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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 14, 2021 10:00am-11:01am GMT

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this is bbc news 7 these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the queen will not attend today's remembrance day service in london after spraining her back. hearing no objections it is so decided. a new global climate deal is struck in glasgow but pledges still aren't enough to limit warming to 1.5 degrees. a previous commitment to phase out coal is watered down at the last—minute by india and china — the un secretary general gave this warning. our planet is hanging by a thread. we are still knocking on the door of climate catastrophe. it is time to go into emergency mode. and — the netherlands becomes the first country in western europe to re—enter a partial coronavirus lockdown this autumn
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hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. watching in the uk we start with some breaking news from here in the uk — it's been announced that queen elizabeth will not now be attending this morning's remembrance service at the cenotaph in london. buckingham palace says she has sprained her back; she is said to be disappointed that she will miss it. it was due to have been her first public engagement in more than three weeks. as in previous years, a wreath will be laid on her majesty s behalf by the prince of wales. our royal correspondentjonny dymond joins me live from the cenotaph in london. this is that she has sprained her back? it this is that she has sprained her back? , ., ., u,
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back? it is what one palace official describes as _ back? it is what one palace official describes as incredibly _ back? it is what one palace official| describes as incredibly unfortunate timing and that is bad timing on a couple of france, primarily because it is remembrance sunday, the national service of remembrance in the uk, the most important day in the uk, the most important day in the royal calendar, the day when the royal family in general and the queen in particular pays tribute to those who laid down their lives for their country. there is a second piece of bad timing. the queen had effectively taken piece of bad timing. the queen had effectively ta ken two piece of bad timing. the queen had effectively taken two weeks off from official engagements, a fortnight ago it was announced she would no longer do any external engagements and instead would be resting at windsor castle. that was specifically so that she could be here in central london, at this most important day, remembrance sunday and attend this service and when that announcement was made two weeks ago, the palace said it was herfirm intention to be here, in the statement that came out about 45 minutes ago in the uk they spoke of the queen �*s deep regret that she
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would not be here and her disappointment. as that official said, incredibly unfortunate timing. that this accident, this back sprain, should comejust at that this accident, this back sprain, should come just at the end of the period she was resting, just as she hoped to make a public appearance at this remembrance sunday event here in central london. tell us which members of the royal family will be there?— family will be there? nearly all the senior members _ family will be there? nearly all the senior members will— family will be there? nearly all the senior members will be _ family will be there? nearly all the senior members will be here - family will be there? nearly all the | senior members will be here barring prince andrew, who has withdrawn from royal duties. and of course, prince harry, who is now living in california with his wife, the duchess of sussex. the prince of wales will be the most senior royal here, he has for the last three or four years, will lay a wreath on behalf of the queen. the queen has watched the ceremony from the balcony of the foreign office, she has overlooked the cenotaph which is the centre point of this ceremony because just about four years ago she appeared to stumble a little as
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she appeared to stumble a little as she went backwards, down the steps that surround the cenotaph and i think it was thought for a then 91—year—old, it was asking a little bit much for her to lay a wreath and walk backwards so the prince of wales will be a wreath on behalf of the queen and then himself and then his wife, camilla, the duchess of cornwall, and then the duke and duchess of cambridge, more commonly known as william and kate, will be here, the duke and duchess of gloucester and the earl and countess of wessex. a fairly full turnout from the royal family, very important day for them, a day when they are not the centre of attention, they want the focus of attention, they want the focus of attention to be on those who gave service here and it is worth mentioning the queen will be absent but here, for the first time this year, since last year, at any rate, the great massed ranks of the public, they are back, lining this
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great thoroughfare of whitehall here in central london, pressing against the crash barriers and keen to show their remembrance of those who gave their remembrance of those who gave their lives for their country. thank ou. remembrance events are being held around the world — but this year, there will be no gathering at the british military cemetery in kabul. that follows the rise to power in afghanistan of the taliban. our world affairs editor john simpson is there — and he sent this update. we are in the british cemetery in the centre of kabul, an oasis of peace and quiet and greenery. it has actually been used and is being used by the british to bury their soldiers since the 1839 war. and throughout the times since then. but now, it has become the place to commemorate the people who have died, they are not buried here, but who have died since the 2001 war which threw out the taliban and has been fought quite
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bitterly ever since. what is different this year is that there is no official commemoration. no british presence whatsoever. the british embassy is entirely empty. and there is, among these five wreaths, four of them are old, from years past, but the one in the middle, the fresh—looking one with the red flowers on it, was put here only three days ago this on the 11th of november. ordered, apparently, by somebody from canada. there is a large number of canadian names on the wall over there. canadians were second only to the british, apart from the americans, in the deaths in afghanistan.
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and there are others, south africans commemorated there. spanish, and so on. but these are the british names. a56 is the kind of accepted number of british soldiers and civilians who died, these are all, in fact, military people. and you can see, i mean, it's a really large number of names. these tables, these commemorative tables, are made locally, they are perhaps not quite what they might be if this was in britain. but it is a very, very moving business to read the names here. world leaders have struck a landmark climate change deal aimed at reducing global warming, after two weeks of intense negotiations. the glasgow climate pact is the most significant of its kind since 2015 — but many experts argue
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that the pledges don't go far enough to limit global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees celsius. our science correspondent victoria gill reports. hearing no objections it is so decided. after two weeks of sleepless nights and negotiations over every detail, a glasgow pact on climate change was finally agreed. it was almost derailed at the last moment as india requested a change, watering down a critical line about phasing out coal. and there were emotional scenes as cop president alok sharma acknowledged the disappointment over that concession and at what was at stake. may i just say to all delegates, i apologise for the way this process has unfolded and i am deeply sorry. i also understand the deep disappointment, but i think, as you have noted, it's also vital that we protect this package.
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silence in auditorium. applause. but, still, this climate pledge, signed off by 197 nations, has made history. this is the first cop agreement to mention fossilfuels, the very stuff of greenhouse gas emissions. but while prime minister boris johnson had previously talked about glasgow being the beginning of the end of climate change, reacting to this deal he sounded less certain. we can't kid ourselves, we haven't beaten climate change and it would be fatal to think that we have, because there is so much more that still needs to be done. but what we do have now is a viable roadmap. but environmental campaigners who've been watching this process for many years are encouraged by some of the pledges. climate change and the nature crisis, they are two sides of the same coin, we can't take them apart from each other and we need
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to have a response that takes both of those at the same time. so it's great declarations on forests, we've seen some good words on oceans at the same time, but we need to make sure they're really followed up with actions in the years ahead. the real test of what's been agreed to here in glasgow will be if all those commitments can be acted upon quickly enough, if that political process can catch up with the speed at which the world is warming up. for the most vulnerable nations, low—lying islands facing the most dangerous impacts of storms and sea level rise, this is a matter of life and death. i'm exhausted. but we not only fought a good fight, but we're going to live fight another day and we did so much that, as a very small island country, i can be deeply proud of. as nations are asked to come back in 2022 with more ambitious pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions
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and catch up with the pace of climate change, tired negotiators are already planning for the next climate summit. victoria gill, bbc news, in glasgow. and we'll return to this story with annita mcveigh in glasgow shortly. the uk home secretary, priti patel, will hold talks this week with her french counterpart, gerald darmanin, to discuss migrant crossings. it comes after the number of migrants arriving in the uk in small boats from france has hit a new peak for a single day. over 1,000 people crossed the channel on thursday. our reporter simonjones is following latest developments. this a shared problem that requires shared solutions. priti patel in a statement said britain and france are already working very closely together to try to stop boats launching from beaches in northern france and trying to tackle the people smugglers organising the crossings. but she says the two countries need to go further and faster.
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it's not entirely clear what she means by this, whether there will be any new solutions proposed, new ideas put on the table, when this meeting takes place later this week but i think it's fair to say over the past few days, there's been a bit of a war of words between britain and france after 1,185 migrants reached the uk on 33 boats on thursday. you had the prime minister boris johnson saying france needed to police their beaches. some suggestion that there was a reluctance on the part of france to do this. you had france hitting back, saying we are working day and night to try and stop the crossings, trying to prevent lives being lost. last time priti patel met her french counterpart was back in september here in london and i think it's fair to say the meeting did not go well at all because britain had just promised france £54 million to try to stop the crossings. increased patrols on beaches in northern france but britain said that money was dependent upon results, france said that clause is new to us and you had
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the french counterpart accusing britain of financial blackmail but you have this war of words taking place. these rows. the crossings are continuing in record numbers and people losing their lives. let's go to glasgow and annita mcveigh is there. and you have all the reaction to the end of cobb 26? good morning, victoria. a really dramatic conclusion here in glasgow. alok sharma trying through the course of the day to move proceedings to a conclusion after the to weeks of intense negotiation. he had asked countries not to leverage the final moments, don't ask, he said, what more can i seek but rather does it provide enough for all of us? but then, even as some smaller more vulnerable countries said the deal was perfect, and they would sign up to it rather than leave with
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nothing, india, backed by china, made that intervention on coal which led to an 11th hour change to the wording of the deal. let's talk through the implications of all of that. victoria gill, our science and environment correspondent is with us. phasing out coal is a pretty clear instruction, there is how you get to that point but it's pretty clear, what does phasing down it mean? �* , ., clear, what does phasing down it mean? 3 ., ~ , clear, what does phasing down it mean? 2 . ~ , , ., ., �* mean? it's a key question and we've talked so much _ mean? it's a key question and we've talked so much about _ mean? it's a key question and we've talked so much about language - mean? it's a key question and we've talked so much about language and | talked so much about language and the nuance of language, the addition of unabated instead of phasing out, inefficient subsidies, instead of phasing out subsidies, that phasing down will be critical because it provides wriggle room. as you say, phasing out is a clear and to call, this is what the presidency would have wanted to see, a clarity that it is the end of days for coal. this is the very stuff of greenhouse gas
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emissions, they will have wanted to say they had secured a deal that pointed to the very end of the kohl era. , , , pointed to the very end of the kohl era. , , _ ., pointed to the very end of the kohl era. , , ,~ ., . ., era. just be absolutely clear. what does science _ era. just be absolutely clear. what does science say _ era. just be absolutely clear. what does science say about _ era. just be absolutely clear. what does science say about fossil- era. just be absolutely clear. what| does science say about fossil fuels, if we are to limit global warming, that was the whole reason for this gathering? the that was the whole reason for this unatherin ? ,. . gathering? the science, the conclusions _ gathering? the science, the conclusions of _ gathering? the science, the conclusions of the _ gathering? the science, the conclusions of the science i gathering? the science, the l conclusions of the science has gathering? the science, the - conclusions of the science has been reached by consensus over a very long period and the consensus that we had reported on before this summit, before we even got here to glasgow was that we were on a trajectory towards a 2.7 degrees temperature rise by the end of the century and to avoid that and bring us down, bring this process online with the speed at which the world is warming, we need to slash emissions, those greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030. fossil fuel burning is the key source of that and the biggest emitters, china, india, they are reliant on burning of coal and so their economies are fuelled by the emissions of those greenhouse
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gases and that is what we really wanted to see, a rapid end, to move forward and on beyond the era of fossil fuels so this wriggle room, to slow that down and rein it back, that's been seen by many critics of this deal is not enough, as watering this deal is not enough, as watering this down so much as to beat not keeping us on pace, taking us away from where we needed to be by the conclusion of this conference. the nuances of — conclusion of this conference. the nuances of language, absolutely critical in all of this. let's look at before the summit in glasgow, countries were expected to come back every five years and give an update on how they were doing with the national determined contributions to dealing with climate change. let's call them climate action plans. now thatis call them climate action plans. now that is an annual process, is that a big positive from this limit, in your opinion? i big positive from this limit, in your opinion?— big positive from this limit, in your opinion?— big positive from this limit, in your opinion? big positive from this limit, in our oinion? ~' , ., , your opinion? i think it is. that is one way in _ your opinion? i think it is. that is one way in which _ your opinion? i think it is. that is one way in which this _ your opinion? i think it is. that is one way in which this is - your opinion? i think it is. that is one way in which this is being - your opinion? i think it is. that is i one way in which this is being seen as quite a progressive step forward, there also been steps forward on commitments for financing the most
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vulnerable nations from the richer nations to deal with the impacts of climate change and adapt to green their economies and also, there's been some talk of the loss and damage already being caused although that's been a little bit watered down as well. this ndc, so much jargon, this action plant that countries are being asked to come back with on an accelerated basis is key to getting us up to speed, we need to slash emissions so quickly that the desire as everyone comes back and ups their ambition, year by year because as we have said throughout this, this is a critical decade. it throughout this, this is a critical decade. ~ , , throughout this, this is a critical decade. ~' ,, , ,, ., decade. it keeps the pressure on, i remember — decade. it keeps the pressure on, i remember this _ decade. it keeps the pressure on, i remember this phrase _ decade. it keeps the pressure on, i remember this phrase used, - decade. it keeps the pressure on, i remember this phrase used, it's i remember this phrase used, it's about international peer pressure. exactly, that is essentially everyone coming back and being able to compare notes, how are we doing? but the problem is this language evenin but the problem is this language even in that commitment, in that request in this document as well
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about people's different national circumstances, that provides a little bit of wriggle room for it say, china or india to not update their plans because their national circumstances do not permit them to because it's too difficult. all of this language is critical to what actually happens next and unfortunately, as my colleagues in the science and environment team have said throughout this, the planet only responds to emissions cuts, it does not respond to promises so we need to see action on this at a pace that gets us up to speed with the physics of climate change. speed with the physics of climate chance. . ., ., ., ,, speed with the physics of climate chane. . ., . . ~' i” speed with the physics of climate chance. . ., . . ~' �* change. victoria, thank you. alok sharma the _ change. victoria, thank you. alok sharma the com _ change. victoria, thank you. alok sharma the cop26 president - change. victoria, thank you. alok sharma the cop26 president was| change. victoria, thank you. alok- sharma the cop26 president was asked about the last—minute intervention by india and china which resulted in that watering down of the agreement on call from phasing out to phasing down. mr; on call from phasing out to phasing down. y ., , on call from phasing out to phasing down. y .,, .,, on call from phasing out to phasing down. g .,, .,, ., on call from phasing out to phasing down. g .,, on call from phasing out to phasing down. g , ,, down. my “0b was to build consensus and the down. my job was to build consensus and the reason, _ down. my job was to build consensus and the reason, andrew, _ down. my job was to build consensus and the reason, andrew, even - down. my job was to build consensus| and the reason, andrew, even though it has happened in this manner and of course, i apologise for the fact it was not as transparent as the rest of this process has been, but
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at the end of the day, the reason we were able to get this over the line was because over two years, my team and i had build trust among countries around the world. did they come to you — countries around the world. did they come to you and _ countries around the world. did they come to you and look _ countries around the world. did they come to you and look you _ countries around the world. did they come to you and look you in - countries around the world. did they come to you and look you in the - come to you and look you in the eye and say sorry, we cannot do this? i think over the past weeks, there were certain countries that did not want to have coal language in this compact. but at the end of the day, this is the first time ever that we have got a language about coal in a summit decision and i think that's absolutely historic but as i said, at the end of the day, china, and india will have to explain themselves to the most climate vulnerable countries in the world and you saw the reaction of the climate vulnerable countries to that change. climate vulnerable countries to that chan . e. ., climate vulnerable countries to that chance. ., .,, climate vulnerable countries to that chance. ., �* climate vulnerable countries to that chance. . �* ,, . . change. that was alok sharma. the united nations _ change. that was alok sharma. the united nations chief— change. that was alok sharma. the united nations chief climate - united nations chief climate negotiator patricia espinosa was asked about the decision in the final agreement to water down that commitment. it is final agreement to water down that commitment-— commitment. it is true and i would like to underline _ commitment. it is true and i would like to underline the _ commitment. it is true and i would like to underline the huge -
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commitment. it is true and i would like to underline the huge step - like to underline the huge step forward in our negotiation was the fact that for the first time in this context, we mentioned coal and fossil fuels. context, we mentioned coal and fossilfuels. before, it had not been possible. of course, because there are so many different realities. we have to be very conscious that there are millions and millions of people also that depend on fossilfuel and millions of people also that depend on fossil fuel industry. and millions of people also that depend on fossilfuel industry. and in terms of coal, there are many people, especially vulnerable and poor people, that also depend on that as a source of energy. so it's really a very difficult issue. on the one hand, we have clarity that thatis the one hand, we have clarity that that is a very big source of emissions and we need to get rid of that. on the other hand, we need to also balance out the social consequences for so many people around the world, especially in the
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poorer countries. that around the world, especially in the poorer countries.— poorer countries. that was patricia es - inosa. poorer countries. that was patricia espinosa- i'm _ poorer countries. that was patricia espinosa. i'mjoined _ poorer countries. that was patricia espinosa. i'mjoined by— poorer countries. that was patricia espinosa. i'm joined by head - poorer countries. that was patricia espinosa. i'm joined by head of. espinosa. i'm joined by head of policy at globaljustice now. thank you for your time. i spoke to you at the beginning of this summit and i asked you about your hopes and expectations for this summit. what is your assessment today? hello and aood is your assessment today? hello and good morning- _ is your assessment today? hello and good morning. thank _ is your assessment today? hello and good morning. thank you _ is your assessment today? hello and good morning. thank you for - is your assessment today? hello and good morning. thank you for having | good morning. thank you for having me again. i have been listening to the previous speakers and the challenge that we face here and the challenge that we face here and the challenge that we face here and the challenge that i see is the us always gets what it wants from climate negotiations and wanted to be seen here to be presented as the climate leader but at the same time, it is fitting the narrative that by blaming india and china, it is hiding the fact there are no new obligations on climate finance or loss and damage and these are the
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priority areas for developing countries. by focusing on call, it does not put light on the use of fossil fuel energy fossil fuels like oil and also the possibility of coal usage will be used in carbon capture and storage which would allow continued use of fossil fuels by only focusing on call. so that is one key message that everyone should understand. but one key message that everyone should understand. �* . , ., understand. but coal is a huge contributor, _ understand. but coal is a huge contributor, isn't _ understand. but coal is a huge contributor, isn't it, _ understand. but coal is a huge contributor, isn't it, to - understand. but coal is a huge contributor, isn't it, to globall contributor, isn't it, to global warming around the world? 40% of carbon dioxide emissions, greenhouse gas emissions come from fossil fuels, it is a huge part? i gas emissions come from fossil fuels, it is a huge part?- fuels, it is a huge part? i agree coal is important _ fuels, it is a huge part? i agree coal is important but _ fuels, it is a huge part? i agree coal is important but so - fuels, it is a huge part? i agree coal is important but so is - fuels, it is a huge part? i agree coal is important but so is oil. fuels, it is a huge part? i agree l coal is important but so is oil and gas. and if you look at who dominates on oil and gas, it is the
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big countries like the us. so by blaming developing countries, it is also hiding the long argument in the negotiations which is that developing countries, the developed countries have more responsibility to stop emitting now but by focusing also on call, i agree, coach should be stopped but at the same time, i think the face down, although it will impact greatly, it will also mean that other countries are escaping, those that are big on oil and gas. going back on the story of the lack of commitment to climate finance and also loss and damage, these two important elements are what seriously bogged down at the negotiations because the negotiations because the negotiations because the negotiations because loss and damage support to developing countries, that will assist them in transitioning towards a low carbon
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economy so without climate finance, and without recognising loss and damage, and we are putting aside the basic principles of differentiated responsibility and capacity. it basic principles of differentiated responsibility and capacity. ii i responsibility and capacity. if i may interrupt you, just to ask you on that point, climate justice was a big theme going into this conference so given what has happened on call, given what has happened on other fossil fuels, given what has happened on other fossilfuels, as given what has happened on other fossil fuels, as you given what has happened on other fossilfuels, as you have given what has happened on other fossil fuels, as you have outlined and on finance as well, can we really say that we are all in it together, thatjustice has been delivered for those countries who have done the least to contribute to climate change but who are suffering the worst impacts? yes. climate change but who are suffering the worst impacts?— the worst impacts? yes, we should all be in this _ the worst impacts? yes, we should all be in this together _ the worst impacts? yes, we should all be in this together so _ the worst impacts? yes, we should all be in this together so that - the worst impacts? yes, we should all be in this together so that is - all be in this together so that is why the long delay, $100 million a year by 2020 is important for many developing countries and they are frustrated about that because they had been waiting since the summit in copenhagen and in canc n and they
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are still waiting.— are still waiting. briefly, dorothy, because we _ are still waiting. briefly, dorothy, because we are _ are still waiting. briefly, dorothy, because we are almost _ are still waiting. briefly, dorothy, because we are almost out - are still waiting. briefly, dorothy, because we are almost out of - are still waiting. briefly, dorothy,| because we are almost out of time but let me ask you again about india and china and the issue of coal. do you think there is a negative domino effect created because of the headlines around this come up with other countries look at this and say if they are not cutting back on call, why should we? or do you think other countries will step up and say we need to show the way, how to transition away from fossil fuels into greener and cleaner energy? well, even from the moment and many countries are facing down the use of coal as well, even in asia, a lack of movement has already pushed the asian development backwards and to stop financing call so it is like halfway there. but then, like what they were insisting, fossilfuel infrastructure and also the massive recess for oil drilling... by
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focusing on call, it is looking away on oil drilling.— on oil drilling. dorothy, i am so sor , on oil drilling. dorothy, i am so sorry. we _ on oil drilling. dorothy, i am so sorry, we could _ on oil drilling. dorothy, i am so sorry, we could talk _ on oil drilling. dorothy, i am so sorry, we could talk for - on oil drilling. dorothy, i am so sorry, we could talk for much i on oil drilling. dorothy, i am so - sorry, we could talk for much longer but we are out of time. you are watching bbc news. good morning. there has been a fair amount of cloud around today but equally a good bit of sunshine. sunshine will break through the cloud where you haveit break through the cloud where you have it but across the board, mild day, even after a chilly start in parts of aberdeen but towards the north and west of scotland we see this card for an earlier version from the atlantic producing heavy rain as we go through the second half of today. highlands and islands in particular. strengthening breeze, drizzle through eastern scotland, some bouts of rain or drizzle in east anglia and the south—east but even those will become less numerous through the day. a bit cloudy and drizzly around western coasts but for most, a dry afternoon, light winds, pleasant for the sunshine
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breaks through, the strong breeze throughout scotland and the west of scotland and northern ireland but that breeze brings in mild air, 13-15. most that breeze brings in mild air, 13—15. most other areas around 11-13. this 13—15. most other areas around 11—13. this evening and overnight, clear skies across england and wales, mist and fog forming but scotland and northern ireland, there is wet weather to come, some of it heavy, pushing south and east, leading to a chilly night across the highlands and islands and western parts of northern ireland, cooler toward some areas of england and wales. mist and fog patches forming. monday, we see that weather front across scotland and northern ireland working and grinding to a halt in northern england and parts of north and west wales. here it will turn timbre through the day, heavier bursts of rain across cumbria and toward snowdonia but scotland and northern ireland, brighter day, early rain in the south and east as caring, isolated showers in the far north—west. across the midlands and east anglia and the south most places staying dry, mist and fog should lift too a few sunny spells,
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temperatures similar to today, cooler through parts of scotland and northern ireland. in the week ahead, slightly cooler spell midway, temperatures around average, getting milder again. temperatures around average, getting milderagain. rate temperatures around average, getting milder again. rate most likely across the north, because you are close to these areas of low pressure in iceland, weatherfront scooting by, windy at times, some bands of heavy rain, scattering of showers which will pepper western scotland through the week. further south, rain in northern ireland, perhaps northern england, further south it becomes still, most places try with the odd glimpse of sunshine and staying pretty mild as well. goodbye for now.
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hello this is bbc news with victoria derbyshire. the headlines: the queen will not attend today's remembrance day service in london because of a sprained back. a new global climate deal is struck in glasgow but pledges still aren't enough to limit warming to 1.5 degrees. but a previous commitment to phase out coal is watered down at the last—minute by india and china. and — the netherlands becomes
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the first country in western europe to re—enter a partial coronavirus lockdown this autumn the queen will miss the remembrance day service at the cenotpah after buckingham palace aanounced she has sprained her back, and took the decision with great regret this morning. as in previous years, a wreath will be laid on her majesty's behalf by the prince of wales. our royal correspondentjonny dymond is at the cenotaph. it is what one palace official describes as incredibly unfortunate timing and that is bad timing on a couple of france, primarily because it is remembrance sunday, the national service of remembrance in the uk, the most important day in the royal calendar, the day when the royal family in general and the queen in particular pays tribute to those who laid down their lives for their country. there is a second piece of bad timing. the queen had effectively taken two weeks off from official engagements, a fortnight ago it was announced she would no longer do any external engagements and instead would be resting at windsor castle. that was specifically so that she could be here in central london, at this most important day, remembrance sunday and attend this service and when that announcement was made two weeks ago, the palace said it was herfirm intention to be here, in the statement that came out about 45 minutes ago in the uk they spoke of the queen's deep regret that she would not be
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here and her disappointment. as that official said, incredibly unfortunate timing. that this accident, this back sprain, should come just at the end of the period she was resting, just as she hoped to make a public appearance at this remembrance sunday event here in central london. tell us which members of the royal family will be there? nearly all the senior members will be here barring prince andrew, who has withdrawn from royal duties. and of course, prince harry, who is now living in california with his wife, the duchess of sussex. the prince of wales will be the most senior royal here, he has for the last three or four years, will lay a wreath on behalf of the queen. the queen has watched the ceremony from the balcony of the foreign office, she has overlooked the cenotaph which is the centre point of this ceremony because just about four years ago she appeared to stumble a little as she went backwards, down the steps that surround the cenotaph and i think
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it was thought for a then 91—year—old, it was asking a little bit much for her to lay a wreath and walk backwards so the prince of wales will be a wreath on behalf of the queen and then himself and then his wife, camilla, the duchess of cornwall, and then the duke and duchess of cambridge, more commonly known as william and kate, will be here, the duke and duchess of gloucester and the earl and countess of wessex. a fairly full turnout from the royal family, it's a very important day for them, a day when they are not the centre of attention, they want the focus of attention to be on those who gave service here and it is worth mentioning the queen will be absent but here, for the first time this year, since last year, at any rate, the great massed ranks of the public, they are back, lining this great thoroughfare of whitehall here in central london, pressing against the crash barriers and keen to show their remembrance of those who gave their lives for their country.
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we'll be back live at the cenotaph in just a few minutes, for a special programme on the remembrance day events — do stay with us for that. in ecuador, police reinforcements have been sent in to secure an infamous prison, after another deadly riot started by rival gangs. at least 68 people have been killed — and more than two—dozen injured — in the latest violence, as fighting intensifies between warring drug cartels. courtney bembridge reports. family and friends of the inmates gathered outside the prison, desperate for information. a list of victims was taped to a post, while others learned what happened through harrowing footage and photos shared on social media.
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dozens of prisoners were killed in the clashes which started on friday evening and lasted for almost eight hours. police eventually forced their way in and found guns and explosives. authorities say it started as a territorial dispute between rival gangs after one of the ringleaders was released early. translation: as this section of the prison was without a ringleader, other gangs tried to subdue them, to enter to carry out a total massacre. there are approximately 700 prisoners in that part of the prison. just two months ago at this same prison, there was another deadly riot. soldiers had to be brought in to help take back control of the complex. it was the worst month for gang—related violence in ecuador�*s history, and the government says it needs international support to combat the growing influence of powerful drug cartels. courtney bembridge, bbc news.
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a new partial lockdown has been imposed in the netherlands — the first country in western europe to do so this autumn. due to record coronavirus infections and rising intensive care cases. bars, caf s and restaurants will have to close their doors at eight pm, and customers will need covid passes. three weeks of restrictions for shops, sport and catering were announced by prime minister mark rutte on friday. anna holligan sent this report. under the new dutch rules, bars, cafes and restaurants can serve until 8pm and diners need to show a covid entry pass. this three—week—long lockdown—lite is designed to limit social interactions in response to a sharp increase in infections. a record number of new cases recorded in just one day this week. they remain stubbornly high. normally everybody is sitting here having dinner. and drinks, dinner.
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now it's empty. yep. crazy. it costs money. people think it's not fair because i know there's covid. but for two hours, what's the difference, four hours? they are going to have parties in their house now. so you're not going to solve the problem, actually. a maximum of four visitors a day are allowed at home but this measure is especially difficult to police. other entrepreneurs have vowed to ignore the early last orders rule. klaxons. anti—lockdown, antivax protesters and conspiracy propagators who hurled fireworks at riot police dominated the headlines, they represent only a minority. most people here in the netherlands reluctantly agreed that sacrificing parts of their social lives will contribute to the greater good. i don't think life is going to stop. it's frustrating, especially as we had a taste of what life
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is like, opening up afterwards. i think frustration is the biggest thing but again, public safety comes first. you've got to do what you've got to do, i suppose. there are of course other social activities but i mean, as a young person, this is something that is kind of what we do. is have some stress release, some wine, some beers. have a good time. so a little bit, yeah, i do think it disproportionately affects young people. the mandatory early closing time does not apply to artistic and cultural performances and sports events can go ahead. but without spectators. considerable frustration and consternation exists among people who diligently wore their masks, kept their distances, and turned up for theirjabs too. i have been vaccinated but i know i can still get it but you know, it's gone on a bit long. the dutch are displaying
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a determination to live within the limitations. but many are increasingly asking when will this be over? anna holligan, bbc news, the hague. the international bestselling author wilbur smith has died at his home in cape town at the age of 88. ina career spanning more than 60 years, he sold 140 million copies of his 49 novels which include when the lion feeds and the triumph of the sun. in an interview with bbc breakfast in 2013 he said his work was inspired by his south african upbringing. i never left africa until i was 30 years of age. and it's in my blood. i know the peoples, i know the animals and i know the terrain so they always, that always comes into my books. £50 million—worth of government funding has been promised over the next five years, to help find a cure for motor neurone disease. it comes two months after a petition
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was delivered to downing street by some of those living with the terminal illness — including former rugby league star rob burrow, whose story we've followed closely here on the bbc. our reporter louise pilbeam has more. september this year, the campaign for £50 million towards motor neurone disease goes to downing street. among those present was former footballer stephen darby, handing over their plea to finally try to find a cure for the terminal disease. at his side, rob burrow, former rugby league star, both living with the impact of the disease. what this will mean to mnd sufferers is great hope. we're now on the brink
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of a meaningful treatment so we need to get to help prolong life and help find a cure. the two spoke to bbc breakfast about life with mnd back in early 2020, alongside scottish rugby union star doddie weir. i played rugby before i knew what i had, knew what the issue was, they said to me you have got this and we will try to fight that. and then i did the dreaded google. it came up mnd. i thought, oh, no! in the months to come, rob burrow will chart the impact of the condition in a documentary. that led to fundraising by people across the country and rob's former teammates. kevin sinfield's seven marathons in seven days raised over £2 million. he takes on a new challenge later this month.
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meanwhile, the campaign for government backing has continued. after 25—30 years, surely to goodness we can find something to find a treatment. if it stops it, that's phase one. a cure's phase two. now the government has confirmed it will provide the £50 million that the campaigners have been asking for. in an article in the express, the prime minister promises to transform the fight against this devastating disease. the announcement has been welcomed by the mnd association, which says it will change lives and ultimately save lives. louisa pilbeam, bbc news. a new image has been released to mark the prince of wales' 73rd birthday today. prince charles can be seen relaxing in the gardens of his highgrove estate in the photograph, taken earlier this summer. his royal highness will spend his birthday attending the annual as we've been hearing, buckingham palace has announced that the queen will not attend the remembrance sunday service
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at the cenotaph in london this morning because she's sprained her back. it had previously said it was the queen's "firm intention" to attend the service, after taking time away from her duties for health reasons. earlier i spoke to the bbc�*s lebo dizeko, who is at the cenotaph. i think people will be disappointed but they understand this is a day that the queen has rarely missed an all her days as people will certainly understand if she has taken that step it is for a good reason. you can probably hear proceedings are starting to get under way in the public gathering together here, very different from the last year when we had no crowd at all and barely any residents taking part in the march past the cenotaph. i think for those this is
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such a special event for so many veterans it will be really important we are somewhat back to normal. i am joined by two serving members of the armed forces. i think what state out for me was watching the empathy from all the arm for —— armed forces working together and helping the afghan people and it was more a story of humanity than the military for me. we were speaking about how important this day as for all members of the armed services. i
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this day as for all members of the armed services.— armed services. i am a fourth generation — armed services. i am a fourth generation serviceman, - armed services. i am a fourth generation serviceman, my i armed services. i am a fourth - generation serviceman, my brother and both my father and both my grandfathers were in the military and i notice a very important day for every serviceman and the families of the serviceman, once you get left behind when we deploy, it is an important day for them and it is an important day for them and it is lovely seeing the veterans back marching down the street. last year they weren't here. i was here in 2019 the prime minister so it is just great to see people back walking on the streets and seeing the public ear to supporters. itrier?r the public ear to supporters. very im ortant the public ear to supporters. very important for _ the public ear to supporters. very important for the _ the public ear to supporters. very important for the public, so many people coming out so early, what does that mean to you? that support means the world _ does that mean to you? that support means the world to _ does that mean to you? that support means the world to us. _ does that mean to you? that support means the world to us. we _ does that mean to you? that support means the world to us. we do - does that mean to you? that support means the world to us. we do our i does that mean to you? that support| means the world to us. we do ourjob for the public and couldn't do it without the support of the support of our families so it is a very special day for all of us. and special day for all of us. and award-winning _ special day for all of us. and award-winning navy - special day for all of us. and award—winning navy photographer. we arejust award—winning navy photographer. we are just a couple of hours away from
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the silence and the really poignant moment and we are really taking in the atmosphere here and what it is like having a remembrance sunday a bit more like what we are used to. the defence secretary ben wallace has been speaking about the significance of today — with it being the first remembrance sunday after the withdrawal of troops from afghanistan. i think today will be very poignant, not only because of the break that was inflicted on everyone over covid, but because we come to the end of afghanistan, so another conflict has effectively closed its books and for many, many veterans it has been a very intense 20 years, so i think today that generation will notice really the passing of that conflict, and with it, in some areas go memories, but also it brings to life new memories which our veterans will
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have to deal with. those who are looking back on afghanistan and reflecting may also be wondering whether that sacrifice was worth it and also wondering about those who have been left behind, those who have helped british forces and who we still haven't been able to assist in escaping the taliban. first of all, we have been able to assist the number of people that couldn't come out during the evacuation. in fact, in their hundreds, we brought back over a hundred last week before that another 100. we are, slowly but surely, as i was promised, continuing to keep rolling through these individuals, getting back to uk and making sure they have a home and a place to go to. so we stand by that commitment in the ministry of defence and will continue to do so for as long as it takes. but it's also the question of was it worth it? i was the security minister, i was the defence secretary, i saw dozens of terrorist plots over the years.
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what i saw was an al-qaeda that was unable to inflict plots on this country, and our citizens and our neighbouring countries because of what we were doing in afghanistan. of course, there were isis based in syria and iraq attacking us, but al-qaeda was not able to do its work, attacks that it had done for years before, so at the very heart of this, did we keep our streets safer? did those sacrifices mean that you and i could go back to our business in our towns and cities because of those actions? and the answer is an emphatic yes. this week we have also seen tensions escalating in belarus and ukraine. how grave is the situation there? are we potentially facing getting involved in another war? i think what we should recognise is russia's malign activity into not only europe but also further round the world is destabilising many countries. that destabilisation leads to insecurity,
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leads to a very anxious environment, and it is very, very important that the nations in europe and nato send a clear, strong message that these are our red lines, this is what we stand for. and stand together when people try to destabilise us and threaten our values. that's a long way from any conflict. we recognise that one of the ways to deter those sort of people is to stand strong. we have already thousands of troops based in eastern europe, in estonia and in poland, that's been around for a number of years to make sure we stand by those nato partners. i have been very clear on a number of occasions, as has the prime minister and the foreign secretary about russia stopping its behaviour will continue to do so and there are a range of tools available such as sanctions when people step out of line. president putin still sanctioned, his government, because of invading crimea illegally in 2014 and those sanctions aren't cost—free to him as a country and so we are incredibly clear that these activities must stop.
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the last british troops left afghanistan in august. today, on remembrance sunday we can share the stories of sergeant rick clements, who was left with life changing injuries after stepping on an explosive device in 2010 — and kingsman darren deady, who was killed at the age of 22 during his second tour of duty. ijoined the army back in 1996, i was 16 and nine months at the time, very much a child, really. darren was a cheeky chap. always laughing. into his music. out with the lads. very loyal. gunfire.
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although we are 11 years on now, i still remember exactly what happened the day he got shot. the way i felt. when i first set foot in afghanistan, it was very similar to iraq in many senses. the heat was just unbearable. you were looking around and watching peoplejust living in poverty. some of the phone calls were quite horrific, really. because you could hear what was going off. i stood up and took a step back and then all of a sudden there was this massive explosion. i was disorientated. didn't know what had gone on. and really, the first sort of time i came to terms
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with it was when i heard the boys coming towards me and i realised it was me. ijust remember thinking, stay awake, because if you are awake, then you are all right. and i was told all the injuries that i had sustained and the fact i could not have children, it was just the lowest point in my life. for me, i had gone from this superfit soldier of 30 years old, everything ahead of me, you know, alpha male, all of those sort of stereotype things of a soldier, i felt like this 95—year—old kind of man who could not do anything for himself. my last words to darren were i'll always love you loads. and his were to me, i will see you soon. i lost friends in afghanistan, particularly, my regiment lost one guy in iraq, and it's different for all those who serve.
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but we all have some special people that we remember. when you lose a son, or a daughter, any child, you lose a part of you. but you have other children that you have to carry on for. what became his first family were the other veterans and those that squaddies that are still serving, are still struggling with the loss of them too. they become brothers. we try to help them. we have set up a foundation in darren's name. i have been helping veterans since darren died. now i work in a role for fleetwood town community trust, we set up veterans groups. we all help each other. i like to be reminded i am very fortunate. people say i am in a bad position
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but it could have been a lot worse, you know? their families miss them every day and do not have the luxury that my family does of being able to spend time and still speak, it doesn't matter what condition i am in. in the 22 years he was alive, trust me, he gave us some fun with his antics. we are so proud of what he did. we always will be. he's included in everything we do, every christmas, every party, his birthday. we still celebrate them for him and we always will. these are the large pictures at the cenotaph. it is coming up to 11 o'clock when we will have the silence for those who have made sacrifices over the decades for us.
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you're watching bbc news — bringing you coverage of remembrance day. we're nowjoining our special programme from the cenotaph in london. the secretary of state for education and the secretary of state for wales find their positions. and the leader of the house of lords and the leader of the house of lords and the leader of the house of lords and the leader of the house of commons and the london mayor. the chief of the defence staff, general sir nick carter. with the first sea lord and
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the chief of the general staff and the chief of the general staff and the chief of the general staff and the chief of the air staff. the irish ambassador leads out the long procession with the man from nepal. they sent people to fight in the two subsequent wars. they will each be laying a wreath. and then there are the representatives of different faith and beliefs, 22 representatives who come here to take part in this
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service.
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parade! attention! asi as i said earlier, the queen will not be here, as was expected. a statement saying she had sprained her back and with great regret wouldn't be here to attend the service, and very disappointed by it. but the duke of kent on the left there, princess alexandra is there on the royal balcony. and coming out
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onto horseguards, the prince of wales leading the royal party who will be laying wreaths. he lays one on behalf of the queen first and then his own one afterwards. and as they take their place, we wait for under a minute until 11 o'clock and the two—minute silence.
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big ben chimes the hour

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