Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 14, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

6:00 am
good morning. welcome to breakfast with chris mason and katherine downes. our headlines today: hearing no projections it is decided. world leaders strike a landmark deal on climate change in glasgow, but emotional last minute wrangling leaves some concerned the agreement doesn't go far enough. i'll apologise for the way this process has unfolded and i am deeply sorry. in her first public engagement in more than three weeks, the queen will lead the national service of remembrance in london. after a campaign that went to downing street, the government pledges £50 million for research into a cure
6:01 am
for motor neurone disease. england thrash australia in the autumn internationals. and there's a sensational win for ireland, as they beat the world's top—ranked side new zealand in dublin. more than 2.5 million raised by owain's children in need drumathon and a heartfelt thank you from the man himself. i'v e i've been trying. i've had a bit of sleep. they can't get my head around it. thank you so much. weather wise it is a little cloudy and drizzly out there this morning for many. sunshine breaking through for many. sunshine breaking through for some of you. i will have the full forecast on this morning's edition of breakfast. it is just it isjust gone it is just gone six o'clock. good morning to you. it's sunday 19th november. our main story: world leaders have struck a landmark climate change deal aimed at reducing global warming,
6:02 am
after two weeks of intense negotiations. the glasgow climate pact is the most significant of its kind since 2015, but the pledges don't go far enough to limit global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees celsius. our science correspondent victoria gill reports. hearing no objections it is so decided. hearing no ob'ections it is so decided. �* ., ., decided. after two weeks of sleepless — decided. after two weeks of sleepless nights _ decided. after two weeks of sleepless nights and - decided. after two weeks of - sleepless nights and negotiations over every detail, glasgow pact on was finally agreed. it was almost derailed at the last moment as india requested a change, watering down a critical line about phasing out coal. and there were emotional scenes as cop present alex sharma acknowledged the disappointment over that concession and what was at stake. ~ ., , , that concession and what was at stake. , ., ., stake. may i 'ust say to all delegates. — stake. may i 'ust say to all delegates, i— stake. may ijust say to all delegates, i apologise - stake. may ijust say to all delegates, i apologise for| stake. may ijust say to all. delegates, i apologise for the stake. may ijust say to all- delegates, i apologise for the way this process has unfolded and i am deeply sorry. i also understand the
6:03 am
deeply sorry. i also understand the deep disappointment, but i think, as you have noted, it's also vital that we protect this package. applause . but, still, this climate please, signed off by 1928 nations, has made history. this is the first cop agreement to mention fossil fuels, the very stuff of greenhouse gas emissions. but while prime minister borisjohnson had previously talked about glasgow being the beginning of the end of climate change, reacting to this deal he sounded less certain. ~ �* to this deal he sounded less certain. �* ., to this deal he sounded less certain. ~ ., , , certain. we can't kid ourselves, we haven't beaten _ certain. we can't kid ourselves, we haven't beaten climate _ certain. we can't kid ourselves, we haven't beaten climate change - certain. we can't kid ourselves, we haven't beaten climate change and| certain. we can't kid ourselves, we i haven't beaten climate change and it will be fatal to think that we have, because there is so much more that still needs to be done. but what we do have now is a viable roadmap. but environmental campaigners who have been watching this process for many years are encouraged by some of the
6:04 am
pledges. years are encouraged by some of the ealedes. ., years are encouraged by some of the ”ledes_ ., . ., years are encouraged by some of the ealedes. . . ., ., pledges. climate change and the need to crisis, pledges. climate change and the need to crisis. they — pledges. climate change and the need to crisis, they are _ pledges. climate change and the need to crisis, they are two _ pledges. climate change and the need to crisis, they are two sides _ pledges. climate change and the need to crisis, they are two sides of - pledges. climate change and the need to crisis, they are two sides of the - to crisis, they are two sides of the same coin, we can't take them apart from each other and we need to have a response that takes both of those at the same time. so it's great declarations on forest, we have seen some good words on oceans at the same time, but we need to make sure they are really followed up with actions in the years ahead. the real test of what's _ actions in the years ahead. the real test of what's been _ actions in the years ahead. the real test of what's been agreed - actions in the years ahead. the real test of what's been agreed to - actions in the years ahead. the real test of what's been agreed to here | test of what's been agreed to here in glasgow will be if all those commitments can be acted upon quickly enough, if the political process can catch up with the speed at which the world is warming up. for the most vulnerable nations, low—lying islands facing the most dangerous impacts of storms and sea level rise, this is a matter of life and death. level rise, this is a matter of life and death-— level rise, this is a matter of life and death. �* ., , �* level rise, this is a matter of life and death. �* . , �* ., and death. i'm exhausted. but we not onl fou~ht and death. i'm exhausted. but we not only fought a — and death. i'm exhausted. but we not only fought a good — and death. i'm exhausted. but we not only fought a good fight, _ and death. i'm exhausted. but we not only fought a good fight, but - and death. i'm exhausted. but we not only fought a good fight, but we're i only fought a good fight, but we're going to live fight another day and we did so much that, as a very small
6:05 am
island country, a can be deeply proud of it. fies island country, a can be deeply proud of it— island country, a can be deeply proud of it. island country, a can be deeply roud of it. a ., ., ,., ., ., proud of it. as nations are asked to come back — proud of it. as nations are asked to come back in _ proud of it. as nations are asked to come back in 2022 _ proud of it. as nations are asked to come back in 2022 with _ proud of it. as nations are asked to come back in 2022 with more - come back in 2022 with more ambitious pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions and catch up with a piece of climate change, tight negotiators are already planning for the next climate summit. victoria gill, bbc news, in glasgow. a quick recap, it is ia november. i think we are wishing the time away. let's take a look at some reaction to that deal. the leader of the labour party, sir keir starmer, welcomed the pact, but said there were "too many promises for tomorrow, not the action that's needed today." scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon praised her home city for hosting the summit, saying glasgow had "opened its doors and its heart". meanwhile, climate activist greta thunberg dismissed the event as simply "blah, blah, blah".
6:06 am
joining us now is our political correspondent, jonathan blake. we hear that the reaction from political leaders and campaigners, i suppose the challenge this morning is trying to pick through it and come to a rounded conclusion as to how much of this is a success. goad how much of this is a success. good mornin: how much of this is a success. good morning to — how much of this is a success. good morning to you- _ how much of this is a success. good morning to you. good _ how much of this is a success. (13mg. morning to you. good morning, chris., 26 presented a huge challenge for the uk and certainly for the government from the start, almost 200 countries, tens of thousands of negotiators, and, at hand, the most pressing problem facing humanity, climate change for them to tackle. and i suppose two weeks later the bottom line is it endedin weeks later the bottom line is it ended in agreement, a deal was done, and that is something which, in itself, will come as a huge relief for borisjohnson and the government, certainly a lot sharma who presided over the summer, the alternative was really unthinkable. it is a deal which campaigners say doesn't go far enough and many of the countries who have signed up to
6:07 am
it have deep concerns about —— alok sharma. before the summit started borisjohnson said that he wanted to make progress in four areas, coal, cars, cash, and trees, as he put it. and he can point to a certain amount of progress in all of those areas stop but as we have seen for his political opponents, it will never be enough. alok sharma said last night, at the conference came to a close, that history had been made in glasgow. it will be for the voters and, perhaps, time itself tojudge whether that history is a scene in a positive light or whether this was a missed opportunity.— missed opportunity. thanks, jonathan- — the queen will attend the national service of remembrance at the cenotaph today, in her first public engagement in more than three weeks. she had been advised to rest by doctors last month for health reasons. she'll be joined by other members of the royal family and the prime minister to lay a wreath at the war memorial later this morning. our royal correspondent
6:08 am
nicholas witchell has more. she will, the palaces, be at the cenotaph watching from a balcony for this, the most solemn moment of the year, as the prince of wales leyds the queen's wreath of red poppies in the queen's wreath of red poppies in the nation pays tribute to the date of the two world wars and other more recent conflicts. the queen's attendance at the cenotaph will be her first appearance at a public engagement since doctors ordered her to rest and she was taken to hospital for tests more than three weeks ago. her programme remains under review, but the national ceremony of remembrance has a very special significance for her stop she first laid a wreath at the cenotaph on 11 november i9a5, the first ceremony after the end of the second world war. fies first ceremony after the end of the second world war.— second world war. as princess elizabeth followed _ second world war. as princess elizabeth followed the - second world war. as princess elizabeth followed the king - second world war. as princess elizabeth followed the king in i elizabeth followed the king in paying her tribute, there were few among the silent crowd who did not recall the comradeship of war years. and in the nearly 70 years of her reign, there have been very few occasions when she has not led the
6:09 am
nation's tribute in person. for those who will be at the cenotaph today, the crowds, the military detachments, and, of course, the veterans, the queen's resins will be a reassurance. after last you's necessarily depleted ceremony due to the pandemic, this remembrance sunday will see a return to the traditions of remembrance both at whitehall and at war memorials around the country, as the nation pays tribute the lives lost in more. nicholas witchell, bbc news. £50 million worth of government funding has been promised over the next five years, to help find a cure for motor neurone disease. it comes two months after a petition was delivered to downing street by some of those living with the terminal illness, including former rugby league star rob burrow, whose story we've followed closely here on breakfast. our reporter louise pilbeam has more. september this year, the campaign for £50 million towards motor neurone disease goes to downing
6:10 am
street. among those present was former footballer stephen darby, handing over their plea to finally try to find a cure for the terminal disease. at his side, rob burrow, former rugby league star, both living with the impact of the disease. , ., living with the impact of the disease. , . , , , disease. this will leave sufferers in ureat disease. this will leave sufferers in great hope- — disease. this will leave sufferers in great hope. we're _ disease. this will leave sufferers in great hope. we're now - disease. this will leave sufferers in great hope. we're now on - disease. this will leave sufferers in great hope. we're now on the | in great hope. we're now on the brink of a medical treatment so we need to get to help prolong life and help find a cure. the need to get to help prolong life and help find a cure.— help find a cure. the two for spoke to bbc breakfast _ help find a cure. the two for spoke to bbc breakfast about _ help find a cure. the two for spoke to bbc breakfast about life - help find a cure. the two for spoke to bbc breakfast about life with i help find a cure. the two for spoke i to bbc breakfast about life with mnd backin to bbc breakfast about life with mnd back in early 2020, alongside scottish rugby union star doddie weir. i scottish rugby union star doddie weir. , ._ scottish rugby union star doddie weir. , , , ., scottish rugby union star doddie weir. , , ., ., ., weir. i played rug before a new at i had, knew — weir. i played rug before a new at i had, knew what _ weir. i played rug before a new at i had, knew what the _ weir. i played rug before a new at i had, knew what the issue - weir. i played rug before a new at i had, knew what the issue was, - had, knew what the issue was, somebody said to me you have got this and we will try to fight this. and then i did the dreaded google. it came up mnd. in and then i did the dreaded google. it came up mnd-— it came up mnd. in the months to come, it came up mnd. in the months to come. rob — it came up mnd. in the months to come, rob burrow— it came up mnd. in the months to come, rob burrow will— it came up mnd. in the months to come, rob burrow will chart - it came up mnd. in the months to come, rob burrow will chart the l come, rob burrow will chart the impact of the condition in a documentary.
6:11 am
that led to fundraising by people across the country and rob's former teammates. kevin's seven marathons in seven days raised over £2 million. it takes on a new challenge later this month. meanwhile, the campaign for government backing has continued. just last week rob's dad gave another emotional plea. patter gave another emotional plea. after 25-30 years. _ gave another emotional plea. after 25-30 years, surely _ gave another emotional plea. after 25-30 years, surely to _ gave another emotional plea. fire 25—30 years, surely to goodness we can find something to find a treatment, if it stops it, that is phase one. a cure is phase two. more? phase one. a cure is phase two. now the government _ phase one. a cure is phase two. now the government have confirmed it will provide the £50 million that the campaigners have been asking for. in an article in the express, the prime minister promises to transform the fight against this devastating disease. the announcement has been welcomed by the mnd association, which says it
6:12 am
will change lives and ultimately save lives. louise pilbeam, bbc news. the international best—selling author wilbur smith has died at his home in cape town at the age of 88. in a career spanning more than 60 years, he sold iao—million copies of his a9 novels which include when the lion feeds, and the triumph of the sun. in an interview with breakfast in 2013, he told us his work was inspired by his south african upbringing. i'm never left africa until i was 30 years of age and it's in my blood. you know the people, so why know the animals, and they know the terrain. so that always comes into my books. a new image has been released to mark the prince of wales' 73rd birthday today. prince charles can be seen relaxing in the gardens of his highgrove estate in the photograph, taken earlier this summer. his royal highness will spend his birthday attending the annual remembrance day service
6:13 am
at the cenotaph. relaxing in a suit in a garden. laughter. yes!- laughter. yes! ., ., , ., laughter. yes! ., ._ ., , laughter- _ yes! if that were may i would be in my trackies- _ let's take a look at the front pages of the sunday papers now. last—minute drama as cop26 strikes climate deal is the headline in the observer. the paper features comments from the conference president, alok sharma, who said the deal was imperfect but showed consensus and support. elsewhere, the sunday express reports that the prime minister has pledged £50 million to help fight motor neurone disease. the paper says borisjohnson intends to throw the full weight of government behind a new mission to find a cure. the times reports on claims that the transport secretary, grant shapps, has spent millions of pounds of public money on lobbyists opposing the government's plans to build homes on private runways.
6:14 am
the paper says mr shapps, who owns his own aircraft, has admitted using one of the sites in question previously. and one of the most read stories on the bbc news website this morning comes from egypt, where scorpions are said to have killed three people and injured hundreds more after heavy storms brought them into people's homes. ugh, i don't like the look of that. it is extraordinary. shall we have a look at some of the inside pages? yes, let's have a look. there are seven days to go until the start of i'm a celebrity, as if we needed any more television to watch in the evenings. it is all about the build—up to the series, taking place at a castle in wales, so not in the australian outback once again. we are all finding out who is going to be taking part, which will be an interesting watch, but they are talking about the fact there are
6:15 am
ghosts to contend with. apparently the castle is said to be haunted, with reported sightings of a distressed dairy made along with household staff, a gamekeeper and the countess's former husband. right. 50 the countess's former husband. rieht. ., ., y the countess's former husband. rieht. ., ., , ., y the countess's former husband. rieht. ., ., , ., , ., ., right. so not only do they have to contest with _ right. so not only do they have to contest with spiders _ right. so not only do they have to contest with spiders and - right. so not only do they have to contest with spiders and snakes . right. so not only do they have to l contest with spiders and snakes and all that hideousness, but there are ghosts to avoid. and on the back, a picture of someone... i ghosts to avoid. and on the back, a picture of someone. . ._ picture of someone... i will raise at least one _ picture of someone... i will raise at least one eyebrow _ picture of someone... i will raise at least one eyebrow about - picture of someone... i will raise at least one eyebrow about the l at least one eyebrow about the ghosts in the castle. shall we talk about pasta? particularly british pasta. in the sunday times, the uk's italian delicatessens are stocking british pasta for the first time because it has been difficult to import the authentic italian stuff from the continent. exports down by 20%, some people blaming brexit. i
6:16 am
always like to shoehorn in a yorkshire reference, naturally, and a quote from the yorkshire pasta company in yorkshire saying their business has been growing exponentially, with people wanting to eat locally to reduce the food miles. i to eat locally to reduce the food miles. ., �* . , to eat locally to reduce the food miles. ., �* , , ., miles. i don't see why yorkshire astor miles. i don't see why yorkshire pastor would — miles. i don't see why yorkshire pastor would taste _ miles. i don't see why yorkshire pastor would taste any - miles. i don't see why yorkshire pastor would taste any different j miles. i don't see why yorkshire i pastor would taste any different to italian pastor.— italian pastor. better! -- pasta. what do i _ italian pastor. better! -- pasta. what do i know _ italian pastor. better! -- pasta. what do i know about _ italian pastor. better! -- pasta. what do i know about the - italian pastor. better! -- pasta. what do i know about the finerl what do i know about the finer points of pasta production? and an article about a santa shortage. it is not the real santa.— article about a santa shortage. it is not the real santa. these other helers. is not the real santa. these other helpers- these — is not the real santa. these other helpers. these other _ is not the real santa. these other helpers. these other helpers - is not the real santa. these other helpers. these other helpers who is not the real santa. these other. helpers. these other helpers who go into the garden _ helpers. these other helpers who go into the garden centres _ helpers. these other helpers who go into the garden centres and - helpers. these other helpers who go into the garden centres and the - helpers. these other helpers who go into the garden centres and the big i into the garden centres and the big shopping malls, and you can take your children along and they can say what they would like from the real father christmas. apparently they are having a big shortage of santas. there is a company called great
6:17 am
grottos, which is the biggest supplier of father christmases, and they have sent out an sos for new recruits. it has pushed wages up to ha an hour to be father christmas. £ia an hour to be father christmas. that sounds quite tempting. that £1a an hour to be father christmas. that sounds quite tempting.- that sounds quite tempting. that is re that sounds quite tempting. that is pretty tempting- — that sounds quite tempting. that is pretty tempting- i _ that sounds quite tempting. that is pretty tempting. i read _ that sounds quite tempting. that is pretty tempting. i read to _ that sounds quite tempting. that is pretty tempting. i read to the - pretty tempting. i read to the bottom of that and you have to be at least 28. ., ., ., , , least 28. the average age is 52 but we will consider _ least 28. the average age is 52 but we will considerjovial _ least 28. the average age is 52 but we will considerjovial applicants i we will consider jovial applicants of 28 we will considerjovial applicants of 28 or above. you we will consider 'ovial applicants of 28 or above.— of 28 or above. you have to be “ovial. i of 28 or above. you have to be jovial. i wonder _ of 28 or above. you have to be jovial. i wonder if _ of 28 or above. you have to be jovial. i wonder if there - of 28 or above. you have to be jovial. i wonder if there is - of 28 or above. you have to be jovial. i wonder if there is a - jovial. i wonder if there is a “ovial jovial. i wonder if there is a jovial interview _ jovial. i wonder if there is a jovial interview to - jovial. i wonder if there is a jovial interview to work - jovial. i wonder if there is a jovial interview to work out | jovial. i wonder if there is a - jovial interview to work out whether or not you can be a santa. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. jovial matt. you could do a bit of santain: , jovial matt. you could do a bit of santaing. i _ jovial matt. you could do a bit of santaing, i reckon. _ jovial matt. you could do a bit of santaing, i reckon. but- jovial matt. you could do a bit of santaing, i reckon. but i - jovial matt. you could do a bit of santaing, i reckon. but i am- santaing, i reckon. but i am under 28, of santaing, i reckon. but i am under 28. of course- _ santaing, i reckon. but i am under 28, of course. good _ santaing, i reckon. but i am under 28, of course. good morning - santaing, i reckon. but i am under 28, of course. good morning to i 28, of course. good morning to you at home _ 28, of course. good morning to you at home i— 28, of course. good morning to you at home. i hope you are having a good _ at home. i hope you are having a good sunday so far. a bit drizzly for some — good sunday so far. a bit drizzly for some of you but it will turn drier—
6:18 am
for some of you but it will turn drier laier~ _ for some of you but it will turn drier later. a fairly cloudy day for most _ drier later. a fairly cloudy day for most but — drier later. a fairly cloudy day for most but some will see a little bit of sunshine coming through and once again— of sunshine coming through and once again temperatures are on the mild side _ again temperatures are on the mild side this _ again temperatures are on the mild side. this morning a touch of frost around _ side. this morning a touch of frost around parts of aberdeenshire. looking — around parts of aberdeenshire. looking at the big picture from space, — looking at the big picture from space, there is plenty of cloud but this light — space, there is plenty of cloud but this light cloud is where the heaviest _ this light cloud is where the heaviest of the rain is, creeping its way— heaviest of the rain is, creeping its way into— heaviest of the rain is, creeping its way into the north and west of scotland — its way into the north and west of scotland. if i show you the radar chart _ scotland. if i show you the radar chart in — scotland. if i show you the radar chart in a — scotland. if i show you the radar chart in a moment, you may have to look very— chart in a moment, you may have to look very closely, there are splashes _ look very closely, there are splashes of rain and drizzle in east anglia. _ splashes of rain and drizzle in east anglia. the — splashes of rain and drizzle in east anglia, the south—east, the south—east midlands, parts of scotland — south—east midlands, parts of scotland and into the western fringes — scotland and into the western fringes of england and wales. it is here where it could be quite misty and murky— here where it could be quite misty and murky this morning. the odd fog patch _ and murky this morning. the odd fog patch elsewhere. a lot of that rain and drizzle — patch elsewhere. a lot of that rain and drizzle will fizzle out but we will continue to see some showers in east anglia _ will continue to see some showers in east anglia and the south—east throughout the day and it will turn wetter _ throughout the day and it will turn wetter across parts of north—west scotland — wetter across parts of north—west scotland as the thick cloud starts to push— scotland as the thick cloud starts to push its — scotland as the thick cloud starts to push its way in. ahead of it we have _ to push its way in. ahead of it we have strengthening southerly winds. most places will see light winds but in that— most places will see light winds but in that stronger winds you could see temperature is of 13 to 15 degrees temperature is of13 to 15 degrees across— temperature is of 13 to 15 degrees across western scotland and northern ireland _ across western scotland and northern ireland. most other areas 11 to ia degrees, — ireland. most other areas 11 to ia degrees, not far off what we saw
6:19 am
yesterday — degrees, not far off what we saw yesterday. as we go into the evening and overnight, the rain becomes heaviar— and overnight, the rain becomes heavier and more extensive across north-west — heavier and more extensive across north—west scotland, it turns wetter for northern ireland. further south and east _ for northern ireland. further south and east we could see mist and fog patches, _ and east we could see mist and fog patches, only a few misty patches around _ patches, only a few misty patches around east anglia and the south—east, not as damp as it was in the night _ south—east, not as damp as it was in the nightiust— south—east, not as damp as it was in the nightjust gone but temperatures down into— the nightjust gone but temperatures down into single figures in any clear— down into single figures in any clear skies. the weather front bringing — clear skies. the weather front bringing the rain across scotland and northern ireland is on the move into northern parts of england, north— into northern parts of england, north and _ into northern parts of england, north and west wales for monday. to the north— north and west wales for monday. to the north of— north and west wales for monday. to the north of it for scotland and northern— the north of it for scotland and northern ireland, after a bit of rain into— northern ireland, after a bit of rain into southern and eastern areas to begin _ rain into southern and eastern areas to begin with, it will turn a little bit drier— to begin with, it will turn a little bit drier and brighter. to begin with, it will turn a little bit drierand brighter. a to begin with, it will turn a little bit drier and brighter. a lot more sunshine — bit drier and brighter. a lot more sunshine around for you tomorrow. it will he _ sunshine around for you tomorrow. it will he a _ sunshine around for you tomorrow. it will be a cloudy, grey day for parts of northern — will be a cloudy, grey day for parts of northern england, misty over the hills, _ of northern england, misty over the hills, and _ of northern england, misty over the hills, and the mist and fog to the south _ hills, and the mist and fog to the south and — hills, and the mist and fog to the south and east will lift a little bit into — south and east will lift a little bit into low cloud but there will still he — bit into low cloud but there will still he a — bit into low cloud but there will still be a few brighter or sunny breaks— still be a few brighter or sunny breaks and many will say dry. temperatures down a little bit across — temperatures down a little bit across scotland and northern ireland compared _ across scotland and northern ireland compared with today, but you will have the — compared with today, but you will have the flip side of things in that you will— have the flip side of things in that you will have a little bit more sunshine _ you will have a little bit more sunshine. as we go into the week ahead _ sunshine. as we go into the week ahead we — sunshine. as we go into the week ahead, we will continue with a
6:20 am
relatively— ahead, we will continue with a relatively mild theme across the week _ relatively mild theme across the week. there will be some rain at times, _ week. there will be some rain at times, especially across northern areas _ times, especially across northern areas the — times, especially across northern areas. the reason for that is because _ areas. the reason for that is because you are going to be closer to areas— because you are going to be closer to areas of— because you are going to be closer to areas of low pressure zipping across— to areas of low pressure zipping across iceland, weather fronts pushing — across iceland, weather fronts pushing their way in with strengthening winds. we will see breezy— strengthening winds. we will see breezy conditions but further south, closer _ breezy conditions but further south, closer to _ breezy conditions but further south, closer to areas of high pressure, any weather fronts that work their way southwards will tend to fizzle out. way southwards will tend to fizzle out most — way southwards will tend to fizzle out. most places staying dry. the quick— out. most places staying dry. the quick outlook for the week ahead, you can _ quick outlook for the week ahead, you can see — quick outlook for the week ahead, you can see in glasgow and parts of north— you can see in glasgow and parts of north and _ you can see in glasgow and parts of north and west scotland, the wettest of the _ north and west scotland, the wettest of the conditions. the south coast and portsmouth will dry and mild. back to _ and portsmouth will dry and mild. back to you. and portsmouth will dry and mild. isack to you— and portsmouth will dry and mild. back to you. and portsmouth will dry and mild. backto ou. ., ., , ., back to you. thanks, matt. lovely to see ou, back to you. thanks, matt. lovely to see you. and — back to you. thanks, matt. lovely to see you. and we _ back to you. thanks, matt. lovely to see you, and we will _ back to you. thanks, matt. lovely to see you, and we will see _ back to you. thanks, matt. lovely to see you, and we will see you - back to you. thanks, matt. lovely to see you, and we will see you a - see you, and we will see you a little bit later on. after 20 years of conflict, the last british troops left afghanistan in august. today on remembrance sunday we can share the stories of sergeant rick clements, who was left with life—changing injuries after stepping on an explosive device in 2010, and kingsman darren deady, who was killed at the age of 22 during his second tour of duty.
6:21 am
ijoined the army back in 1996. i was 16 and nine months, ithink, at was 16 and nine months, i think, at the time, so very much a child, really. darren was a cheeky chap. always laughing. — darren was a cheeky chap. always laughing, into his music, out with the lads, — laughing, into his music, out with the lads, very loyal. although we are 11 years on now, i
6:22 am
still remember exactly what happened on the _ still remember exactly what happened on the day— still remember exactly what happened on the day he got shot — the way i felt _ on the day he got shot - the way i felt. ~ , , , , on the day he got shot - the way i felt. ~ , , ,, felt. when we first stepped foot in afghanistan. _ felt. when we first stepped foot in afghanistan, it _ felt. when we first stepped foot in afghanistan, it was _ felt. when we first stepped foot in afghanistan, it was very _ felt. when we first stepped foot in afghanistan, it was very similar i felt. when we first stepped foot in afghanistan, it was very similar to j afghanistan, it was very similar to iraq in many senses. the heat was just unbearable. you are looking around and watching people just live in poverty. filth. around and watching people 'ust live in ove . ., , ., in poverty. 0h, some of the phone calls were — in poverty. 0h, some of the phone calls were quite — in poverty. 0h, some of the phone calls were quite horrific, _ in poverty. 0h, some of the phone calls were quite horrific, really, . calls were quite horrific, really, because — calls were quite horrific, really, because you could hear what was going _ because you could hear what was going off — i stood up and took a step back, and then all of a sudden there was just this massive explosion. i was disoriented. i didn't know what had gone on. and really, the first sort of time i came to terms with it was when i heard the boys coming towards me and then i realised that it was me. ijust remember thinking, stay awake, because if you are awake then you are all right. then i was told
6:23 am
all the injuries that i had sustained and the fact i couldn't have children was just the lowest point in my life. for me, i had gone from this superfit soldier, 30 years old, everything ahead of me, alpha male, all those sort of stereotype things of a soldier, to i felt like this 95—year—old kind of man who couldn't do anything for himself. my last words to devon were i will always _ my last words to devon were i will always love you loads. his to me were _ always love you loads. his to me were i_ always love you loads. his to me were i will— always love you loads. his to me were i will see you soon. | always love you loads. his to me were i will see you soon.- were i will see you soon. i lost friends in _ were i will see you soon. i lost friends in afghanistan - were i will see you soon. i lost friends in afghanistan in - friends in afghanistan in particular. my regiment lost one guy in iraq. it is different from all —— for all those who serve, but we all have sort of special people that we remember. ~ have sort of special people that we remember. . , ., have sort of special people that we remember-— have sort of special people that we remember. . ., ., remember. when you lose a son or
6:24 am
dauuhter, remember. when you lose a son or daughter. any _ remember. when you lose a son or daughter, any child, _ remember. when you lose a son or daughter, any child, you _ remember. when you lose a son or daughter, any child, you lose - remember. when you lose a son or daughter, any child, you lose a - remember. when you lose a son or| daughter, any child, you lose a part of you _ daughter, any child, you lose a part of you but — daughter, any child, you lose a part of you. but you have other children that you have to carry on for. what became _ that you have to carry on for. what became his — that you have to carry on for. what became his first family, which are the other— became his first family, which are the other veterans and squaddies that are _ the other veterans and squaddies that are still serving, are still struggling with the loss of them as well. struggling with the loss of them as well they— struggling with the loss of them as well. they become brothers. we try to help _ well. they become brothers. we try to help them. we have set up a foundation _ to help them. we have set up a foundation in darren's name. i have been _ foundation in darren's name. i have been helping veterans since darren died _ been helping veterans since darren died i_ been helping veterans since darren died. ., ., ~ ., ., died. i now work for fleetwood town community trust, _ died. i now work for fleetwood town community trust, where _ died. i now work for fleetwood town community trust, where we - died. i now work for fleetwood town community trust, where we set - died. i now work for fleetwood town community trust, where we set up l community trust, where we set up veterans groups and we all help each other. i like to be reminded that i am very fortunate. people always say, oh, iam in a bad position, but it could have been a lot worse, you know? theirfamilies missed them every day and don't have the luxury that my family does of being able to spend time and still speak. it doesn't matter what condition i am
6:25 am
in. in doesn't matter what condition i am in. , ., , ., in. in the 22 years that he was alive, in. in the 22 years that he was alive. trust — in. in the 22 years that he was alive, trust me, _ in. in the 22 years that he was alive, trust me, he _ in. in the 22 years that he was alive, trust me, he gave - in. in the 22 years that he was alive, trust me, he gave us i in. in the 22 years that he was i alive, trust me, he gave us some in. in the 22 years that he was - alive, trust me, he gave us some fun with his _ alive, trust me, he gave us some fun with his antics. and so proud of what _ with his antics. and so proud of what he — with his antics. and so proud of what he did. we always will be. he is included — what he did. we always will be. he is included in everything we do. every— is included in everything we do. every christmas, every party, his birthday— every christmas, every party, his birthday - — every christmas, every party, his birthday — we still celebrate them for him. _ birthday — we still celebrate them for him, and we always will. darren will be among the many veterans honoured at the annual remembrance day service later this morning. you can watch live coverage of that here on bbc one from 10:15am this morning. if you're a fan of classic british films, chances are you'll know the work of lewis gilbert.
6:26 am
he was the director of alfie, educating rita and three james bond films, to name just a few, during his 60—year career. he died at the age of 97, three years ago, and now his entire personal archive is up for auction. our reporter david allard has been taking a look. lewis gilbert was a man who brought stories to the screen. the story of wartime air ace douglas bader, bored housewife shirley valentine, a charmer alfie.— housewife shirley valentine, a charmer alfie. , ., ,, , charmer alfie. they never make these cars be enough. _ charmer alfie. they never make these cars be enough. do — charmer alfie. they never make these cars be enough, do they? _ charmer alfie. they never make these cars be enough, do they? and - charmer alfie. they never make these cars be enough, do they? and super. cars be enough, do they? and super 5. cars be enough, do they? and super s- james cars be enough, do they? and super spy james bond- _ cars be enough, do they? and super spy james bond. and _ cars be enough, do they? and super spy james bond. and this _ cars be enough, do they? and super spy james bond. and this collection | spy james bond. and this collection of items tells the story of how he did it. �* ~' of items tells the story of how he did it. �* ~ , of items tells the story of how he didit. ~ did it. and i think it is probably the only collection _ did it. and i think it is probably the only collection of _ did it. and i think it is probably the only collection of a - did it. and i think it is probably the only collection of a britishl the only collection of a british director that has come up where you have literally the whole timespan of his work. , , , ., , ., his work. lewis gilbert was a film director for _ his work. lewis gilbert was a film director for 60 _ his work. lewis gilbert was a film director for 60 years, _ his work. lewis gilbert was a film director for 60 years, and - his work. lewis gilbert was a film director for 60 years, and he i his work. lewis gilbert was a film | director for 60 years, and he kept directorfor 60 years, and he kept everything. now, the team at billman �*s are cataloguing every script, every memo, every photograph, every
6:27 am
scrapbook before it goes up for auction — your chance to own a piece of film history. so how did this life in film begin?— of film history. so how did this life in film begin? there is this lovely story — life in film begin? there is this lovely story the _ life in film begin? there is this lovely story the family - life in film begin? there is this lovely story the family tell i life in film begin? there is thisj lovely story the family tell that during the war he was working for a hollywood film producer who was in the us army, and because the us man came from the states, he preferred to stay in the hotel on the cold winter days and sent lewis out, and that really set him up.— that really set him up. action. lewis gilbert _ that really set him up. action. lewis gilbert directed - that really set him up. action. lewis gilbert directed three i that really set him up. action. i lewis gilbert directed three james bond films, and it is archived from those that is attracting the most excitement. mil those that is attracting the most excitement-— those that is attracting the most excitement. �* , , , ., excitement. all this is 'ust spy who loved me. are h excitement. all this is 'ust spy who loved me. are these i excitement. all this is just spy who loved me. are these storyboards? | loved me. are these storyboards? storyboards. _ loved me. are these storyboards? storyboards, fascinating. - loved me. are these storyboards? storyboards, fascinating. just i storyboards, fascinating. just planning out the shots. fight! storyboards, fascinating. just planning out the shots. and these are different _ planning out the shots. and these are different drafts _ planning out the shots. and these are different drafts of _ planning out the shots. and these are different drafts of the - planning out the shots. and these are different drafts of the script. l are different drafts of the script. all with variants of the story, absolutely gripping. he knew everybody on the shoot and treated
6:28 am
them all incredibly well, and knew what they were doing and their family, and formed great relationships as well. what a talented man he was, and what he brought all our screens. i love that song, that is my favourite bond theme. taste i love that song, that is my favourite bond theme. we will be sinrain favourite bond theme. we will be singing that _ favourite bond theme. we will be singing that all _ favourite bond theme. we will be singing that all day _ favourite bond theme. we will be singing that all day long. - yesterday on breakfast we saw our very own weather presenter owain finish his 2a—hour drumathon to raise money for children in need. after playing hundreds of songs, changing costumes multiple times and being joined by musicians from across the country, his current total stands at an incredible £2.6 million. let's take a look at all the behind—the—scenes action from owain's mammoth 2a—hour challenge.
6:29 am
we are all going to play the iconic bbc news music. welcome to my crib. i have to wee into a jug so that they can make sure that all of my levels are ok. i willjust plunge my arms into cold water to keep them going, so it is all going well so far. i have got some injuries now. i have some kind of hinge bruise there on my arm. it is have some kind of hinge bruise there on my arm-— on my arm. it is swollen as well. yes, it is — on my arm. it is swollen as well. yes, it is really _ on my arm. it is swollen as well. yes, it is really swollen. - on my arm. it is swollen as well. yes, it is really swollen. we i on my arm. it is swollen as well. | yes, it is really swollen. we think ou yes, it is really swollen. we think you should _ yes, it is really swollen. we think you should maybe _ yes, it is really swollen. we think you should maybe add _ yes, it is really swollen. we think you should maybe add another. yes, it is really swollen. we think| you should maybe add another day yes, it is really swollen. we think i you should maybe add another day on. three _ you should maybe add another day on. three two. _ you should maybe add another day on. three, two, one...
6:30 am
applause we have raised over £2.5 million. i have been crying. i have had a bit of sleep, and i have been crying. obviously i can't get my head around it. thank you so much. the message for you from owain this morning. incredible stuff. and do you know what, drumming looks really good fun. you know what, drumming looks really aood fun. ~ you know what, drumming looks really aood fun. . ., good fun. when i saw all the elasters good fun. when i saw all the plasters down _ good fun. when i saw all the plasters down his _ good fun. when i saw all the plasters down his arm... i good fun. when i saw all the | plasters down his arm... you good fun. when i saw all the i plasters down his arm... you don't do it for 24 — plasters down his arm... you don't do it for 24 hours. _ plasters down his arm... you don't do it for 24 hours. this _ plasters down his arm... you don't do it for 24 hours. this is - plasters down his arm... you don't do it for 24 hours. this is true. it l do it for 24 hours. this is true. it looks quite _ do it for 24 hours. this is true. it looks quite exhausting _ do it for 24 hours. this is true. it looks quite exhausting to - do it for 24 hours. this is true. it looks quite exhausting to me. i l looks quite exhausting to me. i would be finished after about ten minutes. you wouldn't want to listen after about two minutes, so to that extent any drumathon i attempted would be bijou compared with owain's efforts. at 8:20am this morning we will be meeting a little boy called archie
6:31 am
who will be benefitting from some of the money raised by owain's challenge. looking forward to speaking to archie. much more coming up this morning. hello. this is breakfast with chris mason and katherine downes. notjust not just the two notjust the two of us, we have all things sport. and rugby. why was on a trainjourney things sport. and rugby. why was on a train journey yesterday from inverness to manchester and changed in sterling, but the platforms were absolutely teeming with scotland fans heading to murrayfield all in their kit ready for the big moment and plenty of moments for plenty as far as rugby was concerned.
6:32 am
absolutely. disappointment in the end of the scotland fans with their defeat against south africa. they had a bonus with the top scorer. big wins for england and ireland. big for england against australia. bear in mind the week they have had with the two covid cases. eddiejones was talking about that afterward saying it was good to get the victory ahead of playing south africa. and for ireland, a famous win in dublin against new zealand. only the third time they have beaten them in 33 meetings. here is ben croucher. new zealand — the most revered, possibly most feared team in world rugby. well, maybe not for ireland. they'd beaten the all blacks just twice before, the third was full of charm. where they faced the intimidation without trepidation, where the forwards ran through the all blacks like backs. the penalties were celebrated like tries, the victory was celebrated few before in dublin, 29—20. there were personal milestones
6:33 am
to cheer at murrayfield. two stuart hogg tries made it a record—equalling 2a for scotland. it was in a losing cause as south africa scored two of their own, and put the boot in. they'll travel to twickenham next week to find an england team hitting their stride. freddie steward set them on course for an eighth straight win over australia. jamie blamire may not have such speed, but those in green and gold still couldn't catch him. england's captain said they could still play better — the world champions next saturday might have something to fear. ben croucher, bbc news. a great day of autumn internationals. wales take on fiji this afternoon. and wales's women continued their revival with victory over south africa at cardiff arms park. last weekend's win overjapan ended a two—year losing streak but they were impressive again, carys phillips scoring a hat—trick of tries as they won by 29—19. they face canada next in their final autumn international. england lost their test series against france in wheelchair rugby league, with defeat in the second
6:34 am
match in gillingham. they did recover from a 15—point deficit, coming to within a point thanks to this penalty from nathan collins. but in the end, world champions france were too strong, winning by 39—26. the sides should have been playing in a world cup, but it's been put back a year because of the pandemic, and these matches have filled the void. gareth bale got his 100th cap for wales as they thrashed belarus 5—1 in their world cup qualifier in cardiff and he marked the milestone by setting up liverpool's neco williams for their second goal, which came afterjust 20 minutes. wales are already guaranteed a play off place — and if they get a point in their final game against belgium — they'll finish second in the group which would ensure a home draw in that play off. arsenal's women dropped points for the first time in the wsl this season — and only a very late goal saved them from defeat at tottenham. spurs had never taken a point against arsenal in the league — and an upset was on the cards when rachel williams bundled in the opener at the hive.
6:35 am
but vivienne miedema scored a stoppage time equaliser to keep them four points clear at the top of the table. lewis hamilton will be hoping for another remarkable comeback at tonight's sao paolo grand prix in brazil, as he tries to revive his title hopes. the world champion had to start the sprint qualifying race from last place, after his car was found to have broken the rules. and he fought his way up to finish fifth, but a five—place penalty for a new engine means he'll be 10th on the grid for the grand prix. his team—mate valtteri bottas is on pole ahead of max verstappen who leads hamilton by 21 points in the championship race. i think really it was just the mental state of mind i went in was just, you know, never give up, keep pushing, you can do this. it was really difficult to get to swallow the result that we got, but we won't
6:36 am
let that hold us back. it's an end of an era in motogp today as valentino rossi, the most successful motorbike racer of his generation, is calling time on his career. today's valencia grand prix will be his final race after 26 years in the sport, in which he's won the world title seven times. he's a true icon, but at the age of a2, he's decided it's time to retire. he's the only rider to have started over a00 races, winning 115 of them and nine world titles. when the t20 world cup started almost a month ago, not many would have predicted we'd be seeing australia and new zealand in the final. but the sides play for the title in dubai later and australia captain aaron finch thinks it's going to be a good one. we play quite a bit against new zealand now and we all have great battles regardless of the format. and, yes, it is exciting to be playing against new zealand. they are a great team and lead soomer by kane williamson. so it'sjust
6:37 am
are a great team and lead soomer by kane williamson. so it's just one of those things that both teams seem to have found their way into each other�*s path along the way in some tournaments. so it's really exciting. new zealand, of course, put out england, can they now beat australia and win the title? we'll find out later. thank you. we will speak to you later. it's time to take a trip to hollywood now with tom brook in talking movies. hello from new york. i'm tom brook and welcome to our talking movies review of film festival season 2021. as the star—studded big autumn field festival cycle draws to a close, we
6:38 am
hear from the names that have emerged as possible contenders, those who might be up prizes for their work. those who might be up prizes for their work-— their work. people seem to be en'o in: their work. people seem to be enjoying it _ their work. people seem to be enjoying it and _ their work. people seem to be enjoying it and responding i their work. people seem to be enjoying it and responding to i their work. people seem to be i enjoying it and responding to it. and we will see what happens. taste and we will see what happens. we travel to all the key festivals, to telluride, toronto, new york, london, and venice, which got the ball rolling with a big in—person festival. taste ball rolling with a big in-person festival. ~ ., . ball rolling with a big in-person festival. ., , , festival. we are lucky because we are the opening — festival. we are lucky because we are the opening of _ festival. we are lucky because we are the opening of the _ festival. we are lucky because we are the opening of the new- festival. we are lucky because we i are the opening of the new season. everybody is willing to come back. despite the pandemic, film festival season 2021 was, for the most part, a success. we season 2021 was, for the most part, a success. ~ , ., ~ a success. we need this. new york needs this — a success. we need this. new york needs this film _ a success. we need this. new york needs this film festival _ a success. we need this. new york needs this film festival and - a success. we need this. new york needs this film festival and we i a success. we need this. new york. needs this film festival and we need each other. it is quite emotional to be here together.— each other. it is quite emotional to be here together. indeed, many movie fans founded — be here together. indeed, many movie fans founded emotional _ be here together. indeed, many movie fans founded emotional to _ be here together. indeed, many movie fans founded emotional to talk - be here together. indeed, many movie fans founded emotional to talk to i fans founded emotional to talk to in—person festival events wherever they were. the telluride film festival is a real movie lovers event. now in its a0th year. over
6:39 am
the last decade or so it has begun to play a very important role in award season, in that it showcases oscar worthy work.— award season, in that it showcases oscar worthy work. whenever people ask me what — oscar worthy work. whenever people ask me what is _ oscar worthy work. whenever people ask me what is your _ oscar worthy work. whenever people ask me what is your favourite - oscar worthy work. whenever people ask me what is your favourite film i ask me what is your favourite film festival, i will say this one, because it is a real filmmaker�*s festival. because it is a real filmmaker's festival. ., , because it is a real filmmaker's festival. ., ., festival. dame helen was among the stars drawn here _ festival. dame helen was among the stars drawn here this _ festival. dame helen was among the stars drawn here this year, _ festival. dame helen was among the stars drawn here this year, not i festival. dame helen was among the stars drawn here this year, notjust l stars drawn here this year, notjust because she was here with her much like british true crime drama the too, because it is quite special, chose great movies amid a landscape of incredible beauty interconnected ljy of incredible beauty interconnected by ski lifts. it is of incredible beauty interconnected b ski lifts. , , of incredible beauty interconnected bskilifts. , , by ski lifts. it is very easy, it is very unpretentious. _ by ski lifts. it is very easy, it is very unpretentious. you i by ski lifts. it is very easy, it is very unpretentious. you can i by ski lifts. it is very easy, it is i very unpretentious. you can walk to every venue. it has a wonderful feel about it. , ., ., ., ., ., about it. this one-time colorado minin: about it. this one-time colorado mining town _ about it. this one-time colorado mining town turned _ about it. this one-time colorado mining town turned affluent i about it. this one-time colorado mining town turned affluent ski i mining town turned affluent ski resort has definitely become a key point of entry are likely contenders in the oscars race.—
6:40 am
in the oscars race. there is a laundry risk _ in the oscars race. there is a laundry risk -- _ in the oscars race. there is a laundry risk -- list _ in the oscars race. there is a laundry risk -- list of - in the oscars race. there is a laundry risk -- list of those, | in the oscars race. there is a i laundry risk -- list of those, slum laundry risk —— list of those, slum dog millionaire, it has aboltina of understanding what good movies are. i'm venus, i'm serena. so understanding what good movies are. i'm venus, i'm serena.— i'm venus, i'm serena. so what you think? king _ i'm venus, i'm serena. so what you think? king richard, _ i'm venus, i'm serena. so what you think? king richard, a _ i'm venus, i'm serena. so what you think? king richard, a real- think? king richard, a real crowd-pleaser, _ think? king richard, a real crowd-pleaser, was - think? king richard, a real crowd-pleaser, was one i think? king richard, a real. crowd-pleaser, was one film think? king richard, a real- crowd-pleaser, was one film that crowd—pleaser, was one film that generated oscar buzz this year for us star, will smith, for his portrait of richard williams, coach toovey two daughters, serena and venus williams.— toovey two daughters, serena and venus williams.- smith i toovey two daughters, serena and venus williams. iciriha. smith could venus williams. cirino. smith could be “oined venus williams. cirino. smith could beioined in — venus williams. cirino. smith could be joined in the _ venus williams. cirino. smith could be joined in the best _ venus williams. cirino. smith could be joined in the best actor - venus williams. cirino. smith could be joined in the best actor rowes l be joined in the best actor rowes bay peter dinklage, game of thrones die was very impressive with the musicalfilm cyrano. die was very impressive with the musical film cyrano.— die was very impressive with the musical film cyrano. your body, from belfast, musical film cyrano. your body, from belfast. where _ musical film cyrano. your body, from belfast, where everybody _ musical film cyrano. your body, from belfast, where everybody knows i musical film cyrano. your body, fromj belfast, where everybody knows you. belfast, where everybody knows you. belfast, a black and white memoir from kenneth brenner also generated oscar's talk. it is a very personal story of his experiences as a young boy in belfast as life for his
6:41 am
protestant family was thrown into troubles in the late 19's before they relocated to england. share troubles in the late 19's before they relocated to england. are we auoin to they relocated to england. are we going to have _ they relocated to england. are we going to have to _ they relocated to england. are we going to have to leave _ they relocated to england. are we going to have to leave belfast. i they relocated to england. are we | going to have to leave belfast. the film is that during a very tumultuous time, a political time, but it— tumultuous time, a political time, but it is— tumultuous time, a political time, but it is not— tumultuous time, a political time, but it is not a political film, is it? ., ,, but it is not a political film, is it? ., ~ , , , but it is not a politicalfilm, is it? ., , ,, it? no, think because it is seen so --urosel it? no, think because it is seen so purposely through _ it? no, think because it is seen so purposely through the _ it? no, think because it is seen so purposely through the eyes - it? no, think because it is seen so purposely through the eyes of i it? no, think because it is seen so purposely through the eyes of a i purposely through the eyes of a nine—year—old, this is someone who doesn't understand what politics really means, for him it is a big enough challenge and it is a simple and ultimately, fully well, it is a valid challenge to understand, why those are people i was playing the sab lica play with. the those are people i was playing the sab lica play with.— those are people i was playing the sab lica play with. the hand of god was another— sab lica play with. the hand of god was another creating _ sab lica play with. the hand of god was another creating oscar's - sab lica play with. the hand of god was another creating oscar's heat i sab lica play with. the hand of god | was another creating oscar's heat at telluride. it is from paolo sorrentino, set in 19805 naples. it touches on the tragic death of the director's parent5 touches on the tragic death of the director's parents and filmmaker, it mark5 director's parents and filmmaker, it marks a new chapter in his career in terms of intimate storytelling. i was tired after 20 years to make
6:42 am
this movie in the same way. it was starting to become less funny for me to make movies. so they decided to change completely the way to make a movie, facing a different style, facing a different kind of story. ye5, facing a different kind of story. yes, it was a different movie because it was about me and so it was different.— because it was about me and so it was different. being in at telluride was different. being in at telluride was a very positive _ was different. being in at telluride was a very positive experience, i was different. being in at telluride| was a very positive experience, not only did it demonstrate that this award 5eason only did it demonstrate that this award season is going to be packed with some great cinema, it also proved to me that a well curated in—person film festival can function and, indeed, flourish in pandemic time5. although telluride doe5 play a role in the early 05car5 race it is really the venice film festival that gets the ball rolling with more spectacle. this year it opened one
6:43 am
day before telluride. emma jone5 spectacle. this year it opened one day before telluride. emma jones was therefore talking movies looking for those venice films that had 05car'5 tho5e venice films that had 05car'5 heat. venice enjoyed its american dream again, with the return of hollywood stars after a year and a half of nightmare for the film industry. the red carpets were crammed with famous face5 industry. the red carpets were crammed with famous faces in the competition with award 5eason hopefuls. it always makes a beautiful setting for hollywood to launch its awards 5eason hopefuls and this year the festival a5 launch its awards 5eason hopefuls and this year the festival as bad some heavyweight hitters that have been delayed since the pandemic. june, the latest adaptation of the 19605 popular novel, groans under the weight of its famous ca5t 19605 popular novel, groans under the weight of its famous cast and a huge budget of a —— dune. the the weight of its famous cast and a huge budget of a -- dune. the truth does not matter. _ huge budget of a -- dune. the truth does not matter. the _ huge budget of a -- dune. the truth does not matter. the last _ huge budget of a -- dune. the truth does not matter. the last dual, i does not matter. the last dual, directed by _
6:44 am
does not matter. the last dual, directed by ridley _ does not matter. the last dual, directed by ridley scott, - does not matter. the last dual, directed by ridley scott, was i does not matter. the last dual, i directed by ridley scott, was also there. they start in the historical tale of a woman who accuses a night, played by adam driver, raping her. for is director, the venice premier was a vital moment for the movie. i think it is the most important festival. so from our point of view we need to sell an intelligent, extremely well acted and extremely well—made film to an audience that well—made film to an audience that we need to go for, we need some approval of the best critics to, say, give their nod and therefore that helps me. figs say, give their nod and therefore that helps me— say, give their nod and therefore that hels me. a . �*, ., . that helps me. as venice's launched best picture — that helps me. as venice's launched best picture winners _ that helps me. as venice's launched best picture winners from _ that helps me. as venice's launched best picture winners from the - that helps me. as venice's launched best picture winners from the shape of water to nomadland comedy festival direct those few have turned down this year's invitation to attend. we turned down this year's invitation to attend. ~ ., my turned down this year's invitation toattend. . , , to attend. we are lucky because we are at the opening _ to attend. we are lucky because we are at the opening of _ to attend. we are lucky because we are at the opening of the _ to attend. we are lucky because we are at the opening of the new- are at the opening of the new season. everybody is willing to come back to start again promoting them,
6:45 am
to travel abroad, make the promotion, and so on. so it was not difficult to convince everybody to come to the festival. but celebration _ come to the festival. but celebration of _ come to the festival. but celebration of cinema, i come to the festival. but celebration of cinema, rather than the hope of reward, is still a driving force. mona lisa and the blood toby mclean, which was in competition is directed by an iranian american and stars kate hudson as a stripper who befriends a girl with superpowers. at the end of the day, we do it because when you sit here and it all sort of comes to life, you are collectively watching something together, it is magic. and i think festivals, especially this festival, to me— this is my third time, ijust love it so much. to me- this is my third time, i 'ust love it so much.�* love it so much. you feel the love at venice- — love it so much. you feel the love at venice. when _ love it so much. you feel the love at venice. when it _ love it so much. you feel the love at venice. when it came - love it so much. you feel the love at venice. when it came to - love it so much. you feel the love i at venice. when it came to venice's own awards. — at venice. when it came to venice's own awards, happening, _ at venice. when it came to venice's own awards, happening, a - at venice. when it came to venice's own awards, happening, a french i own awards, happening, a french drama aboutan own awards, happening, a french drama about an illegal abortion, won the golden lion. maggie gyllenhaal�*s
6:46 am
debut the lost daughter, and adaptation of another, one best screenplay. it adaptation of another, one best screenplay-— adaptation of another, one best screenla . , . , ., screenplay. it is an unusualfilm, m film. screenplay. it is an unusualfilm, my film- it _ screenplay. it is an unusualfilm, my film- it is _ screenplay. it is an unusualfilm, my film. it is a _ screenplay. it is an unusualfilm, my film. it is a risky _ screenplay. it is an unusualfilm, my film. it is a risky film, - screenplay. it is an unusualfilm, my film. it is a risky film, and i screenplay. it is an unusualfilm,| my film. it is a risky film, and for them to validate it means so much to me. i really feel great — completely over the moon right now. me. i really feel great - completely over the moon right now.— over the moon right now. penelope cruz took best _ over the moon right now. penelope cruz took best actress _ over the moon right now. penelope cruz took best actress for - over the moon right now. penelope cruz took best actress for anotherl cruz took best actress for another collaboration with pedro almodovar, and jane campion won best director for the power of the dog. as in previous years, this event will probably determine the films critics will reward in the months to come. welcome to toronto. normally it is a bustling showcase overflowing with movie riches, but this year, because of the coronavirus, it was somewhat more subdued. the princess of wales theatre hosted the world premiere of theatre hosted the world premiere of the eyes of tammy fae, starring
6:47 am
jessica chastain, a performance that is almost certain to get her an oscar nomination. a portrait of the televangelist who with her husband jim hosted a christian television programme, is mesmerising. jim baker was arrested on counts of fraud in connection with their ministries and sent to jail. for many americans, tammy fae bakker, loved by her followers, stayed in the public consciousness as a figure of ridicule. this film takes her seriously. ridicule. this film takes her seriously-— ridicule. this film takes her seriousl. . , ., seriously. that was my goal, and it came from — seriously. that was my goal, and it came from first _ seriously. that was my goal, and it came from first watching _ seriously. that was my goal, and it came from first watching the - came from first watching the documentary, the eyes of tammy fae. i watched about ten years ago and i was shocked with how little i actually knew about tammy and how full of compassion and love she was. i didn't know much about her beyond the drama and the media sensationalism, so it was really important for me to kind of right that wrong, not only for her family and her legacy, but also for the lgbtq audiences that she wrapped her arms around, in a time when the
6:48 am
conservative evangelical community was turning their backs on them. how much work was _ was turning their backs on them. how much work was involved for you every day when you were shooting the film in transforming yourself to play the part? you really do become tammy faye bakker in the most wondrous way. it faye bakker in the most wondrous wa . ., , faye bakker in the most wondrous wa , ., , ., ., faye bakker in the most wondrous wa . ., , ., ., ., faye bakker in the most wondrous wa. ., faye bakker in the most wondrous wa. . . way. it was a lot of crap. for ten ears in way. it was a lot of crap. for ten years in the _ way. it was a lot of crap. for ten years in the back _ way. it was a lot of crap. for ten years in the back of _ way. it was a lot of crap. for ten years in the back of my - way. it was a lot of crap. for ten years in the back of my head - way. it was a lot of crap. for ten years in the back of my head i i way. it was a lot of crap. for ten i years in the back of my head i knew i was going to play her. i knew it was a huge— pardon the pun — leap of faith for me because there are so many aspects of her. the way her voice is, the preaching, the singing, the silliness — she presents herself to the world very differently than i do, and sol presents herself to the world very differently than i do, and so i was always afraid of it. so much so that towards the end when it started to become real, i almost tried to sabotage it. five, four, three... jessica chastain�*s performance is much better than the film itself, which is a disappointment. it is a story told too much in broad
6:49 am
strokes. it lacks originality. the bakkers lupo 's appeal was to the christian right. it fails to understand the movement that has such a powerful impact on modern american political life. one great influential new york city rock band formed in the 1960s, the velvet underground, was the subject of a new york film festival documentary this year. the band came from a storied era in new york pop culture history. at one time artist andy warhol was its manager and the band had lou reed as its charismatic lead singer. we went to see the documentary. i singer. we went to see the documentary.— singer. we went to see the documentary. singer. we went to see the documenta . . . . singer. we went to see the documenta . . . documentary. i am sponsoring a band that's called — documentary. i am sponsoring a band that's called the _ documentary. i am sponsoring a band that's called the velvet _ that's called the velvet underground. aha, that's called the velvet underground.— that's called the velvet underground. that's called the velvet underaround. �* �* . that's called the velvet underaround. . underground. a rock 'n' roll band like no other. _ underground. a rock 'n' roll band like no other. todd _ underground. a rock 'n' roll band like no other. todd haynes's - underground. a rock 'n' roll band like no other. todd haynes's new documentary on the velvet underground explores the unique set of circumstances that brought together four outsiders to create a distinctly different sound, steeped
6:50 am
in the heady mix of avant garde art and filmmaking of 19605 new york city. and filmmaking of 1960s new york ci . , and filmmaking of 1960s new york ci . . . .- . city. they go so deep within the 19605 city. they go so deep within the 1960s itself, — city. they go so deep within the 1960s itself, and _ city. they go so deep within the 1960s itself, and they _ city. they go so deep within the 1960s itself, and they were - city. they go so deep within the 1960s itself, and they were so l city. they go so deep within the - 1960s itself, and they were so ahead 19605 itself, and they were so ahead of their time thematically and sonically, that no—one knew what to do with them, even at a time of incredible invention and desire for radical change. it still took decades to catch up with what they were doing. so you learn so much about not only the 1960s, but why did that happen. fist about not only the 1960s, but why did that happen.— about not only the 1960s, but why did that happen. at the centre of it was the famous _ did that happen. at the centre of it was the famous new _ did that happen. at the centre of it was the famous new york - did that happen. at the centre of it was the famous new york city - did that happen. at the centre of it| was the famous new york city artist and film director andy warhol, who discovered the band and film director andy warhol, who discovered the hand then became their manager. he incorporated them into his art studio, called the factory, where artists, models and other cool kids known as war whole's superstars, hung out.— superstars, hung out. people came because the — superstars, hung out. people came because the camera _ superstars, hung out. people came because the camera was _ superstars, hung out. people came because the camera was running. i superstars, hung out. people came i because the camera was running. they thought they could become famous.
6:51 am
todd haynes recreates the unconventional nature of velvet underground's music and how it combined with art in his film. he juxtaposes light with sounds, uses split screens and takes viewers on an immersivejourney through split screens and takes viewers on an immersive journey through space and time. velvet underground's music was dark and edgy and full of life, so it makes perfect sense that the band was created here. in fact, in this apartment is where members of velvet underground affected what would become some of their signature sounds. lou reed brought in themes from his own life, with lyrics that never shied away from topics like drug abuse, sexuality and depression. he was immensely talented and deeply emotional, but lou reed could also be a difficult person to be close to. todd haynes's film explores this contradiction through those that knew him best. he: was complicated, man. he was full of all kinds of protect of barriers.
6:52 am
somebody who felt insecurity, and he is sharing it with us in the most direct way possible, which is in his work. . �* . direct way possible, which is in his work. ., �* . . ~' direct way possible, which is in his work. . �* . . ~ . direct way possible, which is in his work. ., �* . . ~ . . direct way possible, which is in his work. . �* . . ~ . . . work. lou reed's work and that of his band work. lou reed's work and that of his hand into _ work. lou reed's work and that of his band into us. _ work. lou reed's work and that of his band into us. speaking - work. lou reed's work and that of his band into us. speaking to - work. lou reed's work and that of his band into us. speaking to who his hand into us. speaking to who don't quite fit in and prefer to embrace life with its row rough edges intact. emerging from a pandemic in which we all felt disconnected and offkilter, todd haynes believes the velvet underground also resonates for a new reason. for underground also resonates for a new reason. . . . . . reason. for us, it was the movie we had been making _ reason. for us, it was the movie we had been making underground - reason. for us, it was the movie we | had been making underground during lockdown in this pandemic, but it was a movie about an incredibly vital time in creative life, in the history of film, and in music. and that music filled that room, and i think it did something to the audience beyond what the film itself is doing, because of the conditions that we have all lived through. in a
6:53 am
wa , film that we have all lived through. in a way, film festival— that we have all lived through. in a way, film festival season was drawing to a close by the time the bfi london film festival arrived in early october. by then there was some clarity as to which films and which performers were significant award season contenders. one of the big red carpet attractions was the movie spencer, which gave festival—goers a fictionalised portrait of diana, princess of wales, when she spent christmas with the royal family at sandringham in 1991. it presents diana as being psychologically vulnerable and under the controlling grip of an unsympathetic royal household. it is an image of a british icon that has been shaped very much by outsiders. the filmmaker is the chilean pablo larrain and the woman who plays diana is the american actress kristin stewart. emma jones reports.
6:54 am
bringing a story about the so—called people's princess to london, where diana, of wales, lived for many years, was a big moment for the cast and crew of spencer. it stars an american, kristin stewart, is directed by chilean filmmaker pablo larrain and was partly made in germany. but there is a supporting cast of british actors and stewart feels the film belongs to britain. do you feel this is a british film as well? ~ ... . ~' as well? absolutely. i feel like we brinuain it as well? absolutely. i feel like we bringing it home _ as well? absolutely. i feel like we bringing it home for— as well? absolutely. i feel like we bringing it home for her— as well? absolutely. i feel like we i bringing it home for her completely. one of the reasons it is fun to talk about this movie existing at all is that we get to have her again, even if itjust through the inspiration that she gave to pablo and to steven and myself. i definitely don't profess to be giving her another platform to exist, but she exists through what lingers. it is her influence. it is the things that she inspired, and we were so influenced and inspired by this woman. it is just nice to have it keep going, not
6:55 am
that anyone would forget her. there is two of you- _ that anyone would forget her. there is two of you. there _ that anyone would forget her. there is two of you. there is _ that anyone would forget her. there is two of you. there is a _ that anyone would forget her. there is two of you. there is a real - that anyone would forget her. there is two of you. there is a real one - is two of you. there is a real one and the — is two of you. there is a real one and the one _ is two of you. there is a real one and the one they take pictures of. the story. — and the one they take pictures of. the story, weekend over a miserable christmas that diana spends with the royal family, is fictional. but stuart's performance and her resemblance to the princess has already attracted critical acclaim where the film has shown. i already attracted critical acclaim where the film has shown. i tried to absorb her — where the film has shown. i tried to absorb her as _ where the film has shown. i tried to absorb her as best _ where the film has shown. i tried to absorb her as best i _ where the film has shown. i tried to absorb her as best i could _ where the film has shown. i tried to absorb her as best i could in - where the film has shown. i tried to absorb her as best i could in a - where the film has shown. i tried to absorb her as best i could in a kind | absorb her as best i could in a kind of spiritual way, and not get so fixated and sort of debilitated by trying to do a perfect, perfect impression. because she felt so alive and she felt so spontaneous and sort of earth shaky that the only way to do herjustice would be to kind of lonely and stuff technically but then forget about it and be free. she was, like, the least free woman for a long time, but her desire for freedom and her ability to attain it was so strong energetically that that was kind of impossible to nail. it is
6:56 am
energetically that that was kind of impossible to nail.— impossible to nail. it is written by oscar nominee _ impossible to nail. it is written by oscar nominee steven _ impossible to nail. it is written by oscar nominee steven knight. - impossible to nail. it is written by i oscar nominee steven knight. since he wrote it, the emmy—winning netflix series the crown became one of the most watched tv series in the world, the audience fascinated by their interpretation of charles and diana's marriage. the british royals may be an ultra— wealthy and privileged family, but the heart of this story, knight says, is a domestic situation. i this story, knight says, is a domestic situation.- this story, knight says, is a domestic situation. i didn't read an of domestic situation. i didn't read any of the _ domestic situation. i didn't read any of the book _ domestic situation. i didn't read any of the book or _ domestic situation. i didn't read any of the book or watch - domestic situation. i didn't read any of the book or watch any . domestic situation. i didn't read any of the book or watch any of| domestic situation. i didn't read i any of the book or watch any of the films or anything, but talked to people who were there at the time and tried to look through the keyhole via those first—hand accounts of what actually went on. and how weird we all are— how weird every family is— how weird we all are at christmas and all the weird things that we do. and they are no different. the things that we do. and they are no different. . . . different. the rest of the royal family are _ different. the rest of the royal family are seen _ different. the rest of the royal family are seen from - different. the rest of the royal family are seen from diana's i family are seen from diana's perspective, and given the interest in their lives, as well as the person of diana, even a quarter of a century after her death film will self generate headlines its leading actress. i know every acting job must be like giving yourself to
6:57 am
people. did you feel any more trepidation?— people. did you feel any more trepidation? people. did you feel any more treidation? . . . . . trepidation? yes. i mean, it is such a controversial— trepidation? yes. i mean, it is such a controversial subject. _ trepidation? yes. i mean, it is such a controversial subject. this - trepidation? yes. i mean, it is such a controversial subject. this movie | a controversial subject. this movie has no answers. it is just asking those questions, so i knew — i was afraid of people maybe thinking that we weren't leading with love and with curiosity. and as outsiders, i thought i was just sort of scared that people would think you have no right. that was my biggest fear, not that i wasn't good in the movie. the movie will succeed if audiences feel that larrain and stuart, amidst the gothic feel of spencer, have delivered the woman and not the icon. i noticed that there was one movie that kept reappearing at every film festival we visited. it was that all of them — at venice,
6:58 am
telluride, toronto, new york and in london. it was the power of the dog, a beautifully realised, disconcerting western put together with great skill by new zealand filmmakerjane campion. this story of a i9th—century rancher in montana, played by benedict cumberbatch, shows jane campion in total control of her craft. she gets brilliant performances from her cast, creates a great sense of place to bring us a study of power in relationships, toxic masculinity and repressed lives that truly lingers. it is a sure fire awards contender and will most definitely be a part of next yea r�*s and will most definitely be a part of next year's oscar's race. that brings our special talking movies festival season 2021 to a close. we
6:59 am
hope you have enjoyed the show. please remember you can always reach us online, and you can find us on facebook and twitter. well, with film festival season now more or less behind us, a new movie season has emerged. it is the end of the year prestige film season, and one of the eagerly awaited movies coming up of the eagerly awaited movies coming up is steven spielberg's adaptation of west side story. today we're going to leave you with a clip from the 1961 film adaptation of that loved broadway musical. i? aha, the 1961 film adaptation of that loved broadway musical. # a time and lace for loved broadway musical. # a time and place for us- — loved broadway musical. # a time and place for us- # — loved broadway musical. # a time and place for us. # hold _ loved broadway musical. # a time and place for us. # hold my _ loved broadway musical. # a time and place for us. # hold my hand - loved broadway musical. # a time and place for us. # hold my hand and - loved broadway musical. # a time and place for us. # hold my hand and we i place for us. # hold my hand and we are halfway there. # hold my hand and i'll take you there. # somehow, some day, somewhere...
7:00 am
good morning. welcome to breakfast with chris mason and katherine downes. our headlines today: hearing no objections it is so decided. world leaders strike a landmark deal on climate change in glasgow, but emotional last minute wrangling leaves some concerned the agreement doesn't go far enough. i apologise for the way this process has unfolded and i am deeply sorry. in her first public engagement in more than three weeks, the queen will lead the national service of remembrance in london. after a campaign that went to downing street. the government pledges 50 million for research into a cure for motor neurone disease.
7:01 am
england thrash australia in the autumn internationals. and there's a sensational win for ireland, as they beat the world's top—ranked side new zealand in dublin. more than 2.5 million raised by owain�*s children in need drumathon — and a heartfelt thank you form the man himself. i've been crying. i've had a bit of sleep. i can't get my head around it. thank you so much. weather wise, it is a little cloudy and drizzly out there this morning for many. sunshine breaking through for some of you. i will have the full forecast on this morning's edition of breakfast. good morning to you. it has just gone seven o'clock. it's sunday 14th november. our main story. world leaders have struck a landmark climate change deal
7:02 am
aimed at reducing global warming, after two weeks of intense negotiations. the glasgow climate pact is the most significant of its kind since 2015, but the pledges don't go far enough to limit global temperature rise to 1.3 degrees celsius. our science correspondent victoria gill reports. hearing no objections it is so decided. after two weeks of sleepless nights and negotiations over every detail, glasgow pact on was finally agreed. it was almost derailed at the last moment as india requested a change, watering down a critical line about phasing out coal. and there were emotional scenes as cop present alok sharma acknowledged the disappointment over that concession and at what was at stake. may i just say to all delegates, i apologise for the way this process has unfolded and i am deeply sorry. i also understand the deep disappointment, but i think, as you have noted, it's also vital that we
7:03 am
protect this package. applause. but, still, this climate pledge, signed off by 197 nations, has made history. this is the first cop agreement to mention fossilfuels, the very stuff of greenhouse gas emissions. but while prime minister boris johnson had previously talked about glasgow being the beginning of the end of climate change, reacting to this deal he sounded less certain. we can't kid ourselves, we haven't beaten climate change and it will be fatal to think that we have, because there is so much more that still needs to be done. but what we do have now is a viable roadmap. but environmental campaigners who've been watching this process for many years are encouraged
7:04 am
by some of the pledges. climate change and the nature crisis, they are two sides of the same coin, we can't take them apart from each other and we need to have a response that takes both of those at the same time. so it's great declarations on forest, we've seen some good words on oceans at the same time, but we need to make sure they're really followed up with actions in the years ahead. the real test of what's been agreed to here in glasgow will be if all those commitments can be acted upon quickly enough, if that political process can catch up with the speed at which the world is warming up. for the most vulnerable nations, low—lying islands facing the most dangerous impacts of storms and sea level rise, this is a matter of life and death. i'm exhausted. but we not only fought a good fight, but we're going to live fight another day and we did so much that, as a very small island country, i can be deeply proud of.
7:05 am
as nations are asked to come back in 2022 with more ambitious pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions and catch up with the pace of climate change, tired negotiators are already planning for the next climate summit. victoria gill, bbc news, in glasgow. let's take a look at some reaction to that deal. the leader of the labour party, sir keir starmer, welcomed the pact, but said there were "too many promises for tomorrow, not the action that's needed today." scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon praised her home city for hosting the summit, saying glasgow had "opened its doors and its heart". meanwhile, climate activist greta thunberg dismissed the event as simply "blah, blah, blah". waking up this morning what will people make of the pack that has come out of glasgow?
7:06 am
joining us now is our political correspondent, jonathan blake. a success or a value, how are people weighing it up? a success or a value, how are people weighing it up?— weighing it up? cop26 was a huge challenae weighing it up? cop26 was a huge challenge from _ weighing it up? cop26 was a huge challenge from the _ weighing it up? cop26 was a huge challenge from the start _ weighing it up? cop26 was a huge challenge from the start for - weighing it up? cop26 was a huge challenge from the start for the i weighing it up? cop26 was a huge i challenge from the start for the uk, from the government certainly, most 200 countries, hundreds of thousands in glasgow for the biggest challenge facing humanity, climate change. i suppose the bottom line is that now the summit is over in the and a deal was done. it ended in agreement and that, in itself, will be seen as an achievement, although the alternative would have been a complete disaster and a thinkable, really, for anyone involved. when it this summit began borisjohnson said he wanted to achieve progress in four areas, as he put it, coal, cars, cash, and trees and he can point to progress, albeit limited as many people see it in all of those areas. in the deal done, of course, is criticised by many is not going far enough and many of the countryside upward have deep
7:07 am
concerns and frustrations about some of the texts, but in the end it was agreed upon. a locker charmer who presided over the conference that history was made in glasgow, i don't see this conference ending in trial, but more with relief that there was an agreement, but with a renewed sense of urgency and understanding of the scale of the challenge that he will face as —— alok sharma. thanks very much. —— that the world faces. the queen will attend the national service of remembrance at the cenotaph today, in her first public engagement in more than three weeks. she had been advised to rest by doctors last month for health reasons. she'll be joined by other members of the royal family and the prime minister to lay a wreath at the war memorial later this morning. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell has more. she will, the palace says, he at the cenotaph watching from a balcony for this, the most solemn moment of the year, as the prince of wales lays the queen's wreath of red poppies in the nation pays tribute to the dead of the two world wars and other more recent conflicts. the queen's attendance
7:08 am
at the cenotaph will be her first appearance at a public engagement since doctors ordered her to rest and she was taken to hospital for tests more than three weeks ago. her programme remains under review, but the national ceremony of remembrance has a very special significance for her. she will, the palace says, he at the cenotaph watching —— she first laid a wreath at the cenotaph on 11 november 1945, the first ceremony after the end of the second world war. as princess elizabeth followed the king in paying her tribute, there were few among the silent crowd who did not recall the comradeship of war years. and in the nearly 70 years of her reign, there have been very few occasions when she has not led the nation's tribute in person. for those who will be at the cenotaph today — the crowds, the military detachments, and, of course, the veterans — the queen's presence will be a reassurance. after last yea r�*s necessarily depleted ceremony due to the pandemic, this remembrance sunday will see a return
7:09 am
to the traditions of remembrance, both in whitehall and at war memorials around the country, as the nation pays tribute the lives lost in war. nicholas witchell, bbc news. our reporter lebo dieseko is at the cenotaph this morning. good morning to you. talk us through what we will be able to see a little later on. ~ . . . what we will be able to see a little later on. ~ . what we will be able to see a little lateron. ~ . later on. well, chris, as you can robabl later on. well, chris, as you can probably see — later on. well, chris, as you can probably see behind _ later on. well, chris, as you can probably see behind me, - later on. well, chris, as you can - probably see behind me, preparations are already under way, we are just a few hours from the start of the service here. as nick said in his report, it is going to be quite different from last year where you will remember it was a much smaller eventin will remember it was a much smaller event in terms of numbers, 25 veterans taking part in the much past last year and no public allowed at all. this year we will see the return of the public and close to 10,000 veterans taking part in that much past. as nick also explained, buckingham palace has confirmed that
7:10 am
the queen will be watching from a nearby balcony and prince charles will be laying a wreath on her behalf, as has been the custom for a number of years now. now, for a number of years now. now, for a number of years now. now, for a number of the military personnel will taking part in the parade, one thing that will weigh heavy on their hearts and minds is events in afghanistan. this year is, of course, 20 years since the start of uk military operations there in the last troops left in august. so many people here today will be thinking of the more than a50 of their colleagues that were killed in the conflict over the past 20 years. this is a day that is so important to so many people, so many families. i think it will really mean a lot to them to be here and that we are going back to some kind of normality in terms of the ceremony.— in terms of the ceremony. lebo, thank you- _ you can watch live coverage of the remembrance day service here on bbc one from 10:15 this morning.
7:11 am
£50 million worth of government funding has been promised over the next five years, to help find a cure for motor neurone disease. it comes two months after a petition was delivered to downing street by some of those living with the terminal illness, including former rugby league star rob burrow, whose story we've followed closely here on breakfast. if the mps had to live one day or one week as a family with somebody with mnd they'd do something. after 25-30 with mnd they'd do something. after 25—30 years, surely to goodness we can find some think to find a treatment. if it stops it, that's phase one. aqi is phase two. the international best—selling author wilbur smith has died at his home in cape town at the age of 88. in a career spanning more than 60 years, he sold 1a0—million copies of his a9 novels which include when the lion feeds, and the triumph of the sun. in an interview with breakfast in 2013 he told us his work was inspired
7:12 am
by his south african upbringing. i never left africa until i was 30 years of age and it's in my blood. i know the people. so i know the animals, and i know the terrain. so that always comes into my books. a new image has been released to mark the prince of wales' 73rd birthday today. prince charles can be seen relaxing in the gardens of his highgrove estate in the photograph, taken earlier this summer. his royal highness will spend his birthday attending the annual remembrance day service at the cenotaph. 12 minutes past seven this morning. after two weeks of tense negotiations and dramatic last—minute wrangling, a deal has been agreed at the climate change conference in glasgow. let's take a look at
7:13 am
some of the key points. it's the first climate deal to commit to limiting coal use. but the wording change to "phase down" from "phase out" has disappointed several nations. delegates agreed to more funding for developing countries, to help them adapt to climate change by 2025. but the pledges don't go far enough to limit global temperature rise to one point five degrees celsius. those plans will be re—visited next year. we can discuss the deal in more detail now with dr amiera sawas, a climate researcher for the charity climate outreach. there are 70 bits of terminology that get thrown around from both sides of the arguments —— so many bits. good morning to you. sides of the arguments -- so many bits. good morning to you.- bits. good morning to you. hello, ureat bits. good morning to you. hello, treat to bits. good morning to you. hello, great to be _ bits. good morning to you. hello, great to be here. _ bits. good morning to you. hello, great to be here. it— bits. good morning to you. hello, great to be here. it is— bits. good morning to you. hello, great to be here. it is really - bits. good morning to you. hello, great to be here. it is really good| great to be here. it is really good to have you- _ great to be here. it is really good to have you. tell— great to be here. it is really good to have you. tell us _ great to be here. it is really good to have you. tell us what - great to be here. it is really good to have you. tell us what you - great to be here. it is really good i
7:14 am
to have you. tell us what you think of it. we have heard various reactions from different world leaders and campaigners, what is your point of view?— your point of view? well, i think that we can _ your point of view? well, i think that we can say _ your point of view? well, i think that we can say that _ your point of view? well, i think that we can say that there - your point of view? well, i think that we can say that there has i your point of view? well, i think . that we can say that there has been some progress, at least climate talks, but many of us are disappointed that we didn't get to the ambition that we had really hoped for by the end of these negotiations stop a lot of litter king and politicking happened at the last minute which we can the deal but we still had a deal and it is important to remember that and be hopeful about the direction that puts us in globally in the future. let us pick some of the politicking and some of the specifics, a moment ago the whole question around coal. there is a mention of coal in the final accord, there is a mention of coal in the finalaccord, but, as there is a mention of coal in the final accord, but, as we were just saying, this watering down to talk about facing down rather than phasing out. how important is it that coal is in there and how important is this pretty heavy caveat? it
7:15 am
important is this pretty heavy caveat? . . , important is this pretty heavy caveat? . . . . . caveat? it is really important that coal is in there. _ caveat? it is really important that coal is in there. as _ caveat? it is really important that coal is in there. as well _ caveat? it is really important that coal is in there. as well as - caveat? it is really important that coal is in there. as well as the . coal is in there. as well as the phasing out of inefficient fuel subsidies, but the issue we have is a lot of developing countries, they didn't have what we had, historically, we industrialised through coal, oil, and gas. they haven't. so they are looking into the economic future and worrying that they cannot develop and progress in the way we were able to without coal. so this is really where the battle is that they feel that they understand that there is a need to reduce, but they feel nervous about what it means to phase out, because many countries, for example india, china, and various kind of growing economies there are worried about what this means for economic development and overcoming things like poverty in future. let us look at _ things like poverty in future. let us look at some of the numbers, especially the temperature rise numbers that have been bandied around a lot in the last few weeks
7:16 am
but are hard for the layperson to get a grasp on in terms of what it means in practical terms. there was lots of talk, wasn't there, about keeping 1.5 alive, the idea of no more than 1.5 degrees of temperature rise from preindustrial levels, and then some fear that we are on track for 2.a degrees of rise. in practical terms, what is the difference between those two numbers? what are we looking at is the likely impacts of climate change as a result of what we have seen in glasgow? i as a result of what we have seen in glasrow? ~ . as a result of what we have seen in glasrow? ~' . . glasgow? i think the first thing to sa is that glasgow? i think the first thing to say is that we _ glasgow? i think the first thing to say is that we are _ glasgow? i think the first thing to say is that we are currently - glasgow? i think the first thing to say is that we are currently at - glasgow? i think the first thing to say is that we are currently at 1.1| say is that we are currently at 1.1 degrees rise, so the wildfires that we are experiencing, the floods, the typhoons, these are all already happening much more unpredictably and much more frequently and severely than we would have had with less warming. we are already at 1.1, so we can already feel those impacts. now, we are on track for 2.a. that is what the scientists say. they have looked at all the commitments that countries have made
7:17 am
across the world and they have said ok, that means we on for 2.a. if i can give you an example of the difference between 1.5 and two: what science says is that we are looking at a doubling of the loss of plant species, and we really need plant species, and we really need plant species in order to survive in terms of our food security. we are looking at a tripling of the loss of insect species, which are also really important for diversity. and things like the arctic sea ice melting — it goes ten times more, it is ten times more likely to melt, at two degrees and 1.5 degrees. when you look at this from the perspective of issues like global poverty and the risk thatis like global poverty and the risk that is facing all of us, we are literally talking about hundreds of millions of people being pushed into poverty from a difference of 1.5 to two degrees. it is really massive, and we're going to feel those impacts at home much more severely we already are at two rather than 1.5. it is going to get worse, even,
7:18 am
at 1.5from where 1.5. it is going to get worse, even, at 1.5 from where we are now, but 2.a is unimaginable. we are looking at several parts of the world becoming literally uninhabitable because of the heat at 2.a. you because of the heat at 2.4. you aint a because of the heat at 2.4. you paint a pretty — because of the heat at 2.a. you paint a pretty apocalyptic picture there. ijust wonder if, bluntly, for the world to react in a more profound way at forthcoming climate summits if the obvious consequences of climate change will need to be more stark. that kind of human reaction to disaster as opposed to projections of disaster in the future? . . . . . future? definitely, and we have seen that actually — future? definitely, and we have seen that actually happened _ future? definitely, and we have seen that actually happened over- future? definitely, and we have seen that actually happened over the - future? definitely, and we have seen that actually happened over the last| that actually happened over the last year. concern across publics across the world, including in the uk, is higher than it has ever been. part of that concern is driven by lived experience of things like floods. when it comes home and you feel it, you really start to focus on what you really start to focus on what you have to do to change it. we have seen a huge amount of concern building, and that has definitely
7:19 am
driven the ambition. a few years ago you couldn't imagine a uk government being as ambitious as it has, setting strategy in place, which it did before cop, to reduce its emissions to zero, effectively. so the public have played a really important role. we cannot lose hope. we have to continue we are doing, and every single one of us can play and every single one of us can play a role in ensuring that our governments are as ambitious as they should be across the world. i was auoin to should be across the world. i was going to ask _ should be across the world. i was going to ask you _ should be across the world. i was going to ask you about _ should be across the world. i was going to ask you about that, - should be across the world. i was going to ask you about that, whether you can find grounds for optimism amid some of the sort of bleaker projections into the future. because humanity is ingenious and find solutions when solutions are necessary, history would suggest, so maybe there is a reason for us to be still positive that in the end this is something that collectively we can deal with.— is something that collectively we can dealwith. ~ ... . . . can dealwith. absolutely. we have seen how people — can dealwith. absolutely. we have seen how people are _ can dealwith. absolutely. we have seen how people are transforming | seen how people are transforming their lives. we have seen how people are putting pressure on governments,
7:20 am
and we have seen several governments really take on this challenge positively. look at the uk government. it has literally transformed the way it is talking about climate change and our economy over the last five years. we absolutely do have to be hopeful, and what we have to understand is that individual relationship to climate, that individual action and systemic action — so basically what governments and institutions do — are two sides of the same coin. what we have to do is build more and more support across publics, across the uk, across the world, to really put pressure on governments and institutions. those countries that were at the last minute watering down the text, and it happened throughout the entire two weeks in different ways, we need those publics as well, and they already are putting pressure on their governments, and wejust are putting pressure on their governments, and we just need to build on that as well as take action in our own lives so that we can really understand that it is possible. when we start to take action on our own, that influences the people around us because we see
7:21 am
the people around us because we see the benefits of that action. that is what we want to see, really, across the country and globally.— what we want to see, really, across the country and globally. thank you very much- — the country and globally. thank you very much. thank _ the country and globally. thank you very much. thank you _ the country and globally. thank you very much. thank you for _ the country and globally. thank you very much. thank you for your - the country and globally. thank you very much. thank you for your time j very much. thank you for your time and for your expertise. i hope you manage to get some rest after a busy couple of weeks for you.— couple of weeks for you. thank you very much- — the cop26 president, alok sharma, will be on the andrew marr showjust before 10:00am this morning. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. looking ahead to next week as well. what have you got for us? i looking ahead to next week as well. what have you got for us?— what have you got for us? i have a fairl mild what have you got for us? i have a fairly mild weekend _ what have you got for us? i have a fairly mild weekend store. - what have you got for us? i have a fairly mild weekend store. good i fairly mild weekend store. good morning to you. not so much this morning to you. not so much this morning and parts of scotland. some clear skies behind me in east lothian, not1 million miles away from edinburgh, and across parts of aberdeenshire, temperatures close to freezing, but it is the exception rather than the rule. most places another mild morning, but lots of cloud around. a little bit of drizzle in places. most will see
7:22 am
some brightness come in at some point through the day even if cloud will generally dominate. taking a look at where the rain is in a moment, you will have to squint to see it in a second but this area of cloud will produce heavy rain towards the north and west. the cloud that we have across the uk, you can just about make out. you can just about make out the light rain and drizzle in parts of east anglia and drizzle in parts of east anglia and the south—east, fairly damp in the morning. another zone of patchy drizzle through scotland into western fringes of england and wales. brightening up a little bit across eastern scotland after morning drizzle, and the rain and drizzle about east anglia and the south—east will become less abundant through the afternoon. most of it fading, just one or two showers towards the very far south—east through the second half of the day. brightest guys in the afternoon across much of england, east wales, around the murray firth as well. to the north—west of scotland we can see is a heavy rain arriving, damper in northern ireland but here we the milder conditions. even with a stiffening breeze, 13 to 19 degrees. that will put its way southward through the night. it will be a wet
7:23 am
night in scotland and northern ireland, but england and wales, other than the odd spot of drizzle, most places dry. the odd spot of rain into the morning and a little bit cooler tomorrow morning that it has been over the past few mornings. particular so in the north—west of scotland. that is because you are in the clear conditions behind this weather front. the clear conditions behind this weatherfront. that the clear conditions behind this weather front. that will bring rain overnight across scotland and northern ireland, only slowly on the move and grinding almost to a halt in parts of northern england, and west wales. that patchy rain and drizzle is heading into northern england, north and west wales, ray afternoon, with a brighter day for scotland. some sunny spells through the second half of the day. sunshine breaking through the cloud towards the south and eastern temperatures at around 13 or 1a degrees. temperatures down a little bit in scotland and northern ireland but you do have the compensation of a lot more in the way of sunshine. as we go into the rest of the week ahead, it is going to be staying mild, as i said, across much of the country, particularly the first half and the end of the week. there will
7:24 am
be some rain at times, mainly in the north. we have high pressure in the south, low pressure in the north. close to the low pressure we will see whether francis get their way past every now and then and some showers chiefly across northern areas. the likes of scotland and north and western areas, rain at times. this is where we have seen the wettest weather through the week. heading further south, the south coast not only staying dry but a little bit of sunshine and temperatures above the seasonal norms. that is how it is looking. back to you. norms. that is how it is looking. lhack to you-— norms. that is how it is looking. backto ou. . ~ . . ~ back to you. thank you. we will talk to ou back to you. thank you. we will talk to you later- — following the killings of sarah everard and sabina nessa, a group of women have starting patrolling newcastle city centre at night to help other women feel safer on the streets. they say they're helping hundreds of vulnerable people every week. our reporter alison freeman has been to meet them. are we ready to rumble? sweet, let's go. are we ready to rumble? sweet, let's lo. . . are we ready to rumble? sweet, let's to. ~ . . . . go. women looking out for other women. women _ go. women looking out for other women. women cosmic - go. women looking out for other women. women cosmic street i go. women looking out for other - women. women cosmic street watch newcastle started its patrols around a month ago in the wake of the killings of sarah everard and sabina
7:25 am
nessa. the aim cold and to help any female who might be vulnerable at night. from the homeless to those who have had too much to drink, the group makes sure everyone feels supported and safe. but it is not long into the volunteers' shift when they spot someone in need of help. you are going to get hurt like this. do you want to come onto the path and speak with us for a little bit? i am in women's street watch newcastle, and there is a woman in distress. . . , newcastle, and there is a woman in distress. . . . . distress. this lady was threatening to take her own _ distress. this lady was threatening to take her own life. _ distress. this lady was threatening to take her own life. we _ distress. this lady was threatening to take her own life. we are - distress. this lady was threatening | to take her own life. we are always aoian to take her own life. we are always aoain to to take her own life. we are always going to intervene _ to take her own life. we are always going to intervene when _ to take her own life. we are always going to intervene when we - to take her own life. we are always going to intervene when we find . going to intervene when we find women — going to intervene when we find women vulnerable like that on the streets. _ women vulnerable like that on the streets, and we are trying to get her some — streets, and we are trying to get her some help. the streets, and we are trying to get her some help-— streets, and we are trying to get her some help. the police arrive in the ratrol her some help. the police arrive in the patrol carries _ her some help. the police arrive in the patrol carries on. _ her some help. the police arrive in the patrol carries on. around - her some help. the police arrive in the patrol carries on. around the i the patrol carries on. around the corner, the team spots a couple of young women struggling to work out how to get home after a night out, sorting through their belongings on the floor. . . . . . . . . the floor. obviously they had had a really good — the floor. obviously they had had a really good night. _ the floor. obviously they had had a really good night, but... _ the floor. obviously they had had a really good night, but... i- the floor. obviously they had had a really good night, but... i think- really good night, but... i think they were _ really good night, but... i think they were a _ really good night, but... i think they were a little _ really good night, but... i think they were a little bit _ really good night, but... i think. they were a little bit embarrassed. they were — they were a little bit embarrassed. they were kind of saying we don't really _ they were kind of saying we don't really need any help, we're all
7:26 am
right, — really need any help, we're all right, and _ really need any help, we're all right, and then after a while they were _ right, and then after a while they were kind — right, and then after a while they were kind of like, actually, we could — were kind of like, actually, we could do— were kind of like, actually, we could do with being walked to the station _ could do with being walked to the station. walked away kind of saying to each _ station. walked away kind of saying to each other we are glad we helped, because _ to each other we are glad we helped, because we _ to each other we are glad we helped, because we got them safe and in a taxi and _ because we got them safe and in a taxi and on— because we got them safe and in a taxi and on the way home much quicken — taxi and on the way home much auicker. . . . . . quicker. the volunteers mainly aimed to hel- quicker. the volunteers mainly aimed to help women. _ quicker. the volunteers mainly aimed to help women, but _ quicker. the volunteers mainly aimed to help women, but they _ quicker. the volunteers mainly aimed to help women, but they offer - quicker. the volunteers mainly aimed to help women, but they offer waterl to help women, but they offer water and support to anyone who needs it, even providing human shield to a young woman caught short in the street. sometimes it isjust young woman caught short in the street. sometimes it is just their presence that makes a difference. fin presence that makes a difference. on friday night we saw a lady coming down clayton street with a man, and as we came across with each other she just sort of stopped in amongst us. we were like, are you all right? she was like, i am not sure. she didn't know the guy who was with her. she obviously stopped, the guy carried on walking and she kind of burst into tears, realised that she was kind of safe. the burst into tears, realised that she was kind of safe.— was kind of safe. the patrols are aeattin a was kind of safe. the patrols are getting a lot _ was kind of safe. the patrols are getting a lot of _ was kind of safe. the patrols are getting a lot of positive - was kind of safe. the patrols are| getting a lot of positive feedback on the streets from both men and women. i on the streets from both men and women. . . . . . women. i have been told over and over again — women. i have been told over and over again to _ women. i have been told over and over again to cover _ women. i have been told over and over again to cover my _ women. i have been told over and over again to cover my drink, - women. i have been told over and over again to cover my drink, but | women. i have been told over and| over again to cover my drink, but if someone is going to inject me with a
7:27 am
drug, i can't do anything about it, ultimately. i think it is just so important that people out there basically watching out for us, because it is just unsafe. basically watching out for us, because it isjust unsafe. because it is 'ust unsafe. they are 'ust reall because it isjust unsafe. they are just really good — because it isjust unsafe. they are just really good girls _ because it isjust unsafe. they are just really good girls looking - because it isjust unsafe. they are just really good girls looking up i just really good girls looking up the good girls. and frankly the world — the good girls. and frankly the world needs more of that. it is so reassuring- _ world needs more of that. it is so reassuring- it _ world needs more of that. it is so reassuring. it is _ world needs more of that. it is so reassuring. it is nice _ world needs more of that. it is so reassuring. it is nice to _ world needs more of that. it is so reassuring. it is nice to see. - world needs more of that. it is so reassuring. it is nice to see. it. world needs more of that. it is so reassuring. it is nice to see. it is| reassuring. it is nice to see. it is nice to see _ reassuring. it is nice to see. it is nice to see that _ reassuring. it is nice to see. it is nice to see that there _ reassuring. it is nice to see. it is nice to see that there are - reassuring. it is nice to see. it isj nice to see that there are people around _ nice to see that there are people around looking _ nice to see that there are people around looking out— nice to see that there are people around looking out for— nice to see that there are people around looking out for us. - nice to see that there are people around looking out for us. it - nice to see that there are people around looking out for us. it is i around looking out for us. it is nice _ around looking out for us. it is nice to — around looking out for us. it is nice to see _ around looking out for us. it is nice to see that _ around looking out for us. it is nice to see that people - around looking out for us. it is nice to see that people will. around looking out for us. it is. nice to see that people will look after— nice to see that people will look after you. — nice to see that people will look after you. no _ nice to see that people will look after you, no matter— nice to see that people will look after you, no matter what. - nice to see that people will look after you, no matter what. it. nice to see that people will look after you, no matter what. it isl nice to see that people will look after you, no matter what. it is on areen, after you, no matter what. it is on green. we're _ after you, no matter what. it is on green, we're good. _ after you, no matter what. it is on green, we're good. and _ after you, no matter what. it is on green, we're good. and local- green, we're good. and local businesses have backed them, offering toilet stops and drinks. is this one of the pubs that has been nice to you, basically? the ma'ority ofthe nice to you, basically? the ma'ority of the i nice to you, basically? the ma'ority of the venues across * nice to you, basically? the majority of the venues across newcastle - nice to you, basically? the majorityl of the venues across newcastle have been really receptive. they are really supportive of everything we do, which is fantastic. has really supportive of everything we do, which is fantastic.— do, which is fantastic. as the bars stutter empty _ do, which is fantastic. as the bars stutter empty on _ do, which is fantastic. as the bars stutter empty on student - do, which is fantastic. as the bars stutter empty on student night, i do, which is fantastic. as the bars stutter empty on student night, a| stutter empty on student night, a few more who are the worse for wear need a helping hand. she few more who are the worse for wear need a helping hand.— need a helping hand. she was quite roorl , need a helping hand. she was quite poorly. but — need a helping hand. she was quite poorly. but was _ need a helping hand. she was quite poorly, but was with _ need a helping hand. she was quite poorly, but was with an _ need a helping hand. she was quite poorly, but was with an absolutely l poorly, but was with an absolutely lovely friend who was really supportive, helped wipe her sick of her shoes with wet wipes and we managed to get her in a taxi and home. . . . .
7:28 am
managed to get her in a taxi and home. . .. . . home. how has the night gone for ou, home. how has the night gone for you. then? _ home. how has the night gone for you. then? it _ home. how has the night gone for you, then? it has _ home. how has the night gone for you, then? it has been _ home. how has the night gone for you, then? it has been intense. i home. how has the night gone for. you, then? it has been intense. we have had a — you, then? it has been intense. we have had a few _ you, then? it has been intense. we have had a few intense _ you, then? it has been intense. we have had a few intense incidences l you, then? it has been intense. we| have had a few intense incidences to deal with, have had a few intense incidences to dealwith, but have had a few intense incidences to deal with, but it is kind of part and parcel of being out on a night with alcohol. what an incredibly positive group of women. what a great thing to go out and do, to help other people. yesterday on breakfast we saw our very own weather presenter owain finish his 2a—hour drumathon to raise money for children in need. after playing hundreds of songs, changing costumes multiple times and being joined by musicians from across the country, his current total stands at an incredible £2.6 million. let's take a look at all the —scenes action from owain's mammoth 2a—hour challenge. i think we will get an update fairly soon as to how high that number may have climbed in the last 2a hours.
7:29 am
we are all going to play the iconic bbc news music. # bbc news theme. welcome to my crib. i have to wee into a jug so that they can make sure that all of my levels are ok. i'lljust plunge my arms into cold water to keep them going, so it's all going well so far. so look, i've got some injuries now. i've got some kind of hinge bruise there on my arm. it is swollen, as well. yeah, it's really swollen. the only thing — we think you should maybe add another day on. three, two, one... cheering. we've raised over £2.5 million. i've been crying. i've had a bit of sleep,
7:30 am
and i've been crying. honestly, i can't get my head around it. thank you so much. i wonder how owain is feeling this morning. i wonder how owain is feeling this mornina. . ... . i wonder how owain is feeling this mornina. . . . . . morning. probably a little bit tired. i hope _ morning. probably a little bit tired. i hope he _ morning. probably a little bit tired. i hope he has - morning. probably a little bit tired. i hope he has some . morning. probably a little bitj tired. i hope he has some ice morning. probably a little bit - tired. i hope he has some ice for those bruises _ tired. i hope he has some ice for those bruises and _ tired. i hope he has some ice for those bruises and swelling. - tired. i hope he has some ice for those bruises and swelling. i - those bruises and swelling. i suspect that even after a good day or night's sleep, once the adrenaline has worn off is probably when the exhaustion kicks in. hand when the exhaustion kicks in. and all ou when the exhaustion kicks in. and all you can — when the exhaustion kicks in. and all you can feel— when the exhaustion kicks in. and all you can feel is _ when the exhaustion kicks in. and all you can feel is the pain. well done to owain. at 8:20am this morning we'll be meeting a little boy called archie who will be benefitting from some of the money raised by owain's challenge. stay with us, lots more coming up.
7:31 am
hello. this is breakfast, with katherine downes and chris mason. let us get a check up on all things sport, a round up on all things are sport, a round up on all things are sport, looking back, looking ahead. lowes to get into. rugby union. yes. lots to get into. england was so impressive against australia. i think they lacked a bit of discipline out there. think they lacked a bit of disci-line out there. . �* . discipline out there. they did. bear in mind there _ discipline out there. they did. bear in mind there are _ discipline out there. they did. bear in mind there are two _ discipline out there. they did. bear in mind there are two covid - discipline out there. they did. bear in mind there are two covid cases, | in mind there are two covid cases, they talked about the nightmare
7:32 am
prep, it wasn't outstanding. they have south africa next week will be fascinating. b. have south africa next week will be fascinatina. �* . . have south africa next week will be fascinatina. . . . fascinating. a good result. we will take that. fascinating. a good result. we will take that- a _ fascinating. a good result. we will take that. a compromise - fascinating. a good result. we will take that. a compromise on - fascinating. a good result. we will take that. a compromise on that. l take that. a compromise on that. l nn for take that. a compromise on that. lynn for ireland. _ take that. a compromise on that. lynn for ireland. that _ take that. a compromise on that. lynn for ireland. that we - take that. a compromise on that. lynn for ireland. that we can - take that. a compromise on that. i lynn for ireland. that we can agree on. it lynn for ireland. that we can agree on. . . lynn for ireland. that we can agree on, . . . . lynn for ireland. that we can agree on. . . . . ., . lynn for ireland. that we can agree on. . . . ~ on. it was an exciting day of autumn internationals. _ and for england an impressive first—half attacking performance helped them beat australia at twickenham. full—back freddie steward was man of the match, slicing through for the first try afterjust six minutes — with england going on to win by 32—15. i thought the first try was one of the best we have seen from england's side. al handling, our running lines, hitting the holes. it was absolutely outstanding. we want to do more about that and we aggressive about wanting to do more. it's just not going to happen all the time. ireland battled to an outstanding 29—20 victory over new zealand. they ran in three tries to the all blacks' two for only their third win over them in 33 attempts
7:33 am
in front of over 50,000 in dublin. but despite outplaying the all blacks, captainjohnny sexton isn't getting carried away. we need to keep our feet on the ground and we need to keep driving this scene. there are a lot of young guysin this scene. there are a lot of young guys in there, very young, younger than me, and they need to realise they are still the start —— this is still the start and we need to keep building. the great thing about beating new zealand as the lifter gives to the country. but you don't win a trophy, you don't have something to show for it, as such. so as happy as we are we needed to push on. meanwhile, scotland were beaten 30—15 by world champions south africa at murrayfield. stuart hogg crossed the line twice to become joint leading try scorer for his country. but the scots were undone by giving away penalties, allowing the springboks to win by 15 clear points. england's women will aim to make it three wins out of three today in their autumn internationals when they face canada at the twickenham stoop. while wales's women continued
7:34 am
their revival with victory over south africa at cardiff arms park. last weekend's win overjapan ended a two—year losing streak but they were impressive again, carys phillips scoring a hat—trick of tries as they won by 29 points to 19. they face canada next in their final autumn international. england lost their test series against france in wheelchair rugby league, with defeat in the second match in gillingham. they did recover from a 15—point deficit, coming to within a point thanks to this penalty from nathan collins. but in the end world champions france were too strong, winning 39—26. the sides should have been playing in a world cup, but it's been put back a year because of the pandemic, and these matches have filled the void. gareth bale got his 100th cap for wales as they thrashed belarus 5—1 in their world cup qualifier in cardiff. and he marked the milestone by setting up liverpool's neco williams for their second goal, which came afterjust 20 minutes. wales are already guaranteed a play off place. and if they get a point in their final game against belgium they'll finish second in the group
7:35 am
which would ensure a home draw in that play off. really please. we picked the team when you would create chances and score. we knew it would come down to goal differences as well. even when we were 2—0 up at half—time, we said starting the second half we need to think about was the first. and get the goal. thankfully we did. i thought we were clinical tonight when we got the chances. arsenal's women dropped points for the first time in the wsl this season. and only a very late goal saved them from defeat at tottenham. spurs had never taken a point against arsenal in the league. and an upset was on the cards when rachel williams bundled in the opener at the hive. but vivienne miedema scored a stoppage time equaliser to keep them four points clear at the top of the table. england's tommy fleetwood is nicely placed going into the final round of golf�*s dubai championship. a late flurry of birdies kept him in contention. he's16—under—par, three shots behind
7:36 am
jb hansen and francesco laporta, who sit at the top of a tightly—packed leaderboard. lewis hamilton will be hoping for another remarkable comeback at tonight's sao paolo grand prix in brazil, as he tries to revive his title hopes. the world champion had to start the sprint qualifying race from last place, after his car was found to have broken the rules. and he fought his way up to finish fifth, but a five—place penalty for a new engine means he'll be10th on the grid for the grand prix. his team—mate valtteri bottas is on pole ahead of max verstappen who leads hamilton by 21 points in the championship race. i think really it was just the mental state of mind i went in was reallyjust, you know, never give up, keep pushing, you can do this. because it was really difficult to get to swallow the result that we got, but we won't let that hold us back. it's an end of an era in motogp today as valentino rossi, the most successful motorbike racer of his generation, is calling time on his career.
7:37 am
today's valencia grand prix will be his final race after 26 years in the sport, in which he's won the world title seven times. he's a true icon, but at the age of a2, he's decided it's time to retire. he's the only rider to have started over a00 races — winning115 of them. an extraordinary career, isn't it? a quarter of a century. it an extraordinary career, isn't it? a quarter of a century.— quarter of a century. it is. it is amazina quarter of a century. it is. it is amazing the — quarter of a century. it is. it is amazing the amount - quarter of a century. it is. it is amazing the amount of - quarter of a century. it is. it is| amazing the amount of drivers, quarter of a century. it is. it is - amazing the amount of drivers, lewis hamilton in particular, says he doesn't get the plaudits he deserves because it is motogp. it is sensational a2 to decide is up. immensity 20 today, we could have been building up england against pakistan, is not happening, obviously —— the t20 today. we should be fascinating. people have been on the fence about whether or not it has been a good time. new zealand had that agony in 2019 of the 50 over world cup against
7:38 am
england. they could win the t20 world cup in you by later today. will we all be supporting new zealand? most of england supporting new zealand. that does tend to be the case. thank you so much. good to talk to you. a packed day of sport as usual. yesterday marked 20 years since british forces entered afghanistan to force the taliban from power. today, the soldiers who lost their lives over decades of conflict will be remembered. our world affairs editor, john simpson is at the british cemetery in kabul this morning, where, under taliban rule, no commemorations will be taking place. just to tell us a little bit more about where you are and how significant that place has been of the past 20 years or so.- significant that place has been of the past 20 years or so. well, i am in the british _ the past 20 years or so. well, i am in the british cemetery, _ the past 20 years or so. well, i am in the british cemetery, which - the past 20 years or so. well, i am in the british cemetery, which is i in the british cemetery, which is kind of a walled enclosure right in the centre of couple. it is a
7:39 am
peaceful place, it is always gentle, quiet, peaceful, a lot of foreigners who have died over the years have been buried here —— kabul. also the bodies of soldiers in wars, british soldiers, that is, wars right back to 1839 have been buried here. that is where the soldiers who have died in the current, over the last 20 years, have been commemorated, with their names on the walls here. very interestingly i have been told there's no british presence, fitted —— official british presence in kabul whatsoever. —— official british presence in kabulwhatsoever. but —— official british presence in kabul whatsoever. but apparently a canadian person rang upjust the other day and said could they leave a wreath here and it is the one in the middle, the larger dark red one. that's the only one. the others are
7:40 am
all from past years of celebration here. it always was a pretty sort of formal occasion here on remembrance sunday. it is very quiet. really very moving indeed to see all the names. not only british names, there are south africans, there's a large number of canadians over there, there are russians, all sorts of others. but mostly british. and each name just remembered others. but mostly british. and each namejust remembered here. hagar namejust remembered here. how s mbolic namejust remembered here. how symbolic is — namejust remembered here. how symbolic is it. _ namejust remembered here. how symbolic is it, john, _ namejust remembered here. how symbolic is it, john, that there will be no formal memorial there at that place when so many foreign service men and women have lost their lives there over the past 20 years and what do you think that says about afghanistan at the moment that they will be no memorial this year? that they will be no memorial this ear? ~ .. . .
7:41 am
year? well, the fact is there is nobody to _ year? well, the fact is there is nobody to come. _ year? well, the fact is there is nobody to come. the - year? well, the fact is there is nobody to come. the british i year? well, the fact is there is - nobody to come. the british embassy is entirely empty. almost every british citizen who was he has either left or is trying to leave. this is not, frankly, the moment to celebrate the loss of life against the taliban, when the taliban are in charge of everything here. i am sure that next year things will be a little bit more relaxed, a little bit more easy, probably the embassy will have some people based there again and i'm sure there will be a ceremony of some sort next year, but this year absolutely nothing. iloathed this year absolutely nothing. what is it that makes _ this year absolutely nothing. what is it that makes you _ this year absolutely nothing. what is it that makes you feel _ this year absolutely nothing. what is it that makes you feel so sure that next year will be different? what have you learned and heard on the streets of kabul that gives you that hope that things make change and they might be a little more understanding?—
7:42 am
and they might be a little more understanding? well, it is clear, ve , understanding? well, it is clear, very. very _ understanding? well, it is clear, very. very clear— understanding? well, it is clear, very, very clear that _ understanding? well, it is clear, very, very clear that the - understanding? well, it is clear, very, very clear that the taliban | very, very clear that the taliban are completely different from when they ran this country from 1996 until 2001, they ran this country from 1996 until2001, in they ran this country from 1996 until 2001, in the sense that they realise their absolute desperate need for outside help. the next few weeks here are going to be pretty frightening. there's going to be a humanitarian disaster, i don't think anybody doubts that, and it will be one of major, major proportions, unless the outside world, western governments in particular, and western aid agencies are able to get in food and medicines and all the supplies to keep this society going. it's in a state of collapse. the economy is in collapse, and social life is in danger of collapsing. my feeling is that the taliban, you know, they were pretty awful when they were here in the five years
7:43 am
from 1996 onwards, pretty terrible, i was here a great deal during that time and saw it, but they know they dare not be like that, otherwise the outside world willjust simply ignore them. and my feeling is that they will try to make the kind of concessions which will make it possible for western governments and organisations to come back here. hand organisations to come back here. and it must be a poignant moment for you, as well, john, because you are part of the bbc team, as you alluded to there, that entered the city back into thousand and one, 20 years it was yesterday since the taliban were forced from power in afghanistan. as you have mentioned you have been dancing at all. and a loss of the people celebrating, commemorating today, not celebrating, that is the wrong word, but commemorating those who lost their lives here in the uk will maybe feel that a lot of that
7:44 am
loss of life has been in vain given the fact that the taliban are back in power. how do you reflect on it personally? i in power. how do you reflect on it personally?— personally? i know an awful lot of a-eole personally? i know an awful lot of people think _ personally? i know an awful lot of people think that _ personally? i know an awful lot of people think that and, _ personally? i know an awful lot of people think that and, of- personally? i know an awful lot of people think that and, of course, | people think that and, of course, you can understand. i mean, a56 people dying only to find that the very group that they were fighting against ah—nau back in power. it must seem a total waste. all i can see is i do no afghanistan quite well, been coming back year after year after year after year since the taliban fell and they have seen what an extraordinary effect the western presence here, the international presence, let's say, has had on afghanistan, on this city, kabul, in particular, the way people's lives have been utterly transformed, the way they have been educated and fed
7:45 am
and how money has come pouring into the country. ok, plenty of it went out incorruption. we know that. but the fact is the lives of, well, i will say 90% of the people in this country have been absolutely transformed and that is because these people gave their lives for it. you know, it wouldn't have happened without them. and once you have changed people's lives for 20 years, frankly, i'm pretty sure it's not going to be possible to put the clock back. so i don't think they died in vain. just my own view. don't think, as somebody who knows afghanistan, that it was a waste stock but, you know, other people have different opinions. it is stock but, you know, other people have different opinions.— have different opinions. it is great to hear your _ have different opinions. it is great to hear your thoughts. _ have different opinions. it is great to hear your thoughts. john - have different opinions. it is great i to hear your thoughts. john simpson in kabulfor us this morning on remembrance sunday. here is matt with a look
7:46 am
at this morning's weather. good morning to you. good morning. a beautiful sunrise _ good morning to you. good morning. a beautiful sunrise for _ good morning to you. good morning. a beautiful sunrise for remembrance - beautiful sunrise for remembrance sunday. a very reflective picture in devon. some cloud, some breaks, which sums up what the weather will be across the uk today. there will be across the uk today. there will be across the uk today. there will be a common theme, even after a chilly start in parts of aberdeenshire, overall forthis stage in november it will be a mild day and most of us will see a bit of sunshine. one or two places will avoid it, especially to the far north—west of scotland. this is the cloud which will bring heavy rain and work its way in. a lot of cloud across the west of the uk at the moment, thick enough for some light rain and drizzle, especially east anglia and the south—east. that continues this morning, easing up into the afternoon. only a few showers left around, it should brighten stop some drizzle across eastern scotland and western coast of england and wales, where it could be a little bit este and grey all day long. heavy rain through the day across the north—west of scotland, the highlands and ireland in particular. many other areas dry
7:47 am
this afternoon. sunshine around the murray coast, sunshine across parts of england and is as well and temperatures still higher than normalfor temperatures still higher than normal for the temperatures still higher than normalfor the time of temperatures still higher than normal for the time of year, 1a or 15 degrees in northern ireland. in northern ireland and scotland we are likely to see some better weather for a time, heavier bursts of rain working their way eastwards. showers in the south—east of england but overall most places in england and wales will be dry. the greater chance of mist and fog to take us into the monday morning commute and temperatures down a little bit on this morning. the big picture for monday shows the weather front pushing into northern england, north and west wales through the day, grinding to a halt. either side of it a little bit of sunshine. scotland and northern ireland are much improved day compared to what we will see today. even starting with some rain in the south and east, that rain will turn light and patchy as it pushes its way into northern england, north and west wales. still the odd heavier best possible towards the coast. mist and fog further south and east, but clearing. sunny breaks into the
7:48 am
afternoon. temperatures dipping a little bit down on what we have seen this weekend but still on the mild side for the time of year as it is. as we finish monday and go into the rest of the week, it will be a battle between high pressure across southern areas and low pressure to the north. low pressure across iceland but allowing weather fronts and gusty winds to push their way eastwards. it will be a windier week after light winds this weekend. what does it mean in terms of rainfall? rain is always going to be heaviest in the north and west. these are the forecast rain amounts for the week, especially across western scotland, but little to no rain across some parts of england and wales. as far as temperatures are concerned, temperatures above average for the moment. a little bit cooler mid week but watch as we go towards the end of the week. amber and red colours reappearing showing that temperatures will climb once again above average. the west of europe remaining on the cool side. that is how it is looking. i remaining on the cool side. that is how it is looking. remaining on the cool side. that is how it is lookina. . . remaining on the cool side. that is how it is looking. remaining on the cool side. that is how it is lookina. . . ~ how it is looking. i am not liking the sound _ how it is looking. i am not liking the sound of— how it is looking. i am not liking the sound of that _ how it is looking. i am not liking the sound of that weather - how it is looking. i am not liking the sound of that weather front | the sound of that weather front grinding to a halt over the north—west of england. i grinding to a halt over the north-west of england. i am loving
7:49 am
our north-west of england. i am loving your shirt. — north-west of england. i am loving your shirt, though. _ north-west of england. i am loving your shirt, though. not _ north-west of england. i am loving your shirt, though. not for - north-west of england. i am loving your shirt, though. not for the - your shirt, though. not for the first time in my life i am feeling a little bit underdressed looking at your snazzy shirt. i little bit underdressed looking at your snazzy shirt.— your snazzy shirt. i have to try every so _ your snazzy shirt. i have to try every so often. _ your snazzy shirt. i have to try every so often. speak - your snazzy shirt. i have to try every so often. speak to - your snazzy shirt. i have to try every so often. speak to you i your snazzy shirt. i have to try - every so often. speak to you later, cheers. time now on breakfast for click. the world's population continuing to rise and across the globe, more housing is needed. but these buildings themselves come with their own environmental cost. of course, building and running offices and homes contributes massively to our carbon footprint — more than 13 billion tonnes of co2 a year.
7:50 am
that's nearly a0% of the world's total carbon emissions. so how about making buildings that are part of the solution, not the problem? maybe it's time to rethink renewable energy, the construction materials that we use, and what happens to them at the end of their lives. and later, we'll see how demolished buildings can be sorted and salvaged using what's in here. drum roll, please. all the rubbish is being tossed around and eventually, the smaller items will make it through one of these tiny holes. just wait till you see what's waiting for them down the line. but first, to swansea university's active building centre. instead of pulling its power from the grid, this place powers itself using the latest innovation in solar energy. the conventional box—shaped solar panels that we've been seeing
7:51 am
on rooftops for years were just the beginning. now, newer, flexible cells are starting to cover roofs across the world. not that you'd necessarily notice they're solar panels. this feels just like a bit of protective flooring rolled up. but when i unroll this, take a look at that — a solar panel that is that bendable compared to the traditional looking ones there! they are slightly less efficient, but the fact that you can cover a whole roof area with them is one of their advantages. and they work very well in low light conditions, so they're ideally suited for use in the uk — in the northern hemisphere, really. part of the electricity generated here also comes from these vertical panels encased in tubing, which produce thermal and solar energy at the same time. on average, one wall could provide enough power per day to boil 38 kettles. that's a lot of tea!
7:52 am
but what could truly revolutionise solar energy next is in the labs. i'm ready! this is a solar cell, and it's printed? wow! the idea that we're looking at is making these new materials to put on all of the outsides of buildings. there are also semitransparent versions of these that you can put onto glass for the windows. it reminds me of old negatives. yeah, it's actually very similar to photographic film orfilm that you'd make a movie with. it's just got a conducting layer on it so that you can collect the solar energy, the electricity that the solar cell is making. but what does this mean for buildings? well, over in a larger clean room, this is happening. it's the same sort of kit as you would print a t—shirt with, but it's bigger! right? the sample goes under it, the ink comes on there and it's just dragged across, so it literallyjust prints straight onto the glass. this allows the structure of buildings to change,
7:53 am
as they don't need to withstand heavy building materials, and can also be put on curved roofing. you don't put the solar cell on top of a roof, you make the roof into a solar cell. the efficiency is very likely to be in the same order initially as the flexible ones we showed you, but the cost is likely to be dramatically lower. so we are doing work in india and mexico, looking at using t—shirt printers for people who would normally make t—shirts, two solar cells. you think it is going to be pretty challenging to scale it? it is challenging, but that is what our teams are here to do, right? so we can actually manufacture these things upscale and try to mount on real buildings. so in the future this means that more and more buildings can become their own energy hubs by combining printed solar cells with next gen batteries. and here, you're storing the power that you've been collecting? yes. you can choose when you import and when you export.
7:54 am
so if plug the car in, we can set it so that it will not charge the car necessarily as soon as it's plugged in. having the ability to release solar energy wherever and whenever it is needed means that here, the offices, the university and the electric vehicles can share with each other, creating a solar—powered community. in many parts of the world where there are no grid connections or the grid connection's weak, you know, rural communities can have power, say, at a school and then share that power around with the local houses, so that they can have an amenity that they can do educational things in, but they can also have power — and particularly at night—time, you know, which is very important for safety. so we are seeing more more
7:55 am
possibilities of how solar can power and empower. the next challenge, though, is how we're going to get more of these infrastructures in place. we know that constructing buildings uses resources. but when they're demolished, many precious materials also go to waste. it's a problem that recycling sites like as this one in finland are trying to solve. construction and demolition waste is usually crushed and most of it will be burned in incineration plants to energy. here, we try to do the opposite — we mechanically handle material to produce raw materials that can be reused again. this is one of those places
7:56 am
that is frighteningly industrial and frighteningly massive. what happens is the waste arrives in lorries at the far end and then the commercial and the industrial waste gets sorted along these conveyor belts and machines here, the construction and demolition waste gets moved along this side here, and it is all a very big deal. but to avoid just crushing and burning everything, debris has to be separated into different materials and different sizes that can be recycled individually. and that's where the fun begins. once we get rid of the small stuff, we have the medium and the large size. and that's what we feed to the robots. no, this is not a warehouse disco. these are sorting lines where an ai brain commands robotic arms to pick
7:57 am
out metal, wood and stone and hurl them into their respective bins. it's fast, furious and continuous. i have to say, these things are moving like lightning. they're not getting everything, they're missing quite a bit, but that's because they're still training these robots and calibrating the system for this type ofjunk. in waste sorting, the first problem is that no—one really knows what's on the belts. if you are welding cars, then obviously the next car will come on the conveyor in 5.0a seconds and there's never really anything unexpected. for these robots, they need to be smart in order to survive the surprises. wow. it's just flinging stuff around! with all sorts rolling towards them, the robots visually track the items
7:58 am
with sensors beneath the belt and lasers scanning shapes and sizes, helping to decide what each is made of, how much it weighs and how much it's worth. it sees not only the wavelengths that humanoids see, they also see infrared and they also sense metals. so we basically show the robot that here's a bunch of rocks and here's a bunch of bricks, here's a bunch of high—quality wood. based on that training, the robot then learns. but knowing what to grab is just part of the problem. there are hundreds of billions of ways how to position the gripper on the belt. the robot needs to have, basically, a second opinion of whether the attempt was successful or not, something that the robot learns fairly easily. today, 80 arms are working around the world, including smaller, faster ones with vacuum grippers,
7:59 am
which are better for light items like plastics and tin cans. all in all, these robot arms are rougher and tougher than human workers and, obviously, it's much safer as well. and despite their different skills, each robot feeds back into one shared system. the more we have robot arms in the world, then we have basically one family of robots that learns and then all of the arms that we have around the world get smarter. of course, there will always be some materials that can't be used again, but robots like these can help recycling plants to recover more and more and save stuff from incineration. and closing this loop means buildings can become much more sustainable, both at the start and the end of their lives.
8:00 am
wow! that's it for the short version of our programme. you can find all three of our sustainability specials on the iplayer. throughout the week you can keep up with the team on social media. find us on youtube, instagram, facebook, and twitter, @bbcclick. and we'll be back next week. thanks for watching. bye— bye. good morning, welcome to breakfast with chris mason and katherine downes. our headlines today... hearing no objection is, it is so
8:01 am
decided — world leaders strike a landmark deal on climate change in glasgow — but emotional last minute wrangling leaves some concerned the agreement doesn't go far enough. i apologise for the way this process has unfolded. and i am deeply sorry. in her first public engagement in more than three weeks, the queen will lead the national service of remembrance in london after a campaign that went to downing street, the government pledges £50 million for research into a cure for motor neorone disease. england thrash australia in the autumn internationals. and ireland put in a stunning performance to beat the all blacks in dublin. more than £2.5—million raised by owain's children in need drumathon and a heartfelt thank you from the man himself. i've been crying. i've had a bit of sleep.
8:02 am
i can't get my head around it. thank you so much. weather—wise it is a little cloudy and drizzly out there this morning for many. sunshine breaking through for some of you. i will have the full forecast on this morning's edition of breakfast. good morning. just gone 8am. just gone 8am. it's sunday 1ath november. our main story. world leaders have struck a landmark climate change deal aimed at reducing global warming, after two weeks of intense negotiations. the glasgow climate pact is the most significant of its kind since 2015, but the pledges don't go far enough to limit global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees temperature rise to 1.5 degrees celsius. our science correspondent victoria gill reports. hearing no objections it is so decided. after two weeks of sleepless nights and negotiations over every detail,
8:03 am
a glasgow pact on climate change was finally agreed. it was almost derailed at the last moment as india requested a change, watering down a critical line about phasing out coal. and there were emotional scenes as cop president alok sharma acknowledged the disappointment over that concession and at what was at stake. may i just say to all delegates, i apologise for the way this process has unfolded and i am deeply sorry. i also understand the deep disappointment, but i think, as you have noted, it's also vital that we protect this package. silence in auditorium. applause. but, still, this climate pledge, signed off by 197 nations, has made history. this is the first cop agreement to mention fossilfuels, the very stuff of greenhouse gas emissions. but while prime minister boris
8:04 am
johnson had previously talked about glasgow being the beginning of the end of climate change, reacting to this deal he sounded less certain. we can't kid ourselves, we haven't beaten climate change and it would be fatal to think that we have, because there is so much more that still needs to be done. but what we do have now is a viable roadmap. but environmental campaigners who've been watching this process for many years are encouraged by some of the pledges. climate change and the nature crisis, they are two sides of the same coin, we can't take them apart from each other and we need to have a response that takes both of those at the same time. so it's great declarations on forests, we've seen some good words on oceans at the same time, but we need to make sure they're really followed up with actions in the years ahead. the real test of what's been agreed to here in glasgow will be if all those commitments can be acted upon quickly enough, if that political process can catch up with the speed at which the world
8:05 am
is warming up. for the most vulnerable nations, low—lying islands facing the most dangerous impacts of storms and sea level rise, this is a matter of life and death. i'm exhausted. but we not only fought a good fight, but we're going to live fight another day and we did so much that, as a very small island country, i can be deeply proud of. as nations are asked to come back in 2022 with more ambitious pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions and catch up with the pace of climate change, tired negotiators are already planning for the next climate summit. victoria gill, bbc news, in glasgow. let's take a look at some reaction to that deal. the leader of the labour party, sir keir starmer, welcomed the pact, but said there were "too many
8:06 am
promises for tomorrow, not the action that's needed today." scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon praised her home city for hosting the summit, saying glasgow had "opened its doors and its heart". meanwhile, climate activist greta thunberg dismissed the event as simply, "blah, blah, blah." joining us now is our political correspondent, jonathan blake. jonathan — has the climate conference been a success for the government? i guess it was inevitable, in the final hours and minutes of the summit, there would have to be compromised to get a deal signed off? . - - - compromised to get a deal signed off? .. . . .. . . off? good morning. good morning,, that's right. — off? good morning. good morning,, that's right, when _ off? good morning. good morning,, that's right, when you _ off? good morning. good morning,, that's right, when you have - off? good morning. good morning,, that's right, when you have 197 - that's right, when you have 197 countries debating a crisis facing the rest of the world, you are never going to get a deal that everyone agrees to but the bottom line, after this summit ended last night, was that it ended in agreement. there
8:07 am
was, in the end, a deal, albeit it was, in the end, a deal, albeit it was one that campaigners as you have heard say does not go far enough and many other countries that signed up to it deep frustrations. that is an achievement in itself and i think something the uk, hosting this summit, will be relieved about this morning. the alternative would have been a complete disaster, unthinkable really for anyone involved. how does borisjohnson emerge from this? he talked about four priorities, coal, cash, cars, trees, and he can point to progress in some of those areas, albeit with huge caveats and claims from some that the pledges fall far short of what was really needed. i do not detect any sense of triumph now that this deal has been done but more perhaps, a sobering reminder of the scale of the challenge that day of climate change facing the world. jonathan, thank you.
8:08 am
the queen will attend the national service of remembrance at the cenotaph today, in her first public engagement in more than three weeks. she had been advised to rest by doctors last month for health reasons. she'll be joined by other members of the royal family and the prime minister to lay a wreath at the war memorial later this morning. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell has more. she will, the palace says, he at the cenotaph watching from a balcony for this, the most solemn moment of the year, as the prince of wales lays the queen's wreath of red poppies and the nation pays tribute to the dead of the two world wars and other more recent conflicts. the queen's attendance at the cenotaph will be her first appearance at a public engagement since doctors ordered her to rest and she was taken to hospital for tests more than three weeks ago. her programme remains under review but the national ceremony of remembrance has a very special significance for her. she first laid a wreath at the cenotaph on 11 november 19a5, the first ceremony after the end of the second world war. archive: as princess -
8:09 am
elizabeth followed the king in paying her tribute, there were few among the silent crowd who did not recall - the comradeship of war years. and in the nearly 70 years of her reign, there have been very few occasions when she has not led the nation's tribute in person. for those who will be at the cenotaph today — the crowds, the military detachments, and, of course, the veterans — the queen's presence will be a reassurance. after last yea r�*s necessarily depleted ceremony due to the pandemic, this remembrance sunday will see a return to the traditions of remembrance, both in whitehall and at war memorials around the country, as the nation pays tribute to the lives lost in war. nicholas witchell, bbc news. £50 million—worth of government funding has been promised over the next five years, to help find a cure for motor neurone disease. it comes two months after a petition was delivered to downing street by some of those living with the terminal illness —
8:10 am
including former rugby league star rob burrow, whose story we've followed closely here on breakfast. the international best—selling author wilbur smith has died at his home in cape town at the age of 88. ina career spanning more than 60 years, he sold 1a0—million copies of his a9 novels which include when the lion feeds, and the triumph of the sun. a new image has been released to mark the prince of wales' 73rd birthday today. prince charles can be seen relaxing in the gardens of his highgrove estate in the photograph, taken earlier this summer. his royal highness will spend his birthday attending the annual remembrance day service at the cenotaph. he could win best dressed man in a garden! he could win best dressed man in a aarden! . . . he could win best dressed man in a garden!_ the i garden! relaxing in a garden. the suit is perfect- — garden! relaxing in a garden. the suit is perfect. you _ garden! relaxing in a garden. the
8:11 am
suit is perfect. you do _ garden! relaxing in a garden. the suit is perfect. you do not - garden! relaxing in a garden. the suit is perfect. you do not often i suit is perfect. you do not often see people photographed on a bench, wearing a suit, and even the little handkerchief in his pocket as well. very well dressed, as ever. speaking of well-dressed. .. _ very well dressed, as ever. speaking of well-dressed. .. it _ very well dressed, as ever. speaking of well-dressed. .. it has _ very well dressed, as ever. speaking of well-dressed. .. it has just - very well dressed, as ever. speaking of well-dressed. .. it hasjust gone i of well—dressed... it has just gone ten past eight, 11 minutes past eight. matt taylor is here. i was going to say with a sunrise, it could be a sunset, but i guess it is sunrise, it is the morning. chris, it isjust from sunrise, it is the morning. chris, it is just from a short time ago, you see some fog as well hugging the bottom of those trees. under the clear skies. bottom of those trees. under the clearskies. some bottom of those trees. under the clear skies. some of you will see sun sign at times during the day, for others, a fair of cloud, the cloud of thick enough for rain or drizzle, parts of east anglia and the south—east, it has been rather damp overnight, a noticeable breeze here but that will ease and most places becoming dry during the day. there will be some drizzle around western coasts of england and wales, some damp conditions across the north and west of scotland. heavy
8:12 am
rain pushing in, strengthening wind, the rain pushing into the west of northern ireland but some of the mildest weather, 15 degrees the high, most places around 11—13. this evening and overnight, the rain in scotland is heavier, pushing south and east, a wet night in northern ireland. much of england and wales is dry, pockets of drizzle, cooler than last night, some clearer skies tonight, a greater chance of mist and fog for your monday morning commute. on monday, the south east of northern ireland, you may start with some rain on monday, brightening up, lows of sunshine head, turning cloudy and wet across northern england, north and west wales, whether south and east, many places staying dry, morning mist and fog lifting, sunshine, and highs of 11—13. morning mist and fog lifting, sunshine, and highs of 11—13 . that is how it is looking. back to you. thank you.
8:13 am
after 20 years of conflict, the last british troops left afghanistan in august. today, on remembrance sunday we can share the stories of sergeant rick clements, who was left with life changing injuries after stepping on an explosive device in 2010 — and kingsman darren deady, who was killed at the age of 22 during his second tour of duty. ijoined the army back in 1996, i was 16 and nine months at the time, very much a child, really. darren was a cheeky chap. always laughing. into his music. out with the lads. very loyal. gunfire.
8:14 am
although we are 11 years on now, i still remember exactly what happened the day he got shot. the way i felt. when i first set foot in afghanistan, it was very similar to iraq in many senses. the heat was just unbearable. looking around and watching people just living in poverty. some of the phone calls were quite horrific, really. because you could hear what was going off. i stood up and took a step back and then all of a sudden there was this massive explosion. i was disorientated. didn't know what had gone on. and really, the first sort
8:15 am
of time i came to terms with that was when i heard the boys coming towards me and i realised it was me. ijust remember thinking, stay awake, because if you are awake, then you are all right. and i was told all the injuries that i had sustained and the fact i could not have children, it was just the lowest point in my life. for me, i had gone from this superfit soldier of 30 years old, everything ahead of me, you know, alpha male, all of those sort of stereotype things of a soldier, i felt like this 95—year—old kind of man who could not do anything for himself. my last words to darren were i always love you loads. and his were to me, i will see you soon. i lost friends in afghanistan, particularly, my regiment lost one guy in iraq, and it's different for all those who serve.
8:16 am
but we all have some special people that you remember. when you lose a son, or a daughter, any child, you lose a part of you. but you have other children that you have to carry on for. but what became his first family were the other veterans and those that are still serving, are still struggling with the loss of them too. they become brothers. we try to help them. we have set up a foundation in darren's name. i have been helping veterans since darren died. now i work as a role for fleetwood town community trust, we set up veterans groups. we all help each other. i like to be reminded
8:17 am
i am very fortunate. people say i am in a bad position but it could have been a lot worse, you know? their families miss them every day and do not have the luxury that my family does of being able to spend time and still speak, it doesn't matter what condition i am in. in the 22 years he was alive, trust me, he gave us some fun with his antics. we are so proud of what he did. we always will be. he's included in everything we do, every christmas, every party, his birthday. we still celebrate them for him and we always will. darren will be among the many veterans honoured at the annual remembrance day service later this morning.
8:18 am
we can speak now to our reporter lebo diseko now, who's at the cenotaph. always a very important and poignant occasion and people beginning to gather at the cenotaph this morning. i'm sure you see some of the preparation starting to take place behind _ preparation starting to take place behind me and i think the report you 'ust behind me and i think the report you just played _ behind me and i think the report you just played really goes to the heart of what _ just played really goes to the heart of what today is about. those who have _ of what today is about. those who have sacrificed so much in service to their— have sacrificed so much in service to their country. i am joined by two serving _ to their country. i am joined by two serving members of the armed forces. may and _ serving members of the armed forces. may and stephen. you have recently come _ may and stephen. you have recently come back— may and stephen. you have recently come back from kabul, as part of an operation _ come back from kabul, as part of an operation there, you must be incredibly— operation there, you must be incredibly proud of the work that you did — incredibly proud of the work that you did. you are fairly young in your— you did. you are fairly young in your career. _ you did. you are fairly young in your career, fairly new comparatively, but what was it like being _ comparatively, but what was it like being part — comparatively, but what was it like being part of such a major operation? i
8:19 am
being part of such a ma'or operationad being part of such a ma'or o-eration? . . operation? i 'ust never thought i was aoain operation? ijust never thought i was going to _ operation? ijust never thought i was going to get _ operation? ijust never thought i was going to get the _ operation? ijust never thought i | was going to get the experience. operation? ijust never thought i - was going to get the experience. the operation, _ was going to get the experience. the operation, to— was going to get the experience. the operation, to go— was going to get the experience. the operation, to go and _ was going to get the experience. the operation, to go and do, _ was going to get the experience. the operation, to go and do, i— was going to get the experience. the operation, to go and do, i have - was going to get the experience. the operation, to go and do, i have not i operation, to go and do, i have not been _ operation, to go and do, i have not been in _ operation, to go and do, i have not been in the — operation, to go and do, i have not been in the army— operation, to go and do, i have not been in the army that _ operation, to go and do, i have not been in the army that long, - operation, to go and do, i have not been in the army that long, i neverj been in the army that long, i never thought— been in the army that long, i never thought i_ been in the army that long, i never thought i would _ been in the army that long, i never thought i would be _ been in the army that long, i never thought i would be able _ been in the army that long, i never thought i would be able to - been in the army that long, i never thought i would be able to go - been in the army that long, i never thought i would be able to go on i been in the army that long, i never| thought i would be able to go on an operation, — thought i would be able to go on an operation, do— thought i would be able to go on an operation, do anything _ thought i would be able to go on an operation, do anything to _ thought i would be able to go on an operation, do anything to help - operation, do anything to help people — operation, do anything to help people that _ operation, do anything to help people that needed _ operation, do anything to help people that needed help. - operation, do anything to help people that needed help. andl operation, do anything to help i people that needed help. and to operation, do anything to help - people that needed help. and to me, it was— people that needed help. and to me, it wasiust _ people that needed help. and to me, it wasiust a — people that needed help. and to me, it was just a great _ people that needed help. and to me, it was just a great opportunity - people that needed help. and to me, it was just a great opportunity to - it was just a great opportunity to help those — it was just a great opportunity to help those that _ it was just a great opportunity to help those that are _ it was just a great opportunity to help those that are in _ it was just a great opportunity to help those that are in such - it was just a great opportunity to help those that are in such a - help those that are in such a vulnerable _ help those that are in such a vulnerable situation. - help those that are in such a vulnerable situation. and . help those that are in such a | vulnerable situation. and get help those that are in such a - vulnerable situation. and get them out of— vulnerable situation. and get them out of there — vulnerable situation. and get them out of there. the _ vulnerable situation. and get them out of there. the 15,000 _ vulnerable situation. and get them out of there. the 15,000 people i vulnerable situation. and get theml out of there. the 15,000 people we have saved — out of there. the 15,000 people we have saved and _ out of there. the 15,000 people we have saved, and we _ out of there. the 15,000 people we have saved, and we are _ out of there. the 15,000 people we have saved, and we are saving - out of there. the 15,000 people we| have saved, and we are saving more everyday. _ have saved, and we are saving more everyday, just — have saved, and we are saving more everyday, just incredible. _ have saved, and we are saving more everyday, just incredible. itithen - have saved, and we are saving more everyday, just incredible.— everyday, 'ust incredible. when you think everyday, just incredible. when you think back to _ everyday, just incredible. when you think back to that _ everyday, just incredible. when you think back to that time, _ everyday, just incredible. when you think back to that time, is - everyday, just incredible. when you think back to that time, is there - think back to that time, is there anything — think back to that time, is there anything in _ think back to that time, is there anything in particular that stands out in _ anything in particular that stands out in terms of what you did? i out in terms of what you did? think when out in terms of what you did? i think when the women and children came _ think when the women and children came through. _ think when the women and children came through, especially _ think when the women and children came through, especially for - think when the women and children came through, especially for them i think when the women and children i came through, especially for them to see a _ came through, especially for them to see a female — came through, especially for them to see a female face, _ came through, especially for them to see a female face, they— came through, especially for them to see a female face, they would, - came through, especially for them to see a female face, they would, theyl see a female face, they would, they would _ see a female face, they would, they would come — see a female face, they would, they would come to— see a female face, they would, they would come to you, _ see a female face, they would, they would come to you, crying. - see a female face, they would, they would come to you, crying. but - see a female face, they would, theyi would come to you, crying. but also, with happy_ would come to you, crying. but also, with happy tears~ _ would come to you, crying. but also, with happy tears. we _ would come to you, crying. but also, with happy tears. we were _ would come to you, crying. but also, with happy tears. we were such - would come to you, crying. but also, with happy tears. we were such a - with happy tears. we were such a calm _ with happy tears. we were such a calm face — with happy tears. we were such a calm face for _ with happy tears. we were such a calm face for them _ with happy tears. we were such a calm face for them to _ with happy tears. we were such a
8:20 am
calm face for them to see. - with happy tears. we were such a calm face for them to see.- calm face for them to see. flight lieutenant. _ calm face for them to see. flight lieutenant, you _ calm face for them to see. flight lieutenant, you have _ calm face for them to see. flight lieutenant, you have served - calm face for them to see. flight lieutenant, you have served in i lieutenant, you have served in afghanistan as well. you are a nurse. — afghanistan as well. you are a nurse. so _ afghanistan as well. you are a nurse, so you must have a particular perspective — nurse, so you must have a particular perspective when it comes to remembrance day and how important it is? �* . . remembrance day and how important it is? absolutely, my 'ob out there in afghanistan _ is? absolutely, my 'ob out there in afghanistan was _ is? absolutely, my 'ob out there in afghanistan was to — is? absolutely, my job out there in afghanistan was to facilitate - is? absolutely, my job out there in afghanistan was to facilitate the i afghanistan was to facilitate the return _ afghanistan was to facilitate the return of — afghanistan was to facilitate the return of injured _ afghanistan was to facilitate the return of injured and _ afghanistan was to facilitate the return of injured and sick- afghanistan was to facilitate the | return of injured and sick serving personnel— return of injured and sick serving personnel back— return of injured and sick serving personnel back to _ return of injured and sick serving personnel back to the _ return of injured and sick serving personnel back to the uk - return of injured and sick serving personnel back to the uk for- personnel back to the uk for treatment _ personnel back to the uk for treatment. it _ personnel back to the uk for treatment. it was _ personnel back to the uk for treatment. it was a - personnel back to the uk for. treatment. it was a wonderful experience _ treatment. it was a wonderful experience. and _ treatment. it was a wonderful experience. and it _ treatment. it was a wonderful experience. and it does - treatment. it was a wonderful experience. and it does havel treatment. it was a wonderful. experience. and it does have an impact — experience. and it does have an impact when _ experience. and it does have an impact when you _ experience. and it does have an impact when you think - experience. and it does have an impact when you think of - experience. and it does have an impact when you think of all. experience. and it does have an impact when you think of all the people — impact when you think of all the people you _ impact when you think of all the people you are _ impact when you think of all the people you are helping - impact when you think of all the people you are helping to - impact when you think of all the people you are helping to get i impact when you think of all the . people you are helping to get back, to the _ people you are helping to get back, to the front — people you are helping to get back, to the front line _ people you are helping to get back, to the front line or _ people you are helping to get back, to the front line or get _ people you are helping to get back, to the front line or get back- people you are helping to get back, to the front line or get back to - people you are helping to get back, to the front line or get back to the i to the front line or get back to the uk to— to the front line or get back to the uk to their— to the front line or get back to the uk to their loved _ to the front line or get back to the uk to their loved ones. _ to the front line or get back to the uk to their loved ones. and - to the front line or get back to the uk to their loved ones. and then i uk to their loved ones. and then to recover— uk to their loved ones. and then to recover and — uk to their loved ones. and then to recover and to _ uk to their loved ones. and then to recover and to rehabilitate - uk to their loved ones. and then to recover and to rehabilitate back - recover and to rehabilitate back into working _ recover and to rehabilitate back into working life. _ recover and to rehabilitate back into working life.— recover and to rehabilitate back into working life. your grandfather served in world _ into working life. your grandfather served in world war— into working life. your grandfather served in world war ii, _ into working life. your grandfather served in world war ii, didn't - into working life. your grandfather served in world war ii, didn't he? | served in world war ii, didn't he? how— served in world war ii, didn't he? how do— served in world war ii, didn't he? how do you — served in world war ii, didn't he? how do you think you would feel seeing _ how do you think you would feel seeing you here today? | how do you think you would feel seeing you here today?- seeing you here today? i think he would be very _ seeing you here today? i think he would be very proud, _ seeing you here today? i think he would be very proud, it _ seeing you here today? i think he would be very proud, it was - seeing you here today? i think he would be very proud, it was not i seeing you here today? i think he | would be very proud, it was not an experience — would be very proud, it was not an experience he _ would be very proud, it was not an experience he spoke _ would be very proud, it was not an experience he spoke about - would be very proud, it was not an experience he spoke about a - would be very proud, it was not an experience he spoke about a lot. would be very proud, it was not an. experience he spoke about a lot but i know _ experience he spoke about a lot but i know from — experience he spoke about a lot but i know from my— experience he spoke about a lot but i know from my father, _ experience he spoke about a lot but i know from my father, he - experience he spoke about a lot but i know from my father, he was - experience he spoke about a lot but i know from my father, he was very| i know from my father, he was very proud _ i know from my father, he was very proud of— i know from my father, he was very proud of the — i know from my father, he was very proud of the work _ i know from my father, he was very proud of the work that _ i know from my father, he was very proud of the work that he _ i know from my father, he was very proud of the work that he did - i know from my father, he was very| proud of the work that he did there. he lost— proud of the work that he did there. he lost a _ proud of the work that he did there. he lost a few— proud of the work that he did there. he lost a few of _ proud of the work that he did there. he lost a few of his _ proud of the work that he did there. he lost a few of his friends - proud of the work that he did there. he lost a few of his friends and - he lost a few of his friends and
8:21 am
colleagues _ he lost a few of his friends and colleagues but _ he lost a few of his friends and colleagues but it— he lost a few of his friends and colleagues but it was _ he lost a few of his friends and colleagues but it was an - he lost a few of his friends and - colleagues but it was an experience he could _ colleagues but it was an experience he could never— colleagues but it was an experience he could never forget. _ colleagues but it was an experience he could never forget. a— colleagues but it was an experience he could never forget. a few- colleagues but it was an experience he could never forget. a few yearsl he could never forget. a few years a -o he could never forget. a few years ago i _ he could never forget. a few years ago i stood — he could never forget. a few years ago i stood at _ he could never forget. a few years ago i stood at the _ he could never forget. a few years ago i stood at the menin— he could never forget. a few years ago i stood at the menin gate - he could never forget. a few years ago i stood at the menin gate in. ago i stood at the menin gate in belgium. — ago i stood at the menin gate in belgium, listening _ ago i stood at the menin gate in belgium, listening to— ago i stood at the menin gate in belgium, listening to the - ago i stood at the menin gate in belgium, listening to the last i ago i stood at the menin gate in. belgium, listening to the last post being _ belgium, listening to the last post being played — belgium, listening to the last post being played and _ belgium, listening to the last post being played and there _ belgium, listening to the last post being played and there is - belgium, listening to the last post being played and there is a - belgium, listening to the last post being played and there is a real. being played and there is a real sense _ being played and there is a real sense of— being played and there is a real sense of sadness _ being played and there is a real sense of sadness and _ being played and there is a real sense of sadness and loss i being played and there is a real sense of sadness and loss and i being played and there is a real- sense of sadness and loss and grief but much _ sense of sadness and loss and grief but much like — sense of sadness and loss and grief but much like today, _ sense of sadness and loss and grief but much like today, a _ sense of sadness and loss and grief but much like today, a real- sense of sadness and loss and grief but much like today, a real sense i sense of sadness and loss and grief| but much like today, a real sense of pride _ but much like today, a real sense of pride and _ but much like today, a real sense of pride and gratitude _ but much like today, a real sense of pride and gratitude and _ but much like today, a real sense of pride and gratitude and respect- but much like today, a real sense of pride and gratitude and respect for. pride and gratitude and respect for everyone _ pride and gratitude and respect for everyone that _ pride and gratitude and respect for everyone that has _ pride and gratitude and respect for everyone that has laid _ pride and gratitude and respect for everyone that has laid down i pride and gratitude and respect for everyone that has laid down their. everyone that has laid down their lives _ everyone that has laid down their lives and — everyone that has laid down their lives and paid _ everyone that has laid down their lives and paid the _ everyone that has laid down their lives and paid the ultimate i lives and paid the ultimate sacrifice _ lives and paid the ultimate sacrifice for— lives and paid the ultimate sacrifice for the _ lives and paid the ultimate sacrifice for the freedomsl lives and paid the ultimate i sacrifice for the freedoms we lives and paid the ultimate - sacrifice for the freedoms we enjoy today— sacrifice for the freedoms we enjoy today as _ sacrifice for the freedoms we enjoy today as a — sacrifice for the freedoms we enjoy today as a nation. _ sacrifice for the freedoms we enjoy today as a nation. he _ sacrifice for the freedoms we en'oy today as a nation.i today as a nation. he was actually art of today as a nation. he was actually part of the — today as a nation. he was actually part of the west _ today as a nation. he was actually part of the west african _ today as a nation. he was actually part of the west african colonial i part of the west african colonial trip. _ part of the west african colonial trip. so — part of the west african colonial trip. so do _ part of the west african colonial trip, so do you think remembrance day resonates around the world? yes, i think it does. — day resonates around the world? yes, i think it does. i _ day resonates around the world? yes, i think it does, i think— day resonates around the world? yes, i think it does, i think throughout the world. — i think it does, i think throughout the world, everyone _ i think it does, i think throughout the world, everyone that - i think it does, i think throughout the world, everyone that has i i think it does, i think throughout i the world, everyone that has served either— the world, everyone that has served either as— the world, everyone that has served eitheras part— the world, everyone that has served eitheras part of— the world, everyone that has served either as part of the _ the world, everyone that has served either as part of the british- the world, everyone that has served either as part of the british empire i either as part of the british empire or part _ either as part of the british empire or part of— either as part of the british empire or part of the — either as part of the british empire or part of the colonies _ either as part of the british empire or part of the colonies at _ either as part of the british empire or part of the colonies at the i either as part of the british empirej or part of the colonies at the time, i think— or part of the colonies at the time, i think they— or part of the colonies at the time, i think they have _ or part of the colonies at the time, i think they have a _ or part of the colonies at the time, i think they have a real— or part of the colonies at the time, i think they have a real sense i or part of the colonies at the time, i think they have a real sense of. i think they have a real sense of pride _ i think they have a real sense of pride in — i think they have a real sense of pride in what _ i think they have a real sense of pride in what they— i think they have a real sense of pride in what they achieved, i i think they have a real sense of. pride in what they achieved, being stood _ pride in what they achieved, being stood here — pride in what they achieved, being stood here today, _ pride in what they achieved, being stood here today, for— pride in what they achieved, being stood here today, for me, - pride in what they achieved, being stood here today, for me, it i pride in what they achieved, being stood here today, for me, it is i stood here today, for me, it is a real— stood here today, for me, it is a real sense — stood here today, for me, it is a real sense of— stood here today, for me, it is a real sense of pride _ stood here today, for me, it is a real sense of pride in _ stood here today, for me, it is a real sense of pride in what i stood here today, for me, it is a real sense of pride in what theyl stood here today, for me, it is a i real sense of pride in what they did and we _ real sense of pride in what they did and we pay— real sense of pride in what they did and we pay our— real sense of pride in what they did and we pay our respects _ real sense of pride in what they did and we pay our respects to - real sense of pride in what they did and we pay our respects to them. i
8:22 am
and we pay our respects to them. lance _ and we pay our respects to them. lance corporal. _ and we pay our respects to them. lance corporal, as— and we pay our respects to them. lance corporal, as a _ and we pay our respects to them. lance corporal, as a young i and we pay our respects to them. i lance corporal, as a young person, what _ lance corporal, as a young person, what does _ lance corporal, as a young person, what does the state mean to you? to me, it what does the state mean to you? me, it means what does the state mean to you? to me, it means those who sacrificed themselves— me, it means those who sacrificed themselves for— me, it means those who sacrificed themselves for their— me, it means those who sacrificed themselves for their country, i'mi themselves for their country, i'm sorry. _ themselves for their country, i'm sorry. and — themselves for their country, i'm sorry. and we _ themselves for their country, i'm sorry. and we as _ themselves for their country, i'm sorry. and we as a _ themselves for their country, i'm sorry, and we as a country, i themselves for their country, i'm sorry, and we as a country, will. sorry, and we as a country, will forget — sorry, and we as a country, will never forget what _ sorry, and we as a country, will never forget what they- sorry, and we as a country, will never forget what they have i sorry, and we as a country, will. never forget what they have done sorry, and we as a country, will- never forget what they have done for us. never forget what they have done for us and _ never forget what they have done for us and i— never forget what they have done for us and i think— never forget what they have done for us. and i think it's _ never forget what they have done for us. and i think it's such— never forget what they have done for us. and i think it's such a _ never forget what they have done for us. and i think it's such a big - us. and i think it's such a big point — us. and i think it's such a big point for— us. and i think it's such a big point for us _ us. and i think it's such a big point for us as _ us. and i think it's such a big point for us as young - us. and i think it's such a bigj point for us as young people, us. and i think it's such a big - point for us as young people, today, that we _ point for us as young people, today, that we would — point for us as young people, today, that we would never— point for us as young people, today, that we would never forget - point for us as young people, today, that we would never forget their i that we would never forget their legacy. — that we would never forget their legacy. that _ that we would never forget their legacy. that they— that we would never forget their legacy, that they sacrificed i that we would never forget their legacy, that they sacrificed for. that we would never forget their l legacy, that they sacrificed for us. and we _ legacy, that they sacrificed for us. and we just — legacy, that they sacrificed for us. and we just need _ legacy, that they sacrificed for us. and we just need to— legacy, that they sacrificed for us. and we just need to respect- legacy, that they sacrificed for us. and we just need to respect and l and we just need to respect and acknowledge _ and we just need to respect and acknowledge what— and we just need to respect and acknowledge what they - and we just need to respect and acknowledge what they have - and we just need to respect and l acknowledge what they have done and we just need to respect and - acknowledge what they have done for us. , ~' acknowledge what they have done for us. , ~ , a, acknowledge what they have done for us. ,, ~ n acknowledge what they have done for us. thank you both so much. as they have both said _ us. thank you both so much. as they have both said so _ us. thank you both so much. as they have both said so eloquently, - us. thank you both so much. as they have both said so eloquently, this i have both said so eloquently, this is about_ have both said so eloquently, this is about remembering the contribution and the sacrifices, paying — contribution and the sacrifices, paying tribute to all of those who have done — paying tribute to all of those who have done so much in service to this country— have done so much in service to this country and — have done so much in service to this country and we are just a couple of hours _ country and we are just a couple of hours awake — country and we are just a couple of hours awake now from the start of proceedings here in whitehall and we will bring _ proceedings here in whitehall and we will bring you the latest as we have it. ,, ~ , t, , t will bring you the latest as we have
8:23 am
it. thank you very much for that. and ou it. thank you very much for that. and you can _ it. thank you very much for that. and you can watch _ it. thank you very much for that. and you can watch live _ it. thank you very much for that. and you can watch live coverage | it. thank you very much for that. i and you can watch live coverage of remembrance sunday here on bbc one, that's from 10:15am this morning. yesterday on breakfast we saw our very own weather presenter, owain, finish his 21r—hourdrumathon to raise money for children in need. after playing hundreds of songs, changing costumes multiple times and being joined by musicians from across the country, his current total stands at an incredible... let's have a drum roll. quite fittingly! is let's have a drum roll. quite fittinul ! , ., let's have a drum roll. quite fittinul! , ., , , fittingly! is that the best you can do? the new _ fittingly! is that the best you can do? the new figure _ fittingly! is that the best you can do? the new figure is... - fittingly! is that the best you can do? the new figure is... 2 - fittingly! is that the best you can i do? the new figure is... 2 million, £739,000. that figure has reached us in just the last few minutes. let's take a look back at some of the best bits of owain's mammoth 2a hour challenge.
8:24 am
0wain sings. yeah!
8:25 am
# we built this city on rock and roll... five, four, three, two, one! fanfare and cheering. drumroll.
8:26 am
ican i can only imagine how that felt. and i can as well!— i can only imagine how that felt. and i can as well! you need to give it a bit more _ and i can as well! you need to give it a bit more welly. _ and i can as well! you need to give it a bit more welly. i've _ and i can as well! you need to give it a bit more welly. i've only - and i can as well! you need to give it a bit more welly. i've only been i it a bit more welly. i've only been doing this — it a bit more welly. i've only been doing this for _ it a bit more welly. i've only been doing this for 15 _ it a bit more welly. i've only been doing this for 15 seconds - it a bit more welly. i've only been doing this for 15 seconds on - it a bit more welly. i've only been doing this for 15 seconds on my i doing this for 15 seconds on my wrists are hurting! after taking a bit of time to recover, owain had this to say. i'v e i've been crying. i've had a bit of sleep. i have been crying some more. it's overwhelming. honestly. when i first said i wanted to do this drumathon, i honestly thought, i would have been happy if we had raised anything. my personal target that i did not reveal was 250,000. honestly, i cannot, that i did not reveal was 250,000. honestly, icannot, i that i did not reveal was 250,000. honestly, i cannot, i cannot get my head around it. thank you so much!
8:27 am
blimey, thank you to you for such an incredible effort, smashing that target that you had said. the money raised from owain's mammoth challenge will be going towards funding music therapy for children with special needs and disabilities. one of those children that will be benefitting is eight—year—old archie. and archie is here with us now alongside his mum, tracey. what did you think of that? the alongside his mum, tracey. what did you think of that?— alongside his mum, tracey. what did you think of that? the drumathon was excellent. and _ you think of that? the drumathon was excellent. and you've _ you think of that? the drumathon was excellent. and you've brought - you think of that? the drumathon was excellent. and you've brought your i excellent. and you've brought your drumsticks. _ excellent. and you've brought your drumsticks, can _ excellent. and you've brought your drumsticks, can you _ excellent. and you've brought your drumsticks, can you give _ excellent. and you've brought your drumsticks, can you give us - excellent. and you've brought your drumsticks, can you give us a - excellent. and you've brought your drumsticks, can you give us a bashj drumsticks, can you give us a bash on the table? {30 drumsticks, can you give us a bash on the table?— drumsticks, can you give us a bash on the table?- hurray! - drumsticks, can you give us a bash on the table?- hurray! and i drumsticks, can you give us a bash i on the table?- hurray! and the on the table? go on! hurray! and the table is just — on the table? go on! hurray! and the table isjust about _ on the table? go on! hurray! and the table isjust about in _ on the table? go on! hurray! and the table isjust about in one piece. - table is just about in one piece. terrific. online would be proud of that, definitely.— terrific. online would be proud of that, definitely. mum, tell us about
8:28 am
archie. archie _ that, definitely. mum, tell us about archie. archie is _ that, definitely. mum, tell us about archie. archie is eight _ that, definitely. mum, tell us about archie. archie is eight and - that, definitely. mum, tell us about archie. archie is eight and when - that, definitely. mum, tell us about archie. archie is eight and when he | archie. archie is eight and when he was six months _ archie. archie is eight and when he was six months old, _ archie. archie is eight and when he was six months old, yes, _ archie. archie is eight and when he was six months old, yes, that - archie. archie is eight and when he was six months old, yes, that is i was six months old, yes, that is you. _ was six months old, yes, that is you. isn't— was six months old, yes, that is you. isn't it. _ was six months old, yes, that is you. isn't it. we _ was six months old, yes, that is you, isn't it, we got _ was six months old, yes, that is you, isn't it, we got a _ was six months old, yes, that is you, isn't it, we got a diagnosis| was six months old, yes, that is . you, isn't it, we got a diagnosis of curvature — you, isn't it, we got a diagnosis of curvature of— you, isn't it, we got a diagnosis of curvature of the _ you, isn't it, we got a diagnosis of curvature of the spine. _ you, isn't it, we got a diagnosis of curvature of the spine. and - you, isn't it, we got a diagnosis of curvature of the spine. and we - you, isn't it, we got a diagnosis of. curvature of the spine. and we have had four— curvature of the spine. and we have had four spinal— curvature of the spine. and we have had four spinal surgeries _ curvature of the spine. and we have had four spinal surgeries now- curvature of the spine. and we have had four spinal surgeries now and l had four spinal surgeries now and each _ had four spinal surgeries now and each time, — had four spinal surgeries now and each time, archie _ had four spinal surgeries now and each time, archie has _ had four spinal surgeries now and each time, archie has had - had four spinal surgeries now and each time, archie has had to- had four spinal surgeries now and each time, archie has had to go. had four spinal surgeries now and i each time, archie has had to go into intensive _ each time, archie has had to go into intensive care — each time, archie has had to go into intensive care. and _ each time, archie has had to go into intensive care. and effectively- intensive care. and effectively learn — intensive care. and effectively learn to — intensive care. and effectively learn to eat _ intensive care. and effectively learn to eat again. _ intensive care. and effectively learn to eat again. walk- intensive care. and effectively| learn to eat again. walk again. intensive care. and effectively- learn to eat again. walk again. he said significant— learn to eat again. walk again. he said significant time _ learn to eat again. walk again. he said significant time off _ learn to eat again. walk again. he said significant time off school, i. said significant time off school, i have _ said significant time off school, i have had — said significant time off school, i have had to _ said significant time off school, i have had to take _ said significant time off school, i have had to take time _ said significant time off school, i have had to take time off - said significant time off school, i have had to take time off work, i have had to take time off work, he is now— have had to take time off work, he is now eight— have had to take time off work, he is now eight years _ have had to take time off work, he is now eight years old. _ have had to take time off work, he is now eight years old. and - have had to take time off work, he is now eight years old. and yes, i have had to take time off work, he i is now eight years old. and yes, you can see, _ is now eight years old. and yes, you can see, most — is now eight years old. and yes, you can see, most of— is now eight years old. and yes, you can see, most of the _ is now eight years old. and yes, you can see, most of the time, - is now eight years old. and yes, you can see, most of the time, he - is now eight years old. and yes, you can see, most of the time, he has . is now eight years old. and yes, you can see, most of the time, he has a | can see, most of the time, he has a bil can see, most of the time, he has a big smile _ can see, most of the time, he has a big smile on — can see, most of the time, he has a big smile on his— can see, most of the time, he has a big smile on his face! _ can see, most of the time, he has a big smile on his face! so _ can see, most of the time, he has a big smile on his face!— big smile on his face! so tell us about the _ big smile on his face! so tell us about the music _ big smile on his face! so tell us about the music therapy, - big smile on his face! so tell us about the music therapy, you i big smile on his face! so tell us i about the music therapy, you have set out the challenges you have had as a family. how can music play a role? foryou, it's been as a family. how can music play a role? for you, it's been really significant. role? for you, it's been really significant-— role? for you, it's been really siunificant. . ,, ., , , . ,, significant. taking ourselves back to a - ril,
8:29 am
significant. taking ourselves back to april, archie _ significant. taking ourselves back to april, archie experienced - significant. taking ourselves back to april, archie experienced high | to april, archie experienced high anxiety— to april, archie experienced high anxiety going _ to april, archie experienced high anxiety going into _ to april, archie experienced high anxiety going into hospital, - to april, archie experienced high anxiety going into hospital, it - to april, archie experienced high| anxiety going into hospital, it was anxiety going into hospital, it was an emergency— anxiety going into hospital, it was an emergency operation, - anxiety going into hospital, it was an emergency operation, with - an emergency operation, with coronavirus _ an emergency operation, with coronavirus adaptations - an emergency operation, with coronavirus adaptations as - an emergency operation, with . coronavirus adaptations as well, an emergency operation, with - coronavirus adaptations as well, he spent _ coronavirus adaptations as well, he spent three — coronavirus adaptations as well, he spent three days _ coronavirus adaptations as well, he spent three days laid _ coronavirus adaptations as well, he spent three days laid up _ coronavirus adaptations as well, he spent three days laid up on - coronavirus adaptations as well, he spent three days laid up on the - spent three days laid up on the sofa, _ spent three days laid up on the sofa, he — spent three days laid up on the sofa, he was— spent three days laid up on the sofa, he was not _ spent three days laid up on the sofa, he was not sure, - spent three days laid up on the sofa, he was not sure, we - spent three days laid up on the | sofa, he was not sure, we were spent three days laid up on the - sofa, he was not sure, we were not able to _ sofa, he was not sure, we were not able to plan — sofa, he was not sure, we were not able to plan what _ sofa, he was not sure, we were not able to plan what was _ sofa, he was not sure, we were not able to plan what was going - sofa, he was not sure, we were not able to plan what was going aheadi sofa, he was not sure, we were not l able to plan what was going ahead so music— able to plan what was going ahead so music therapy— able to plan what was going ahead so music therapy has _ able to plan what was going ahead so music therapy has given _ able to plan what was going ahead so music therapy has given him - able to plan what was going ahead so music therapy has given him the - music therapy has given him the chance _ music therapy has given him the chance to — music therapy has given him the chance to express _ music therapy has given him the chance to express emotion, - music therapy has given him the . chance to express emotion, forget what _ chance to express emotion, forget what is _ chance to express emotion, forget what is going — chance to express emotion, forget what is going on— chance to express emotion, forget what is going on in— chance to express emotion, forget what is going on in his _ chance to express emotion, forget what is going on in his life - chance to express emotion, forget what is going on in his life and - what is going on in his life and really— what is going on in his life and really be — what is going on in his life and really be himself, _ what is going on in his life and really be himself, enjoy- what is going on in his life and| really be himself, enjoy music. what is going on in his life and - really be himself, enjoy music. and be this— really be himself, enjoy music. and be this confident _ really be himself, enjoy music. and be this confident little _ really be himself, enjoy music. and be this confident little boy. - really be himself, enjoy music. and be this confident little boy.- be this confident little boy. archie has had speech — be this confident little boy. archie has had speech therapy _ be this confident little boy. archie has had speech therapy as - be this confident little boy. archie has had speech therapy as well, i be this confident little boy. archie l has had speech therapy as well, he is almost entirely nonverbal but how is almost entirely nonverbal but how is music therapy better for him than speech therapy, how has that been better? ~ , . . _ , better? with music therapy there is no pressure — better? with music therapy there is no pressure to _ better? with music therapy there is no pressure to talk— better? with music therapy there is no pressure to talk so _ better? with music therapy there is no pressure to talk so you - better? with music therapy there is no pressure to talk so you can - better? with music therapy there is no pressure to talk so you can be i no pressure to talk so you can be yourself, — no pressure to talk so you can be yourself, no _ no pressure to talk so you can be yourself, no one _ no pressure to talk so you can be yourself, no one is— no pressure to talk so you can be yourself, no one is saying, - no pressure to talk so you can be| yourself, no one is saying, archie can you _ yourself, no one is saying, archie can you show— yourself, no one is saying, archie can you show me _ yourself, no one is saying, archie can you show me how _ yourself, no one is saying, archie can you show me how to - yourself, no one is saying, archie can you show me how to say- yourself, no one is saying, archie| can you show me how to say this? music— can you show me how to say this? music is _ can you show me how to say this? music is a — can you show me how to say this? music is a chance _ can you show me how to say this? music is a chance for— can you show me how to say this? music is a chance for him - can you show me how to say this? music is a chance for him to - can you show me how to say this? music is a chance for him to lead. | music is a chance for him to lead. show— music is a chance for him to lead. show us — music is a chance for him to lead. show us what _ music is a chance for him to lead. show us what he _ music is a chance for him to lead. show us what he enjoys. - music is a chance for him to lead. show us what he enjoys. and - music is a chance for him to lead. show us what he enjoys. and by. show us what he enjoys. and by taking _ show us what he enjoys. and by taking that _ show us what he enjoys. and by taking that lead, _ show us what he enjoys. and by taking that lead, he _ show us what he enjoys. and by taking that lead, he is _ show us what he enjoys. and by taking that lead, he is able - show us what he enjoys. and by taking that lead, he is able to. taking that lead, he is able to do that in— taking that lead, he is able to do that in music— taking that lead, he is able to do
8:30 am
that in music therapy. _ taking that lead, he is able to do that in music therapy. it- taking that lead, he is able to do that in music therapy.— taking that lead, he is able to do that in music therapy. it has helped ou as that in music therapy. it has helped you as parents. _ that in music therapy. it has helped you as parents, it _ that in music therapy. it has helped you as parents, it is _ that in music therapy. it has helped you as parents, it is helping - that in music therapy. it has helped you as parents, it is helping archiel you as parents, it is helping archie to explore himself and his capabilities but you say it has been so informative for you as parents, helping archie and being part of his life? , , ., , ., .,, . life? definitely, what is fantastic about the funding _ life? definitely, what is fantastic about the funding is _ life? definitely, what is fantastic about the funding is the - life? definitely, what is fantastic i about the funding is the therapists, catherine. — about the funding is the therapists, catherine. is— about the funding is the therapists, catherine, is able _ about the funding is the therapists, catherine, is able to _ about the funding is the therapists, catherine, is able to get _ about the funding is the therapists, catherine, is able to get to - about the funding is the therapists, catherine, is able to get to know i catherine, is able to get to know us. initially. _ catherine, is able to get to know us. initially, when— catherine, is able to get to know us. initially, when you _ catherine, is able to get to know us. initially, when you start- catherine, is able to get to know us. initially, when you start the. us. initially, when you start the programme _ us. initially, when you start the programme you _ us. initially, when you start the programme you get— us. initially, when you start the programme you get a _ us. initially, when you start the programme you get a full- us. initially, when you start the programme you get a full 60 i us. initially, when you start the - programme you get a full 60 minutes to talk _ programme you get a full 60 minutes to talk that — programme you get a full 60 minutes to talk that is— programme you get a full 60 minutes to talk. that is right! _ programme you get a full 60 minutes to talk. that is right! we _ programme you get a full 60 minutes to talk. that is right! we will- programme you get a full 60 minutes to talk. that is right! we will get- to talk. that is right! we will get a taxi _ to talk. that is right! we will get a taxi later! _ to talk. that is right! we will get a taxi later! i— to talk. that is right! we will get a taxi later! i know, _ to talk. that is right! we will get a taxi later! i know, we - to talk. that is right! we will get a taxi later! i know, we will- a taxi later! i know, we will concentrate _ a taxi later! i know, we will concentrate just _ a taxi later! i know, we will concentrate just for- a taxi later! i know, we will concentrate just for a - a taxi later! i know, we will- concentrate just for a moment. you concentrate 'ust for a moment. you are doinu concentrate just for a moment. are doing brilliantly, archie. concentrate just for a moment. you are doing brilliantly, archie. yes, i are doing brilliantly, archie. yes, that means _ are doing brilliantly, archie. yes, that means when _ are doing brilliantly, archie. yes, that means when we _ are doing brilliantly, archie. yes, that means when we had - are doing brilliantly, archie. yes, that means when we had the sessions, we concentrate — that means when we had the sessions, we concentrate on— that means when we had the sessions, we concentrate on some _ that means when we had the sessions, we concentrate on some of— that means when we had the sessions, we concentrate on some of those i we concentrate on some of those goals. _ we concentrate on some of those goals, the — we concentrate on some of those goals, the therapy— we concentrate on some of those goals, the therapy in— we concentrate on some of those goals, the therapy in those - goals, the therapy in those sessions. _ goals, the therapy in those sessions, it's— goals, the therapy in those sessions, it's not— goals, the therapy in those. sessions, it's not something goals, the therapy in those i sessions, it's not something we would _ sessions, it's not something we would have _ sessions, it's not something we would have received _ sessions, it's not something we would have received from - sessions, it's not something we i would have received from school. so the fact— would have received from school. so the fact we _ would have received from school. so the fact we have _ would have received from school. so the fact we have had _ would have received from school. so the fact we have had this _ the fact we have had this opportunity— the fact we have had this opportunity is _ the fact we have had this| opportunity is significant. the fact we have had this - opportunity is significant. we've been _ opportunity is significant. we've been able. _ opportunity is significant. we've been able. yes, _ opportunity is significant. we've been able, yes, to _ opportunity is significant. we've been able, yes, to see - opportunity is significant. we've been able, yes, to see what- opportunity is significant. we've i been able, yes, to see what archie can do— been able, yes, to see what archie can do and — been able, yes, to see what archie can do and focus _ been able, yes, to see what archie can do and focus on— been able, yes, to see what archie can do and focus on his _ been able, yes, to see what archie can do and focus on his strengths i can do and focus on his strengths which _ can do and focus on his strengths which is _ can do and focus on his strengths which is lovely, _ can do and focus on his strengths which is lovely, it's— can do and focus on his strengths which is lovely, it's a _ can do and focus on his strengths which is lovely, it's a really- which is lovely, it's a really lovely— which is lovely, it's a really lovely place _ which is lovely, it's a really lovely place to _ which is lovely, it's a really lovely place to be - which is lovely, it's a really lovely place to be in - which is lovely, it's a really lovely place to be in and i which is lovely, it's a reallyj lovely place to be in and as which is lovely, it's a really. lovely place to be in and as a parent, — lovely place to be in and as a parent. when— lovely place to be in and as a parent, when you _
8:31 am
lovely place to be in and as a parent, when you have - lovely place to be in and as a parent, when you have those lovely place to be in and as a i parent, when you have those low points _ parent, when you have those low points of— parent, when you have those low points of going _ parent, when you have those low points of going into _ parent, when you have those low points of going into hospital, i parent, when you have those lowi points of going into hospital, when the high _ points of going into hospital, when the high points— points of going into hospital, when the high points are _ points of going into hospital, when the high points are there, - points of going into hospital, when the high points are there, you i points of going into hospital, when the high points are there, you feel| the high points are there, you feel so much _ the high points are there, you feel so much more _ the high points are there, you feel so much more proud _ the high points are there, you feel so much more proud of— the high points are there, you feel so much more proud of what i the high points are there, you feel so much more proud of what he i the high points are there, you feel. so much more proud of what he can do. ., , ., do. how did you feel watching weinman evans _ do. how did you feel watching weinman evans do _ do. how did you feel watching weinman evans do that i do. how did you feel watching weinman evans do that 24 i do. how did you feel watching i weinman evans do that 24 hours weinman evans do that 2a hours drumathon, raising money for children like archie. it drumathon, raising money for children like archie.— drumathon, raising money for children like archie. it must have been brilliant. _ children like archie. it must have been brilliant. i'm _ children like archie. it must have been brilliant. i'm not _ children like archie. it must have been brilliant. i'm not quite i children like archie. it must have been brilliant. i'm not quite sure| been brilliant. i'm not quite sure how he _ been brilliant. i'm not quite sure how he did — been brilliant. i'm not quite sure how he did the _ been brilliant. i'm not quite sure how he did the whole _ been brilliant. i'm not quite sure how he did the whole 24 - been brilliant. i'm not quite sure how he did the whole 24 hours. i been brilliant. i'm not quite surej how he did the whole 24 hours. i been brilliant. i'm not quite sure i how he did the whole 24 hours. i got goose _ how he did the whole 24 hours. i got goose bumps— how he did the whole 24 hours. i got goose bumps when— how he did the whole 24 hours. i got goose bumps when i— how he did the whole 24 hours. i got goose bumps when i heard - how he did the whole 24 hours. i got goose bumps when i heard the - how he did the whole 24 hours. i got goose bumps when i heard the total| goose bumps when i heard the total amount _ goose bumps when i heard the total amount it's— goose bumps when i heard the total amount. it's fantastic. _ goose bumps when i heard the total amount. it's fantastic. tier? - goose bumps when i heard the total amount. it's fantastic.— amount. it's fantastic. very well done to him- — amount. it's fantastic. very well done to him. archie, _ amount. it's fantastic. very well done to him. archie, do - amount. it's fantastic. very well done to him. archie, do you i amount. it's fantastic. very welll done to him. archie, do you want amount. it's fantastic. very well - done to him. archie, do you want to have another go at drumming on the table? ,, ., ., ., have another go at drumming on the | table?— one. table? shall we do it together? one, two, table? shall we do it together? one, two. three! — table? shall we do it together? one, two, three! brilliant _ table? shall we do it together? one, two, three! brilliant stuff, _ table? shall we do it together? one, two, three! brilliant stuff, playing i two, three! brilliant stuff, playing us out. archie. archie and tracy, thanks so much for coming in to talk to us this morning. and of course, you can donate to the drumathon for children in need. and here is how. if you would like to owain support
8:32 am
you can donate £5 by texting the word drama. to donate £10 dot—mac and two text £20 dot—mac text will cost of the nation past your standard message charge and 100% of your donation will go to children in need. you must be 16 or over and have the bill payers permission. the andrew marr show, will be on bbc one straight after us on breakfast at 9am. andrew, who's on the programme this morning? we will be discussing cop26 alok sharma and a key speaker who was
8:33 am
there and we will be talking about sleaze with angela rayner and talking about russia and afghanistan and talking to andrew lloyd webber and talking to ralph fiennes who will be talking to ralph fiennes who will be talking about the poet ts eliot. here on breakfast we've been closely following the campaign for more funding for motor neurone disease research, after former rugby league player rob burrow was diagnosed with the terminal illness two years ago. today, a breakthrough. two months after delivering a petition to number 10, the government has pledged to give £50 million over september this year, the campaign for £50 million towards motor neurone disease
8:34 am
goes to downing street. among those present was former footballer stephen darby, handing over their plea to finally try to find a cure for the terminal disease. at his side, rob burrow, former rugby league star, both living with the impact of the disease. what this will mean to mnd sufferers is great hope. we're now on the brink of a medical treatment so we need to get to help prolong life and help find a cure. the two first spoke to bbc breakfast about life with mnd back in early 2020, alongside scottish rugby union star doddie weir. i played rugby before i knew what i had, knew what the issue was, when they said to me you have got this and we will try to fight that.
8:35 am
and then i did the dreaded google. it came up mnd. iwent, uh—oh! in the months to come, rob burrow will chart the impact of the condition in a documentary. that led to fundraising by people across the country and rob's former teammates. kevin sinfield's seven marathons in seven days raised over £2 million. he takes on a new challenge later this month. meanwhile, the campaign for government backing has continued. just last week rob's dad gave another emotional plea. after 25—30 years, surely to goodness we can find something to find a treatment. if it stops it, that's phase one. a cure's phase two. now the government has confirmed it will provide the £50 million that the campaigners have been asking for. in an article in the express, the prime minister promises to transform the fight against this devastating disease. the announcement has been welcomed by the mnd association,
8:36 am
which says it will change lives and ultimately save lives. louise pilbeam, bbc news. now let's speak to professor ammar al—chalbi who researches mnd and has been involved in the funding campaign. what you make of this announcement? we are very, very pleased. it is an excellent shot in the arm and exactly what motor neurone disease research in this country needs. tell]! research in this country needs. tell us how the — research in this country needs. tell us how the money will be spent. research in this country needs. tell i us how the money will be spent. the uk as a us how the money will be spent. tue: uk as a global us how the money will be spent. tte: uk as a global leader in motor neurone disease research and this will allow us to coordinate efforts to accelerate the search for a cure and go to testing and bringing them to the clinic. hoar and go to testing and bringing them to the clinic— to the clinic. how close do you think we could _ to the clinic. how close do you think we could be _ to the clinic. how close do you think we could be to _ to the clinic. how close do you think we could be to a - to the clinic. how close do you think we could be to a cure? i to the clinic. how close do you i
8:37 am
think we could be to a cure? we to the clinic. how close do you - think we could be to a cure? we have never been — think we could be to a cure? we have never been closer. _ think we could be to a cure? we have never been closer. we _ think we could be to a cure? we have never been closer. we are _ think we could be to a cure? we have never been closer. we are extremely| never been closer. we are extremely close to finding cures for people with genetic forms of motor neurone disease and the learning format could be applied to people with known genetic forms so the cure is pretty close. known genetic forms so the cure is pretty close-— pretty close. when taking on a horrendous — pretty close. when taking on a horrendous disease _ pretty close. when taking on a horrendous disease like - pretty close. when taking on a horrendous disease like this, | pretty close. when taking on a horrendous disease like this, i | horrendous disease like this, i wonder where the balance is struck between attempting to find those cures you speak of and also treatments that make patients with mnd have better lives whilst they are still with us.— are still with us. that is a really important _ are still with us. that is a really important point. _ are still with us. that is a really important point. we _ are still with us. that is a really important point. we don't - are still with us. that is a really important point. we don't want| are still with us. that is a really i important point. we don't want to prolong life without allowing people to have a proper quality of life and it is very important to find that balance correctly. we need to find treatments that act extremely early in the disease and stop it and then allow it to heal. 0r in the disease and stop it and then allow it to heal. or even better identify people who might be addressed and them even before the disease takes place. in addressed and them even before the disease takes place.— disease takes place. in the national conversation _ disease takes place. in the national conversation there _ disease takes place. in the national
8:38 am
conversation there are _ disease takes place. in the national conversation there are so _ disease takes place. in the national conversation there are so many - conversation there are so many diseases we hear about. how important is the high profile campaigning that we brought to viewers here with kevin stanfield doing his fundraising, for instance. —— sinfield. how important they are talked about an deemed worthy of government funding? thea:r talked about an deemed worthy of government funding?— talked about an deemed worthy of government funding? they are crucial and i'm very — government funding? they are crucial and i'm very grateful _ government funding? they are crucial and i'm very grateful for _ government funding? they are crucial and i'm very grateful for your - and i'm very grateful for your awareness raising. people die with it very quickly and it will kill one in every 300 people so it is not really rare and it will affect peoples lives so having some kind of campaign that raises the awareness of it as an important disease is extremely important. i5 of it as an important disease is extremely important. is it becoming more common? _ extremely important. is it becoming more common? it _ extremely important. is it becoming more common? it will— extremely important. is it becoming more common? it will become - extremely important. is it becoming| more common? it will become more common as — more common? it will become more common as the _ more common? it will become more common as the population _ more common? it will become more common as the population ages - common as the population ages because the risk increases as people age so we are beginning to see a small increase but not noticeably
8:39 am
more common other than the population ageing.— more common other than the population ageing. when does an announcement _ population ageing. when does an announcement like _ population ageing. when does an announcement like this, - population ageing. when does an announcement like this, you - population ageing. when does an i announcement like this, you hear population ageing. when does an - announcement like this, you hear and see headlines talking about a particular sum of money, how soon does it make a practical difference to you? how soon can you do things as a result of what we are reporting this morning that up until today you have not been able to?— have not been able to? pretty ruickl . have not been able to? pretty quickly- once _ have not been able to? pretty quickly. once the _ have not been able to? pretty quickly. once the money - have not been able to? pretty quickly. once the money is i have not been able to? pretty - quickly. once the money is available for us to use we have teams in place and can hire new staff as needed. all of us in the uk, a large number of scientists working on this condition, we can all activate our research teams and we all have research teams and we all have research programmes taking place already that can then be accelerated.— already that can then be accelerated. ., ~ , ., , ., accelerated. take us into your research- _ accelerated. take us into your research- i— accelerated. take us into your research. i am _ accelerated. take us into your research. i am intrigued - accelerated. take us into your - research. i am intrigued day-to-day, research. i am intrigued day—to—day, week to week as to what you're doing day attempting to do this most important thing to try to find a cure. �* important thing to try to find a cure, �* ,., . ., important thing to try to find a cure. ~ . ., ., cure. are particular laboratory works on _ cure. are particular laboratory works on what _
8:40 am
cure. are particular laboratory works on what causes - cure. are particular laboratory works on what causes motorl cure. are particular laboratory - works on what causes motor neurone disease and how fast it progresses because if you can find things that make it accelerate we might be able to find things that stop that happening and stop the disease. we look at peoples genetic make up and ask them about the lifestyle and test their blood and you're in and skin samples. we set up clinical trials and invite people to take part in them and that is part of the national effort that this money will really help to coordinate and accelerate things a lot. can really help to coordinate and accelerate things a lot. can we put the money — accelerate things a lot. can we put the money into — accelerate things a lot. can we put the money into context _ accelerate things a lot. can we put the money into context because i l accelerate things a lot. can we put i the money into context because i am always conscious whenever announcements from government have million or billion attached to them they can be quite hard to comprehend. we have seen huge numbers attached to the response to covid. compared to the money you are used to where 50 million set? might
8:41 am
it is a boost. if you remember the ice bucket challenge that brought in about £7 million extra funding which exhilarated our research programmes by few years so 50 million will dramatically improve that. how do you deal with the reality of what you deal with the reality of what you research, from the moment people must be told they have a terminal illness and a particularly grim one to go more uplifting moments either at a human level with the patient or when you make a breakthrough scientifically? it when you make a breakthrough scientifically?— when you make a breakthrough scientifically? it is an emotional roller-coaster. _ scientifically? it is an emotional roller-coaster. telling - scientifically? it is an emotional roller-coaster. telling people i scientifically? it is an emotional i roller-coaster. telling people they roller—coaster. telling people they have motor neurone disease is always extreme difficult but telling them they have hope and this is what the money represents in terms of a cure is what really makes it worthwhile. thank you, professor, we really appreciate your time.
8:42 am
now the sport. i managed to watch the game between england and australia. it turned out the match should have watched, should have watched ireland versus new zealand. to be fair to england, it is a good set up for them next week. there was plenty of drama in rugby's autumn internationals — scotland losing despite a valiant effort from stuart hogg, while england and ireland both secured eye—catching wins. ben croucher reports. they do haka. new zealand — the most revered, possibly most feared team in world rugby. well, maybe not for ireland. they'd beaten the all blacks just twice before, the third
8:43 am
was full of charm. where they faced the intimidation without trepidation, where the forwards ran through the all blacks like backs. the penalties were celebrated like tries, the victory was celebrated few before in dublin, 29—20. there were personal milestones to cheer at murrayfield. two stuart hogg tries made it a record—equalling 21! for scotland. it was in a losing cause as south africa scored two of their own, and put the boot in. they'll travel to twickenham next week to find an england team hitting their stride. freddie steward set them on course for an eighth straight win over australia. jamie blamire may not have such speed, but those in green and gold still couldn't catch him. england's captain said they could still play better — the world champions next saturday might have something to fear. ben croucher, bbc news. england's women will aim to make it three wins out of three today in their autumn internationals when they face canada at the twickenham stoop. whilst wales's women continued their revival with victory over south africa at cardiff arms park. last weekend's win overjapan ended a two—year losing streak and they were imprssive again,
8:44 am
carys phillips scoring a hat—trick of tries as they won by 29 points to 19. they face canada next in their final autumn international. england lost their test series against france in wheelchair rugby league 2—nil, beaten 39—26 in the second match in gillingham. they did recover from a 15—point defecit, coming to within a point thanks to this penalty from nathan collins, but in the end world champions france were too strong. the sides should have been playing in a world cup but it's been put back a year because of the pandemic, and these matches have filled the void. gareth bale got his 100th cap for wales as they thrashed belarus 5—1 in their world cup qualifier in cardiff. and he marked the milestone by setting up liverpool's neco williams for their second goal which came afterjust 20 minutes. wales are already guaranteed a play—off place — and if they get a point in theirfinal game against belgium — they'll finish second in the group
8:45 am
which would ensure a home draw in that play—off. really pleased. we picked the team we knew would create chances and score. we knew it would come down to goal differences, as well. even when we were 2—0 up at half—time, we said starting the second half we need to think about the first and get the goal. thankfully, we did. i thought we were clinical tonight when we got the chances. arsenal's women dropped points for the first time in the wsl this season — and only a very late goal saved them from defeat at tottenham. spurs had never taken a point against arsenal in the league — and an upset was on the cards when rachel williams bundled in the opener at the hive. but vivienne miedema scored a stoppage—time equaliser, to keep arsenal four points clear at the top of the table. lewis hamilton will be hoping for another remarkable comeback at tonight's sao paolo grand prix in brazil, as he tries to revive his title hopes. the world champion had to start the sprint qualigying race from last place, after his car was found to have
8:46 am
broken the rules. and he fought his way up to finish fifth — but a five—place penalty for a new engine means he'll be 10th on the grid for the grand prix. his team—mate valtteri bottas is on pole ahead of max verstappen who leads hamilton by 21 points in the chamopionship race. it's an end of an era in motogp today as valentino rossi — the most successful motorbike racer of his generation — is calling time on his career. today's valencia grand prix will be his final race, after 26 years in the sport, in which he's won the world title seven times. he's a true icon, but at the age of 42, he's decided it's time to retire. he's the only rider to have started over 400 races — winning115 of them. when the t20 world cup started almost a month ago, not many would have predicted we'd be seeing australia and new zealand in the final. but the sides play for the title in dubai later — and australia captain aaron finch thinks it's going to be a good one.
8:47 am
we play quite a bit against new zealand now and we always have great battles regardless of the format. and, yeah, it's exciting to be playing against new zealand. they're a great team and lead super by kane williamson. so it's just one of those things that both teams seem to have found their way into each other�*s path along the way in some tournaments. so it's really exciting. and finally — what do you do when the floodlights fail at a football match? well, in the non—league game, when you don't have a staff of thousands, one of the players steps in. this is dunston tweeting a picture of midfielder phil turnbull with a screwdriver — he's an electrician by day — and he tried to sort out the fuse box at marine, in their fa trophy game. it was eventually fixed after 45 minutes — not by him but turnbull did later score in the penalty shootout — though they lost the match.
8:48 am
it is good to multitask. i don't know if marine will get a bill. is that a call—out charge? that is a double shift right there. it didn't quite fix those floodlights but he scored a penalty. you would not get cristiano ronaldo doing that. this is where we say goodbye to kat who's off to read the news on andrew marr. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. we've had a reasonable start to sunday for some of you. a fair bit of cloud around as you can see here in scarborough but there
8:49 am
are breaks with some seeing a bit more sunshine than others. cloud thickest at the moment in east anglia and the south—east there is occasional drizzle and less this afternoon, brighter breaks developing. some drizzle around england and wales with low cloud and dampers conditions in the afternoon across north—west scotland, the highlands and islands especially. in northern ireland some of the mildest conditions of 11 degrees to 40 degrees. elsewhere mild and 11 to 13 degrees. elsewhere mild and 11 to 13 degrees. the evening and overnight heavier rain across scotland are pushing south. wet for a time in northern ireland. much of england and wales dry with clear skies. cooler than last night but still mild for this stage in november. for tomorrow morning patches of mist and fog. wet airlie and the south and east of northern ireland and scotland but overall a much sunnier day than this weekend and one or two showers in the highlands. thick
8:50 am
cloud and wales and quite misty on the hills but for the south and east mist and fog lifts. for some low cloud will linger but for one or two sunshine break through. temperatures a degree or two up on today the temperature is cooler for scotland and northern ireland who will have more sunshine. in the week in scotland the wettest and windiest conditions and the further south you are you should be largely dry and fairly mild. after eight weeks of strutting their stuff on the strictly ballroom floor, the glitterball trophy is edging closer for the remaining couples. this week saw a sensational samba, a cheeky charleston and a quirky quickstep. but, it was rose and giovanni's performance to raise awareness
8:51 am
of the deaf community that stole the show. let's remind ourselves of that moment. # won't let go. # if you want the truth. # ijust want to be part of your symphony # symphony
8:52 am
# when you hold me tight and not let go. # cheering and applause. i love you. this is a number that will be etched in my heart for a long, long time. it was absolutely beautiful. that's the greatest thing i've ever seen on the show. oh, my goodness! congratulations. i feel very, very thankful for your determination to —— make this dance the most positive, happy dance know that being deaf, there's nothing wrong, it's such a joy to be deaf,
8:53 am
and i think that says a lot about you as a person. we're joined now by former strictly professional dancer, flavia cacace—mistry. what a moment, that moment of silence taking us into rose's world and it felt like it lasted a long time and that is the whole reality for her. t time and that is the whole reality for her. . , time and that is the whole reality for her. ., , ., ., ., for her. i have been a huge fan of rose from _ for her. i have been a huge fan of rose from the _ for her. i have been a huge fan of rose from the very _ for her. i have been a huge fan of rose from the very beginning - for her. i have been a huge fan ofj rose from the very beginning and for her. i have been a huge fan of i rose from the very beginning and to see her do her performances each week with such ease and natural together with giovanni that you forget what our world is like an earlier in the day i heard on the radio the song they would be dancing to and i closed my eyes and visualised they would do something like the dead and i knew there would be a special moment in their and i thought that maybe they would incorporate some signing into the routine but what they did was much
8:54 am
more powerful, taking the sound away and allowing us to experience what she feels in her world and it was quite emotional. you can hear, listening to it now and again, it hits you because we're so used to always having music and the audience and the clapping. when you take everything away and strip it all back, it is incredible what she does and achieves credible performances every week. and achieves credible performances every week-— and achieves credible performances eve week. ., ., ,, ., ., every week. how does she do it? how would you. — every week. how does she do it? how would you. if— every week. how does she do it? how would you. if you _ every week. how does she do it? how would you, if you are _ every week. how does she do it? how would you, if you are working - every week. how does she do it? how would you, if you are working with - would you, if you are working with her, try to train someone to be a dancer, a big enough challenge if it is, if they cannot hear anything or cannot hear very much.— is, if they cannot hear anything or cannot hear very much. when you hear the audience. — cannot hear very much. when you hear the audience, you _ cannot hear very much. when you hear the audience, you get _ cannot hear very much. when you hear the audience, you get that _ cannot hear very much. when you hear the audience, you get that extra - the audience, you get that extra buzz and adrenaline rush and sometimes that can work in your favour and you step up to it and other times it is actually not a
8:55 am
great thing and people go wrong and make mistakes. she does not have that, she has this neutral plateau in what she does in rehearsal and pretty much the same as on the actual show, she doesn't have that sudden reaction from the audience or listen to the music being played live by a band so that works about in her favour live by a band so that works about in herfavour and her other live by a band so that works about in her favour and her other senses take over so they are much stronger and that is what i have said to the beginning, the great thing about her and giovanni is their unison, they dance together as one and are connected and she is feeding off everything else, using her site and her body and her connection with them and that is why as a couple i think they are the most together, especially when they do ballroom. he is guiding everything she does and thatis is guiding everything she does and that is really how it should be but obviously other people that everybody else takeover and with her is just a beautiful thing and their
8:56 am
routines are so simple. a lot of the routines are so simple. a lot of the routines they do are simple. thea;r routines they do are simple. they cho ed routines they do are simple. they chopped up _ routines they do are simple. they chopped up by _ routines they do are simple. they chopped up by 39 _ routines they do are simple. they chopped up by 39 but _ routines they do are simple. they chopped up by 39 but there was a 40 ——chalked. so much energy from rhys, he was crawling on all fours at the end. ., ., , . he was crawling on all fours at the end. ., ., ,.,, end. you have such simple choreography _ end. you have such simple choreography from - end. you have such simple choreography from rose i end. you have such simple i choreography from rose and end. you have such simple _ choreography from rose and giovanni and then with rhys it was jam—packed through to the end and it is funny how they both get high scores but very different interpretations. simple and then full of content but again it works. one was a couples choice freestyle and the other at charleston which has to be full of
8:57 am
content and lifts and full on routine. i enjoyed them both. i do love simple routines, they grab you, don't they? theyjust impact love simple routines, they grab you, don't they? they just impact that extra bit of emotion. lets don't they? they just impact that extra bit of emotion.— extra bit of emotion. lets talk about dan _ extra bit of emotion. lets talk about dan and _ extra bit of emotion. lets talk about dan and his _ extra bit of emotion. lets talk about dan and his american i extra bit of emotion. lets talk - about dan and his american smooth. our desperate lifestyle, for from craig and five from anton. i agree more with — craig and five from anton. i agree more with anton. _ craig and five from anton. i agree more with anton. i _ craig and five from anton. i agree more with anton. i think- craig and five from anton. i agree more with anton. i think he - craig and five from anton. i agree more with anton. i think he is - craig and five from anton. i agree i more with anton. i think he is more confident dancing solo and he looks a bit more nervous and unsure when dancing with nadia. last week was the first time i saw the ballroom boy come out so he started to use is topline which is elegant and his long legs to move across the floor and he was starting to look confident and hold and he does look
8:58 am
goodin confident and hold and he does look good in that so i saw real improvements last night from dan and i think it was by far his best dance. ~ ., , ., ., ., dance. who is going out and who's rroin to dance. who is going out and who's going to win? _ dance. who is going out and who's going to win? for _ dance. who is going out and who's going to win? for me, _ dance. who is going out and who's going to win? for me, i _ dance. who is going out and who's going to win? for me, i have - dance. who is going out and who's going to win? for me, i have been dance. who is going out and who's i going to win? for me, i have been a bi fan of going to win? for me, i have been a big fan of rose _ going to win? for me, i have been a big fan of rose and _ going to win? for me, i have been a big fan of rose and i _ going to win? for me, i have been a big fan of rose and i think _ going to win? for me, i have been a big fan of rose and i think she - big fan of rose and i think she deserves to win and i think she started at a certain level and this constantly working her way up and i completely admire her as a dancer in the way she has taken on the sole experience. the way she has taken on the sole experience-_ the way she has taken on the sole exerience. ~ ., , ., ~ experience. who is leaving? i think dan will be — experience. who is leaving? i think dan will be fine. _ experience. who is leaving? i think dan will be fine. a] _ experience. who is leaving? i think dan will be fine. a] is _ experience. who is leaving? i think dan will be fine. a] is at _ experience. who is leaving? i think dan will be fine. a] is at the - dan will be fine. a] is at the bottom and _ dan will be fine. a] is at the bottom and it _ dan will be fine. a] is at the bottom and it all _ dan will be fine. a] is at the bottom and it all depends i dan will be fine. a] is at the bottom and it all depends ifj dan will be fine. a] is at the - bottom and it all depends if the public will save her. team sara in the middle of the board and tom, not
8:59 am
too much of a worry so i'm a bit worried about tilly and sara. you can watch the strictly results show on bbc one tonight, at 7:15. that's all we've got time for this morning. we'll be back tomorrow at 6. have a lovely rest of your day, goodbye.
9:00 am
hello, this is bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. our top stories... hearing no objections it is so decided. a new global climate deal is struck in glasgow but pledges still aren't enough to limit warming to 1.5 degrees. a previous commitment to phase out coal is watered down at the last—minute by india and china — the un secretary general gave this warning. our planet is hanging by a thread. we are still knocking on the door of climate catastrophe. it is time to go into emergency mode. the queen will lead the national service of remembrance in london in herfirst public engagement for more than three weeks. and — the netherlands becomes the first country in western europe
9:01 am
to re—enter a partial coronavirus lockdown this autumn

115 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on