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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 14, 2021 4:00pm-4:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at apm: a deal is agreed at the cop26 climate change summit — but its president says, china and india will need to justify themselves after watering down pledges on the use of coal. at the end of the day, china and india are going to have to explain themselves to the most climate vulnerable countries in the world and you saw the reaction of the climate vulnerable countries to that change. big ben chimes the hour. the queen misses the remembrance day service at the cenotaph, because of a sprained back — but other members of the royal familyjoin the nation, in falling silent around the country to remember those who lost their lives in conflicts. one person has died and another has been injured after a car exploded outside liverpool women's
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hospital. police have declared a major incident. the home secretary, priti patel, will meet her french counterpart this week, as the uk increases pressure on france to stop migrants crossing the channel. an estimated two million unvaccinated people in austria will go into lockdown from midnight tonight, as covid cases continue to rise in the country. # so if you want the truth... and an emotional couple's choice dance in strictly — as rose and giovanni pay tribute to the deaf community.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the president of the cop26 climate conference, alok sharma, has said that india and china would have to "justify" themselves to the world's most climate vulnerable countries after the two nations secured last—minute changes to the climate deal in glasgow. those changes last night controversially ended up softening commitments to reduce the use of coal. our science correspondent, victoria gill, reports. hearing no objections, it is so decided. after two weeks of sleepless nights and negotiations over every detail, a glasgow pact on climate change was finally agreed. it was almost derailed at the last moment, as india, backed by china, requested a change, watering down a critical line about phasing out coal. today, cop president alok sharma insisted that this deal was a significant step forward. this is the first time ever that we have got a language about coal in a cop decision.
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i think that is absolutely historic. but, as i said, at the end of the day, china and india are going to have to explain themselves to the most climate vulnerable countries in the world and you saw the reaction of the climate vulnerable countries to that change. this is the first cop agreement to mention fossil fuels, the very stuff of greenhouse gas emissions. but while prime minister boris johnson had previously talked about glasgow being the beginning of the end of climate change, reacting to this deal, he sounded less certain. we can't kid ourselves, we haven't beaten climate change and it would be fatal to think that we have because there is so much more that still needs to be done. but what we do have now is a viable road map. but environmental campaigners who have been watching this process for many years are encouraged by some of the pledges. so, there's great- declarations on forests. we've seen some good words on oceans, at the same time. but we need to make sure they're i really followed up with actions. i
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the planet responds to emissions, not to promises, so the real test of whether these commitments made here in glasgow will be enough is if they can be acted upon quickly enough to catch up with the speed at which the world is warming up. for the most vulnerable nations, low—lying islands facing the most dangerous impacts of storms and sea—level rise, this is a matter of life and death. we're going to live to fight another day. and we did so much that, as a very small island country, i can be deeply proud of. as nations are asked to come back in 2022 with more ambitious pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions and catch up with the pace of climate change, tired negotiators are already planning for the next climate summit. victoria gill, bbc news, in glasgow. and the prime minister will hold a news conference in downing street, alongside the cop president alok sharma.
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we'll bring you that live from 5pm here on bbc news. let's give you an update on the latest coronavirus figures from the uk government. people who have tested positive is being reported as 36,517. the number of people who have died within 28 days of a positive test is 63, and a quick look at the vaccinations. the percentage of population aged 12 and above, first dose currently stands at 89% and those who have had a second dose is 80% and that his 12 and over —— 87.9%. let's return to
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work top story, that final agreement that was put in place and passed by alok sharma last night in glasgow. i will speak now to helen mountford, the vice president of climate and economics at the world resources institute. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. can i take you back to your twitter timeline and yesterday your twitter timeline and yesterday you were saying you were eagerly awaiting the cop 26 taxed. it has come out, what you think of it? we came in come out, what you think of it? - came in really helping to keep this global goal of keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees our life and ensuring we did it with solidarity and support for developing countries. we didn't quite get where we needed to get, what we did get is a basis on which we can build and some clear avenues
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forward so we definitely didn't get what the world needed but we got something and what we need to do is build on what we have going forward. a clear pathway, it's interesting because boris johnson a clear pathway, it's interesting because borisjohnson also said we have a viable road map. how do you see that road map unfolding over the next few years? i see that road map unfolding over the next few years?— next few years? i think there are three critical— next few years? i think there are three critical parts _ next few years? i think there are three critical parts of— next few years? i think there are three critical parts of that - next few years? i think there are three critical parts of that road i three critical parts of that road map, one is and usually what country is they will come back next year with more ambition normally this is meant to happen in a five—year cycle, this is a five years after the paris agreement plus an extra date because we missed last year with covid so we were meant to come backin with covid so we were meant to come back in another five years but instead they said that is not enough, the gap is too wide, the challenges are too urgent so we will
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come back next year and announce more ambitious plans so we need to watch those carefully and make sure they do deliver those as those as well as implementing what is on the table. the second area is around finance and support for developing countries and rich nations missed their goal to deliver 100 billion in climate finance in 2020 and then again in 2021 so the glasgow agreement is clear they need to do that as soon as possible and particularly to double financing for developing countries to help them adapt to and build resilience to climate impacts. the third element that's important is around losses and damages and this is where you have climate impacts which are so vast and devastating that you cannot adapt to them, losses of lives, towns and communities, the potential for small island states to become
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uninhabitable in the future and for the first time they finally started discussing this properly and agreed to go forward with dialogue and discussion on how to address financing. that sounds like a baby step and it is but it's something that hasn't been possible before. we need to ensure that now turns into reality with clear recommendations which countries take back next year and start to deliver that agenda. i just want to go back to india and of course that rephrasing, we have seen a lot of angry reaction to it, a lot of disappointment from alok sharma. are theyjust being realistic as to what can be achieved when they are trying to balance their own economic development of the country as well? first of all let me be clear, it was notjust india. india made that
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statement at the end but a number of other countries had been pushing back on the phrasing, china, saudi arabia, australia, others had been pushing back on that phrasing. i think what it is, it is a disconnect between understanding of the challenge of what is needed and not yet being ready to take on the level of change we need. we need to transform our energy systems and we are going in the right direction but not with the speed we need so what was agreed in the end was taxed around phasing down coal rather than phasing out coal and the reality is that coal is already disappearing, it is already moving out of the markets, people are not willing to finance it from the private sector, insurers are not willing to back it. a number of countries have committed to stopping coal finance and are accelerating it so to me this was
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just a hesitation that they were not quite ready to make that commitment of transformative change that we need to see. of transformative change that we need to see-— of transformative change that we need to see. ~ ., ., ., need to see. helen mountford at the world resources _ need to see. helen mountford at the world resources institute, _ need to see. helen mountford at the world resources institute, thank- world resources institute, thank you. the queen was unable to attend today's remembrance sunday service, at the cenotaph in london. buckingham palace said she had sprained her back and it was with great regret that she wasn't able to be there. the palace had previously said it was the queen's "firm intention" to attend the service, after taking time away from her duties for health reasons. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, reports. band plays. it was the customary cenotaph commemoration, after the limitations last year caused by the pandemic. there was, though, one notable absentee. the queen did not, as had been expected, take her place on a balcony
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overlooking the cenotaph. according to buckingham palace, she had sprained her back. she continues to rest at windsor. the prince of wales led other senior members of the royal family to their places at the cenotaph, in readiness for the two—minute silence observed in whitehall and at ceremonies around the country. big ben chimes the hour.
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music: last post. after the two—minute silence, and the sounding of the last post in whitehall by royal marine buglers, the prince of wales placed the queen's wreath of red poppies against the cenotaph's northern face, in tribute to those from britain and the commonwealth who lost their lives in the world wars and more recent conflicts. quick march! then, after the official wreath—laying, it was the return of the veterans' march—past. the former servicemen and women, denied the chance to be at the cenotaph last year, paying their own tributes to former colleagues.
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the head of state had been absent — a matter of great regret, we are told, to her and to those who were on parade. by by nicholas witchell. a person has died and another has been injured after a car explosion outside liverpool women's hospital. emergency services were called to an "incident" this morning. police say they understand that the car involved was a taxi which pulled up at the hospital shortly before the explosion occurred. in the past half hour authorities have been holding a news conference. ican i can confirm that at 10:59am to dyke police were called to reports of a car explosion at liverpool city centre. police attended along with the merseyside fire and rescue service and the north west regional
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ambulance service. unfortunately i can confirm that one person has died and another has been taken to hospital where he is being treated for his injuries, which thankfully are not life—threatening. so far we understand the car involved was a taxi which pulled up at the hospital shortly before the explosion occurred. work is ongoing to establish what has happened and could take some time before we are in a position to confirm anything. we are keeping an open mind as to what caused the explosion but given how it has happened and out of caution, counterterrorism police are leading the investigation, supported by merseyside police. the emergency services have well rehearsed plans for dealing with major incidents. our response is ongoing at the hospital and will be for some time. cordons are in place and there are some road closures. we have triggered our information channels to inform the local community about
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what information we can provide. i would urge the public to remain calm but be vigilant, to keep updated on what is happening. to keep updated on what is happening, please keep watching the news and check the merseyside police website. if you have not done so already, sign up to the merseyside police twitter feed. i would like to thank the public for their patience and cooperation today, which has already greatly assisted our response and i will update you again as soon as we have more information. thank you. tell gaviaan, more information. thank you. tell gavigan. chief— more information. thank you. tell gavigan, chief officer for merseyside fire and rescue service. we were _ merseyside fire and rescue service. we were called at 10:59am to an we were called at10:59am to an explosion— we were called at 10:59am to an explosion involving a vehicle outside _ explosion involving a vehicle outside the women's hospital. we responded with two fire appliances and a _ responded with two fire appliances and a senior officer in attendance to a fully— and a senior officer in attendance to a fully developed fire. the crews
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extinguished the fire but as has been _ extinguished the fire but as has been reiterated by the police chief constable, there was unfortunately one fatality and another individual has left _ one fatality and another individual has left the vehicle prior to the fire developing to the extent it did in our— fire developing to the extent it did in our thoughts are with the families_ in our thoughts are with the families involved. merseyside fire and rescue service reiterates the message — and rescue service reiterates the message is to keep safe and remain calm under— message is to keep safe and remain calm under the circumstances and we will support _ calm under the circumstances and we will support the investigation fully with merseyside police.— with merseyside police. catherine thompson. _ with merseyside police. catherine thompson, chief _ with merseyside police. catherine thompson, chief executive - with merseyside police. catherine thompson, chief executive officer with merseyside police. catherine i thompson, chief executive officer at liverpool— thompson, chief executive officer at liverpool women's _ thompson, chief executive officer at liverpool women's hospital. - thompson, chief executive officer at liverpool women's hospital. i- thompson, chief executive officer at liverpool women's hospital. i wouldj liverpool women's hospital. i would like to— liverpool women's hospital. i would like to provide — liverpool women's hospital. i would like to provide assurance _ liverpool women's hospital. i would like to provide assurance about - liverpool women's hospital. i would like to provide assurance about thel like to provide assurance about the actions _ like to provide assurance about the actions we — like to provide assurance about the actions we are _ like to provide assurance about the actions we are taking _ like to provide assurance about the actions we are taking to _ like to provide assurance about the actions we are taking to keep - like to provide assurance about the actions we are taking to keep our. actions we are taking to keep our hospital— actions we are taking to keep our hospital site _ actions we are taking to keep our hospital site along _ actions we are taking to keep our hospital site along with _ actions we are taking to keep our. hospital site along with merseyside police _ hospital site along with merseyside police we — hospital site along with merseyside police. we have _ hospital site along with merseyside police. we have restricted - hospital site along with merseyside police. we have restricted visiting. police. we have restricted visiting access— police. we have restricted visiting access with — police. we have restricted visiting access with immediate _ police. we have restricted visiting access with immediate effect - police. we have restricted visiting access with immediate effect andl access with immediate effect and until further— access with immediate effect and until further notice. _ access with immediate effect and until further notice. where - access with immediate effect and . until further notice. where possible we have _ until further notice. where possible we have diverted _ until further notice. where possible we have diverted patients - until further notice. where possible we have diverted patients to- until further notice. where possible we have diverted patients to otherl we have diverted patients to other hospitals — we have diverted patients to other hospitals until— we have diverted patients to other hospitals until further— we have diverted patients to other hospitals until further notice. - we have diverted patients to other hospitals until further notice. we i hospitals until further notice. we are currently—
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hospitals until further notice. we are currently allowing _ hospitals until further notice. we l are currently allowing ambulances hospitals until further notice. we - are currently allowing ambulances to access _ are currently allowing ambulances to access the _ are currently allowing ambulances to access the hospital _ are currently allowing ambulances to access the hospital in _ are currently allowing ambulances to access the hospital in emergencies. i access the hospital in emergencies. we are _ access the hospital in emergencies. we are reviewing _ access the hospital in emergencies. we are reviewing our— access the hospital in emergencies. we are reviewing our patient - we are reviewing our patient activity — we are reviewing our patient activity for _ we are reviewing our patient activity for the _ we are reviewing our patient activity for the next - we are reviewing our patient activity for the next 48 - we are reviewing our patient| activity for the next 48 hours we are reviewing our patient - activity for the next 48 hours and patients — activity for the next 48 hours and patients should _ activity for the next 48 hours and patients should wait _ activity for the next 48 hours and patients should wait to _ activity for the next 48 hours and patients should wait to be - activity for the next 48 hours and i patients should wait to be contacted for updates — patients should wait to be contacted for updates about _ patients should wait to be contacted for updates about any _ patients should wait to be contacted for updates about any planned - for updates about any planned appointments _ for updates about any planned appointments. our— for updates about any planned appointments. our staff- for updates about any planned appointments. our staff are l for updates about any planned - appointments. our staffare being committed — appointments. our staffare being committed to _ appointments. our staffare being committed to leave _ appointments. our staffare being committed to leave and _ appointments. 0ur staffare being committed to leave and enter- appointments. our staffare being committed to leave and enter the| committed to leave and enter the hospital— committed to leave and enter the hospital under— committed to leave and enter the hospital under the _ committed to leave and enter the hospital under the supervision - committed to leave and enter the hospital under the supervision ofl hospital under the supervision of merseyside — hospital under the supervision of merseyside police. _ hospital under the supervision of merseyside police. i— hospital under the supervision of merseyside police. i would - hospital under the supervision of merseyside police. i would like l hospital under the supervision ofl merseyside police. i would like to say thank— merseyside police. i would like to say thank you _ merseyside police. i would like to say thank you for— merseyside police. i would like to say thank you for the _ merseyside police. i would like to say thank you for the cooperation | say thank you for the cooperation and support— say thank you for the cooperation and support of— say thank you for the cooperation and support of our— say thank you for the cooperation and support of our patients, - and support of our patients, visitors _ and support of our patients, visitors and _ and support of our patients, visitors and staff— and support of our patients, visitors and staff who - and support of our patients, visitors and staff who have i and support of our patients, - visitors and staff who have been impacted — visitors and staff who have been impacted by— visitors and staff who have been impacted by this _ visitors and staff who have been impacted by this incident. - visitors and staff who have been impacted by this incident. in- impacted by this incident. in particular— impacted by this incident. in particular those _ impacted by this incident. in particular those staff- impacted by this incident. in particular those staff who i impacted by this incident. in. particular those staff who were impacted by this incident. in- particular those staff who were at the scene — particular those staff who were at the scene at _ particular those staff who were at the scene at the _ particular those staff who were at the scene at the time _ particular those staff who were at the scene at the time of- particular those staff who were at the scene at the time of the - the scene at the time of the incident _ the scene at the time of the incident. we _ the scene at the time of the incident. we will— the scene at the time of the incident. we will be - the scene at the time of the l incident. we will be ensuring the scene at the time of the - incident. we will be ensuring anyone affected _ incident. we will be ensuring anyone affected by— incident. we will be ensuring anyone affected by this _ incident. we will be ensuring anyone affected by this has _ incident. we will be ensuring anyone affected by this has the _ incident. we will be ensuring anyone affected by this has the appropriate i affected by this has the appropriate support— affected by this has the appropriate support in— affected by this has the appropriate support in place _ affected by this has the appropriate support in place. please _ affected by this has the appropriate support in place. please check- affected by this has the appropriate support in place. please check our. support in place. please check our website _ support in place. please check our website for— support in place. please check our website for any _ support in place. please check our website for any further— support in place. please check our. website for any further information. our reporter phil mccann is at the scene. ican i can see the police behind you and they are likely to be there for a number of hours. the
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they are likely to be there for a number of hours.— they are likely to be there for a number of hours. the police said there are lots _ number of hours. the police said there are lots of _ number of hours. the police said there are lots of unanswered - there are lots of unanswered questions and we heard that this is being investigated by anti—terror police but there was emphasis that is being done out of caution because of those unanswered questions. earlier on today we spoke to a patient at this hospital who said they came towards one of the entrances, the entrance behind us at about 11am and then heard a very loud bang. at that point they said security sealed the doors and wouldn't allow anyone to leave, then pictures appeared on social media showing a car ablaze, it was a private hire taxi and that fire was put out but questions were raised because of the timing of this, the fact it happened at 11am on remembrance sunday as the country was falling silent, but no more details at this point given by the
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police and liverpool women's hospital are keen to point out they are still treating emergency cases but some patients have been diverted today. this is a busy hospital serving the whole of liverpool and lots of the merseyside area, the entrances around this hospital have been cordoned off. it is just around the corner from where we can see it now, the car is still there, but it burnt out and surrounded by lots of tactical aid units and fire appliances and police appliances, so at this point lots of unanswered questions from the police but clearly very keen to point out that while anti—terror police are investigating this, at this point the site that is being done out of caution. ., ~ the site that is being done out of caution. ., ,, , ., the site that is being done out of caution. ., ,, i. ., the site that is being done out of caution. . ~' , ., ., . the site that is being done out of caution. ., ,, ., ., , ., the home secretary, priti patel, is to meet her french counterpart this week to try to increase pressure on france to stop migrants crossing
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the channel in small boats. more than 1000 people made the journey on thursday — a record numberfor a single day. our correspondent, simonjones, has more on what the home secretary is doing to tackle the crisis. priti patel will tell the french interior minister gerald darnanin that the issue of migrants crossing the channel is a shared problem that requires shared solutions. on thursday we saw 1,185 migrants cross the channel. they arrived in the uk on 33 bouts. the french authorities stopped just 99 people from making the crossing so britain has been asking france what they are doing to stop migrants leaving northern france in the first place and priti patel wants to express some of her concerns to her french counterpart about how this issue is being dealt with. we have seen a build—up in the war of words, it has been quite interesting.
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borisjohnson got involved on friday because he was saying, why are you not policing your beaches, and suggesting there was a reluctance on the part of the french to take this issue seriously but the french authorities hit back, we heard from the french interior ministry who said they are working day and night to stop people risking their lives making the crossing. priti patel last met gerald darnanin in september in london and it's fair to say the meeting didn't go according to plan because britain had threatened to withhold some of the £54 million promised to france to increase patrols on beaches in northern france and to increase surveillance,, but gerald darmanin was not happy, he accused britain of financial blackmail over that so i think the talking continues between the two sides but in reality the crossings are set to continue and lives could be lost. that's interesting you say about financial blackmail.
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originally £54 million was on the table, could we see more money put towards this? 54 million euros. at the moment only the first tranche of that money has been paid, that was handed overfrom britain to france last week so there are still millions more potentially to be handed over but france has always implied this is a british problem because the migrants ultimately want to get to the uk and france has always said to the uk government we can have far more officers on the beaches and far more patrols but it will cost you british cash. that was simon jones that was simonjones speaking to me earlier. belarus has told the european union that sanctions on minsk are counter productive, amid the ongoing migrant crisis on the polish border. thousands of people, many of them kurds, arriving from the middle east, are camping at the border with poland, enduring freezing conditions in the hope of crossing into the eu. poland's border guard agency has accused belarus of preparing a large
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group of migrants to make an attempt to cross into its territory by force. belarus denies this. adam easton is in warsaw and has more on what poland has been saying. they are talking about more than 1000 migrants who have been camped out in a makeshift camp just inside belarus, on the border, for a week now, sleeping in temperatures which are falling below zero overnight. they are saying they are noticing an increased number of armed belarusian guards and soldiers in that camp, they are also noticing the migrants are being given instructions and equipment which they say will help them make this attempt to try to force their way over the border and also they say some of the tents the migrants have been sleeping in are disappearing so they are on high alert, they say they are prepared for any attempt to force the border
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and as you mentioned, there were two attempts by large groups of migrants overnight to try to get over the border. one was successful, about 50 migrants managed to get over the border, but they were all detained in a search in the subsequent hours and sent back to the border, and in another incident, polish police were pelted with stones, according to the police spokesman, when they approached the border and tried to stop another large group of migrants from crossing, so it's a very tense situation today on the polish—belarusian border. the nobel laureate, malala yousafzai, has told the andrew marr show that she fears the taliban's claim of a temporary interruption in girls' education in afghanistan, may not be true. after seizing power, the group excluded girls from returning to secondary school,
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while allowing boys back to class. malala yousafzai became the youngest ever nobel peace prize winner seven years ago, after being shot in the head by the pakistani taliban for campaigning for girls' education. i think neighbouring countries have a role to play including pakistan and i hope that imran khan and other leaders ensure that women's rights are protected. it's not just for the safety of people of afghanistan but for the safety of the whole region as well. we know that talibanisation was not limited to afghanistan, it has spread across the border as well and their ideology influenced talibanisation in swat valley from 2007 to 2009 and my story comes from that, girls' education was banned, women were flogged and not allowed to go to market. this was happening in 1996 in afghanistan, women were not allowed to take a job or go to school. at that time, the taliban were spreading a similar message
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that girls' education ban was only temporary. but we know that ban lasted for five years. i'm afraid that this ban that they have announced right now, that they are calling temporary, might not actually be temporary and it may last for years. girls should not be losing their right to education. we know afghanistan right now is the only country in the world where girls do not have access to secondary education. malala yousafzai there. from tomorrow unvaccinated people in austria will be subject to lockdown
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to combat high rates of infection. did you watch strictly come dancing last night? if you did you may have witnessed something very different from the show�*s first ever deaf contestant. rose ayling ellis — who's an actress on "eastenders" — and her partner giovanni pernice — performed an emotional number # ijust want to be part of your symphony... that was a special moment. i spoke to harriet oppenheimer from the national hearing loss charity rnid a little earlier, and she told me how significant rose's performance was to the deaf community. it was an extraordinary moment, it's a visceral moment to switch between hearing and silence. and i think that is what everyone
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felt who watched it. we have had a huge amount of interest from people, those who are deaf and in the hearing world, to what rose did last night. what have people been saying after viewing that piece last night? i think there are two things to be said. those in the deaf world, throughout rose being on strictly come dancing, they have talked about feeling seen and valued and included and what an amazing role model she is and rose is wonderful because she is an outstanding dancer and i feel she has demonstrated that deaf people can dance as well as anyone else with some reasonable adjustments. she said, didn't she, there's nothing wrong with being deaf, it is such a joy to be deaf?
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what she did last night was, it is that old adage, isn't it? you don't know until you walk in someone else's shoes and she certainly put us all through that last night. that is absolutely right. i think that last night was actually, for the hearing world to get a glimpse of the world through the experience of someone who is deaf and what i personally felt, looking at it, was quite how beautiful and graceful the dance is in the kind of still calm moment of silence and to be able to see it through that as a hearing person i thought was incredibly moving and everybody at our charity feels, on behalf of everybody, how important it is that is accessible to us as hearing people to see what it is like, to see the world from a very different perspective. now it's time for a look at the weather with alina jenkins showers breaking out across parts of east anglia and south—east
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england to end sunday, and more persistent rain pushing

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