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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 14, 2021 2:00pm-2:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the latest headlines at 2pm: the queen misses the remembrance day service in central london, after spraining her back. buckingham palace said she was disappointed not to attend. bell tolls other members of the royal familyjoin the nation, in falling silent at the cenotaph, and around the country, to remember those who have died in past conflicts. also today, a new climate deal is struck in glasgow, but experts warn the promises still aren't enough to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees. the home secretary, priti patel, will meet her french counterpart this week, as the uk increases pressure on france to stop migrants crossing the channel. # so if you want the truth...
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silence. and an emotional couple's choice dance in strictly — as rose and giovanni pay tribute to the deaf community. good afternoon. the queen was unable to attend today's remembrance sunday service at the cenotaph in london. buckingham palace said she had sprained her back and it was with "great regret" that she wasn't able to be there. the palace had previously said it was the queen's "firm intention" to attend the service, after taking time away from her duties for health reasons. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, reports.
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it was the customary cenotaph commemoration, after the limitations last year caused by the pandemic. there was, though, one notable absentee. the queen did not, as had been expected, take her place on a balcony overlooking the cenotaph. according to buckingham palace, she had sprained her back. she continues to rest at windsor. the prince of wales led other senior members of the royal family to their places at the cenotaph, in readiness for the two—minute silence observed in whitehall and at ceremonies around the country. big ben chimes the hour.
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music: last post. after the two—minute silence, and the sounding of the last post in whitehall by royal marine buglers, the prince of wales placed the queen's wreath of red poppies against the cenotaph's northern
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face, in tribute to those from britain and the commonwealth who lost their lives in the world wars and more recent conflicts. then, after the official wreath—laying, it was the return of the veterans�* march—past. the former servicemen and women, denied the chance to be at the cenotaph last year, paying their own tributes to former colleagues. the head of state had been absent — a matter of great regret, we are told, to her and to those who were on parade. and nicholas has been explaining more about the decision that led to the queen not attending today's remembrance service at the cenotaph. we rely, as ever, on what buckingham palace tells us. they say that she sprained her back recently. they say it is unconnected to the advice from the royal doctors three weeks ago that she should rest, it is unconnected to the hospital tests, of course, that she underwent. we understand that she was deeply disappointed to have to miss
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such a significant event, really, the most solemn duty of the royal year. nobody regrets her absence more deeply than she does, according to one source at the palace. it had, indeed, been herfirm intention to be there, it was one of the reasons she was resting for the past three weeks and the palace said on thursday definitely that she would be there. so, we will have to see what impact this latest health issue will now have on her programme. we understand that she will be continuing with light duties at windsor. the president of the cop26 climate conference, alok sharma, today said that india and china would have to justify themselves to the world's most climate vulnerable countries — after the two nations secured last—minute changes to the climate deal in glasgow. those changes last night controversially ended up softening commitments to reduce the use of coal. our science correspondent, victoria gill, reports.
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hearing no objections, it is so decided. after two weeks of sleepless nights and negotiations over every detail, the glasgow pact on climate change was finally agreed. it was almost derailed at the last moment, as india, backed by china, requested a change, watering down a critical line about phasing out coal. today, cop president alok sharma insisted that this deal was a significant step forward. this is the first time ever that we have got a language about coal in a cop decision. i think that is absolutely historic. but, as i said, at the end of the day, china and india are going to have to explain themselves to the most climate vulnerable countries in the world and you saw the reaction of the climate vulnerable countries to that change. this is the first cop agreement to mention fossilfuels, the very stuff of greenhouse gas emissions. but while prime minister boris johnson had previously talked about glasgow being the beginning of the end of climate change, reacting to this deal, he sounded less certain. we can't kid ourselves,
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we haven't beaten climate change and it would be fatal to think that we have because there is so much more that still needs to be done. but what we do have now is a viable road map. but environmental campaigners who have been watching this process for many years are encouraged by some of the pledges. so, there's great- declarations on forests. we've seen some good words on oceans, at the same time. but we need to make sure they're i really followed up with actions. i the planet responds to emissions, not to promises, so the real test of whether these commitments made here in glasgow will be enough is if they can be acted upon quickly enough to catch up with the speed at which the world is warming up. for the most vulnerable nations, low—lying islands facing the most dangerous impacts of storms and sea—level rise, this is a matter of life and death. we're going to live to fight another day. and we did so much that, as a very small island country,
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i can be deeply proud of. as nations are asked to come back in 2022 with more ambitious pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions and catch up with the pace of climate change, tired negotiators are already planning for the next climate summit. victoria gill, bbc news, in glasgow. the agreement is the first climate deal to explicitly plan to reduce global coal consumption. but was a controversial change in the wording of the text from "phase out" coal to "phase down" after india opposed it along with china. our correspondent in bejing, stephen mcdonell explained why china wanted this change on coal. well, on the one hand, it will come as something of a blow to people who wanted a more ambitious goal at this conference, to see this wording watered down. but, on the other hand, perhaps we shouldn't be too pessimistic about the final agreement.
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for example, here, we're already seeing in the communist party's media mouthpiece, xinhua wire service, commentaries saying that coal is the dominant contributor, the dominant cause for carbon emissions in electricity generation. so that is a message, a party line, going out to everyone — coal is the biggest part of the problem. what's also being stressed here from the chinese delegation at the conference has been its disappointment that the world's wealthiest countries haven't made good on their promises to deliver finance, to deliver technology, which would assist developing countries to move to cleaner energy. and they think that's their biggest disappointment at the conference. of course, beijing would say that, because their argument has always been that the world's wealthiest countries — they're the ones that got us all into this
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mess in the first place. and that was stephen mcdonnell, and later this afternoon the prime minister borisjohnson will be holding a news conference in downing street alongside the cop president alok sharma. we will bring you that life from 5pm on the bbc news channel. poland s border guard agency has accused neighbouring belarus of preparing a large group of migrants to make an attempt to cross into its territory by force. poland's interior ministry is warning about false rumours designed to encourage people staying in a makeshift camp to storm the border. belarus denies allegations that it is engineering a border surge in retaliation for sanctions imposed by the european union. the austrian chancellor has announced that unvaccinated citizens are to be placed into lockdown. alexander schallenberg said the new rules will apply from tomorrow. roughly 65% of the population is
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fully vaccinated against covid—i9, one of the lowest rates in western europe. mr schallenberg described this as "shamefully low". £50 million worth of government funding has been promised over the next five years, to help find a cure for motor neurone disease. it comes two months after a petition was delivered to downing street by some of those living with the terminal illness — including former rugby league star rob burrow. our reporter louise pilbeam has more. september this year, the campaign for £50 million towards motor neurone disease goes to downing street. among those present was former footballer stephen darby, handing over their plea to finally try to find a cure for the terminal disease. at his side, rob burrow, former rugby league star, both living with the
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impact of the disease. what this will mean to mnd sufferers is great hope. we're now on the brink of a medical treatment so we need to get to help prolong life and help find a cure. the two first spoke to bbc breakfast about life with mnd back in early 2020, alongside scottish rugby union star doddie weir. i played rugby before i knew what i had, knew what the issue was, so when he said to me you have got this and we will try to fight that. and then i did the dreaded google. it came up mnd. in the months to come, rob burrow will chart the impact that led to fundraising by people across the country and rob's former teammates.
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kevin sinfield's seven marathons in seven days raised over £2 million. he takes on a new challenge later this month. meanwhile, the campaign for government backing has continued. just last week rob's dad gave another emotional plea. after 25—30 years, surely to goodness we can find something to find a treatment. if it stops it, that's phase one. a cure�*s phase two. now the government has confirmed it will provide the £50 million that the campaigners have been asking for. in an article in the express, the prime minister promises to transform the fight against this devastating disease. the announcement has been welcomed by the mnd association, which says it will change lives and ultimately save lives. the home secretary, priti patel,
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is to meet her french counterpart this week to try to increase pressure on france to stop migrants crossing the channel in small boats. more than a thousand people made the journey on thursday — a record numberfor a single day. with me is our correspondent, simonjones. i wonder if you could give us a background as to why this meeting is being held. the background as to why this meeting is bein: held. ., ,, . ., , being held. the home secretary, priti patel cup _ being held. the home secretary, priti patel cup will _ being held. the home secretary, priti patel cup will tell _ being held. the home secretary, priti patel cup will tell the - being held. the home secretary, j priti patel cup will tell the french interior minister gerald don and that the issue of migrants crossing the channel is a shared problem that requires shared solutions —— gerald darmanin. on thursday we saw 185 migrants cross the channel, the french authorities stopped just 99 people from making the crossing so britain has been asking france what they are doing to stop migrants leaving northern france in the first
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place and priti patel ones to express some of her concerns to her french counterpart about how this issueis french counterpart about how this issue is being dealt with. we french counterpart about how this issue is being dealt with.- issue is being dealt with. we have seen a build-up— issue is being dealt with. we have seen a build-up in _ issue is being dealt with. we have seen a build-up in the _ issue is being dealt with. we have seen a build-up in the war of - issue is being dealt with. we have i seen a build-up in the war of words, seen a build—up in the war of words, it has been quite interesting. boris johnson it has been quite interesting. boris johnson got _ it has been quite interesting. boris johnson got involved _ it has been quite interesting. boris johnson got involved on _ it has been quite interesting. err" 3 johnson got involved on friday because he was saying to france why are you not policing or your breaches, and suggesting there was a reluctance of the french to take this issue seriously but the french authorities hit back, we heard from the french interior ministry who said we are working day and night to stop people risking their lives making the crossing. priti patel last met gerald donnan inc in inc in september in london and it's fair to say the meeting didn't go according to plan because britain had threatened to withhold some of the £54 million promised to france to increase patrols on beaches in northern france but gerald darmanin was not happy, he accused britain of
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financial blackmail over that so i think the talking continues between the two sides but in reality the crossings are set to continue and lives could be lost.— crossings are set to continue and lives could be lost. originally £54 million was _ lives could be lost. originally £54 million was on _ lives could be lost. originally £54 million was on the _ lives could be lost. originally £54 million was on the table, - lives could be lost. originally £54 million was on the table, could i lives could be lost. originally £54| million was on the table, could we seek more money put towards this? at the moment only the first tranche of that money has been paid, that was handed over from that money has been paid, that was handed overfrom britain to france last week so there are still millions more potentially to be handed over but france has always employed this as a british problem because that migrants ultimately want to get to the uk and france has always said to the uk government we cannot have far more officers on the beaches and more patrols but it will cost you british cash. simonjones, thank you. —— we can have far more officers. the headlines on bbc news:
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the queen misses the remembrance day service in central london after spraining her back. other members of the royal familyjoin the nation in falling silent at the cenotaph and around the country to remember those who have died in past conflicts. a new climate deal is struck in glasgow, but experts warn the promises still aren't enough to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees. more now on the agreement at the global climate summit in glasgow. let's speak now to tom burke, who is chairman of the climate change think tank e3g. thank you forjoining us. there has been a lot of encouraging sounds coming on this idea that we are now on the path to 1.5 degrees. do you believe that? i on the path to 1.5 degrees. do you believe that?— believe that? i think that's right, i think we have _ believe that? i think that's right, i think we have taken _ believe that? i think that's right, i think we have taken a - believe that? i think that's right, i think we have taken a step - i think we have taken a step forward. the challenge now is to
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accelerate and start running because as the experts have said we are still a long way from doing what we need to do to keep below 1.5, that is the threshold of dangerous climate change.— is the threshold of dangerous climate change. what was your reaction to _ climate change. what was your reaction to what _ climate change. what was your reaction to what we _ climate change. what was your reaction to what we so - climate change. what was your reaction to what we so agreed l climate change. what was your i reaction to what we so agreed last night? indie reaction to what we so agreed last niuht? ~ , ., , reaction to what we so agreed last niuht? , , ., ,, ., , night? we stop progress in all sorts of areas and — night? we stop progress in all sorts of areas and not _ night? we stop progress in all sorts of areas and not just _ night? we stop progress in all sorts of areas and notjust by _ of areas and notjust by governments, some of that was technical, agreement on the rules by which countries will check whether other countries have done what they say, we have agreement on rules about how the common markets, which will be essential, are going to work, but we got our range of separate agreements on cars, on coal, on forests, all of which are partnerships between governments and the private sector so those go beyond government in mobilising the whole of society. we also, perhaps
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most importantly, reflect the urgency that governments have now realised that we have agreements to come back in 12 months and increase the commitments governments have made so all those things are positive but where we didn't do as well as we should wasn't mobilising more money to help both countries that have been worst hit by climate change but also to help with recovery from the pandemic so we make a green recovery, notjust a recovery that makes the climate problem worse.— recovery that makes the climate problem worse. why is it that the ficher problem worse. why is it that the richer nations _ problem worse. why is it that the richer nations have _ problem worse. why is it that the richer nations have failed - problem worse. why is it that the richer nations have failed to - problem worse. why is it that the j richer nations have failed to meet the promises of that £75 billion to help fight climate change? {line the promises of that £75 billion to help fight climate change? one of the thin . s help fight climate change? one of the things that _ help fight climate change? one of the things that happened - help fight climate change? one of the things that happened sadly i help fight climate change? one of. the things that happened sadly was that in a sense we lost a lot of our bargaining power at the beginning of the year when the prime minister agreed to cut our aid budget from 0.7% of gdp to 0.5% and it's hard to
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ask other countries to cough up more when you were coughing up less so week started off on a bad know at the beginning of the year and we haven't made up that ground through the different cycles, so there is more, typically there is more commitment there to mobilise financial firepower through that multilateral banks, there is a lot of willingness in that private institutions to do more that they need that framework to be provided by government to move the money fast enough to make a difference in time. there has been talk about the change in the language from phasing out to phasing down, the disappointment we saw as alok sharma passed the agreement but also some strong language from civil society groups, utter betrayal was the statement coming from the cup 26 coalition. did alok sharma have any other option but to agree? i
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did alok sharma have any other option but to agree?— did alok sharma have any other option but to agree? i don't think he did and _ option but to agree? i don't think he did and i— option but to agree? i don't think he did and i think _ option but to agree? i don't think he did and i think you _ option but to agree? i don't think he did and i think you did - option but to agree? i don't think he did and i think you did the - option but to agree? i don't think| he did and i think you did the right thing to agree. i understand why people feel, the worst of all fossil fuels, why people react badly to trying to temper rise but the real world difference between phasing out and phasing down is not that great and phasing down is not that great and actually what is now clear is that the financial community, both the private financiers and the international financiers, the private financiers and the internationalfinanciers, will the private financiers and the international financiers, will not support coal, so even doubt people have agreed only to phase down, the reality is that coal is dead. john kerry said _ reality is that coal is dead. john kerry said something _ reality is that coal is dead. john kerry said something interesting, he said it's all about implementation and following up, how will that happen? in and following up, how will that ha en? ., , , and following up, how will that hauen? . , , ., and following up, how will that ha en? . , , ., . happen? in a sense of what we did in glasaow happen? in a sense of what we did in glasgow was — happen? in a sense of what we did in glasgow was a _ happen? in a sense of what we did in glasgow was a great _ happen? in a sense of what we did in glasgow was a great how _ happen? in a sense of what we did in glasgow was a great how to - happen? in a sense of what we did in glasgow was a great how to deliver l glasgow was a great how to deliver what we agreed to do in paris and that's important, delivery is a hard
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slog and that is why apparently technical things like the rule book a very important. if people don't agree on the rules by which they report their emissions and how they are measured, it's hard to see whether they are doing what they say they are and bring the kind of pressure on them, as we have seen here the pressure does notjust come from government to governments, it comes from open actors, from people themselves, citizens in countries rework and if you have clear reporting of what is happening and everyone has agreed how you do that can then those pressures have got much more scope to make a difference. much more scope to make a difference-— much more scope to make a difference. ., �* ~ ., ~ , ., ., difference. tom burke, thank you for our time. let's talk more now about the remberance day services which have been taking place around the uk to honour the men and women who have died in past conflicts. the prince of wales and prime minister were among those laying a wreath at the war memorial for the national service of remembrance in london.
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other services have been takling place, including at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. we can speak now to philippa rawlinson from the royal british legion. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. first, congratulations on your centenary for the royal british legion. today must have been a special date for you after what took place last year. special date for you after what took place last year-— place last year. absolutely, we are all delighted _ place last year. absolutely, we are all delighted at _ place last year. absolutely, we are all delighted at the _ place last year. absolutely, we are all delighted at the festival- place last year. absolutely, we are all delighted at the festival of - all delighted at the festival of remembrance yesterday evening at the royal albert hall and today at the cenotaph and around the country with our branch members in every community across our nation to be marking remembrance with people and to have so many people turn out for us was truly moving. i know at the national memorial arboretum today we welcomed over 2000 people and it was wonderful to have people uniting in
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that act of remembrance again and we all found it very moving.— all found it very moving. obviously we didn't see _ all found it very moving. obviously we didn't see the _ all found it very moving. obviously we didn't see the queen _ all found it very moving. obviously we didn't see the queen at - all found it very moving. obviously we didn't see the queen at the - we didn't see the queen at the cenotaph today, understandably and she released a statement but you had the duke and duchess of gloucester. how important is it to have figureheads like that attending these services? the figureheads like that attending these services?— figureheads like that attending these services? , ., these services? the country looks to work well family _ these services? the country looks to work well family very _ these services? the country looks to work well family very much - these services? the country looks to work well family very much to - these services? the country looks to work well family very much to lead l work well family very much to lead the way and given their position and how they are respected in our society, it's important where we have significant services like at the cenotaph or at the arboretum, we have a world figurehead with us to lead the service and lead our nation and those poignant acts of remembrance. it’s and those poignant acts of remembrance.— and those poignant acts of remembrance. �* , ., , ., remembrance. it's not 'ust about those who — remembrance. it's not 'ust about those who have _ remembrance. it's not 'ust about those who have left _ remembrance. it's notjust about those who have left us, - remembrance. it's notjust about those who have left us, there - remembrance. it's notjust about| those who have left us, there are still people serving. do you think people today, especially the younger
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generation, understand that and also the significance of what took place today? the significance of what took place toda ? , ., ~ the significance of what took place toda ? , ., . , the significance of what took place toda? ., , today? remembrance is year round but this cominu today? remembrance is year round but this coming together _ today? remembrance is year round but this coming together over _ today? remembrance is year round but this coming together over this - this coming together over this weekend is a really powerful opportunity to share the stories of the first world war, the second world war, reference, some of whom are still with us, but also the personnel who have been serving ever since and those who continue to serve and anyone who tuned in to watch the festival last night or the service this morning and right around the country would have seen veterans, theirfamilies around the country would have seen veterans, their families and those still serving and it's an opportunity to engage people in conversations, to say people do still serve, we are still serving in our country, for the armed forces are supporting the response to the pandemic and around the world, especially with the withdrawal from afghanistan and the important part of our forces played there so it's a
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good opportunity to say bank cute to those who continue to serve and remember the sacrifice of those who have gone before and that those who serve today still continue to make. i know that service was also live streamed on facebook and youtube because people had to book a place to attend in person but when it comes to what you have described, and education, what sort of work does the royal british legion get itself involved with to pass on that information? we itself involved with to pass on that information?— itself involved with to pass on that information? ~ . , ., information? we have extensive and recently reviewed _ information? we have extensive and recently reviewed all— information? we have extensive and recently reviewed all our— information? we have extensive and recently reviewed all our online - recently reviewed all our online teaching resources and we know they have a leap donated by teachers from all ages of the curriculum and at the moment they help teachers put lesson plans together, reflecting on remembrances that are appropriate for children or book groups or assemblies so those resources are freely available for teachers and at the national memorial arboretum we
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see many teachers bring their students to explore the 150 acres and the stories of service and sacrifice behind that memorials, with facilitated learning, so we do much to cross the bridge across the generations and unite people in remembrance.— generations and unite people in remembrance. , ., remembrance. philippa rawlinson, thank ou remembrance. philippa rawlinson, thank you very _ remembrance. philippa rawlinson, thank you very much _ remembrance. philippa rawlinson, thank you very much and _ thank you very much and congratulations on that double anniversary today.— congratulations on that double i anniversary today._ we congratulations on that double - anniversary today._ we are anniversary today. thank you. we are auoin to anniversary today. thank you. we are going to bring — anniversary today. thank you. we are going to bring you _ anniversary today. thank you. we are going to bring you some _ anniversary today. thank you. we are going to bring you some breaking - going to bring you some breaking news, we have reports of emergency services that have been called to an incident outside liverpool women's hospital. mersey police say a cording has been placed around the area and enquiries are ongoing so a spokeswoman elaborating, saying we can confirm an incident occurred around 11am outside the hospital, a cordon around the affected area has
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been established and a number of surrounding roads have been closed. emergency services are at the scene assessing the situation. that is all we have at the moment, but more as and when we get it. did you watch strictly come dancing last night? if you did you may have witnessed something very different from the show�*s first ever deaf contestant. rose ayling—ellis — who's an actress on eastenders — and her partner giovanni pernice performed an emotional number dedicated to the deaf community. let's take a look at what happened. rose ayling—ellis and giovanni pernice. # and when you're gone, ifeel incomplete # so if you want the truth... silence.
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# ijust want to be part of your symphony as you saw there, during the middle of the performance, the music was paused as the couple continued you to dance in silence as a tribute to the deaf community. the judges on the show were visibly moved — and the reaction from the public has been enormous. what exactly has the impact of this performance been? to discuss it, i'm joined now by harriet oppenheimer from the national hearing loss charity rnid. thank you so much forjoining us here on bbc news. i don't know about you but i got goose bumps and every time i have watched that i get goose bumps. how did you feel and experience what you're watching? i experience what you're watching? i think goose bumps is a great word.
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it was an extraordinary moment, it's a visceral moment to switch between hearing and silence. and i think thatis hearing and silence. and i think that is what everyone fell to watched it. we have had a huge amount of interest from people, those who are deaf and in the hearing world, to what rose did last night. hearing world, to what rose did last niuht. ~ ., ., hearing world, to what rose did last nirht.~ . ., , , night. what have people been saying after viewing — night. what have people been saying after viewing that _ night. what have people been saying after viewing that piece _ night. what have people been saying after viewing that piece last - night. what have people been saying after viewing that piece last night? i they had talked about feeling seen and valued and included and what an amazing role model she is and how rose is wonderful because she is an outstanding dancer and they have felt that she has demonstrated that death people can dance just as well as anyone else with some reasonable
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adjustments. she as anyone else with some reasonable adjustments-— adjustments. she said, didn't she? there is nothing _ adjustments. she said, didn't she? there is nothing wrong _

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