog. we should get our dogs together. next time - a terrific dog. we should get our dogs together. next time you i a terrific dog. we should get our. dogs together. next time you come bring henry review. thank you so much. a pleasure to talk to you. chris' book is called the apollo murders. it's brilliant. thank you. as we've heard this morning, our weatherman owain has smashed a children in need record with his spectacular drumathon, it's become the most successful 24—hour challenge in the charity's history. so far, he's raised more than £2.7 million. we'll be catching up with owain in about half an hour, but here's another listen to one of the drumathon's stand out moments. this will lead us up to the eight o'clock headlines.—
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this will lead us up to the eight o'clock headlines. two... three... four... bbc news theme plays.
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i enjoyed that. it was good, wasn't it?! good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. the fatal car explosion outside a liverpool hospital — mi5 are called in to help with the investigation after one man died. liverpool women's hospital remains
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sealed off this morning. police are checking cards as they go in. houses have been cited in other locations across the city and three men have been arrested under the terrorism act. six months after a damning report into the bbc�*s handling of princess diana's 1995 panorama interview, her brother tells this programme he believes there's more to come out. it's clear to me that there are certain people who were in the bbc who have behaved in a way that is truly abysmal and possibly criminal. how much pay is fair pay? the rate of the real living wage goes up today. what does that mean to those on the lowest incomes? and why are more employers opting to pay their staff more? £50 million is pledged to find a cure for motor neurone disease — we have reaction from the people most affected. the moment on saturday's strictly for everyone in the deaf community — we'll find out why it means so much to so many.
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good morning. some dense fog across parts of england and wales this morning. rain crossing scotland and northern ireland. forall of crossing scotland and northern ireland. for all of us it is going to be a mild week. next week is looking colder. details later in the programme. good morning. it's monday, 15th november, our main story. the security service, mi5, has been called in to assist counter terrorism police investigating yesterday's car explosion outside a hospital in liverpool. one man has been killed and another injured in the incident. three men have been arrested under the terrorism act after several houses were evacuated in the city. our reporter, andy gill, is outside liverpool women's hospital this morning. what is the very latest? the hosital what is the very latest? the hospital remained _ what is the very latest? the hospital remained sealed off this morning — hospital remained sealed off this morning. police tape around the entire _ morning. police tape around the entire perimeter. police also checking _ entire perimeter. police also checking cars as they go in.
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visiting _ checking cars as they go in. visiting not allowed but appointments going ahead as normal. add two— appointments going ahead as normal. add two other locations in liverpool, to the north of here, three _ liverpool, to the north of here, three men— liverpool, to the north of here, three men arrested by counterterrorist officers. another location — counterterrorist officers. another location about a mile south of here, rutland _ location about a mile south of here, rutland avenue, police sealed off a street _ rutland avenue, police sealed off a street and — rutland avenue, police sealed off a street and a number of homes were evacuated — street and a number of homes were evacuated. people are to go to emergency accommodation provided by the councit _ emergency accommodation provided by the council. counterterrorism officers — the council. counterterrorism officers keeping an open mind about why this _ officers keeping an open mind about why this has all happened, why the car exploded. but at this hospital is very— car exploded. but at this hospital is very close to liverpool's anglican _ is very close to liverpool's anglican cathedral and the city's remembrance service was taking place there at— remembrance service was taking place there at 11_ remembrance service was taking place there at 11 o'clock at about at the time _ there at 11 o'clock at about at the time the — there at 11 o'clock at about at the time the car exploded. it is unusual for the _ time the car exploded. it is unusual for the remembrance service in liverpool— for the remembrance service in liverpool to take place at the cathedral. it normally takes place in the _ cathedral. it normally takes place in the city — cathedral. it normally takes place in the city centre. the local police force. _ in the city centre. the local police force, merseyside police, say there will he _ force, merseyside police, say there will be more patrols on the streets of liverpool today to reassure people — of liverpool today to reassure people. the home secretary, priti
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patel. _ people. the home secretary, priti patel. has— people. the home secretary, priti patel, has said she is going to be kept _ patel, has said she is going to be kept up _ patel, has said she is going to be kept up to— patel, has said she is going to be kept up to date with events as they unfold _ kept up to date with events as they unfold. and if the prime minister tweeted — unfold. and if the prime minister tweeted his support yesterday and sympathy for people affected by the events _ sympathy for people affected by the events in _ sympathy for people affected by the events in liverpool. thank _ events in liverpool. thank you very much. we can talk now to our security correspondent, frank gardner. we know mi5 involved in these investigations. what does that tell us, what will they be looking at? right, there are three bodies involved _ right, there are three bodies involved in these fast—moving investigations. merseyside police, counter— investigations. merseyside police, counter terrorism north—west police, who have _ counter terrorism north—west police, who have been issuing statements out of greater— who have been issuing statements out of greater manchester, and also mi5, the security— of greater manchester, and also mi5, the security services. there are a number— the security services. there are a number of— the security services. there are a number of different lines that they are looking at. and at the moment they still— are looking at. and at the moment they still haven't come down on one side or— they still haven't come down on one side or the — they still haven't come down on one side or the other to determine the cause _ side or the other to determine the cause or— side or the other to determine the cause or motivation for this blast. they— cause or motivation for this blast. they are — cause or motivation for this blast. they are keeping an open mind. but those _ they are keeping an open mind. but those lines — they are keeping an open mind. but those lines include digital, forensic— those lines include digital, forensic and intelligence.
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unfortunately, the fire that consumed the taxi after the blast will have — consumed the taxi after the blast will have destroyed a lot of the forensic— will have destroyed a lot of the forensic evidence. inevitably there will look _ forensic evidence. inevitably there will look for any clues, any forensic— will look for any clues, any forensic residue. normally those will he _ forensic residue. normally those will be examined by the forensic explosives laboratory, part of the government's technical laboratory, to look— government's technical laboratory, to look at _ government's technical laboratory, to look at what was the cause of that blast — to look at what was the cause of that blast. the newspapers are speculating it may have been the detonator— speculating it may have been the detonator that went off but not the main explosive blast, but there has been _ main explosive blast, but there has been no _ main explosive blast, but there has been no confirmation of that. on the intelligence side it is not unusual that mi5— intelligence side it is not unusual that mi5 would be called in on something like this because clearly this looks, — something like this because clearly this looks, this doesn't look like an accident, it looks like an act of terrorism. — an accident, it looks like an act of terrorism. or— an accident, it looks like an act of terrorism, ora an accident, it looks like an act of terrorism, or a failed act of terrorism. _ terrorism, or a failed act of terrorism, but it hasn't been declared _ terrorism, but it hasn't been declared as such. we can read a lot into the _ declared as such. we can read a lot into the fact — declared as such. we can read a lot into the fact it is a counter terrorism _ into the fact it is a counter terrorism led investigation that opens— terrorism led investigation that opens up— terrorism led investigation that opens up a lot of doors.
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counterterrorism police work very closely _ counterterrorism police work very closely with mi5 intelligence investigators. they will be looking at lists _ investigators. they will be looking at lists of— investigators. they will be looking at lists of people active in the area — at lists of people active in the area. they will be going back to see if there _ area. they will be going back to see if there was— area. they will be going back to see if there was any spike in communication at the time, things like that— communication at the time, things like that going on behind the scenes _ like that going on behind the scenes. ., ., . ., ., . scenes. you touched on some of that speculation — scenes. you touched on some of that speculation about _ scenes. you touched on some of that speculation about what _ scenes. you touched on some of that speculation about what was - speculation about what was potentially the target, what happen with the driver, but the next few hours and next few days are really important, it is when those services will be piecing together what happened, what they were trying to do, what might have happened and to try to get to the bottom of that? yeah, the police cordoned two remain in place _ yeah, the police cordoned two remain in place but _ yeah, the police cordoned two remain in place but i — yeah, the police cordoned two remain in place but i think significantly the national terrorism threat level has not _ the national terrorism threat level has not moved. it hasn't changed. if it was— has not moved. it hasn't changed. if it was thought there were, that there _ it was thought there were, that there was— it was thought there were, that there was a risk of other people out there _ there was a risk of other people out there right — there was a risk of other people out there right now with, in an active, serviceable — there right now with, in an active, serviceable explosive device, britain — serviceable explosive device, britain would have moved up the scale. _ britain would have moved up the
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scale, possibly even to critical. that _ scale, possibly even to critical. that hasn't _ scale, possibly even to critical. that hasn't happened. that is some reassurance. this is certainly very unusuat — reassurance. this is certainly very unusuat the _ reassurance. this is certainly very unusual. the fact it took place just before _ unusual. the fact it took place just before 11_ unusual. the fact it took place just before 11 o'clock on remembrance sunday. _ before 11 o'clock on remembrance sunday, not too far from a cathedral where _ sunday, not too far from a cathedral where a _ sunday, not too far from a cathedral where a couple of thousand people were expected to be taking part in the memorial service on remembrance sunday. _ the memorial service on remembrance sunday, that is one of the fact is they— sunday, that is one of the fact is they will— sunday, that is one of the fact is they will be looking at, but they are not— they will be looking at, but they are not ruling out anything at the moment — moment. frank gardner, thank moment. — frank gardner, thank you for your time. despite the government's plans to raise the minimum wage, there are still claims it's too low to cover the increased cost of living. the so—called real living wage is independently calculated, and today will rise to above minimum wage level. nina's here to explain more. it is an expensive day for some businesses, it puts pressure on the government. this is about working out what is a minimum amount for people to auntie simply live, to pay their bills and keep their heads above water. the government says the
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national living wage, the smallest hourly rate employers can legally pay to those 23 and over, from april that goes up to £9.50 an hour. there is also the real living wage. it is based on what the low pay commission thinks that people need for a decent standard of living. that goes up from today to more than 40p higher to £9.90 every hour. higher than the government level. you may think, what difference does 40p an hour make? the answer is, a lot. this is ryan, who used to struggle on the minimum wage, and his boss and why he chooses to pay more. when i used to work at the pub, i was working more and more just sol could _ was working more and more just sol could get— was working more and more just sol could get by — was working more and more just sol could get by. basically paying for rent and — could get by. basically paying for rent and any bills i had to pay. and _ rent and any bills i had to pay. and at— rent and any bills i had to pay. and at the _ rent and any bills i had to pay. and at the end of the month i would try to _ and at the end of the month i would try to put _ and at the end of the month i would try to put a — and at the end of the month i would try to put a little bit away to save and end — try to put a little bit away to save and end up — try to put a little bit away to save and end upjust coming back out of my account — and end upjust coming back out of my account will stop every day i was sort of _ my account will stop every day i was sort of feeling down. i was thinking
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about— sort of feeling down. i was thinking about money all the time. ror— about money all the time. for us, _ about money all the time. for us, a _ about money all the time. for us, a real living wage is part of giving — for us, a real living wage is part of giving people _ for us, a real living wage is part of giving people work— for us, a real living wage is part of giving people work with - for us, a real living wage is partj of giving people work with dignity and purpose _ of giving people work with dignity and purpose i_ of giving people work with dignity and purpose. i think— of giving people work with dignity and purpose. i think we _ of giving people work with dignity and purpose. i think we have - of giving people work with dignity and purpose. i think we have to l of giving people work with dignity i and purpose. i think we have to ask, what _ and purpose. i think we have to ask, what is _ and purpose. i think we have to ask, what is a _ and purpose. i think we have to ask, what is a business _ and purpose. i think we have to ask, what is a business for _ and purpose. i think we have to ask, what is a business for if _ and purpose. i think we have to ask, what is a business for if not - and purpose. i think we have to ask, what is a business for if not to - what is a business for if not to enable — what is a business for if not to enable people _ what is a business for if not to enable people to _ what is a business for if not to enable people to live - what is a business for if not to enable people to live the - what is a business for if not to enable people to live the bestj what is a business for if not to - enable people to live the best life they can? — they can? money. they can? money isi they can? - money is part of they — money is part of that. they can? mone is art of that. ., money is part of that. the bottom line is someone _ money is part of that. the bottom line is someone on _ money is part of that. the bottom line is someone on the _ money is part of that. the bottom . line is someone on the government's living wage would earn £18,500 a year. someone in the real living wage would earn £800 a year more. good for that worker but of course it puts a lot of pressure on employers. you might be thinking, why would employers opt into this decision? it is their decision. at the moment we have a record number ofjob vacancies. it is the employees's market when it comes to choosing where they want to work. if you can say to them, we are committed to paying you more, it becomes a bit more appealing. thank you. buckingham palace says the queen is disappointed to have missed the annual remembrance sunday service at the cenotaph yesterday, after spraining her back. it's the first time in 22 years that she's missed the event. our correspondent helena wilkinson
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is in windsor this morning. this is another public engagement of the queen has missed. what does that tell us about the state of health at the moment? i tell us about the state of health at the moment?— tell us about the state of health at the moment? ~ .. , . the moment? i think we can expect, in the short — the moment? i think we can expect, in the short term _ the moment? i think we can expect, in the short term at _ the moment? i think we can expect, in the short term at least, _ the moment? i think we can expect, in the short term at least, a - in the short term at least, a quieter— in the short term at least, a quieter period for the queen as she recovers— quieter period for the queen as she recovers from that back sprain. we know— recovers from that back sprain. we know that — recovers from that back sprain. we know that she does not need hospital treatment— know that she does not need hospital treatment for that at the moment and we know— treatment for that at the moment and we know that it also happened fairly recently _ we know that it also happened fairly recently. but i think it was a decision— recently. but i think it was a decision that would not have been taken _ decision that would not have been taken lightly by buckingham palace for the _ taken lightly by buckingham palace for the cancellation, for the queen not to— for the cancellation, for the queen not to attend remembrance sunday yesterday. remember, it is one of the most _ yesterday. remember, it is one of the most significant engagements in the most significant engagements in the queen's calendar. she regards it as such _ the queen's calendar. she regards it as such but— the queen's calendar. she regards it as such. but the idea, for a 95—year—old woman, to get into the back of— 95—year—old woman, to get into the back of a _ 95—year—old woman, to get into the back of a car, — 95—year—old woman, to get into the back of a car, travel from windsor to london. — back of a car, travel from windsor to london, stand on a balcony for a short— to london, stand on a balcony for a short while — to london, stand on a balcony for a short while for that service, it was simply— short while for that service, it was simply too — short while for that service, it was simply too much given that she does
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have this _ simply too much given that she does have this back sprain. this is now completely— have this back sprain. this is now completely unrelated to the advice of doctors for her to rest. you remember— of doctors for her to rest. you remember she had to have an overnight— remember she had to have an overnight stay in hospital on october— overnight stay in hospital on october the 20th for preliminary investigations. so she was resting over the _ investigations. so she was resting over the last three weeks with the intention— over the last three weeks with the intention of going to remembrance sunday _ intention of going to remembrance sunday. but at the very last minute that was _ sunday. but at the very last minute that was cancelled. there is clearly some _ that was cancelled. there is clearly some concern, given that she has got this back— some concern, given that she has got this back sprain and the additional health— this back sprain and the additional health problems. but we are told the queen— health problems. but we are told the queen is— health problems. but we are told the queen is hoping to continue carrying out light— queen is hoping to continue carrying out light duties here at windsor castle _ out light duties here at windsor castle during this week. helena, thank you very much indeed. whether time at i! helena, thank you very much indeed. whether time at 11 minutes past eight on monday. here is carol. good morning. good morning. forsome here is carol. good morning. good morning. for some of us it is a beautiful start to the day. we have seen some lovely sunrises like this one in wales, but for others there is dense fog around, especially around the midlands and the m6. if
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you are travelling, do bear that in mind. it is fairly patchy. it will be slow to left and for much of england and wales we are starting off with mist and fog or low cloud. thick enough for drizzle in wales and the south—west. we have a weakening band of rain sinking south across northern england, getting into northern wales as well. behind it for scotland, for northern ireland, you are looking at a dry day with some sunshine. the cloud building towards the west and the breeze and strengthening. temperatures today ten in the north to 13 in the south. this evening and overnight here is that same weather front slowly slipping south. still producing cloud in some spots of rain. some patchy mist and fog forming but not as widespread as last night. and then you can see the arrival of a new weather front with strengthening winds. that will push it slowly southwards and eastwards across scotland and northern ireland through the course of tomorrow. it will start to weaken because it is bumping into an area of high pressure. underthis
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bumping into an area of high pressure. under this high pressure for england and wales it will be mostly dry. they will be some glimmers of sunshine in there as well. we could see some drizzle coming out across north—west england, south—west scotland as well, and windy across the fat north and west. the temperature range similar to today, ten in the north to 13 in the south. thank you. researchers working on a cure for motor neurone disease say they're waiting for more detail on how a "game changing" £50 million worth of government funding will be spent. it comes two months after a petition was delivered to downing street by some of those living with the terminal illness, including former rugby league star rob burrow, whose story we've followed closely here on breakfast. here's how he reacted to the news. when you try to go through a disease which has no cure, all you want is for people to try and find a reasonable treatment for the worst, cruel disease imaginable. with the government pledging £50 million for research to find a positive treatment and a possible
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cure, means that all sufferers have hope in the future and a hope of living a longer life expectancy. i feel on top of the world. it is like playing great in the game knowing that someone is listening to us. the hard work starts now to find an effective treatment. wink. great. he looks good. good morning, rob. let's speak to two people who've been at the heart of the campaign for more mnd funding. joining us now are rob's dad geoff and former rugby union player, doddie weir. doddie, lovely to have you with us. let's come to you first of all. tell us where you were when you find out this news and what sort of impact it has had on you and so many other people? has had on you and so many other neale? ., �* has had on you and so many other --eole? ., ~ , ~ people? good morning. a bit like rubber. people? good morning. a bit like rubber- top _ people? good morning. a bit like rubber- top of— people? good morning. a bit like rubber. top of the _ people? good morning. a bit like rubber. top of the world. - people? good morning. a bit like rubber. top of the world. i - people? good morning. a bit like rubber. top of the world. i was i people? good morning. a bit likej rubber. top of the world. i was at
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home _ rubber. top of the world. i was at home i_ rubber. top of the world. i was at home i was _ rubber. top of the world. i was at home. i was a bit down on saturday because _ home. i was a bit down on saturday because the — home. i was a bit down on saturday because the scottish rugby team got beaten _ because the scottish rugby team got beaten by— because the scottish rugby team got beaten by south africa. so when i heard _ beaten by south africa. so when i heard the — beaten by south africa. so when i heard the news i was absolutely elated — heard the news i was absolutely elated it — heard the news i was absolutely elated. it gives the profession, the government funding that we have received. — government funding that we have received, gives the professionals time _ received, gives the professionals time five — received, gives the professionals time. five years. we have got some of the _ time. five years. we have got some of the best— time. five years. we have got some of the best professionals in the world _ of the best professionals in the world in— of the best professionals in the world in the uk. we had them all around _ world in the uk. we had them all around the — world in the uk. we had them all around the table last week. i think optimistically they can make a big change _ optimistically they can make a big change. but not only that, the foundation has got some focus now.
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not only— foundation has got some focus now. not only the 50 million that the government are giving, there will be an additional 50 million. government are giving, there will be an additional50 million. $0 government are giving, there will be an additional 50 million. so that will be _ an additional 50 million. so that will be £100 million to go into finding — will be £100 million to go into finding a — will be £100 million to go into finding a cure for mnd. and finally, i think— finding a cure for mnd. and finally, i think what is brilliant is hope. finally— i think what is brilliant is hope. finally the _ i think what is brilliant is hope. finally the mnd community has hope. not only— finally the mnd community has hope. not only for the patients, but also for family. — not only for the patients, but also forfamily, carers, everyone behind the scenes. — forfamily, carers, everyone behind the scenes, who know how brutal this diseases _ the scenes, who know how brutal this diseases it— the scenes, who know how brutal this diseases. it is good to have the government on the team. teamwork makes _ government on the team. teamwork makes the _ government on the team. teamwork makes the dream work. now we can
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start dreaming. doddie, good morning. great to see you looking so well this morning. brilliant news on saturday. ijust want to pick up on what you are saying there about hope. that is what you have always said through all these years of campaigning. you wanted to give sufferers and their families something to hope for. this is it now for you, isn't it? how important is that mental strength that you have, that you now inspire in other people? how important is it to stay mentally strong? well. in other people? how important is it to stay mentally strong?— to stay mentally strong? well, i think it is vital. _ to stay mentally strong? well, i think it is vital. as _ to stay mentally strong? well, i think it is vital. as you - to stay mentally strong? well, i think it is vital. as you know, i to stay mentally strong? well, i | think it is vital. as you know, we have _ think it is vital. as you know, we have been— think it is vital. as you know, we have been on this journey for a number— have been on this journey for a number of— have been on this journey for a number of years now. there is nothing — number of years now. there is nothing on _ number of years now. there is nothing on the table for mnd patients to get a hold of, apart from _ patients to get a hold of, apart from hope and mental strength. so now, _ from hope and mental strength. so now, finally, with the government backing _ now, finally, with the government backing us, — now, finally, with the government backing us, i think it is vital. it
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is up _ backing us, i think it is vital. it is up to— backing us, i think it is vital. it is up to the _ backing us, i think it is vital. it is up to the professionals to go and deliver~ _ is up to the professionals to go and deliver~ it _ is up to the professionals to go and deliver~ it is — is up to the professionals to go and deliver. it is a great time. i would love to _ deliver. it is a great time. i would love to have — deliver. it is a great time. i would love to have punched my arms in the air but— love to have punched my arms in the air but i_ love to have punched my arms in the air but i can't — love to have punched my arms in the air but i can't. sol love to have punched my arms in the air but i can't. so i keep smiling. it's wonderful news. you air but i can't. so i keep smiling. it's wonderful news.— air but i can't. so i keep smiling. it's wonderful news. you are a top man, it's wonderful news. you are a top man. doddie- _ it's wonderful news. you are a top man, doddie. it— it's wonderful news. you are a top man, doddie. it is— it's wonderful news. you are a top man, doddie. it is wonderful- it's wonderful news. you are a top man, doddie. it is wonderfulto i it's wonderful news. you are a top. man, doddie. it is wonderfulto see man, doddie. it is wonderful to see jeff with a massive smile on his face. this must have gone down incredibly well in your family, didn't it? it incredibly well in your family, didn't it? . , ., �* incredibly well in your family, didn't it? ., �* didn't it? it has. i don't say we lost out but — didn't it? it has. i don't say we lost out but we _ didn't it? it has. i don't say we lost out but we didn't - didn't it? it has. i don't say we lost out but we didn't see i didn't it? it has. i don't say we i lost out but we didn't see much. when _ lost out but we didn't see much. when i _ lost out but we didn't see much. when i got — lost out but we didn't see much. when i got the _ lost out but we didn't see much. when i got the tip _ lost out but we didn't see much. when i got the tip off, _ lost out but we didn't see much. when i got the tip off, i- lost out but we didn't see much. when i got the tip off, ijust i when i got the tip off, ijust couldn't— when i got the tip off, ijust couldn't believe _ when i got the tip off, ijust couldn't believe it. - when i got the tip off, ijust couldn't believe it. i- when i got the tip off, ijust couldn't believe it. i haven't stopped _ couldn't believe it. i haven't stopped smiling _ couldn't believe it. i haven't stopped smiling since - couldn't believe it. i haven't i stopped smiling since saturday night — stopped smiling since saturday niuht. ., , , night. the other thing is it is auoin to night. the other thing is it is going to make _ night. the other thing is it is going to make a _ night. the other thing is it is going to make a huge i night. the other thing is it is i going to make a huge difference to so many people because we were speaking to one of the professors involved earlier on and it wasn't mentioned in the budget. that felt like a bit of a hit. to get this news over the weekend, that is going to impact a lot of people who not only have mnd now, but we'll get it
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in the future?— only have mnd now, but we'll get it in the future? yeah, and that is why doddie nailed _ in the future? yeah, and that is why doddie nailed it _ in the future? yeah, and that is why doddie nailed it there _ in the future? yeah, and that is why doddie nailed it there by _ in the future? yeah, and that is why doddie nailed it there by saying i in the future? yeah, and that is why doddie nailed it there by saying we | doddie nailed it there by saying we have some — doddie nailed it there by saying we have some of— doddie nailed it there by saying we have some of the _ doddie nailed it there by saying we have some of the top _ doddie nailed it there by saying we| have some of the top professionals in have some of the top professionals in the _ have some of the top professionals in the world — have some of the top professionals in the world. but _ have some of the top professionals in the world. but it— have some of the top professionals in the world. but it has— have some of the top professionals in the world. but it has been- in the world. but it has been underfunded. _ in the world. but it has been underfunded. this _ in the world. but it has been underfunded. this helps. it. in the world. but it has been. underfunded. this helps. it will in the world. but it has been- underfunded. this helps. it will get it underfunded. this helps. it will get it over— underfunded. this helps. it will get it over the — underfunded. this helps. it will get it over the line, _ underfunded. this helps. it will get it over the line, i'm _ underfunded. this helps. it will get it over the line, i'm sure. - underfunded. this helps. it will get it overthe line, i'm sure. i- underfunded. this helps. it will get it over the line, i'm sure. i won't i it over the line, i'm sure. i won't stop— it over the line, i'm sure. i won't stop smiling _ it over the line, i'm sure. i won't stop smiling now. _ it over the line, i'm sure. i won't stop smiling now. we _ it over the line, i'm sure. i won't stop smiling now.— it over the line, i'm sure. i won't stop smiling now. we have seen those incredible pictures _ stop smiling now. we have seen those incredible pictures of _ stop smiling now. we have seen those incredible pictures of you _ stop smiling now. we have seen those incredible pictures of you and - stop smiling now. we have seen those incredible pictures of you and rob i incredible pictures of you and rob and the rest of the gang going to downing street taking the petition just a few weeks ago now. i know when you went, here we can see you, that was not an easy trip for any of you to make. when you are inside talking to people, did you have any indication there was any hope at all? ~ , ., ~ ., all? when they were talking to the ministers, all? when they were talking to the ministers. yes- — all? when they were talking to the ministers, yes. it _ all? when they were talking to the ministers, yes. it was _ all? when they were talking to the ministers, yes. it was a _ all? when they were talking to the ministers, yes. it was a hectic- all? when they were talking to the ministers, yes. it was a hectic day| ministers, yes. it was a hectic day but it— ministers, yes. it was a hectic day but it was— ministers, yes. it was a hectic day but it was a — ministers, yes. it was a hectic day but it was a great _ ministers, yes. it was a hectic day but it was a great day, _ ministers, yes. it was a hectic day but it was a great day, an - ministers, yes. it was a hectic day. but it was a great day, an enjoyable day. but it was a great day, an enjoyable day we _ but it was a great day, an enjoyable day we were — but it was a great day, an enjoyable day. we were looked _ but it was a great day, an enjoyable day. we were looked after - but it was a great day, an enjoyable day. we were looked after so - but it was a great day, an enjoyable day. we were looked after so well. i day. we were looked after so well. then _ day. we were looked after so well. then to _ day. we were looked after so well. then to come _ day. we were looked after so well. then to come away _ day. we were looked after so well. then to come away and _ day. we were looked after so well. then to come away and it - day. we were looked after so well. then to come away and it not i then to come away and it not mentioned _ then to come away and it not mentioned in— then to come away and it not mentioned in the _ then to come away and it not mentioned in the budget, i then to come away and it not mentioned in the budget, it. then to come away and it not i mentioned in the budget, it goes from _
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mentioned in the budget, it goes from that— mentioned in the budget, it goes from that to _ mentioned in the budget, it goes from that to rock— mentioned in the budget, it goes from that to rock bottom. - mentioned in the budget, it goes from that to rock bottom. but i mentioned in the budget, it goes. from that to rock bottom. but then, can't _ from that to rock bottom. but then, can't believe — from that to rock bottom. but then, can't believe it. _ from that to rock bottom. but then, can't believe it. it _ from that to rock bottom. but then, can't believe it. itjust— from that to rock bottom. but then, can't believe it. itjust shows - from that to rock bottom. but then, can't believe it. itjust shows if- can't believe it. itjust shows if you believe _ can't believe it. itjust shows if you believe things _ can't believe it. itjust shows if you believe things do - can't believe it. itjust shows if you believe things do happen. | can't believe it. itjust shows if| you believe things do happen. i can't believe it. itjust shows if- you believe things do happen. [will you believe things do happen. i will tell ou you believe things do happen. i will tell you somebody _ you believe things do happen. tell you somebody who does you believe things do happen.“ tell you somebody who does believe and support you every step of the way is kevin sinfield. another amazing effort to run 100 miles around —— in 2a hours. he never stops giving, does he? he loves rob and it is a beautifulfriendship stops giving, does he? he loves rob and it is a beautiful friendship and relationship but doing so much at the moment, isn't he?— relationship but doing so much at the moment, isn't he? yeah, he never stos. i the moment, isn't he? yeah, he never stops- i think — the moment, isn't he? yeah, he never stops- i think it — the moment, isn't he? yeah, he never stops. i think it is _ the moment, isn't he? yeah, he never stops. i think it is going _ the moment, isn't he? yeah, he never stops. i think it is going to _ the moment, isn't he? yeah, he never stops. i think it is going to call- stops. i think it is going to call in stops. ! think it is going to call in to— stops. i think it is going to call in to see — stops. ! think it is going to call in to see rob— stops. ! think it is going to call in to see rob later— stops. i think it is going to call in to see rob later this - stops. i think it is going to call in to see rob later this week. i stops. i think it is going to call| in to see rob later this week. i have _ in to see rob later this week. i have been— in to see rob later this week. i have been worried _ in to see rob later this week. i have been worried about - in to see rob later this week. i have been worried about him, i in to see rob later this week. i. have been worried about him, but kevin, _ have been worried about him, but kevin, if— have been worried about him, but kevin, ifthis— have been worried about him, but kevin, if this is _ have been worried about him, but kevin, if this is too _ have been worried about him, but kevin, if this is too much. - have been worried about him, but kevin, if this is too much. but i i kevin, if this is too much. but i spoke — kevin, if this is too much. but i spoke to— kevin, if this is too much. but i spoke to him _ kevin, if this is too much. but i spoke to him the _ kevin, if this is too much. but i spoke to him the other- kevin, if this is too much. but i spoke to him the other day- kevin, if this is too much. but i spoke to him the other day and kevin, if this is too much. but i i spoke to him the other day and he said, _ spoke to him the other day and he said. no, — spoke to him the other day and he said. no, he — spoke to him the other day and he said. no, he is— spoke to him the other day and he said, no, he is going _ spoke to him the other day and he said, no, he is going to— spoke to him the other day and he said, no, he is going to get- spoke to him the other day and he said, no, he is going to get over. said, no, he is going to get over the line — said, no, he is going to get over the line with _ said, no, he is going to get over the line with it. _ said, no, he is going to get over the line with it.— the line with it. everything is aoian the line with it. everything is going well- _ the line with it. everything is going well- if— the line with it. everything is going well. if kevin - the line with it. everything is going well. if kevin says i the line with it. everything is going well. if kevin says he i the line with it. everything is | going well. if kevin says he is getting over the line, i am telling you now, he is getting over that line. i have complete faith in him. doddie, we have been talking about hope. busy week yourself. lots of things to look forward to. what are the next steps that you would like
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to see this money used for? i am talking about in really practical terms for people who are maybe going to be diagnosed this week or next, or in the next year, 18 months, what do people need? what would you like that money to be spent on to help people quickly?— that money to be spent on to help people quickly? well, i think we all know there's _ people quickly? well, i think we all know there's a _ people quickly? well, i think we all know there's a lot _ people quickly? well, i think we all know there's a lot of _ people quickly? well, i think we all know there's a lot of good - people quickly? well, i think we all know there's a lot of good people l know there's a lot of good people behind _ know there's a lot of good people behind the scenes who have helped us. behind the scenes who have helped us we _ behind the scenes who have helped us. we have to keep continuing that. there _ us. we have to keep continuing that. there are _ us. we have to keep continuing that. there are hundreds of thousands of people _ there are hundreds of thousands of people involved to get the government funding. what we have to continue~ _ government funding. what we have to continue... there is no doubt about it, money— continue... there is no doubt about it, money makes a difference. with this sort— it, money makes a difference. with this sort of— it, money makes a difference. with this sort of funding we just need hope. _ this sort of funding we just need hope. and — this sort of funding we just need hope, and hoped i think has now arrived _ hope, and hoped i think has now arrived on — hope, and hoped i think has now arrived on the table to try and find arrived on the table to try and find a cure _ arrived on the table to try and find a cure and — arrived on the table to try and find a cure and eliminate the world of mnd~ _ a cure and eliminate the world of mnd. , ,.,
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a cure and eliminate the world of mnd. , ., , a cure and eliminate the world of mnd. , ., y ., a cure and eliminate the world of mnd. ., y mnd. doddie, it is so lovely to see ou this mnd. doddie, it is so lovely to see you this morning — mnd. doddie, it is so lovely to see you this morning being _ mnd. doddie, it is so lovely to see you this morning being so - mnd. doddie, it is so lovely to see| you this morning being so positive. and i have to tell you i am seeing doddie later in the week, i cannot wait to come and see you. i am travelling to see on friday. that be amazing. abs. travelling to see on friday. that be amazina. �* w' travelling to see on friday. that be amazina. . w , ., travelling to see on friday. that be amazina. . , ., ., travelling to see on friday. that be amazina. �* , ., ., amazing. a quick update on rob, if ou can. amazing. a quick update on rob, if you can- people — amazing. a quick update on rob, if you can. people love _ amazing. a quick update on rob, if you can. people love to _ amazing. a quick update on rob, if you can. people love to know i amazing. a quick update on rob, if you can. people love to know howl you can. people love to know how he's getting on. he you can. people love to know how he's getting on-— you can. people love to know how he's getting on. he is like doddie, lookina so he's getting on. he is like doddie, looking so well— he's getting on. he is like doddie, looking so well and _ he's getting on. he is like doddie, looking so well and he _ he's getting on. he is like doddie, looking so well and he is - he's getting on. he is like doddie, looking so well and he is so i looking so well and he is so positive _ looking so well and he is so positive he— looking so well and he is so positive. he contacted i looking so well and he is so positive. he contacted me. looking so well and he is so- positive. he contacted me after this news _ positive. he contacted me after this news broke — positive. he contacted me after this news broke and _ positive. he contacted me after this news broke and it's, _ positive. he contacted me after this news broke and it's, well... - positive. he contacted me after this news broke and it's, well... that i news broke and it's, well... that man— news broke and it's, well... that man doddie. _ news broke and it's, well... that man doddie, and _ news broke and it's, well... that man doddie, and stephen- news broke and it's, well... that| man doddie, and stephen darby, news broke and it's, well... that i man doddie, and stephen darby, he inspires— man doddie, and stephen darby, he inspires rob — man doddie, and stephen darby, he inspires rob every— man doddie, and stephen darby, he inspires rob every day. _ man doddie, and stephen darby, he inspires rob every day.— inspires rob every day. that's lovel . inspires rob every day. that's lovely. lovely _ inspires rob every day. that's lovely. lovely to _ inspires rob every day. that's lovely. lovely to have - inspires rob every day. that's lovely. lovely to have you i inspires rob every day. that's lovely. lovely to have you on. inspires rob every day. that's i lovely. lovely to have you on. what was it like having a chat with an astronaut outside? this is what i love about breakfast. you get rob burrow because my dad and chris hadfield. l burrow because my dad and chris hadfield. �* ., , , hadfield. i didn't realise but when i saw his interview _ hadfield. i didn't realise but when i saw his interview i _ hadfield. i didn't realise but when i saw his interview i thought, i i i saw his interview i thought, i should — i saw his interview i thought, i should know! _ i saw his interview i thought, i should know!— i saw his interview i thought, i should know! great to see you, doddie. take _ should know! great to see you, doddie. take care. _ should know! great to see you, doddie. take care. lovely i should know! great to see you, doddie. take care. lovely to i should know! great to see you, | doddie. take care. lovely to see doddie. take care. lovely to see doddie smiling _ doddie. take care. lovely to see doddie smiling even _ doddie. take care. lovely to see doddie smiling even though i doddie. take care. lovely to see i doddie smiling even though scotland got battered over the weekend.
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always smiling. i was positive. he’s always smiling. i was positive. he's a to always smiling. i was positive. he's a tap man- — always smiling. i was positive. he's a tap man- it _ always smiling. i was positive. he's a tap man- it is _ always smiling. i was positive. he's a top man. it is 22 _ always smiling. i was positive. he's a top man. it is 22 minutes - always smiling. i was positive. he's a top man. it is 22 minutes past - a top man. it is 22 minutes past eiaht. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. thousands of londoners will get a pay rise of 20p an hour if their employer is signed up to the real living wage. here in the v hourly rate is rising to £11 and five p. like the compulsory national living wage, it is independently calculated. new measures which could mean insulated britain demonstrators face a six—month jail terms if they cause major disruption will be unveiled in parliament later. the amendments to the police crime sentencing and courts bill will also give officers greater powers to target anyone suspected to be planning to block or glue themselves to roads, planes or trains.
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following the announcement that uber are putting their prices up now the ride hailing app bolt say it will lead drivers set their own charges. it is aiming to cut waiting times amid surging demand for minicabs. i don't how well you recall your chemistry lessons from school, but one teacher in north—west london have helped make it much more memorable experience for her pupils. she spent seven years completing a tapestry of periodic table. i she spent seven years completing a tapestry of periodic table.— tapestry of periodic table. i have essentially _ tapestry of periodic table. i have essentially just _ tapestry of periodic table. i have essentially just finished - tapestry of periodic table. i have essentially just finished making l tapestry of periodic table. i have i essentiallyjust finished making the entirety of the elements that make up entirety of the elements that make up the periodic table. it has evolved. it is still the original pattern. that is what i try to convey as much as possible. ultimately we are not learning lots of little factoids. we are learning
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the general patterns of how things behave and seeing how they apply in the real world and what the exceptions are. travel now. time for the weather. good morning. it is looking mostly dry and still mild for the time of year across the capitalfor much of mild for the time of year across the capital for much of the rest of this week. high—pressure dominates. there will be a few week weather fronts at times that could give us spots of rain. we are starting off the morning with some mist and fog patches. poor visibility on many of the roads for a time. they were left unclear slowly through the morning. lifting into low cloud. we keep those cloudy conditions for much of the rest of the day. a few brighter spells developing, may be some sunshine. it should stay dry today. we do stand a some spots of rain as we head through to the end of the day into the late afternoon. a weak cold front moving south eastwards.
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the winds stay light. top temperatures peaking at 12 celsius. tonight a bit more of a breeze. mist and fog shouldn't be an issue going into tuesday morning. lows of five to seven celsius. it is windier tomorrow. a brighter spells. always plenty of cloud. top ten bridges peaking between ten and i2 plenty of cloud. top ten bridges peaking between ten and 12 degrees. more sunshine on wednesday. cloudy conditions. again, milderair on thursday and friday. i'm backjust after nine. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. morning live is coming up here on bbc one straight after us this morning. here's sara and gethin to tell us more. good morning to you. coming up on morning live. imagine spending your life savings on a car to find out it's a deathtrap on wheels. as sales of used cars soar, some bargains may not be
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as good as they seem. we find out how to spot the dodgy deals that could put your safety at risk. and, from fake injuries to staged car crashes, bogus insurance claims cost us over a billion pounds a year. ahead of a new series of 'claimed and shamed', naga munchetty tells us how the criminals are being caught in action. also coming up. nearly five million people in the uk have diabetes and as the world marks 100 years since insulin was discovered, dr xand explains the revolutionary treatments being developed now. that's right, whether you or somebody you know has diabetes you not going _ somebody you know has diabetes you not going to want to miss this because — not going to want to miss this because i_ not going to want to miss this because i will be telling you about the amazing medical breakthroughs to help treat _ the amazing medical breakthroughs to help treat type one diabetes and type two — help treat type one diabetes and type two diabetes. also today, she's known for her quick wit but comedian angela barnes tells us why it's her quick thinking that's been put to the test in a special edition of university challenge for children in need. not for me, thank you. katya jones is here to kick—start our monday morning in today's strictly fitness, as she teaches us a move
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inspired by one of strictly�*s most memorable musical performances. look at that, it's one of her own she has decided on. what a surprise. jazz hands at the ready. well done, damn. we can nine, congratulations. i do like the way katia picked her own move. pick any move you like. one of mine, thank you very much. nothing wrong with that. see later on. he certainly raised the roof with his spectacular drumathon but our very own weather man owain has also smashed a children in need record. after hundreds of songs, multiple costume changes and countless pep talks, owain has raised more than £2.7 million so far — the most successful 24—hour challenge in the charity's history. jayne mccubbin has been taking a look back at some of the highlights. three, two, one... cheering
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it's official. the drumathon is now the most successful 24—hour challenge in the history of bbc children in need. ijust can't believe it. sorry, i can't believe that we've done it, you know, the generosity of people. it's just been incredible. applause this is how it all began. thank you, everyone. cheering # i love you, baby, like the flower loves the spring... i first started playing drums when i was about six or seven maybe. i actually meant today. # soon turned out, heart of glass... what is the time now? it's going well. i promise not to ask
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that ever again. # soon turned out, heart of glass... yes! it was never going to be easy. i don't suffer in silence and you are right. i suffer in full decibel! i shouldn't be laughing. i actually thought i was going to vomit on my drums. which is not what we want because they are electric and they could short—circuit. # you can go your own way # go your own way... you are doing amazing. i'm impressed. you are brilliant. you are absolutely doing it. an absolute legend.
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i think presenting for 13 hours, you're notjust drumming, it's a 24—hour chat show. hello, everyone. # before we come undone. how are you doing? i'm great, thank you, owain. you look sensational tonight. thank you, i did just for you. # tragedy, no one to love you... johnny quinn from snow patrol. i can't believe you've done it. you haven't pulled a drummer face yet. # the final countdown... i was going to say something then of high importance, ifelt. still here drumming away. i think this is proper hard work.
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i enjoyed that chat, mark. me too. one of the highlights had to be this. bbc news theme plays did you feel it here? the most amazing piece of music i've played. it was incredible. he is superhuman. how was he doing it? the support was overwhelming. as were the donations which grew... £1.6 million. i can't believe that. and grew. over 2,000,000. cheering all hail, owain evans,
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king of the drums. yes! my goodness. ijust love that. are you all right, the pair of you? oh winners here with mark richardson.— 0h winners here with mark richardson. �* ., ., ., richardson. i'm getting emotional watchin: richardson. i'm getting emotional watching that _ richardson. i'm getting emotional watching that now. _ richardson. i'm getting emotional watching that now. i'm _ richardson. i'm getting emotional watching that now. i'm an - richardson. i'm getting emotional. watching that now. i'm an emotional wreck— watching that now. i'm an emotional wreck of— watching that now. i'm an emotional wreck of three days later. how watching that now. i'm an emotional wreck of three days later.— wreck of three days later. how is our wreck of three days later. how is your rain? _ wreck of three days later. how is your rain? i'm — wreck of three days later. how is your rain? i'm feeling _ wreck of three days later. how is your rain? i'm feeling all - wreck of three days later. how is your rain? i'm feeling all right, l your rain? i'm feeling all right, actuall , your rain? i'm feeling all right, actually, surprisingly. - your rain? i'm feeling all right, actually, surprisingly. are - your rain? i'm feeling all right, actually, surprisingly. are you | actually, surprisingly. are you sure? i'm _ actually, surprisingly. are you sure? i'm not _ actually, surprisingly. are you sure? i'm not sure. _ actually, surprisingly. are you sure? i'm not sure. i - actually, surprisingly. are you sure? i'm not sure. ithink- actually, surprisingly. are you| sure? i'm not sure. i think i've still not sure? i'm not sure. i think i've still got a _ sure? i'm not sure. i think i've still got a lot _ sure? i'm not sure. i think i've still got a lot of _ sure? i'm not sure. i think i've still got a lot of adrenaline - sure? i'm not sure. i think i've still got a lot of adrenaline in l sure? i'm not sure. i think i've i still got a lot of adrenaline in the system. i've already tried this morning. i tried about seven times every hour this weekend. because, you know, the drumathon, there were so much work, so much work went into it and the big band you just saw where all of the drummers were playing, orchestrated by mark, that wasjust playing, orchestrated by mark, that was just incredible. playing, orchestrated by mark, that wasjust incredible.—
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was 'ust incredible. thank you. i saw wasjust incredible. thank you. i saw ou wasjust incredible. thank you. i saw you tiering _ wasjust incredible. thank you. i saw you tiering up _ wasjust incredible. thank you. i saw you tiering up listening - wasjust incredible. thank you. i saw you tiering up listening to i saw you tiering up listening to people talk about how they can fill it in their body. listen, i will did you a brief look into my world this weekend, i was walking around the strictly offices playing that and i were saying, watch this, donate for this, it'sjust were saying, watch this, donate for this, it's just amazing, were saying, watch this, donate for this, it'sjust amazing, and were saying, watch this, donate for this, it's just amazing, and the thing i love about it is drumming is so simple, a great talent, but so simple for anyone to get involved and that was the brilliant thing about this drumathon. easy and that was the brilliant thing about this drumathon.- and that was the brilliant thing about this drumathon. easy to learn but hard to master— about this drumathon. easy to learn but hard to master but _ about this drumathon. easy to learn but hard to master but anyone - about this drumathon. easy to learn but hard to master but anyone can l but hard to master but anyone can learn _ but hard to master but anyone can learn and — but hard to master but anyone can learn and it's in the next thing we can do— learn and it's in the next thing we can do within us. it's one of the wonderfui— can do within us. it's one of the wonderful things about seeing that clip, it— wonderful things about seeing that clip, itjust moves you. for the first— clip, itjust moves you. for the first time — clip, itjust moves you. for the first time iri— clip, itjust moves you. for the first time in a couple of years, we are seeing— first time in a couple of years, we are seeing a— first time in a couple of years, we are seeing a group of people coming together— are seeing a group of people coming together and just having so much fun. together and 'ust having so much fun. �* , ., ., together and 'ust having so much fun. �*, ., ,, ., ., together and 'ust having so much fun. �*, ., ,, ., , fun. let's talk about that big moment- — fun. let's talk about that big moment. watching - fun. let's talk about that big moment. watching it, - fun. let's talk about that big moment. watching it, it - fun. let's talk about that big moment. watching it, it is. fun. let's talk about that big - moment. watching it, it is magical. it is the scale of it, the number of people involved, the fact everybody is playing what looks like, to perfection to me, now tell me how much of a rehearsal you had before
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this moment which has been viable globally? this moment which has been viable aloball ? ., ., . ., ., globally? zero rehearsal. we had on the da , globally? zero rehearsal. we had on the day. no — globally? zero rehearsal. we had on the day, no rehearsal. _ globally? zero rehearsal. we had on the day, no rehearsal. it— globally? zero rehearsal. we had on the day, no rehearsal. it was - globally? zero rehearsal. we had on the day, no rehearsal. it was all- globally? zero rehearsal. we had on the day, no rehearsal. it was all on. the day, no rehearsal. it was all on the day, no rehearsal. it was all on the day _ the day, no rehearsal. it was all on the day we — the day, no rehearsal. it was all on the day. we had two or three runs lose and _ the day. we had two or three runs lose and then we did an amazing job on the _ lose and then we did an amazing job on the sound, and i think they did it five _ on the sound, and i think they did it five times — on the sound, and i think they did it five times and that was it. it�*s it five times and that was it. it's 'ust the it five times and that was it. it's just the joy _ it five times and that was it. it's just the joy on _ it five times and that was it. it�*s just the joy on everyone's faces. it's just beautiful to watch. you can see why people watch that. they want to get involved in donate. they want to get involved in donate. they want to get involved in donate. they want to be part of it.— want to be part of it. when i first said i wanted _ want to be part of it. when i first said i wanted to _ want to be part of it. when i first said i wanted to do _ want to be part of it. when i first said i wanted to do this - want to be part of it. when i first. said i wanted to do this drumathon, there were a few things that came, there were a few things that came, the ideas developed over months, but i really want to show anybody could be a drummer. and also, that drumming is incredible, is great for your mental health, we have spoken about this countless times over the past couple of months, and also just to be able to be part of something like that, ifelt to be able to be part of something like that, i felt so grateful.-
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like that, i felt so grateful. would ou like like that, i felt so grateful. would you like to — like that, i felt so grateful. would you like to know— like that, i felt so grateful. would you like to know how _ like that, i felt so grateful. would you like to know how much - like that, i felt so grateful. would you like to know how much you i like that, i felt so grateful. would i you like to know how much you have raised? i you like to know how much you have raised? ., �* ,, ., �* ., , raised? i don't know if i'm ready. do ou raised? i don't know if i'm ready. do you have _ raised? i don't know if i'm ready. do you have any _ raised? i don't know if i'm ready. do you have any clue _ raised? i don't know if i'm ready. do you have any clue before i raised? i don't know if i'm ready. do you have any clue before we l raised? i don't know if i'm ready. i do you have any clue before we save a number? we've actually onlyjust heard ourselves in the last couple of seconds. heard ourselves in the last couple of seconds-— heard ourselves in the last couple of seconds. . , , ., ., , of seconds. the last update was 2.5 million. of seconds. the last update was 2.5 million- the — of seconds. the last update was 2.5 million. the figure _ of seconds. the last update was 2.5 million. the figure is... _ applause amazing. do you know what, that's just... sorry. what i can't get my head around that so many £5 notes, so many people texting in or going on the website and saying, giving what they can. the website and saying, giving what the can. �* the website and saying, giving what the can. . ., �* the website and saying, giving what the can. . . �* , , they can. after what we've 'ust been throu . h they can. after what we've 'ust been through the — they can. after what we've 'ust been through the last i they can. after what we've 'ust been through the last couple i they can. after what we've 'ust been through the last couple of i they can. after what we've just been through the last couple of years, i they can. after what we've just been through the last couple of years, as| through the last couple of years, as well, _ through the last couple of years, as well, for— through the last couple of years, as well, for people to be so generous,
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it's so— well, for people to be so generous, it's so amazing. well, for people to be so generous, it's so amazing-— it's so amazing. owain, what will that money _ it's so amazing. owain, what will that money do? _ it's so amazing. owain, what will that money do? sadly, _ it's so amazing. owain, what will that money do? sadly, it's i it's so amazing. owain, what will that money do? sadly, it's going j it's so amazing. owain, what will. that money do? sadly, it's going to chance that money do? sadly, it's going to change lives. _ that money do? sadly, it's going to change lives, it's _ that money do? sadly, it's going to change lives, it's going _ that money do? sadly, it's going to change lives, it's going to - that money do? sadly, it's going to change lives, it's going to change l change lives, it's going to change countless lives across the uk. thank you to everyone who was donated, honestly, i can't get over that. wherever you are, wherever you live, there will be children and young people who will benefit from this, look at that. look at that number. what is your expectation level before hand? be what is your expectation level before hand?— what is your expectation level before hand? �* ., , ., , , before hand? be honest. i honestly thouhht before hand? be honest. i honestly thouht i before hand? be honest. i honestly thought i would _ before hand? be honest. i honestly thought i would have _ before hand? be honest. i honestly thought i would have been - before hand? be honest. i honestly thought i would have been happy i before hand? be honest. i honestly i thought i would have been happy with 250 grand, which is incredible, a lot of favours, again, a lot of people giving what they can. 3,000,000 quid . i can't believe that. it's a record- — . i can't believe that. it's a record. it's _ . i can't believe that. it's a record. it's never - . i can't believe that. it's a record. it's never been i . i can't believe that. it's a i record. it's never been done . i can't believe that. it's a - record. it's never been done before for a single 24—hour challenge. is for a single 24—hour challenge. is it? for a single 24-hour challenge. is it? and includes _
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for a single 24-hour challenge. is it? and includes dermot - for a single 24-hour challenge. is it? and includes dermot o'learyl it? and includes dermot o'leary doinh is it? and includes dermot o'leary doing is dancing, _ it? and includes dermot o'leary doing is dancing, rylan - it? and includes dermot o'leary doing is dancing, rylan singing i it? and includes dermot o'leary i doing is dancing, rylan singing ford 24 doing is dancing, rylan singing ford 2a hours, joe wicks, 2a hours, sara cox, you surpassed all of those. it's an incredible thing you been part of. it's an incredible thing you been art of. ., �* , it's an incredible thing you been art of. ., �*, ., ., part of. that's amazing. it will also help _ part of. that's amazing. it will also help to — part of. that's amazing. it will also help to kick-start - part of. that's amazing. it will also help to kick-start more i also help to kick—start more research _ also help to kick—start more research. when you've got leading neurologists like steve williams saying _ neurologists like steve williams saying i've never seen this before in the _ saying i've never seen this before in the rain. — saying i've never seen this before in the rain, this is incredible, you know_ in the rain, this is incredible, you know you — in the rain, this is incredible, you know you are _ in the rain, this is incredible, you know you are onto something really special, _ know you are onto something really special, so — know you are onto something really special, so it will enable us to see that being — special, so it will enable us to see that being continued, as well. ? in the rain _ that being continued, as well. ? in the rain. ., that being continued, as well. ? in the rain. . ., the rain. one thing i have learned from the films _ the rain. one thing i have learned from the films we've _ the rain. one thing i have learned from the films we've done - the rain. one thing i have learned from the films we've done on i from the films we've done on breakfast, in the run—up, is how music helps in so many ways, you know ? in their rain. this 3,000,000 will go into this pot which helps all of the challenges do amazing things and help amazing things up and down the uk if it wasn't going to exist if it wasn't the children in need. �*
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to exist if it wasn't the children in need. . , ., to exist if it wasn't the children in need. . i. ., ., to exist if it wasn't the children in need. . ., ., , .,~ ., in need. are you having a break from the drumming? _ in need. are you having a break from the drumming? he's _ in need. are you having a break from the drumming? he's got _ in need. are you having a break from the drumming? he's got a _ in need. are you having a break from the drumming? he's got a practice i the drumming? he's got a practice rehime. i the drumming? he's got a practice regime. i thought _ the drumming? he's got a practice regime. ithought i _ the drumming? he's got a practice regime. i thought i would - the drumming? he's got a practice regime. i thought i would want i the drumming? he's got a practice regime. i thought i would want to l regime. i thought i would want to throw them _ regime. i thought i would want to throw them into _ regime. i thought i would want to throw them into a _ regime. i thought i would want to throw them into a skip _ regime. i thought i would want to throw them into a skip and i regime. i thought i would want to throw them into a skip and burn l regime. i thought i would want to i throw them into a skip and burn them but it's made me loving drumming even more and the amount of messages i've had off people, as someone who is an amateur drummer, who just loves getting behind the drum kit and making a noise, this has been incredible for me and i have loved it. i love the drums. igrate]!!! incredible for me and i have loved it. i love the drums.— incredible for me and i have loved it. i love the drums. well done and thank ou it. i love the drums. well done and thank you very _ it. i love the drums. well done and thank you very much _ it. i love the drums. well done and thank you very much for _ it. i love the drums. well done and thank you very much for coming i it. i love the drums. well done and thank you very much for coming in | thank you very much for coming in this morning. thank you very much for coming in this morning-— thank you very much for coming in this morninh. ., . , .,, ., this morning. you are smashing it on strictly come — this morning. you are smashing it on strictly come dancing, _ this morning. you are smashing it on strictly come dancing, by _ this morning. you are smashing it on strictly come dancing, by the - this morning. you are smashing it on strictly come dancing, by the way. i strictly come dancing, by the way. so proud of you both. if you would like to donate, you still can. here is how you can do it.
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and thank you to everybody who has been involved in that, an amazing total, and i'm sure it will continue total, and i'm sure it will continue to grow. a real team effort if ever there was one. six months after a damning report into the bbc�*s handling of princess diana's 1995 parorama interview, her brother says he believes there's "still more to come out". speaking exclusively to bbc breakfast, earl spencer said "big questions" remain, after former bbcjournalist martin bashir was found to have used "deceitful behaviour" to help secure her consent. he made the comments while showing me around the althorp estate, which is the subject of a new documentary.
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i've known forever there was a lost village in the park there. that block around the tree, that is just not natural. we know there is something under there. there is always something new to find with this house and the park. there is so much history contained in these walls. we just scrape the surface with this one. the archaeologists have uncovered evidence of an iron age roundhouse and now where they thought there might be a buried road, they are finding signs of ancient earthworks. it is very historic. i reckon all of england was like this. with so much underneath it. but so much has been developed or farmed that it has been lost. and because this park is unspoiled, it is still here. it is right of the crown wanted to use this location?
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they did. they applied. they wanted to shoot here. but i don't really do that stuff, so... you wouldn't let them in? well actually, to be honest, i don't watch the crown. so ijust said, thank you but no thank you. so these are all members of the family here. and down the bottom here is more generals and that sort of thing. but it used to be an open courtyard, this, in the tudor times. so there was no roof? no. take a seat. are you constantly repairing it? yes! we are sitting here on this magnificent staircase, surrounded by lots of pairs of eyes looking at us. how aware of all of these people are you? well, i've took over running this place 30 years ago when i was 27. i remember when i first walked through here is the nominal owner, as it were. i really was nervous.
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you look at these people, they have lived here many hundreds of years ago, and i did feel, my goodness, they arejudging how i'm going to play this hand. you were really young? i was really young but when you are 27 you don't know you're really young. i'm incredibly lucky because i love history. so, yeah, it is a responsibility but it is one that i see as a privilege, not a burden. this picture of you at the top of the staircase, what are you holding in your hand? so, there is a painting of diana up there, painted by an american artist. he came to view it in situ here. and he said he would like to do one of me and link the two together. so that is actually the notes i made when writing the eulogy for diana's funeral. they reflect each other? i suppose they do, yes. my main memory of it is having to stand for three weeks posing. it is not something you are used to doing, eight hours a day for three weeks. but the paintings do hang as a pair.
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and that piece of paper in my hand is whatjoins the two themes. it is several months now since the bbc was found to have been woefully inadequate in its handling of the interview that martin bashir did with your late sister, the princess of wales, at the time. now you have had some time to reflect on that and think about what happened, how do you feel about that finding? actually lord dyson did a very good job. his brief was tiny. it was to look at a very specific area. there is still so much more to look at in the broader terms of who was responsible for what and how did it come to this? and did documents get hidden from view? all sorts of really important stuff which has yet to come out. so i see the lord dyson report as a very welcome development, but there is still a long way to go with this.
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how far is there to go? what more can be done? i've been doing quite a lot behind—the—scenes. quite soon we will find out. there are very big questions still out there for me as to the broader picture of how something like this could have happened. and what are they? it's clear to me that there are certain people who were in the bbc who have behaved in a way that is truly abysmal and possibly criminal. how far can you take that now yourself personally? that's the question and i got people looking at that and we'll see, but it's not going to end now. i'm not saying that as an ugly threat. itjust can't stop here because there's still more to come out. might that be a private case, a legal matter that you will take yourself? there's everything possible at this stage and i just wouldn't want to box myself
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into a corner here. but i'm quite determined really. and i'm really sure that there are some very wrong things here. the bbc has apologised, martin bashir has apologised. has he? he's not apologised to me. would that make a difference to you now? it's difficult to deal with specifics but i would say on a general basis everything is being looked at very clearly, not in a... i just think there is right and wrong in this case and although some wrong has been rightly flagged up by lord dyson, there's another level that has to looked into. and why is that important to you now? what change do you think you can make or contribute to?
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i don't know. i don't know what i'm able to do but i know what i'm going to try to do. when you look back on your childhood in this house, what are the things that stay in your mind now? well, this staircase, of course it's very grand but for the children and my family it is where you can get a lot of speed up on a tray coming down on it like a toboggan, so it's very lucky that they start break halfway down because otherwise over the generations i think a lot of spencer children would have broken a lot of bones. i look in this hallway and i actually look forward to christmas, so in a month or so we will put up a christmas tree that's been grown especially on the estate each year and it's about 20 foot high and you need something like that to look to scale in a room like this, actually. we do a very traditional english christmas here. it just looks right.
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incredible place to visit inside. a real privilege. snazzy. that's one way of describing it. in a statement, the bbc said... ancient secrets of althorp with charles spencer is on channel 4 tonight at 9pm. do you remember when we first came out of the sort of pandemic restrictions and we were very excited to have one guest in the studio? .,, . studio? the most exciting thing ever. studio? the most exciting thing ever- 0ne _ studio? the most exciting thing ever. one guest. _ studio? the most exciting thing
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ever. one guest. things - studio? the most exciting thing ever. one guest. things have i studio? the most exciting thing i ever. one guest. things have just ever. one guest. things have 'ust one u- ever. one guest. things have 'ust gone up a — ever. one guest. things have 'ust gone up a notch. i the wanted are one of britain's biggest pop bands, with over 12 million record sales worldwide and multiple uk top tens. they've been away from the spotlight for seven years, but reunited in september for a charity concert, after band member tom parker was diagnosed with a brain tumour. now, they've released another album. let's remind ourselves of some of their greatest hits. # the only thing i've never known # the only thing i've never known # how— # the only thing i've never known # how do — # the only thing i've never known # how do you _ # the only thing i've never known # how do you get— # the only thing i've never known # how do you get up— # the only thing i've never known # how do you get up from - # the only thing i've never known # how do you get up from a i # the only thing i've never known # how do you get up from a long i # the only thing i've never known i # how do you get up from a long time role? _ role? # i. role? i # i can't rote? - # i can't even rote? — # i can't even find a space to start # i can't even find a space to start # how— # i can't even find a space to start # how do — # i can't even find a space to start # how do i — # i can't even find a space to start # how do i see _ # i can't even find a space to start # how do i see my— # i can't even find a space to start # how do i see my head _ # i can't even find a space to start # how do i see my head and - # i can't even find a space to start. # how do i see my head and heart? # how do i see my head and heart? # i'u— # how do i see my head and heart? # i'll never— # how do i see my head and heart? # i'll never know _ # how do i see my head and heart? # i'll never know how— # how do i see my head and heart? # i'll never know how you _ # how do i see my head and heart? # i'll never know how you get - # how do i see my head and heart? # i'll never know how you get up i # i'll never know how you get up from _ # i'll never know how you get up from a _ # i'll never know how you get up from a long — # i'll never know how you get up from a long time _ # i'll never know how you get up from a long time low— from a long time low # aren't _ from a long time low # aren't you - from a long time low # aren't you glad i from a long time lowi # aren't you glad you from a long time low- # aren't you glad you came? # aren't you glad you came? # the — # aren't you glad you came? # the sun_ # aren't you glad you came? # the sun goes— # aren't you glad you came? # the sun goes down, - # aren't you glad you came? # the sun goes down, the i # aren't you glad you came? i # the sun goes down, the stars # aren't you glad you came? - # the sun goes down, the stars come out # i outl # is out- # is here out— # is here and out — # is here and now #_ # is here and now # the— # is here and now # the universe i # is here and nowl # the universe will # is here and now- # the universe will never # is here and now— # the universe will never be the same _ same #- same| # i'iti same- # i'm glad you same— # i'm glad you came, i'm glad you came—
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i'm glad you came. # the memory of being here with you # the memory of being here with you # is one i'm going to take my life through # someday stay gold for ever. that's gorgeous. good morning, lads. how excited are we to have five people here on the sofa? now let's speak to tom parker, max george, siva kaneswaran, jay mcguiness and nathan sykes from the wanted. good morning. let's talk about the
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videos we just watched because you were having quite strong reactions to seeing yourself from years ago. what was that like? it’s to seeing yourself from years ago. what was that like?— what was that like? it's beautiful, nostal: ic, what was that like? it's beautiful, nostalgic. i _ what was that like? it's beautiful, nostalgic, i mean, _ what was that like? it's beautiful, nostalgic, i mean, there - what was that like? it's beautiful, nostalgic, i mean, there were - what was that like? it's beautiful, l nostalgic, i mean, there were some stories from those videos.— stories from those videos. that's not how you _ stories from those videos. that's not how you described _ stories from those videos. that's not how you described it, - stories from those videos. that's not how you described it, to - stories from those videos. that's not how you described it, to be l not how you described it, to be fair _ not how you described it, to be fair. , . ., not how you described it, to be fair. , . . . , it's not how you described it, to be. fair._ it's like fair. keep it clean, lads. it's like lookin: fair. keep it clean, lads. it's like looking at— fair. keep it clean, lads. it's like looking at us _ fair. keep it clean, lads. it's like looking at us as _ fair. keep it clean, lads. it's like looking at us as little _ fair. keep it clean, lads. it's like looking at us as little kids - fair. keep it clean, lads. it's like looking at us as little kids but i fair. keep it clean, lads. it's like| looking at us as little kids but we are trying — looking at us as little kids but we are trying to _ looking at us as little kids but we are trying to be _ looking at us as little kids but we are trying to be dead _ looking at us as little kids but we are trying to be dead serious- looking at us as little kids but we are trying to be dead serious andj are trying to be dead serious and inside _ are trying to be dead serious and inside were — are trying to be dead serious and inside were so— are trying to be dead serious and inside were so frightened. - are trying to be dead serious and inside were so frightened. inierel are trying to be dead serious and inside were so frightened. were you nervous? just _ inside were so frightened. were you nervous? just figuring _ inside were so frightened. were you nervous? just figuring it _ inside were so frightened. were you nervous? just figuring it out, - inside were so frightened. were you nervous? just figuring it out, do - nervous? just figuring it out, do know what _ nervous? just figuring it out, do know what i _ nervous? just figuring it out, do know what i mean? _ nervous? just figuring it out, do know what i mean? looking - nervous? just figuring it out, do | know what i mean? looking back nervous? just figuring it out, do - know what i mean? looking back at those memories, _ know what i mean? looking back at those memories, how— know what i mean? looking back at those memories, how does - know what i mean? looking back at those memories, how does it - know what i mean? looking back at those memories, how does it feel l know what i mean? looking back at | those memories, how does it feel to be back together performing again? it's really nice. it's a feeling like — it's really nice. it's a feeling like you _ it's really nice. it's a feeling like you go back to school after summer— like you go back to school after summer break. all the laughter we have with _ summer break. all the laughter we have with each other, and also we have _ have with each other, and also we have people who take care of us, who wipe our _ have people who take care of us, who wipe our everything. the same team who did _ wipe our everything. the same team who did it— wipe our everything. the same team who did it back on the day. boys, -et who did it back on the day. boys, get in _ who did it back on the day. boys, get in the — who did it back on the day. boys, get in the van. this time around, i think— get in the van. this time around, i think there's — get in the van. this time around, i think there's a lot more perspective. i feel how lucky i am
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every— perspective. i feel how lucky i am every day — perspective. i feel how lucky i am every day. why did i waste so much time thinking negatively but now i'm 'ust time thinking negatively but now i'm just so— time thinking negatively but now i'm just so grateful to be there. that�*s just so grateful to be there. that's really lovely- _ just so grateful to be there. that's really lovely. let's _ just so grateful to be there. that's really lovely. let's think _ really lovely. let's think positively, everybody. tell me what brought you back together. tam brought you back together. tom mentioned _ brought you back together. tom mentioned a _ brought you back together. tom mentioned a couple _ brought you back together. tom mentioned a couple of— brought you back together. trrrn mentioned a couple of years ago about mobius doing it but we were all in different places doing our own thing and then, we started a conversation last year but then tom got some news which she had to deal with, which as we all know he's been smashing. and he said, look, i'm going to put something together for stand up to cancer and would be interested in doing it and, of course, we were all in, the boys flew over from la and we did that. just rehearsing and being back together it was a no—brainer that we want to do another album, do new music and eventually go on tour next year. it all came together really quickly. year. it all came together really cuickl . , , year. it all came together really cuickl. , , . quickly. did it 'ust click, when he not back quickly. did itjust click, when he got back together? _ quickly. did itjust click, when he got back together? was - quickly. did itjust click, when he got back together? was it - quickly. did itjust click, when he
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got back together? was it like i got back together? was it like you've never been apart, the same conversations as before, straight away? conversations as before, straight awa ? . , ., , ~ conversations as before, straight awa ? . , ~ ., away? initially, it was like a school reunion, _ away? initially, it was like a school reunion, but - away? initially, it was like a school reunion, but there i away? initially, it was like a l school reunion, but there was away? initially, it was like a i school reunion, but there was a away? initially, it was like a - school reunion, but there was a few nerves— school reunion, but there was a few nerves for— school reunion, but there was a few nerves for the — school reunion, but there was a few nerves for the first _ school reunion, but there was a few nerves for the first ten _ school reunion, but there was a few nerves for the first ten minutes, - nerves for the first ten minutes, and then— nerves for the first ten minutes, and then you _ nerves for the first ten minutes, and then you just _ nerves for the first ten minutes, and then you just clicked - nerves for the first ten minutes, and then you just clicked backi nerves for the first ten minutes, l and then you just clicked back in. it was _ and then you just clicked back in. it was lovely _ and then you 'ust clicked back in. n was lovely.— it was lovely. there was a magic moment. _ it was lovely. there was a magic moment. back _ it was lovely. there was a magic moment, back together - it was lovely. there was a magic moment, back together with i it was lovely. there was a magicj moment, back together with the it was lovely. there was a magic - moment, back together with the film you did with us for bbc breakfast, you did with us for bbc breakfast, you could see that the bond you had from one of those years ago may be because you will grow up together. it hasn't gone, has it? ihla. because you will grow up together. it hasn't gone, has it?— it hasn't gone, has it? no. i don't think ou it hasn't gone, has it? no. i don't think you will _ it hasn't gone, has it? no. i don't think you will ever _ it hasn't gone, has it? no. i don't think you will ever lose _ it hasn't gone, has it? no. i don't think you will ever lose that. - it hasn't gone, has it? no. i don't think you will ever lose that. you | think you will ever lose that. you know, you have fallouts and disagreements along the way, but we are brothers at the end of the day and he went through something a lot of people don't go through. the boys have been amazing, supporting me through this whole time, it's been a nice distraction. they've been such great support. we nice distraction. they've been such great support-— great support. we followed you really closely — great support. we followed you really closely on _ great support. we followed you really closely on bbc _ great support. we followed you | really closely on bbc breakfast, great support. we followed you i really closely on bbc breakfast, we saw the concert you did and had a huge reaction to that on this programme. give us an update on how
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you are doing. i programme. give us an update on how you are doing-— you are doing. i feel really well and happy _ you are doing. i feel really well and happy to — you are doing. i feel really well and happy to be _ you are doing. i feel really well and happy to be present, - you are doing. i feel really well and happy to be present, to i you are doing. i feel really well and happy to be present, to bej and happy to be present, to be honest with you. for about 15 months, since diagnosis, i'm just happy to be here to be a quite honest with you. that's the thing when we watch the piece together. you are friends and have had history in years together. you come together essentially through what happened to tom, yet the bond of you being together and the emotion not only from you but also from everybody watching in the concert that night and then who watched it the next day on tv been incredible. it and then who watched it the next day on tv been incredible.— on tv been incredible. it was really -owerful on tv been incredible. it was really powerful and _ on tv been incredible. it was really powerful and moving. _ on tv been incredible. it was really powerful and moving. it's - on tv been incredible. it was really powerful and moving. it's a - on tv been incredible. it was really| powerful and moving. it's a strange kind of— powerful and moving. it's a strange kind of conflicting emotion as well, because _ kind of conflicting emotion as well, because that was such an amazing experience, to be there raising so much _ experience, to be there raising so much money for charity, but we know we would _ much money for charity, but we know we would all — much money for charity, but we know we would all rather not be in that situation, — we would all rather not be in that situation, because we would rather, wasn't _ situation, because we would rather, wasn't going through what he was going _ wasn't going through what he was going through, but he'sjust so inspiring — going through, but he'sjust so
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inspiring. you just want to do more and more _ inspiring. you just want to do more and more and even to the point where it's like _ and more and even to the point where it's like i— and more and even to the point where it's like i want to do an arena tour next _ it's like i want to do an arena tour next year — it's like i want to do an arena tour next year. we were right, 0k. laughter he's doing all right now. once he's got two in the room. how was that creative energy being channelled now into writing perhaps? how has that changed for you?— into writing perhaps? how has that changed for you? someone asked that last niuht. changed for you? someone asked that last night- sorry- _ changed for you? someone asked that last night. sorry. we've _ changed for you? someone asked that last night. sorry. we've answered - last night. sorry. we've answered that one, sally. _ last night. sorry. we've answered that one, sally. it's _ last night. sorry. we've answered that one, sally. it's an _ last night. sorry. we've answeredj that one, sally. it's an interesting cuestion that one, sally. it's an interesting question because _ that one, sally. it's an interesting question because it _ that one, sally. it's an interesting question because it differs - that one, sally. it's an interesting i question because it differs between each member. last night, i said for me nty— each member. last night, i said for me my head — each member. last night, i said for me my head was kind of always in it, so even _ me my head was kind of always in it, so even when — me my head was kind of always in it, so even when i was writing for myself — so even when i was writing for myself i — so even when i was writing for myself i was stilljust automatically writing for the boys. i was _ automatically writing for the boys. i was thinking what would we do? but i was thinking what would we do? but i think— i was thinking what would we do? but i think we _ i was thinking what would we do? but i think we are all different in that way _ i think we are all different in that wa . a i think we are all different in that wa , �* ., ., , ., i think we are all different in that wa . ., , ., ., ., way. max loves the wanted more than an one, way. max loves the wanted more than anyone. any — way. max loves the wanted more than anyone. any of— way. max loves the wanted more than anyone. any of our— way. max loves the wanted more than anyone, any of our fans. _
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way. max loves the wanted more than anyone, any of our fans. has - way. max loves the wanted more than anyone, any of our fans. has not - anyone, any of our fans. has not alwa s anyone, any of our fans. has not always been _ anyone, any of our fans. has not always been the _ anyone, any of our fans. has not always been the case, _ anyone, any of our fans. has not always been the case, max? - anyone, any of our fans. has not always been the case, max? the anyone, any of our fans. has not - always been the case, max? the love for it? figs always been the case, max? the love for it? w always been the case, max? the love forit? a .,, always been the case, max? the love forit? a ,., for it? as soon as we started it, when we _ for it? as soon as we started it, when we did _ for it? as soon as we started it, when we did all— for it? as soon as we started it, when we did all time _ for it? as soon as we started it, when we did all time low, - for it? as soon as we started it, when we did all time low, i - for it? as soon as we started it, i when we did all time low, i mean, for it? as soon as we started it, - when we did all time low, i mean, it was my— when we did all time low, i mean, it was my life. — when we did all time low, i mean, it was my life, you know. this is what i love _ was my life, you know. this is what i love doing — was my life, you know. this is what i love doing. this is me at my happiest _ i love doing. this is me at my happiest when i'm with these boys. and to _ happiest when i'm with these boys. and to have it after seven years and -et and to have it after seven years and get another — and to have it after seven years and get another shot at it, for me personally, i'm very grateful for that _ personally, i'm very grateful for that. ., ., , personally, i'm very grateful for that. ., , ,, personally, i'm very grateful for that. ., ., that. how has the process changed? that's lovely- _ that. how has the process changed? that's lovely. coming _ that. how has the process changed? that's lovely. coming up _ that. how has the process changed? that's lovely. coming up with - that. how has the process changed? | that's lovely. coming up with songs? producin: that's lovely. coming up with songs? producing an — that's lovely. coming up with songs? producing an album? _ that's lovely. coming up with songs? producing an album? how— that's lovely. coming up with songs? producing an album? how was - that's lovely. coming up with songs? producing an album? how was it - producing an album? how was it different to first time around? lstallion different to first time around? when we first started _ different to first time around? when we first started recording _ different to first time around? when we first started recording we were in separate — we first started recording we were in separate places _ we first started recording we were in separate places so _ we first started recording we were in separate places so it _ we first started recording we were in separate places so it was - we first started recording we were in separate places so it was very. in separate places so it was very different — in separate places so it was very different for— in separate places so it was very different for us— in separate places so it was very different for us and _ in separate places so it was very different for us and i— in separate places so it was very different for us and i think - in separate places so it was very different for us and i think we i in separate places so it was very| different for us and i think we do work— different for us and i think we do work lrest— different for us and i think we do work best in— different for us and i think we do work best in a _ different for us and i think we do work best in a studio _ different for us and i think we do work best in a studio together. different for us and i think we do. work best in a studio together and it's a _ work best in a studio together and it's a bit— work best in a studio together and it's a bit like — work best in a studio together and it's a bit like getting _ work best in a studio together and it's a bit like getting on _ work best in a studio together and it's a bit like getting on a - work best in a studio together and it's a bit like getting on a bike, - it's a bit like getting on a bike, did i— it's a bit like getting on a bike, did i say— it's a bit like getting on a bike, did i say that _ it's a bit like getting on a bike, did i say that right? _ it's a bit like getting on a bike, did i say that right? getting i it's a bit like getting on a bike, i did i say that right? getting back on a bike — did i say that right? getting back on a bike we _ did i say that right? getting back on a bike. we just— did i say that right? getting back on a bike. we just know- did i say that right? getting back on a bike. we just know each - did i say that right? getting back- on a bike. we just know each other's voices. _ on a bike. we just know each other's voices. you — on a bike. we just know each other's voices. you know _ on a bike. we just know each other's voices, you know. we _ on a bike. we just know each other's voices, you know. we know- on a bike. we just know each other's voices, you know. we know what- voices, you know. we know what energy— voices, you know. we know what energy we — voices, you know. we know what energy we bring _ voices, you know. we know what energy we bring to _ voices, you know. we know what energy we bring to the _
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voices, you know. we know what energy we bring to the group, i voices, you know. we know what energy we bring to the group, so voices, you know. we know what- energy we bring to the group, so you io energy we bring to the group, so you go in— energy we bring to the group, so you go inand— energy we bring to the group, so you go inand it— energy we bring to the group, so you go in and itiust — energy we bring to the group, so you go in and itjust clicks. _ energy we bring to the group, so you go in and itjust clicks. i— energy we bring to the group, so you go in and itjust clicks. i do— energy we bring to the group, so you go in and itjust clicks. i do mean, i go in and itjust clicks. i do mean, as a _ go in and itjust clicks. i do mean, as a creative — go in and itjust clicks. i do mean, as a creative endeavour— go in and itjust clicks. i do mean, as a creative endeavour and - go in and itjust clicks. i do mean, as a creative endeavour and also i as a creative endeavour and also 'ust as a creative endeavour and also just as _ as a creative endeavour and also just as colleagues. _ as a creative endeavour and also just as colleagues. all _ as a creative endeavour and also just as colleagues. all the - as a creative endeavour and alsoi just as colleagues. all the people here, _ just as colleagues. all the people here, you — just as colleagues. all the people here. you have _ just as colleagues. all the people here, you have a _ just as colleagues. all the people here, you have a role, _ just as colleagues. all the people here, you have a role, and - just as colleagues. all the people here, you have a role, and wheni just as colleagues. all the people i here, you have a role, and when you come _ here, you have a role, and when you come back, — here, you have a role, and when you come back, it — here, you have a role, and when you come back, it doesn't _ here, you have a role, and when you come back, it doesn't matter- here, you have a role, and when you come back, it doesn't matter who i here, you have a role, and when you i come back, it doesn't matter who you were outside — come back, it doesn't matter who you were outside of— come back, it doesn't matter who you were outside of this _ come back, it doesn't matter who you were outside of this room, _ come back, it doesn't matter who you were outside of this room, when - come back, it doesn't matter who you were outside of this room, when you| were outside of this room, when you are in— were outside of this room, when you are in this _ were outside of this room, when you are in this room _ were outside of this room, when you are in this room you _ were outside of this room, when you are in this room you are _ were outside of this room, when you are in this room you are that- are in this room you are that person _ are in this room you are that aerson. ,, . are in this room you are that aerson. i. ., , are in this room you are that aerson. ., , person. do you all bring something different? is _ person. do you all bring something different? is that _ person. do you all bring something different? is that the _ person. do you all bring something different? is that the weight - person. do you all bring something j different? is that the weight comes together? different? is that the weight comes to . ether? , ., different? is that the weight comes touether? , ., , .~' different? is that the weight comes touether? , ., , ., together? yes, we all pick our roles. together? yes, we all pick our roles- the _ together? yes, we all pick our roles. the dad. _ together? yes, we all pick our roles. the dad. the _ together? yes, we all pick ourj roles. the dad. the handsome together? yes, we all pick our- roles. the dad. the handsome dad. cheers, mate. roles. the dad. the handsome dad. cheers. mate-— cheers, mate. you've put yourself under pressure _ cheers, mate. you've put yourself under pressure now— cheers, mate. you've put yourself under pressure now by _ cheers, mate. you've put yourself under pressure now by naming i under pressure now by naming everybody. under pressure now by naming everybody-— under pressure now by naming everybody-_ i i under pressure now by naming i everybody._ i would everybody. the mediator. i would have said philosopher. _ everybody. the mediator. i would have said philosopher. tom - everybody. the mediator. i would have said philosopher. tom is i everybody. the mediator. i would| have said philosopher. tom is like everybody. the mediator. i would i have said philosopher. tom is like a uuard do. have said philosopher. tom is like a guard dog- in _ have said philosopher. tom is like a guard dog. in the _ have said philosopher. tom is like a guard dog. in the meetings, - have said philosopher. tom is like a guard dog. in the meetings, he - have said philosopher. tom is like a guard dog. in the meetings, he was always so strong, like a jack russell. i always so strong, like a jack russell. ., ., ., russell. i will go to war with someone- — russell. i will go to war with someone. they _ russell. i will go to war with someone. they are - russell. i will go to war with someone. they are my - russell. i will go to war with | someone. they are my boys, russell. i will go to war with - someone. they are my boys, don't russell. i will go to war with _ someone. they are my boys, don't you know— someone. they are my boys, don't you know what _ someone. they are my boys, don't you know what i— someone. they are my boys, don't you know what i mean? the someone. they are my boys, don't you know what i mean?— know what i mean? the leader of the -ack. how
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know what i mean? the leader of the pack- how do — know what i mean? the leader of the pack- how do you. — know what i mean? the leader of the pack. how do you, looking _ know what i mean? the leader of the pack. how do you, looking ahead - know what i mean? the leader of the pack. how do you, looking ahead to i pack. how do you, looking ahead to next ear pack. how do you, looking ahead to next year and _ pack. how do you, looking ahead to next year and a _ pack. how do you, looking ahead to next year and a tour, _ pack. how do you, looking ahead to next year and a tour, how— pack. how do you, looking ahead to next year and a tour, how are - pack. how do you, looking ahead to next year and a tour, how are you i next year and a tour, how are you going to manage your energy, because that's going to be really important? that's the one thing which has been a bit consuming because it's quite mentally draining as well, not draining, because that's a negative way of putting it, butjust mentally stimulating, which is quite tiring. so ijust tried to rest during the day, down periods and stuff. in terms of treatment, how is that going to work on a regular scans and things like that? i’m going to work on a regular scans and things like that?— things like that? i'm stable now, so 'ust kee- things like that? i'm stable now, so just keep an — things like that? i'm stable now, so just keep an eye — things like that? i'm stable now, so just keep an eye on _ things like that? i'm stable now, so just keep an eye on it _ things like that? i'm stable now, so just keep an eye on it over - things like that? i'm stable now, so just keep an eye on it over the - things like that? i'm stable now, so just keep an eye on it over the nextj just keep an eye on it over the next few months and hopefully that continues. few months and hopefully that continues-— few months and hopefully that continues. ., , ., , ., continues. how did the rest of you react when — continues. how did the rest of you react when tom _ continues. how did the rest of you react when tom told _ continues. how did the rest of you react when tom told you - continues. how did the rest of you react when tom told you the - continues. how did the rest of you | react when tom told you the news, the good news about what was going on? i the good news about what was going on? ., the good news about what was going on? . ., , ., , , on? i mean, it was wild. it was 'ust so... i on? i mean, it was wild. it was 'ust i mean. fl on? i mean, it was wild. it was 'ust so... i mean, he'si on? i mean, it was wild. it was 'ust so... i mean, he's a i on? i mean, it was wild. it was 'ust so... i mean, he's a miracle h on? i mean, it was wild. it wasjust| so... i mean, he's a miracle maker, always— so... i mean, he's a miracle maker, always has— so... i mean, he's a miracle maker, always has been, but, you know, for everyone _ always has been, but, you know, for everyone as — always has been, but, you know, for everyone as element of fear and nervousness over the years, and they will continue —
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nervousness over the years, and they will continue to be, but to have those _ will continue to be, but to have those up — will continue to be, but to have those up swings and just see him improve — those up swings and just see him improve so— those up swings and just see him improve so much, it's like, wow. see what ou improve so much, it's like, wow. see what you have _ improve so much, it's like, wow. s-- what you have done to them? improve so much, it's like, wow. see i what you have done to them? because it is time as — what you have done to them? because it is time as well, _ what you have done to them? because it is time as well, there _ what you have done to them? because it is time as well, there is _ what you have done to them? because it is time as well, there is that - it is time as well, there is that expectancy that that's going to be the news because of the way he is. i was like, of course. it’s the news because of the way he is. i was like, of course.— was like, of course. it's funny, when we _ was like, of course. it's funny, when we did — was like, of course. it's funny, when we did a _ was like, of course. it's funny, when we did a documentary, l was like, of course. it's funny, when we did a documentary, i | was like, of course. it's funny, - when we did a documentary, i think a lot of— when we did a documentary, i think a lot of people, because it has ended, that's— lot of people, because it has ended, that's the _ lot of people, because it has ended, that's the end of a chapter, and a lot of— that's the end of a chapter, and a lot of people think that's it now, i'm cured — lot of people think that's it now, i'm cured of cancer but ultimately, i've still— i'm cured of cancer but ultimately, i've still got— i'm cured of cancer but ultimately, i've still got cancer, which has been — i've still got cancer, which has been quite difficult if people obviously, it's nice in one sense, because — obviously, it's nice in one sense, because i— obviously, it's nice in one sense, because i don't want people to think or treat _ because i don't want people to think or treat me — because i don't want people to think or treat me any differently because i or treat me any differently because i -ot or treat me any differently because i got cancer, but ultimately i do still have — i got cancer, but ultimately i do still have it, do you know what i mean? — still have it, do you know what i mean? �* , , ., still have it, do you know what i mean? �*, , ., ., still have it, do you know what i mean? i, ., .,, still have it, do you know what i mean? i, ., mean? it's brilliant to see you here this morning- _ mean? it's brilliant to see you here this morning. it's _ mean? it's brilliant to see you here this morning. it's great _ mean? it's brilliant to see you here this morning. it's great to - mean? it's brilliant to see you here this morning. it's great to see - mean? it's brilliant to see you here this morning. it's great to see you | this morning. it's great to see you here looking like a proper boyband. thank you very much. thank you very much, great to have you with us. the wanted's new album 'most wanted: the greatest hits' is out now. who came up with that? very good.
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you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59. this is bbc news with the latest headlines. mi5 and counter—terrorism police are investigating yesterday's explosion in a taxi in liverpool yesterday — which killed one man. detectives from counter terrorism police north west have arrested three men following the explosion which happened just before iiam three men following the explosion which happened just before 11am on remembrance sunday. after borisjohnson admits he could have handled the row involving owen paterson better — the debate about parliamentary standards returns to the commons today. and at 09.30 today we'll bring you a government covid—i9 data briefing live here on the news channel. a report by mps finds "serious failings" including avoidable deaths in the care for patients with sickle cell disease in england.

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