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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 14, 2021 7:00pm-7:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at seven. the prime minister borisjohnson says the cop26 climate deal is a "game—changing agreement" — despite concerns over the watered down commitments on phasing out fossil fuels like coal. glasgow has sounded the deathknell for coal power. it's a fantastic achievement and it's just one of many to emerge from cop26. three men in their 20s have been arrested under the terrorism act as part of an investigation into a car explosion outside the women's hospital in liverpool. the passenger of the car — a man — was declared dead at the scene. the queen misses the remembrance sunday service at the cenotaph because of a sprained back — but other members of
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the royal familyjoin the nation in falling silent to remember those who died in past conflicts. £50 million worth of government funding has been promised over the next five years to help find a cure for motor neurone disease. hello and welcome to bbc news if you have justjoined hello and welcome to bbc news if you havejustjoined us, it is good hello and welcome to bbc news if you have justjoined us, it is good to have justjoined us, it is good to have your company this evening. the president of the cop26 climate conference, alok sharma, says india and china will have to justify themselves to the world's most vulnerable countries after the two nations demanded last—minute changes to the climate deal, softening commitments to reduce the use of coal. an agreement was finally reached last night. it says limiting
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average global temperatures to 1.5 celsius above pre—industrial levels by the year 2100 is still attainable. scientists have said that amount, by then, would avoid the worst impacts of climate change. but there's controversy over the pledge about coal — which now says its use should be phased down, rather than phased out. the deal pledges more money for poorer countries to help them adapt, and nations will have to re—publish their climate plans next year — to keep what's agreed on track. the conference also agreed to reductions in methane emissions and to curb deforestation across the planet. here's our science editor, david shukman. it was billed as a landmark moment in our relations with the planet but did the glasgow conference do anything to limit the rise in temperatures? the man at the centre of the talks, alok sharma, had to shuttle between delegations. china and india refusing to allow coal to be phased out. the pressure really
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showed at one point. the final wording about coal has left disappointment. china and india will have to explain themselves to the most climate vulnerable countries in the world. this is a fragile win, because at the end of the day what we need is to ensure that all these commitments are delivered upon. so what happens now? by the end of next year, countries should update their climate pledges. a faster pace than before. and they are now expected to do this more often. by 2024, a package of long—term financial aid for the poorest nations should be agreed. then, by 2030, to avoid the worst of global warming, carbon emissions should be halved, but we're still a long way from achieving that. as things stand, the polar ice will melt faster than ever, raising sea levels and together with heavier rain, threatening millions of people with flooding.
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the implications of failing to act soon have never been clearer. we've already warmed by 1.1 celsius since preindustrial times and the hope is that 1.5 will be the limit of the rise. but we are heading for at least 1.8 and that's only if every promise is kept. more realistically, we're on course for about 2.4, a really dangerous level. the difference between 1.5 and 2.4 is really survival of millions and millions of people and species in the planet. this is what is particularly true for the islands. but according to camilla born, a government adviser at the heart of the talks, the worst outcomes can be averted. we have kept 1.5 alive but on the basis of delivering on those commitments, and that will be our next task, for us as the presidency, but for all the countries and it's on us to make sure this is real in action.
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the key to that is what's happening far beyond the conference. the spectacular fall in the price of renewable forms of energy. they now make good business sense, whatever gets agreed in talks about climate change. the arguments here over the last fortnight were about words on a page and in the end they may or may not prove important. what matters more is the signal sent by this gathering and others to come, to businesses, investors, banks, all of us. that with the right pace and scale of change, it should still be possible to get the world onto a safer course. david shukman, bbc news, glasgow. speaking at a downing street press conference, borisjohnson said the deal sounded the death knell for coal power and addressed criticism that india and china had watered down the proposals. this summit, cop26, was never going to be able to halt climate change.
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as you rightly said, we were never going to be able to stop it now in its tracks at glasgow. that was never on the cards. but what people thought we could conceivably do was slow the rate of increase and equip ourselves with the tools to turn it around. and the reason i'm so optimistic is that i think for the first time, humanity is genuinely equipping ourselves with the equipment we need to halt anthropogenic climate change altogether. and so when you look at some of the things we are doing on coal, cars, cash and trees, you can see the individual commitments that we're making, i think alok will speak about coal, but it is an immense thing to get a commitment from 190 countries to phase down or phase out coal. i don't know whether the language phase down or phase—out, doesn't seem to me as a speaker of english to make that much difference. the direction of travel is pretty much the same,
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and that has never been said before. 0n trees, you saw this enormous commitment to protect the forests of the world, to halt and reverse the loss of forests by 2030. and on cars, even on cars which was actually very difficult, we got a third of the world's car market from a standing start, because it had never been discussed before, to agree to go to electric vehicles by 2035. and every country made substantial commitment tos, substantial, granular commitments, to reduce carbon emissions. so, no, we haven't fixed it, but we have the tools, and the final thing that we, i think, got right at cop26 was an idea that everybody basically gravitated around and towards,
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and that is using development aid, state money, our overseas budgets, multilateral development banks and investments, using that to trigger private sector investment. and using that to drive the big decarbonisation programmes in the countries that find it hard. and that, i think, was the big intellectual breakthrough at this cop. that was the real change. the prime minister speaking a little over an hour ago the prime minister speaking a little overan hourago in the prime minister speaking a little over an hour ago in downing street. we can now speak to sam nadel, head of uk government relations at 0xfam gb. thank you for being with us on bbc news. it is a deal. it is perhaps not more than the end of the beginning as opposed to the beginning as opposed to the beginning of the end of the battle to contain global temperatures, because we're talking in terms of decades for these targets to be hit. how do we ensure that the progress
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is consistent towards them, that it doesn't become a case of leaps and starts, and in the end so chaotic in terms of its enforcement, varying from government to government, when governments go out of power, whether the new lot will sign up, and that we don't actually achieve our objective?— we don't actually achieve our ob'ective? ., ~ , ., ., ~ objective? thank you, hello. i think that objective? thank you, hello. ithink that oint objective? thank you, hello. i think that point around _ objective? thank you, hello. i think that point around consistency - objective? thank you, hello. i think that point around consistency is - that point around consistency is exactly right, this is why these agreements are so important. they are not the be all and end all, they are not the be all and end all, they are not the be all and end all, they are not going to solve climate change but they do provide a framework for different governments, different leaders, to follow. and while they were certainly modest progress at cop26, the goes nowhere near far enough to address the urgent climate needs that we are seeing around the world, in particularfor seeing around the world, in particular for those developing countries on the front line of the crisis who we know did the least because it. we are still on track for a disastrous 2.5 degrees of warming, and i think mary robinson said last night, the former president of ireland, who spent practically her whole life
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campaigning on climate change and climate justice, campaigning on climate change and climatejustice, she campaigning on climate change and climate justice, she said campaigning on climate change and climatejustice, she said people will see this deal as an historically shameful dereliction of duty. it is not all bad. there has been some fairly promising moves on methane emissions, and deforestation, and importantly on climate adaptation, so that is the money that developing countries, vulnerable communities, need to be able to adapt to a looming climate crises around the corner, and in particular i personally drew a lot of strength in the work of activists, different school campaigners, young people, they have generated some real momentum and shown that actually the political will and the public awareness is there, wejust will and the public awareness is there, we just need far more ambition. there, we 'ust need far more ambition.— there, we 'ust need far more ambition. �* ., , ., ., ambition. and on the question of ambition, ambition. and on the question of ambition. if— ambition. and on the question of ambition, if countries _ ambition. and on the question of ambition, if countries at - ambition. and on the question of ambition, if countries at the - ambition. and on the question of ambition, if countries at the last | ambition, if countries at the last minute can alter a text as fundamental as this one in such an apparently significant way, is ambition the right way to describe the kind of meeting of minds? some
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people might say it is a bit more lowest common denominator. that is alwa s the lowest common denominator. that is always the difficulty _ lowest common denominator. that is always the difficulty with _ lowest common denominator. that is always the difficulty with these - always the difficulty with these huge deals, and there has to be flexibility built in. i understand the coal language is the thing that seems to be getting the most attention at the moment. it is definitely disappointing to see that language change from phase—out to phase down on coal. a lot of people are pointing the finger at india. it is disappointing, but india have also made some pretty positive steps when you consider where they are at in their development path. at the beginning of this conference, india committed two by 2030 2% of their energy coming from renewable sources. that is pretty amazing, and you wouldn't have predicted that at the beginning of this conference. what we need from india as with every other big polluting countries to put commitments like that in their nationally determined contributions. we need to see what are quite vague commitments at the moment on paper, part of a recognised international process
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where they can be analysed and held accountable. and that is another i think welcome piece of the puzzle from this conference this week was that party is committed to come back next year to revisit their nationally determined contributions. that is going to be essential because we know warming is far too high and the impacts are going to be dramatic, and again if i may on impact, this is the one area that climate vulnerable communities asked for the most, was more money for loss and damage. this was the turn that speaks to the impacts of climate change right now on communities all over the world. the international system is leaving them to deal with terrible catastrophes themselves, and this conference fell painfully short on the loss and damage issue. it is really difficult to take when communities are already enduring terrible impacts on their lives and livelihoods, and the international community fell short. they committed to a dialogue on some technicalfinancing, but they committed to a dialogue on some technical financing, but we they committed to a dialogue on some technicalfinancing, but we need countries to do far more to help
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communities on the front line who are already facing big impacts. 5am are already facing big impacts. sam nadel, head — are already facing big impacts. sam nadel, head of _ are already facing big impacts. sam nadel, head of government relations at 0xfam, thank you for being with us. and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers. our guests joining me tonight are the broadcaster and psychotherapist lucy beresford, and joe twyman, who's the director of the polling organisation, deltapoll. in other news. three men have been arrested as part of an investigation into an explosion at a hospital in liverpool. one person died and another person was injured in the incident outside the liverpool women's hospitaljust before 11 o'clock this morning 0ur correspondent phil mccann is at the scene. good evening to you. is it still is confused a picture as it was looking in the immediate aftermath of this explosion? it in the immediate aftermath of this exlosion? , ., , in the immediate aftermath of this exlosion? , . , ,, in the immediate aftermath of this exlosion? , ,, , explosion? it is a bit less confused now because _ explosion? it is a bit less confused now because within _ explosion? it is a bit less confused now because within the _ explosion? it is a bit less confused now because within the last - explosion? it is a bit less confused now because within the last few i now because within the last few minutes, we have had that update from the police, which as you mentioned has told us that three
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people have now been arrested. it was at one of the entrances to the hospital just was at one of the entrances to the hospitaljust behind me and slightly to the left out of shot where this happened at 10.59 this morning, people across this part of liverpool heard a very loud bang, and that was a car exploding and then some dramatic pictures emerged on social media showing this car completely alight. but when the police did a press conference out here a few hours ago, they wouldn't give any more details other than to say that one person had died and one person had been injured. they have now revealed it was the passenger of the car who died at the scene, who was a man who has yet to be formally identified. the person who was injured was the driver, the taxi driver, who was injured. he is in hospital in a stable condition. insofar as these arrests go, these three men, aged 29,26 and 21, they were detained police say in the kensington area of liverpooljust to
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the north of here and they were arrested under the terrorism act. police say they will continue to keep an open mind about the cause of this explosion. they say this investigation continues at pace. and it is worth pointing out of course that suspicions have been raised given the fact that this explosion happened at 10.59, just before 11 o'clock, on remembrance sundayjust before the uk falls silent every year. rumours across liverpool about exactly what has been happening here, and we have spoken to some of the people on two streets which have been searched by the police this afternoon, who say that i'm one of the streets they sought two men being bundled into police cars. so no more details expected from the detail tonight ? no more details expected from the detailtonight ? met no more details expected from the detail tonight ? met from the police tonight other than those three men being arrested. phil tonight other than those three men being arrested.— being arrested. phil mccann in liverpool. _ being arrested. phil mccann in liverpool, thank— being arrested. phil mccann in liverpool, thank you _ being arrested. phil mccann in liverpool, thank you very - being arrested. phil mccann in i liverpool, thank you very much. the queen has missed the annual remembrance day service at the cenotaph in london for the first time in 22 years,
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after spraining her back. buckingham palace said she was disappointed not to be able to attend what would have been her first public engagement for more than three weeks. the prince of wales laid a wreath on the queen's behalf at one of the many events around the uk to honour those fallen in conflict. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. band plays. it was the customary cenotaph commemoration, after the limitations last year caused by the pandemic. there was, though, one notable absentee. the queen did not, as had been expected, take her place on a balcony overlooking the cenotaph. according to buckingham palace, she had sprained her back. she continues to rest at windsor. the prince of wales led other senior members of the royal family to their places at the cenotaph, in readiness for the two—minute silence observed in whitehall and at ceremonies around the country.
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big ben chimes the hour. music: last post.
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after the two—minute silence, and the sounding of the last post in whitehall by royal marine buglers, the prince of wales placed the queen's wreath of red poppies against the cenotaph�*s northern face, in tribute to those from britain and the commonwealth who lost their lives in the world wars and more recent conflicts. then, after the official wreath—laying, it was the return of the veterans�* march—past. the former servicemen and women, denied the chance to be at the cenotaph last year, paying their own tributes to former colleagues. the head of state had been absent — a matter of great regret, we are told, to her and to those who were on parade. nicholas witchell, bbc news. austria has ordered a lockdown for people who've not been vaccinated against covid — about two million people.
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the country is seeing the highest rate of daily infections since the pandemic began and has one of the lowest vaccination rates in western europe. 0ur vienna correspondent bethany bell has more. these are the biggest daily infection rates that austria has had since the pandemic began. the government has said it is very worried about the strain on hospitals, intensive care units are coming increasingly under pressure. so now it's really upped the pressure on the unvaccinated. the chancellorjust now said that it's clear that infection rates among the unvaccinated are much higher than among the vaccinated and it should be said that this lockdown for the unvaccinated comes on what are already quite tough measures for people who haven't been vaccinated — already in austria you cannot go to a restaurant or to the cinema, you cannot have your hair cut if you cannot show a vaccination certificate
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or a certificate of recovery. now this new step means that people will be asked to stay at home except for certain essential reasons like going to work, going to buy food or going for exercise. let's speak to martin mckee, professor of european public health at the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine. professor mckee, thank you for being with us. in one sense, these are dramatic figures. in another, i suppose the environment in which we are gaining this number of infections is very different to the one when we were approaching christmas last year.— one when we were approaching christmas last year. well, it is to the extent _ christmas last year. well, it is to the extent that _ christmas last year. well, it is to the extent that the _ christmas last year. well, it is to the extent that the roll-out - christmas last year. well, it is to the extent that the roll-out of i christmas last year. well, it is to | the extent that the roll-out of the the extent that the roll—out of the vaccination programme has been very successful right across europe, so therefore the probability of getting very seriously ill or dying if you
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get the infection is less. but the figures are still extremely worrying. figures are still extremely worrying-— figures are still extremely wor inc. , . ., ., figures are still extremely wor inc. ., ., worrying. they are, and for some countries more _ worrying. they are, and for some countries more than _ worrying. they are, and for some countries more than others. - worrying. they are, and for some countries more than others. i - countries more than others. i suppose precisely because of this lagging vaccination rate, and i suppose this isn't the time that they are going to move fast enough to be able to contain the infections. is it now the delta variant that is pretty much the common form of covid around western europe? the common form of covid around western euro e? , ., common form of covid around western euroe? , . ., ., , europe? the delta variant is dominant— europe? the delta variant is dominant around _ europe? the delta variant is dominant around most - europe? the delta variant is dominant around most of. europe? the delta variant is| dominant around most of the europe? the delta variant is - dominant around most of the world at the minute. there are a few exceptions but it has outcompeted the other variants. but europe is a very mixed picture. some parts of europe are doing very well, and they have shown that if you don't rely purely on the vaccine, you do need to get vaccination rates up high, but if you look at a vaccination plus strategy like spain or portugal, you can control the delta
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variant. you just need to add a few more things in as well as getting a high vaccine uptake.— more things in as well as getting a high vaccine uptake. where does this leave us? because _ high vaccine uptake. where does this leave us? because we _ high vaccine uptake. where does this leave us? because we saw _ high vaccine uptake. where does this| leave us? because we saw something of a surge in cases, but then it seemed to plateau, and we didn't see massive variations over a period of the last, and you'll correct me if i'm wrong on this, the last couple of months or so. is that still at the stage where the scientists can be reasonably content that the health service will cope with this load given that we are about to hit winter, properwinter, and load given that we are about to hit winter, proper winter, and that tends to see an increase in other diseases of this kind, other illnesses that can affect people's ability to breathe.— illnesses that can affect people's ability to breathe. there are a lot of thin . s ability to breathe. there are a lot of things wrapped _ ability to breathe. there are a lot of things wrapped up _ ability to breathe. there are a lot of things wrapped up in - ability to breathe. there are a lot of things wrapped up in that - of things wrapped up in that question. we have been on a plateau but at a very much higher rate than most of the rest of western europe. we have seen a small increase in the last few weeks, probably due to half term because we know the virus has been transmitting very much in
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schools, and then out to parents and members of families, but that seems to be reversing again. it is incredibly difficult to predict what is going to happen now, because we have the combination of both the transmission, the opportunities for transmission, the opportunities for transmission, and the levels of immunity, the percentage of the population that are covered and so on. i think it would be very unwise to predict anything at the minute, but we really have to remember that in the united kingdom we have under invested in our health service for a decade, and we have very many fewer, very much less capacity in terms of intensive care unit beds and health workers than many other european countries, so that immediately puts us in a difficult situation. professor martin mckee, professor of european public health at the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine, thank you very much for giving us your expertise this evening. the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk
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show there were 36,517 new infections recorded, in the latest 24—hour period, which means on average, there were 37,488 new cases reported per day in the last week. 63 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test. on average in the past week, 156 related deaths were recorded, every day. and 12.6 million people have received their boosterjab. poland's border guard has accused neighbouring belarus of preparing a large group of migrants to make an attempt to cross into its territory by force. thousands of people, most from iraq, syria and yemen, are at a makeshift camp on belarus' border with poland, enduring freezing conditions, in the hope of crossing into the eu. belarus denies it's engineering a border surge in retaliation for eu sanctions, which it described today as "counter—productive". 0ur correspondentjenny hill has been to the polish side
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of the border, near the town of hajnowka. her report contains images you may find distressing, from the start. freezing darkness of the polish forest, the human cost of the political deadlock. this woman has severe hypothermia and is pregnant. she had come across the borderfrom belarus. volunteers then border guards found her here, with her husband and five children. she is now in hospital. the others are in police custody. two other men who were with them were, we were told, driven back to the border. the man who gave us the footage is from an informal network of people who try to help those who make it across the
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border. ~ , ., ., ., ., border. whether you are for or auainst border. whether you are for or against refugees, _ border. whether you are for or against refugees, i— border. whether you are for or against refugees, i think - border. whether you are for or against refugees, i think we i border. whether you are for or| against refugees, i think we all deeply agree that people need some basic help if they are in need. at basic help if they are in need. at the border, desperation. people trapped in the cold of a makeshift camp on the far side. poland refuses to let them in, and accuses belarus of preparing people to storm the border. poland sent 15,000 troops. there are patrols, checkpoints. police pulled us over to inspect the car as we neared an exclusion zone they have imposed along the border. they don't want us to see what this man sees. he wanted to remain anonymous forfear of man sees. he wanted to remain anonymous for fear of reprisals, but he lives inside the zone.— he lives inside the zone. recently i met a grouo _ he lives inside the zone. recently i met a grouo of— he lives inside the zone. recently i met a group of 25 people - he lives inside the zone. recently i met a group of 25 people from - he lives inside the zone. recently i l met a group of 25 people from iraq, and before 15 from syria, some guys from somalia, some people from turkey. so i don't know, but it is
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probably around 100 or something. {iii probably around 100 or something. of some people have made it across the border and are hiding in the forests along its length. behind them, a hostile belarus border force, and ahead of them a europe where they are not really wanted. we went back to the woods where the young family was fine. the geopolitical stand—off continues. belarus and russia against poland and the west. these scattered possessions a reminder of those caught in the middle. jenny hill, bbc news, poland. £50 million worth of government funding has been promised over the next five years to help find a cure for motor neurone disease. it comes two months after a petition was delivered to downing street, by some of those living with the terminal illness, including the former rugby league star, rob burrow, 0ur reporter, louise pilbeam, has more. september this year, the campaign for £50 million towards motor neurone disease goes
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to downing street. among those present was former footballer stephen darby, handing over their plea to finally try and find a cure for the terminal disease. at his side, rob burrow, former rugby league star, both living with the impact of the disease. what this will mean to mnd sufferers is great hope. we're now on the brink of a medical treatment so we need to get funding to help prolong life and help find a cure. the two first spoke to bbc breakfast about life with mnd back in early 2020, alongside scottish rugby union star doddie weir. i think rugby—resilient, i knew what i had, knew what the issue was, so when he said it, "all right, we've got this, we're going to try and fight it", and then i did the dreaded google. "what have i got, what's going on?" and it came up mnd and you kind of go, "uh—oh". in the months to come, rob burrow would chart the impact of the condition in a documentary. that led to fundraising
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by people across the country and rob's former teammates. that led to fundraising by people across the country and rob's former teammates. kevin sinfield's seven marathons in seven days raised over £2 million. he takes on a new challenge later this month. meanwhile, the campaign for government backing has continued. just last week rob's dad gave another emotional plea. after 25, 30 years, surely to goodness we can find something to find a treatment. if it stops it, that's phase one. a cure's phase two. now the government has confirmed it will provide the £50 million that the campaigners have been asking for. in an article in the express, the prime minister promises to "transform the fight against this devastating disease". the announcement has been welcomed
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by the mnd association, which says it will change lives and ultimately save lives. louise pilbeam, bbc news. alan towart has motor neurone disease and raises money for mnd charities. hejoins us now. thank you for being with us. it is a degenerative disease and its pace varies from case to case, how much can you tell people how much it impacts on the daily life of those who live with it? it is impacts on the daily life of those who live with it?— impacts on the daily life of those who live with it? it is massive. as ou who live with it? it is massive. as you said. — who live with it? it is massive. as you said. it _ who live with it? it is massive. as you said, it affects _ who live with it? it is massive. as you said, it affects people - who live with it? it is massive. as you said, it affects people at - you said, it affects people at different rates. i was diagnosed just over four years but now i need help with washing and dressing. cutting up food and things like that, so it gets more difficult as time goes on. in
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that, so it gets more difficult as time goes om— that, so it gets more difficult as time goes on. that, so it gets more difficult as time aoes on. , ., .,, time goes on. in terms of losing the vafious time goes on. in terms of losing the various physical _

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