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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 14, 2021 12:00am-12:31am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm philippa thomas. after two weeks of intense negotiations at the global climate summit, world leaders have agreed a deal, but is it a cop out? the revised agreement means countries must strengthen their emissions—cutting targets for 2030. but a last minute intervention from india waters down the commitment to phase out coal, leaving many nations deeply disappointed. a visibly emotional cop26 president alok sharma apologised for the way in which the talks ended, and the disappointment caused. un secretary general, antonio guterres, calls the final agreement in glasgow an important step, but questions if it's enough to avoid what he calls �*climate catastrophe�*.
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in other news, belarus says it's stepping up humanitarian aid for migrants trapped on its border — but the eu says the country is playing politics. doctors in sudan says at least five protesters have been killed in the latest mass rally against military rule. hello and welcome to audiences in the uk and around the world. we're covering all the latest coronavirus developments here in britain and globally. first . the un climate summit in glasgow has adopted a new pact aimed at curbing global warming — but many have called the deal a disappointment. the summit�*s british president has apologised for the way the process had unfolded,
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but said the agreement would keep within reach the goal of limiting temperature rises to one—point— five degrees. but many countries said the final text had been watered down, and the un secretary general said the world was still knocking on the door of a climate catastrophe. our science editor david shukman has the latest. hearing no objection is, it was so decided. hearing no ob'ection is, it was so decided.— so decided. relief after a stressful _ so decided. relief after a stressful fortnight - so decided. relief after a stressful fortnight the . stressful fortnight the conference face challenges write to the end. the day began with confusion and uncertainty. a delivery of what looked like pizza boxes. in fact, a delivery of what looked like pizza boxes. infact, documents for the un secretary general. a great deal was stake.— for the un secretary general. a great deal was stake. we've had two incredibly _ great deal was stake. we've had two incredibly intensive - great deal was stake. we've had two incredibly intensive weeks i two incredibly intensive weeks of negotiations in glasgow and we arrive at what i believe is a moment of truth. and this is the moment of truth for our planet and it is a moment of truth for our children and our grandchildren.— grandchildren. negotiators broke u- grandchildren. negotiators broke up into _ grandchildren. negotiators broke up into adults. - grandchildren. negotiators
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broke up into adults. a - grandchildren. negotiators| broke up into adults. a real glimpse of bargaining that normally happens behind closed doors. the american envoy with china's chief negotiator. arguing the line by line about fossil fuels. arguing the line by line about fossilfuels. china and india are worried about slowing down their development. haw are worried about slowing down their development.— their development. how can an one their development. how can anyone expect _ their development. how can anyone expect developing . anyone expect developing countries can make promises about— countries can make promises about phasing out coal and fossil— about phasing out coal and fossil fuels, about phasing out coal and fossilfuels, developing countries still have development agendas... and then the conference chair began his own shuttle diplomacy. first, trying — own shuttle diplomacy. first, trying to _ own shuttle diplomacy. first, trying to persuade the chinese to support the agreement and then_ to support the agreement and then checking in with the americans and then with the indian — americans and then with the indian delegation. in americans and then with the indian delegation.— americans and then with the indian delegation. in the end, where the _ indian delegation. in the end, where the biggest _ indian delegation. in the end, where the biggest obstacles l indian delegation. in the end, | where the biggest obstacles in these talks was over the future of coal. the early drafts are talked about phasing out this dirtiest fossil fuels but after a last—minute flurry of negotiations, that was changed to phasing down. it sounds like a minor alteration and indeed many are asking, what it means?
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coal is the single biggest source of greenhouse gases but countries that depend on it managed to get the agreement watered down which left others very unhappy. let watered down which left others very unhappy-— very unhappy. let us be clear, we do not _ very unhappy. let us be clear, we do not need _ very unhappy. let us be clear, we do not need to _ very unhappy. let us be clear, we do not need to phase - very unhappy. let us be clear, j we do not need to phase down but to phase out coal and fossil fuel but to phase out coal and fossilfuel subsidies. we but to phase out coal and fossil fuel subsidies. we know full well that _ fossil fuel subsidies. we know full well that coal _ fossil fuel subsidies. we know full well that coal has - fossil fuel subsidies. we know full well that coal has no - full well that coal has no future. and this is what we are working on with our own plans. to put an end to coal in europe in the foreseeable future. i5 in the foreseeable future. is also in the foreseeable future. i3 also vital that we protect. in the foreseeable future. isl also vital that we protect. his emotions _ also vital that we protect. his emotions got _ also vital that we protect. his emotions got the better of him. where things going wrong? but enough countries were reluctantly giving their support. reluctantly giving their swoon-— reluctantly giving their su-oort. . ., ., ., , reluctantly giving their su-oort. ~ ., ., ., , ., support. would do so only and i only want _ support. would do so only and i only want to — support. would do so only and i only want to stress, _ support. would do so only and i only want to stress, only - only want to stress, only because _ only want to stress, only because there _ only want to stress, only because there are - only want to stress, only| because there are critical elements— because there are critical elements of— because there are critical elements of this - because there are critical elements of this package because there are critical- elements of this package that people — elements of this package that wrote in_ elements of this package that pe0ple in my— elements of this package that people in my country - elements of this package that
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people in my country need. i elements of this package that| people in my country need. as elements of this package that. people in my country need. as a lifeline — people in my country need. as a lifeline for — people in my country need. as a lifeline for their— people in my country need. as a lifeline for their future. - lifeline for their future. history— lifeline for their future. history has _ lifeline for their future. history has been - lifeline for their future. history has been made| lifeline for their future. - history has been made here in glasgow. history has been made here in glasoow. ., , ., ., , ., glasgow. that is for others to 'ud . e. glasgow. that is for others to judge- and — glasgow. that is for others to judge. and receiver _ glasgow. that is for others to judge. and receiver pledges l judge. and receiver pledges made here to reduce emissions and to boost aid to the poorest nations that actually delivered in the years to come. we heard in david's report from the cop26 president, the british government minister, alok sharma. as well as telling the conference it was a historic moment mr sharma also became visibly emotional as he apologised for the way in which the meeting ended. may i just say to all delegates, i apologise for the way this process has unfolded. and i'm deeply sorry. i also understand the deep disappointment but i think, as you've noted, it is also vital that we protect this package.
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applause. at the heart of the two weeks of talks, was the aim of keeping temperatures as close to i.5c above pre—industrial levels as possible, to avoid the worst effects of climate change. so what sort of impact will the agreement have on global temperatures., and on the way we all live? here's our science correspondent, rebecca morelle. piece by piece, after two weeks of intense negotiations, uniting people from all over the world, a plan for the future of our planet has come together. but will it stop temperatures rising over 1.5 degrees? at the start of the conference,
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every country submitted plans to cut their greenhouse gas emissions, and scientists have been crunching the numbers. global temperatures are already 1.1 degrees over preindustrial levels. if every nation carries out its long—term pledges, we get to 1.8 degrees. but if you look at what countries are actually doing, the more likely outcome is 2.4 degrees. this is more progress on climate than we've seen before. but in an absolute sense, we are miles and miles away from where we need to be, and we are still on course for really catastrophic warming. the glasgow conference clearly hasn't solved the problem, but will some aspects of what's happened here keep 1.5 alive?
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coal, the most polluting fossilfuel, will be reduced but not phased out. some nations will cut methane, a potent greenhouse gas. tackling deforestation has been promised too. and importantly, countries are being asked to return next year with better plans to cut emissions. we need these governments to really come back with an honest action. notjust empty pledges, not just about net zero by 2050, but the actions that they're going to take in the short term. so, how will the glasgow agreement affect all of us? how are our lives going to change? ultimately, this will impact everything from how we get around to the food we eat and how we heat our homes. but this will take time. 0ur fragile planet is already changing, and while there has been progress in glasgow and 1.5 degrees hasn't been lost, it will take a monumental effort to stop temperatures from rising above that. rebecca morelle,
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bbc news, glasgow. the low—lying island countries and small economy blocs had been pushing hard for more money from rich nations to help themdeal with everything from transitioning to clean energy to recovering from climate—driven disasters. speaking to my colleague in glasgow, christian fraser, the marshall islands climate envoy tina stege, said the existing deal did not go far enough and expressed her it was a real blow. we had been told that there would be no further changes to the text, and we had already swallowed some changes that were very difficult to swallow, and that came at the end, and... as i said in a statement, there are other pieces of that package that are critical that we fought really hard to get and that are part of the lifeline that people in my country need. and so what we took it, but i needed to express
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the deep disappointment that we felt about having to do that. india is a very big place in the room, naturally. and i guess alok sharma as the president took the view that he wouldn't get this across the line unless you ballad to what they were saying. was it as simple as they wouldn't have backed the whole document had he not made that change? as i said, we were not in the room. and perhaps if we had been, i could answer your question, but i can't tell you, but i think for us particularly, the very small island states, we come here to speak, to be heard, and for that to happen, we need to be in the room. so, this is where we are. we do have a package that has doubling of adaptation finance, which is something that the high ambition coalition really brought up, brought to the table, and there are also other pieces of the package that reflect the leader statement that we put out last week. so really, really important pieces that, you know, we could not afford to lose. and that we hope gives us a basis for more progress. it has to. this has to be the basis
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for more progress, much more accelerated progress over the next year up to cop27. clara winkler — is an executive member of the federation of young european greens and spoke to christian earlier about greta thunberg's remarks that the summit was "blah blah blah" i completely agree with this. it is all just i completely agree with this. it is alljust blah blah blah. before its, we had a fossil fuel phase out horse phase out of subsidies and the documents and now we have a fossil fuel phase down. nobody knows what that means or how it is
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measured and would definitely not save our future. it would definitely not keep the earth from overheating below 1.5 degrees and it would definitely not stopped weather events from occurring. flan not stopped weather events from occurrina. ., , ., , occurring. can you see the ooint occurring. can you see the point of — occurring. can you see the point of the _ occurring. can you see the point of the leader - occurring. can you see the point of the leader that i occurring. can you see the i point of the leader that there is a process started here. it is a process started here. it is the first time fossil fuels have been mentioned in any climate summit. and also the targets these countries are going to have to come up with, there is an acceleration process. there will need to be a new target next year and the year after. things are happening much more quickly. targets that these countries are coming outwith, there a huge gap between the targets and their actions. so so this is really another basically. and we also don't think they're just mentioning fossil fuels to have them in the documents is going to change anything if
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they are surrounded already. nigel topping, is the un high level climate action champion for cop26. he's been responding to criticism from those including greta thunberg and clara we will need to elevate the conversation a bit higher than throwing accusations of blah blah blah and it is all green wash. and it is all based on offsets and it is alljust long—term and not short—term because none of that is true. we can say, let's be honest and then throw away dismissive comments like that. there is real progress here. it is not enough. this climate pact has enshrined 1.5 degrees as the north star. there was unimaginable in madrid just two years ago. it has got everybody committed to coming back to ratchet their commitments next year the year after. not waiting to 2025. as we know
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that 1.5 degrees is still not actually the sum of all ambition. throughout those two weeks we have seen really substantive commitments in the short term real money in real solutions. this is a significant step forward and it is not enough so we should neither celebrate the saving of the world nor dismiss this because it is neither of those. it is more nuanced. she because it is neither of those. it is more nuanced.— it is more nuanced. she was sa in: it is more nuanced. she was saying don't _ it is more nuanced. she was saying don't forget, - it is more nuanced. she was saying don't forget, the - it is more nuanced. she was saying don't forget, the uk| it is more nuanced. she was i saying don't forget, the uk has the presidency so what do you do next? what happens in the coming weeks and months? the real hard work starts tomorrow so what we do next? everybody who has made _ so what we do next? everybody who has made commitments i so what we do next? everybody i who has made commitments need to back them up with concrete lens and the good news is we're not talking about 2050, which at 20252030. that is notjust
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kicking the can down the road. those fans need to be enacted in mini to see the results of those. a lot of those plans will be... you've got to start buying electric buses if you're not already doing so. 0ne buying electric buses if you're not already doing so. one of the key thing to remember is, this is notjust been a commitment festival double of these are based on momentum building since person is now starting to grow exponentially whether it is buses, verification of cars, green hydrogen. some of these announcements are out. decarbonising shipping. green shipping corridors. the company saying they will only buy zero carbon freight in 2040. so, these commitments we will be more confident we can pull 2050 dates forward earlier as innovation starts to kick in. this is bbc news,
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a reminder of our main story this hour: the un climate summit reaches a deal to limit global warming, but there's dismay at a last—minute change backed by india that waters down commitments on getting rid of coal. let's get some other news now, and belarus has said it's stepping up providing aid to migrants trapped on the border with poland. poland says belarus is provoking a surge in migrants as revenge for eu sanctions, and is trying to establish a permanent camp. it says belarusian security forces tried to break part of the border fence in a thwarted attempt to let migrants cross. some two—thousand people — many of them iraqi kurds — are camped on the belarusian side of the frontier. 0ur correspondent steve rosenberg sent this report from inside belarus, close to the polish border. winter is coming in belarus, so at the migrant camp they're gathering whatever they can to build some shelter. but for the people camping out, there is little protection — and no one knows how long they're going to be here.
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we can't stay more, because the weather is too cold, people may die here from cold. so, you'll have to go back to your country, no? never. we never go back. better to die here, no go back to our country. poland is so close — they're living on the eu's doorstep. poland now has 15,000 troops in this area guarding europe's border. these people have come to belarus with one aim, to try to use this country to get to europe. and look how close they've got. the european union is almost within touching distance. but as you can see,
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poland is determined not to let them through. many of these people are from the middle east. the eu has accused belarus of facilitating theirjourney here — of bringing them to the border to pressure europe. belarus denies that. as for the migrants, they are desperate to leave here. we want to go, we don't want to stay here. where do you want to go? europe, or us, or canada. don't matter. belarusian police are trying to keep order. go back! please, go back! but there has been a delivery of humanitarian aid. this is what happens when you're hungry and cold. well, this is the chaos of the migrant camp. aid is being distributed, in this case blankets and clothes, and people are desperate to receive it. the police are struggling to maintain control.
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they're telling people to get down while the aid is being given out. sit down! for these people, at this moment, their priority isn't europe — it's survival. steve rosenberg, bbc news, on the border of belarus and poland. a doctors' group in sudan says security forces have killed five protesters attending mass pro—democracy demonstrations. these are the latest pictures. tens of thousands of people coup have been rallying in towns and cities across sudan. 0ur correspondent sally nabil is in khartoum. the protesters here are chanting slogans. it was staged by an army last october and they want to have a civilian government in place. on our way here we have seen heavy security presence in parts of the capital. we have also seen some streets and bridges closed. just a short while ago security forces arrived here and tear
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gas, some of the protesters, but they have managed to regroup. the political scene here at the moment described complicated. the head of the now dissolved civilian government is still under house arrest. we have seen many of the protesters here. some other pilot actions are still behind bars, too. what infuriated the crowd here even more is the stand taken recently by the army chief. translation: we want him to stop creating i divisions in this country and to leave office. we want a civilian rule.
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we are fed up with military rule. we have had enough of them. they've done no good to any arab country. as you can see, there are clouds of smoke here, as a result of car tires being burned, apparently. public anger is rising here, and western pressure is growing on military leader is to hand over power to a civilian government. western countries have also called for the release of all political delays. but so far, the army generals seem to be proceeding with their own plans. despite local and international pressure. sudan is now standing at a crossroads, and the path to the future is quite uncertain. in ecuador — at least sixty—eight people have been killed in clashes between rival gangs in
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a prison. police say more deaths were avoided only because they were able to stop the unrest. at least ten people are said to have been injured in what is the latest outbreak of violence there. the same jail was the scene of a lethal riot in september in which a—hundred— and—nineteen people were killed. ecuadorean prisons are often overcrowded and struggle to cope with violent clashes that break out between drug gangs. the husband of the detained british—iranian aid worker nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, mrs zaghari—ratcliffe, a british—iranian dual national, was firstjailed in tehran in 2016 on spying charges, which she has always denied. richard ratcliffe has been on hunger strike in whitehall since 24 october, demanding the government does more to secure his wife's release. in a post on twitter, mr radcliffe explained his decision to end the strike saying: ”today i have
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promised nazanin to end the hunger strike. gabriella — their daughter — needs two parents. thank you all for your overwhelming care these past three weeks” on friday the bbc�*s victoria derbyshire spoke to him outside the foreign office and she asked him how gabriella had been impacted by her mother's imprisonment. clearly very traumatised at the beginning, would cry every night for her mum. they'd go to the picture on the mantelpiece at my in—laws house and point to the wedding photo of mummy and daddy saying, "i want to see mummy and daddy." and at some point, she adjusted to the reality that she was being brought up by her grandparents for a bit. that became her life, got to see nazinin in prison periodically, where she would be taken into solitary confinement, and the parents would wear hoods over their heads to go there. she was so small, of course, she didn't understand that. and, you know, the interrogators would insist on taking gabriella and playing with her first before they let her mum do it. and, you know, actually, at some point, she picked up emotionally she shouldn't play with them, she should just play with mummy and daddy, but at the beginning, she was just a little
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baby, so, absorbed it. over the years, she clearly when she came back and came back when she was past five years old, that was a real shock for her. she could speak farsi fluently, she'd lost her english. quite disruptive, came back to school, really threw herself into school and learning and being in english, and that way, as migrant children do, they almost don't want to speak their former language outside or anywhere near school and want to show that they are english. and i think now she's sort of a feeling settled into being where we live, part of the community and feeling normal. but she's definitely desperate to be normal rather than to be, you know, out of place. but she will ask, you know, "when is mummy coming home? and when can mummy pick me up from the school gates?" and how do you answer that? well, when mummy is coming home, i don't know. the south african novelist,
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wilbur smith, has died at the age of 88. born in northern rhodesia— now zambia— he wrote his first novel in 1964 and went on to write another 48 which have now sold over 140 million copies. smith wanted to become a journalist, writing about social conditions in south africa, but his father's advice to "get a real job" prompted him to become a tax accountant before returing to his first love — writing. he died at his home in cape town. a reminder of our top story the united nations climate summit in glasgow has adopted a new pact aimed at curbing global warming. the summit�*s british president, alok sharma, said the agreement would keep within reach the goal of limiting temperature rises to one— point— five degrees celsius, but only if countries kept their promises. the final text on fossil fuels was watered down at the last minute, with the expression �*phasing out�* of coal changed to �*phasing down', something both china and india had wanted. more on that and all our stories on our website.
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you can reach me on twitter — i'm @ philippa bbc. hello there. part one of the weekend was a little bit dull for many of us. we held onto cloudy skies, sunshine was limited. it is going to be pretty similar, i think, for sunday, with limited sunshine, a lot of cloud around, and there will be some rain as well, particularly across the northwest at the uk closer to this area of low pressure and its weather front. but further south, it's higher pressure, barely any isobars, so the winds will be light. but it is still going to be relatively mild for the time of year, particularly towards the western side of the country, as we draw up the south—westerly breeze. now, we start sunday morning off on a rather cloudy note. there could be a little bit of sunshine too, but also some mist and fog patches to watch out for. i think into the afternoon, much of england and wales should tend to see more holes breaking in the cloud
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with some sunny spells. a few showers across the southeast there, but the wettest and breeziest of the weather will be across the north and west of scotland, perhaps northwestern parts of northern ireland. 11—14 celsius pretty mild, but we could see 15 degrees for belfast. now, as we head through sunday night, that weather front in the northwest begins to sink southwards and eastwards. but as it's running into an area of high pressure, it will begin to fizzle out. so the rain will get lighter. there will be some heavier bursts on it, i think, during sunday night. those temperatures range from 6—11 celsius. so, this weather front will be sinking slowly southeastwards, almost grinding to a halt. as it pushes into that area of high pressure, it will fizzle out through the day. so, we start off with some patchy rain for southern scotland, just pushing into parts of northwest england and northwest wales, but you can see it fades away and just leaves no more than a band of cloud. behind it, skies brighten for scotland and northern ireland, just a few blustery showers,
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but a much better day. further south and east, another rather cloudy one for much of england and wales, limited sunshine once again. temperatures 11—12, maybe 13 celsius. as we move through the rest of the week, it stays milder, even turns very mild at times, particularly across southern areas, and most of the wind and the rain will be confined to the north of the uk, as you can see here, as we run through tuesday into wednesday, it's low—pressure to the north of the uk, which will bring these spells of wet and windy weather further south closer to this area of high pressure, this is where we will see the light winds and the more settled conditions. but you'll see how mild it is. temperatures reaching the mid—teens at times, particularly across southern areas. quite a bit of cloud around, limited sunshine with most of the rain confined to northern areas. see you later.
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this is bbc news.
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the headlines... the un climate summit has ended in glasgow with an agreement to strenghthen emissions—cutting targets for 2030. summit president, alok sharma, said the agreement would keep within reach the goal of limiting temperature rises to 1.5 degrees celsius. but a last minute intervention from india watered down the commitment. the final text changed the expression "phasing out" of coal to "phasing down", leaving many nations deeply disappointed. the un secretary general said the world was still knocking on the door of a climate catastrophe belarus has said it's stepping up humanitarian support to migrants trapped on the border with poland. it's been accused by the european union of cynically using them as political pawns, by engineering a surge in retaliation for eu sanctions against minsk. poland has accused belarus of trying to establish a permanent camp. now on bbc news, it's spotlight: escape from kabul.
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the story of an interpreter�*s family who fled afghanistan

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