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tv   Our World  BBC News  November 13, 2021 9:30pm-10:01pm GMT

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and dirty energy into clean energy, and that is_ dirty energy into clean energy, and that is one — dirty energy into clean energy, and that is one thing. the second thing is that— that is one thing. the second thing is that at— that is one thing. the second thing is that at the beginning of this cop. _ is that at the beginning of this cop. we — is that at the beginning of this cop, we saw a whole range of announcements, real—world announcements, real—world announcements on deforestation, methane, — announcements on deforestation, methane, coal, public finance. what i'll methane, coal, public finance. what i'tt -- _ methane, coal, public finance. what i'tt -- what— methane, coal, public finance. what i'll —— what will be interesting is over_ i'll —— what will be interesting is over the — i'll —— what will be interesting is over the coming year, in the run—up to the _ over the coming year, in the run—up to the date — over the coming year, in the run—up to the date to — over the coming year, in the run—up to the date to when countries need to the date to when countries need to bring _ to the date to when countries need to bring back their ambitious pledges, but actually to see some of those _ pledges, but actually to see some of those outside of the formal negotiation pledges worked into country— negotiation pledges worked into country ambitions. because that will make _ country ambitions. because that will make a _ country ambitions. because that will make a significant dent in some of the pledges that we received in advance — the pledges that we received in advance of this climate summit. and working _ advance of this climate summit. and working back through the year and the uk _ working back through the year and the uk cah— working back through the year and the uk can play a role working back through the year and the uk can playa role in shepherding that process. alok sharma exhausted _ shepherding that process. ir sharma exhausted tonight, rightly exhausted after what has been going on over the last few nights, he has been playing the role of sherpa, carrying the negotiation from one room to the other, carrying notes, getting agreement over one particular word or one particular
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phrase, it is a thankless task at times and at one point in the proceedings this evening, it —— he became visibly emotional as he apologised for the way in which a meeting within the —— with india and a change in a text, how that came about. have a watch. may i just say to all delegates, i apologise for the way this process has unfolded, and i am deeply sorry. i also understand the deep disappointment, but i think as you have noted, it is also vital that we protect this package.—
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ina in a rather touching moment in the proceedings. that spring and john, who are still with us. i guess having been at the sharp end of some of these negotiations, you have probably an exhausted and some of the summits yourself. you probably understand what was going on there, but it did happen very late then the night, and he didn't consult all the parties. india is a very big voice in the do of course, the marshall islands here a short time ago seemed a bit consulted, they are very unhappy, but at the end of the data have to make a judgment. did unhappy, but at the end of the data have to make a judgment.— unhappy, but at the end of the data have to make a judgment. have to make a 'udgment. did he make the riaht have to make a 'udgment. did he make the right can? — have to make ajudgment. did he make the right call? he _ have to make ajudgment. did he make the right call? he landed _ have to make ajudgment. did he make the right call? he landed a _ have to make ajudgment. did he make the right call? he landed a deal, - the right call? he landed a deal, the right call? he landed a deal, the only alternative facing him but have been to try and face down the indian delegation, which would have been risky. if i had been advising
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him in that position, i probably would have drawn my breath in and advise them to do what she did. let mejust one other thing advise them to do what she did. let me just one other thing about that, the sounds of inclusivity in this process is incredibly valuable. if you can't maintain a critical mass of this, too many people think it is not transparent enough, or too exclusive, this whole thing falls apart. it is based on reciprocal trust, so he was really walking a tightrope when he did that. particularly so in some of the countries concerned that valtrex quoted were precisely the kind of countries that i was mentioning earlier he got a pretty raw deal out of this, to be really blunt about this. but the other thing i would say, it is worth thinking quite hard about the significance of that moment. i think that the indian minister was also taking a risk, standing in the spotlight, trying to pull down the level of ambition of
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the soul exercise. and i think it's possible to look at that and support disorder was a desperate rearguard action on behalf of coal. i don't except for a moment that pulling an ambition and back to what is going to be a positive thing for those who are trying to alleviate poverty in countries like india. what it does is to socialise the risks that will have to be dealt with by incumbency interests who are locked into the coal based energy system, corporate interest, financial interest, political interest, as they contemplate the diminishing value of their assets. and there are much more attractive doberman passwords, hunted at the commitments made about ramping up renewable energy by 2030. some very positive elements in those commitments, but this is going to be the nub of the matter. have you seen
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at this marker the writing on the wall for coal, oiland at this marker the writing on the wall for coal, oil and gas, all fossil fuels. wall for coal, oil and gas, all fossilfuels. a lot wall for coal, oil and gas, all fossil fuels. a lot of people who are vested and call oil and gas have never quite believe that the game is up, we don't know that but there is an opportunity to make that a reality of the next few months. you had a lot of glass half—full, glass half empty discussion of the last half empty discussion of the last half an hour, i have been listening are contributing to it, but this isn't a moment to do that. this is a moment to redouble our efforts and work even harder inside the bubble and on the streets with peaceful activism to try to make sure that the promises no meds are delivered, and that the additional promises that need to be made that on the table by the time of the next cop in egypt. to table by the time of the next cop in e, -t. ., , table by the time of the next cop in e. -t. ., , , table by the time of the next cop in egypt. to stay with us, john. just to brina egypt. to stay with us, john. just to bring up-to-date, _ egypt. to stay with us, john. just to bring up-to-date, while - egypt. to stay with us, john. just to bring up-to-date, while john | egypt. to stay with us, john. just i to bring up-to-date, while john was to bring up—to—date, whilejohn was talking, there was a bit of a commotion because we are waiting for alok sharma to appear at this project. the microphones are live on
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the podium, and one of the activists got past the garden and shouted that cop has been a failure, and has been manhandled out of the room. a little bit lively for the conclusion here outside the plenaries room. i don't know if you can relate to whatjohn was doing there. if you had said to john, in copenhagener, all the way backin john, in copenhagener, all the way back in 2009, while we would be phasing out the internal combustion engine, and that would be in the text, and would have an agreement on getting rid of coal and all fossil fuels, he would have ruptured an arm. ~ , y fuels, he would have ruptured an arm. ~ , , ~ fuels, he would have ruptured an arm. , �* fuels, he would have ruptured an arm. , ~ arm. absolutely. and looking back six short years _ arm. absolutely. and looking back six short years to _ arm. absolutely. and looking back six short years to repair _ arm. absolutely. and looking back six short years to repair the - six short years to repair the trajectory was just before the paris agreement, we were on track for 6
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degrees of warming. after the paris agreement, it was down to 4 degrees of warming, then over the years just before the summit and was a 2.7 degrees of warming, and that rehab estimates of around 2.4. also done possibly to 1.8 at the broader promises and pledges outside the formal negotiations are brought into play. and there were just like to take a step back and think, it is tricky, because as night topping was sent, it is fantastic progress, but it is still not enough. what is really interesting as it is a synergy here about what the activists on the one hunter, calling it a failure, and then you have climate deniers or climate to layers, as the undercoat also calling it a failure. it is a very strange synergy from those who do want climate action on those who are wanting to delay climate action, actually calling this cop the same thing. and i think we do need to
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step back. yes, they are right, not enough has been done on loss and damage, not enough on finance, but the fact that it ratchet, there is agreement that countries will come back within one year rather than five years in order to increase their ambition on their promises to reduce carbon emissions, that's can't be overestimated, how critical thatis, can't be overestimated, how critical that is, because this next decade is critical decade. emissions need to be half by 2030, and they are not on track, so countries can't wait five years to come back, they need to come back within the year, and that is why there is agreement actually so critical. if is why there is agreement actually so critical. , ., ., is why there is agreement actually so critical. ., ., ., so critical. if you go about two weeks, so critical. if you go about two weeks. peeple _ so critical. if you go about two weeks, people sing, _ so critical. if you go about two weeks, people sing, it - so critical. if you go about two weeks, people sing, it be - so critical. if you go about two weeks, people sing, it be a i so critical. if you go about two - weeks, people sing, it be a success when the presidency is not in the negotiating is one of the big five emitters. what has happened since wednesday? we have had a declaration between united states and china on
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the enhancement of climate action in the enhancement of climate action in the 20 20s, sort of recognition from china that they have to do something in there is a pivotal decade. that in there is a pivotal decade. that in itself is a major step forward, and now we have president biden, presidency on monday, a bilateral virtual conference, they haven't been talking for months, and there are going to be talking together about climate change. —— and president xi. about climate change. -- and president xi.— about climate change. -- and president xi. �* ., president xi. and when you look at that and the _ president xi. and when you look at that and the broader, _ president xi. and when you look at that and the broader, geopolitical. that and the broader, geopolitical context. — that and the broader, geopolitical context, the tensions we have seen between _ context, the tensions we have seen between these are too big emitting a very powerful nations ended last year. _ very powerful nations ended last year. part— very powerful nations ended last year, part of the nuclear powered submarines of the pandemic and its origins. _ submarines of the pandemic and its origins. you — submarines of the pandemic and its origins, you have seen a lot of tension. — origins, you have seen a lot of tension, trade words, overthe years — tension, trade words, overthe years and _ tension, trade words, overthe years. and actually people to call climate _ years. and actually people to call climate is — years. and actually people to call climate is a bit of an oasis, per of these _ climate is a bit of an oasis, per of these powers can come together and actually— these powers can come together and actually collaborate, and that can
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only be _ actually collaborate, and that can only be good for the broader international community. but what i would _ international community. but what i would say _ international community. but what i would say is that we do need to be a little bit _ would say is that we do need to be a little bit careful about the collaboration, because it has been said that _ collaboration, because it has been said that america and china actually to have _ said that america and china actually to have more in common than perhaps would _ to have more in common than perhaps would like _ to have more in common than perhaps would like to _ to have more in common than perhaps would like to admit to themselves, or to _ would like to admit to themselves, or to the _ would like to admit to themselves, or to the boil. you would like to admit to themselves, or to the boil.— would like to admit to themselves, or to the boil. you mean in slowing this process _ or to the boil. you mean in slowing this process down? _ or to the boil. you mean in slowing this process down? and _ or to the boil. you mean in slowing this process down? and many - or to the boil. you mean in slowing i this process down? and many things. the both this process down? and many things. they both have _ this process down? and many things. they both have to _ this process down? and many things. they both have to answer _ this process down? and many things. they both have to answer to - this process down? and many things. they both have to answer to a - this process down? and many things. they both have to answer to a very i they both have to answer to a very powerful _ they both have to answer to a very powerful domestic audience, on the part of— powerful domestic audience, on the part of that — powerful domestic audience, on the part of that domestic audience is much _ part of that domestic audience is much more powerful to the leaders of those _ much more powerful to the leaders of those countries that an international audience is. they are always— international audience is. they are always point to a domestic audience, there _ always point to a domestic audience, there are _ always point to a domestic audience, there are both big emitters. they both have — there are both big emitters. they both have a very international reach, — both have a very international reach, and _ both have a very international reach, and the computer lock. but their— reach, and the computer lock. but their interests to collate somewhat, and you _ their interests to collate somewhat, and you could argue that that statement was made was actually not particularly good, because it took a little bit _ particularly good, because it took a little bit of— particularly good, because it took a little bit of the off china, after a week— little bit of the off china, after a week and — little bit of the off china, after a week and a half when they refuelling pressure. _ week and a half when they refuelling pressure, but we had seen and to come _ pressure, but we had seen and to come up — pressure, but we had seen and to come up with a really good net zero
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pledge. _ come up with a really good net zero pledge, and rubbing up ambition in the 20 _ pledge, and rubbing up ambition in the 20 30s, to the other allies taking — the 20 30s, to the other allies taking action, pressure,, and they were _ taking action, pressure,, and they were thinking they had more structures. and then you have the us - chiha _ structures. and then you have the us — china statement, which takes the pressure _ — china statement, which takes the pressure off, it makes them look good, _ pressure off, it makes them look good, but — pressure off, it makes them look good, but the substance of it was not actually much beyond what was agreed _ not actually much beyond what was agreed and the paris agreement. so, we can— agreed and the paris agreement. so, we can debate, it is good on the one hand, _ we can debate, it is good on the one hand, possibly not so good on the other, _ hand, possibly not so good on the other, howeverwhat hand, possibly not so good on the other, however what we do seek you is an agreement that brings countries back round the table within— countries back round the table within the year, and now they need to match _ within the year, and now they need to match that with the finance. alok sharma is right _ to match that with the finance. ir sharma is right behind us, we are looking out them.— looking out them. let's listen in. i'm ve looking out them. let's listen in. m very pleased _ looking out them. let's listen in. i'm very pleased to _ looking out them. let's listen in. i'm very pleased to say - looking out them. let's listen in. i'm very pleased to say that i looking out them. let's listen in. i'm very pleased to say that we l looking out them. let's listen in. i i'm very pleased to say that we now have in place the glagow climate pact, signed by all the parties
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here. you can see... the bodyjust came out and set out what they wanted to come out of this. i would say that this is a fragile thing, and we have kept it 1.5. that was my own objector from a set of mature only two years ago, taking on the role of the presidency. but i would still say that the pulse of 1.5 is weak. and that is why, classic... and that
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is why, prosper habits, i do believe, an historic agreement, what they should bejudged on is notjust they should bejudged on is notjust the fact that countries have signed up, butjudged on four that they meet and deliver the commitments, and tuning up presidency year, which started at the start of this summer, we will ensure that we worked really hard to ensure that the commitments have been set out are being delivered by countries, and we will work in partnership with all of them. collectively, we have got this over the line. i'm incredibly grateful to everyone who has helped with this, but as i say, the hard work starts now. thank you. with the intervention to weaken the language on call that cop26 take your credibility hat at the last moment,
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and also, you are clearly emotional on stage as the process went on, what was going to yemen? thank you for that. what was going to yemen? thank you forthat. firstly, what was going to yemen? thank you for that. firstly, of course i wish we had managed to preserve the limit on coal that was originally agreed. nevertheless, we do have language coal on first, and i don't think anyone at the start of this process but toughness of some expected that that would have been returned, but it has. and i think that is down to the flexibility and the goodwill shown by many of the parties here today. yes, the language was not what we had set out to do, but nevertheless, this was it language that was ultimately a good, and i want to thank all the parties who showed such good grace and agreeing to it. you ask about my being emotional. i have had about six hours sleep in the last three days.
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but it is emotional in the sense that collectively as a team we have achieved what i suspect very many people doubted, probably aren'tjust the last few days. so of course it is emotional, but as i said, the hard work starts here. thank you. congratulations. it is quite an intense — congratulations. it is quite an intense process. on coal, if you had a friend _ intense process. on coal, if you had a friend that — intense process. on coal, if you had a friend that said i'm going to face down _ a friend that said i'm going to face down smoking rather than giving up, would _ down smoking rather than giving up, would you _ down smoking rather than giving up, would you be impressed? and a loss and damage, there is not going to be and damage, there is not going to be a dialogue _ and damage, there is not going to be a dialogue. what will the uk presidency contribute to that dialogue? in presidency contribute to that dialo . ue? . presidency contribute to that dialo . ue? , ., presidency contribute to that dialouue? , ., ., dialogue? in terms of coal, as i said, i dialogue? in terms of coal, as i said. i wish _ dialogue? in terms of coal, as i said, i wish we _ dialogue? in terms of coal, as i said, i wish we had _ dialogue? in terms of coal, as i said, i wish we had been i dialogue? in terms of coal, as i said, i wish we had been able l dialogue? in terms of coal, as i | said, i wish we had been able to retain the language that was originally there. nevertheless, we do have language on coal, we have language on a phasing turn unabated coal, and i think many people will work on the fact that at least has
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been achieved. one of my goals at the start of the work was to be able to say that we have consigned coal to say that we have consigned coal to history. and if you look at so far we have come over the past year, we have not got the g7, t20, all signed up to ending international coal financing, signed up to ending international coalfinancing, and signed up to ending international coal financing, and today, signed up to ending international coalfinancing, and today, here, almost 200 countries have signed up to a down unabated coal. i think thatis to a down unabated coal. i think that is something that we can be proud of, but as i said, nevertheless, i wish we had been able to retain the original marriage. on loss and damage, for the very first time, loss and damage has appeared in they cover text, and that again demonstrates both the change in the bid that people are approaching this, being more collegiate, and yes it is a work programme, we will contribute to that, but i think the key issue is,
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it has been recognised that loss and damage is an issue that deserves proper consideration, and that was shown here today. taste proper consideration, and that was shown here today.— proper consideration, and that was shown here today. we have spent two weeks listening _ shown here today. we have spent two weeks listening to _ shown here today. we have spent two weeks listening to heartbreaking i weeks listening to heartbreaking stories— weeks listening to heartbreaking stories in— weeks listening to heartbreaking stories in the whole, from people whose _ stories in the whole, from people whose countries are naturally being swallowed by the sea. many of them a furious _ swallowed by the sea. many of them a furious and _ swallowed by the sea. many of them a furious and saddened to hear the language — furious and saddened to hear the language water tight at the last moment. the minister for fiji said he felt _ moment. the minister for fiji said he felt like — moment. the minister for fiji said he felt like it had been held hostage. when you're quite downstairs, possibly because you knew _ downstairs, possibly because you knew that — downstairs, possibly because you knew that there still was not enough to protect _ knew that there still was not enough to protect the most vulnerable countries? it to protect the most vulnerable countries?— to protect the most vulnerable countries? , . , .,~ countries? it is heartbreaking, i have had the — countries? it is heartbreaking, i have had the honour _ countries? it is heartbreaking, i have had the honour to - countries? it is heartbreaking, i have had the honour to go i countries? it is heartbreaking, i have had the honour to go and. countries? it is heartbreaking, ii have had the honour to go and visit countries around the world over the last year and meet communities who are on the front line of climate change. i have seen for myself that when people talk about 1.5 to keep alive, that is precisely what it means. so i do understand that and i
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understand the sense of disappointment. but what was really important for me was obviously to try and get a deal over the line, to ensure that all the hard work that parties commit ministers, negotiators had put in over two years was not going to dissipate. so, we have managed to get a lot of things over the line in terms of finance, in terms of adaptation, in terms of mitigation. yes, i am sorry that we couldn't hold the original language on coal, but nevertheless we do have language on coal, and i think that is a start. i we do have language on coal, and i think that is a start.— think that is a start. i was 'ust wondering �* think that is a start. i was 'ust wondering what i think that is a start. i was 'ust wondering what would i think that is a start. i wasjust wondering what would you i think that is a start. i wasjust| wondering what would you say think that is a start. i wasjust i wondering what would you say to those _ wondering what would you say to those vulnerable countries, because they have _ those vulnerable countries, because they have told me they couldn't reopen — they have told me they couldn't reopen the tech's command right at the largest— reopen the tech's command right at the largest one of these developing economies was able to reopen the taxed _ economies was able to reopen the taxed antigen supporting. in terms of reapening _
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taxed antigen supporting. in terms of reopening the _ taxed antigen supporting. in terms of reopening the text, _ taxed antigen supporting. in terms of reopening the text, you - taxed antigen supporting. in terms of reopening the text, you are i of reopening the text, you are right, from our perspective reset at the final battle won, but was published this morning. ultimately, we were always going to get to a point but if there were countries that wanted to raise concerns and objections they would be able to do that, having heard about what was coming down the line, i thought it was important that we try and build some consensus, and i apologise people felt that the process that took place was somewhat opaque. nevertheless, and you will have seen this in the focus the cameras, identical vent and test the language with a whole range of groups and parties. —— i did go round. and i think it is because the trust that year he has built up over the past few years the people were able to accept the language at the end of the day, very reluctantly, of course. and i'm disappointed, as i said, in terms of where we ended up,
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but nevertheless we have got a historic agreement over the line. i am not going to go into the conversations that took place amongst parties, but i think anyone who has seen footage of the conversations can make up their own minds about howl conversations can make up their own minds about how i felt. what conversations can make up their own minds about how i felt.— minds about how i felt. what could the consequences _ minds about how i felt. what could the consequences would _ minds about how i felt. what could the consequences would be - minds about how i felt. what could the consequences would be for i the consequences would be for countries — the consequences would be for countries perhaps that kind of —— perhaps— countries perhaps that kind of —— perhaps like australia that chose to ignore _ perhaps like australia that chose to ignore the — perhaps like australia that chose to ignore the risk averse out of this fact to _ ignore the risk averse out of this fact to come back next year with a higher— fact to come back next year with a higher target? fire fact to come back next year with a higher target?— fact to come back next year with a higher target? are conscious of sign u . higher target? are conscious of sign u- to this, higher target? are conscious of sign up to this. and _ higher target? are conscious of sign up to this, and at _ higher target? are conscious of sign up to this, and at the _ higher target? are conscious of sign up to this, and at the end _ higher target? are conscious of sign up to this, and at the end of- higher target? are conscious of sign up to this, and at the end of the i up to this, and at the end of the day, this is an international agreement, and every country will be judged by whether or not they stick to the commitments they have made. that applies for all the countries that are party to this agreement. the language has changed overdrafts
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when it _ the language has changed overdrafts when it came to fossil fuels and subsidies — when it came to fossil fuels and subsidies. is the reality that there is still— subsidies. is the reality that there is still a _ subsidies. is the reality that there is still a long way to go to get a collective — is still a long way to go to get a collective consensus on energy transition — collective consensus on energy transition and on fossil fuels? there — transition and on fossil fuels? there is— transition and on fossil fuels? there is certainly more work to be done on this issue, there is no doubt about that. however, as i have asserted, when we take on the role of the presidency, said very clearly that i wanted us to try to concern call, to history, and if at that here, to the end of this year at cop, we would have ensured that the biggest economies were no longer finance international co—projects, and we had managed to get the sort of agreement we have had here, i think people would have been sceptical. yes, of course, i wanted to go further, faster, but as i also said, we have ensured through the last week that there have been announcements in terms of supporting countries with a energy transition.
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$10 million, has been set at. —— 10 billion. should be bigger and faster? of course. the billion. should be bigger and faster? of course.— billion. should be bigger and faster? of course. . ., . , faster? of course. the cop president alok sharma — faster? of course. the cop president alok sharma just _ faster? of course. the cop president alok sharma just completing - faster? of course. the cop president alok sharma just completing his i alok sharma just completing his approach a press conference here, right behind us at the pudding. just to sum up to be seen, i understand the sense of disappointment that we had to change some of the wanting relating to the critical passage about coal, facing down rather than phasing out unabated coal, but i had to get a deal over the line to ensure all the hard work was not going to dissipate. i am sorry we couldn't hold the language on coal, but we do have some language, and thatis but we do have some language, and that is a start. i'm not going to go into the conversations that happen, he said, but anyone who was watching the negotiations on the floor, which we were, or howl the negotiations on the floor, which we were, or how i felt about it. and clearly, there was some frustration
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on the part of the cop president. that's quickly go tojohn kerry, also holding a press conference at the moment. he also holding a press conference at the moment-— also holding a press conference at the moment. he would still have a rise of about _ the moment. he would still have a rise of about three _ the moment. he would still have a rise of about three point _ the moment. he would still have a | rise of about three point something degrees, if not more. however, four. paris was a signal to the marketplace, not a guarantee that we wouldn't be able to hold the earth's temperature rises to well below 2 degrees, let alone 1.5. but now, here in glasgow, we have 65% of global gdp committed to real plans that have been certified by the ipcc are by the iea, or by various modellers that you know. they have been certified to say, just come if you do all those things, you can keep 1.5 degrees alight. how does a result of what took place here, with nations who have never even consider having the what coal in a plan, but
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it remains, even today after what took place, coal and the phase darren cole is on the books. it is part of the decision. —— the phase down coal. and you have to phase down coal. and you have to phase down coal. and you have to phase down coal before you can enter coal. so, this is a beginning or something. i think we always knew that glasgow was not the finish line, and anybody who thought it was doesn't understand the chance that we have. glasgow was never going to be that we were going to come to glasgow and everybody was going to have a decision that was somehow going to end the crisis. are automatically put us on the path we have to go. so i would say that, paris about the arena and glasgow starts the race. and tonight, the
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starting gun was fired. and we have about nine years within which to make those critical decisions. we were warned about them in 2018 by the ipcc, and we have in this decade, the decisive decade, in order to cut 45% of global emissions to hold on to now, we raised ambition here in glasgow. this was not business as usual. i have been attending these meetings since 1992, when we first created this entire process, and the story here is not taught only through the ndcs, as critical as you are. they ndcs for the basic tool that paris created, but the fact is that we saw the full
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coalition that we need come together here in glasgow and make a commitment, and that includes civil society, private sector, ngos, activists, young people, older people, people from all over the world. demonstrating and pushing. and the result is that we have tribal and indigenous representatives here in force, demanding a just transition which is vital, and to mounting environmental justice. this is critical to any approach. so, we had a series of objectors before we came here. first, thanks took many months of negotiations, the objective we had of finalising that so—called archaic name, the the rule book, the
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infamous robert, be completed here, folks. that was a go. and it was really hard to be able to do that. there are soft negotiations over things that matter and the context of the economy and trade in peoples beliefs over how they should behave in this process. —— there were a tough negotiation. transparency grows, all of those things, progress in order to measure fur we are going with the andy cs and what the meaning is. we set out to raise ambition, and on our team, meaning is. we set out to raise ambition, and on ourteam, we travelled the world to do that. we raised ambition with engineers, raised ambition with engineers, raised ambition with south africa, raised ambition with south africa, raised ambition with japan, with south korea, with our colleagues in canada. raised ambition in terms of saudi arabia and brazil. and so the
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majority of the 20 largest economies in the world, which are responsible for 80% of all emissions, are among those committed to achieve the 1.5 degrees. and what we believe we are doing and that raising of ambition is setting a template for what we take out to other countries all around the world. third, glasgow capsis around the world. third, glasgow caps is a very clear blueprint to come forward for the things that we need to do through 2030 and 2030 through 2050, and it embraces keeping 1.5 alight. it sets out a lot of steps in that. some people might want wanted stronger language, the text that we agreed to as the first ever, believe it or not, mention of coal and a fossil fuel
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subsidies. that has never happened. and it has happened in a way that big countries that have been dependent on coal have signed on to phase down. does that mean it has been facing down, no. that is the full, that is accountability, the reporting. but we emerge from glasgow having dramatically raised the world's ambition to solve this challenge in this decade and beyond. and we will have measurements starting nine, every month, every day, every period of the year, each year, come forward, and we have a formal doctor because you are not in 2023. so, there is accountability built into what happened here in glasgow. fourth, we focus on the critical issue, adaptation. and president biden started to break with a commitment to adaptation, creating the president's emergency
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plan for adaptation and resurgence and putting $3 billion into it, dear one. that is how we started this cop, and we gladlyjoin in supporting the doubling of funding for adaptation, supporting the doubling of funding foradaptation, because supporting the doubling of funding for adaptation, because it's needed. we are at the end of the summit in the last hour the text which has been negotiated over the last two weeks has been adopted by 196 countries. here in glasgow. we are listening to the special envoy for climate, joe biden's special envoy for climate, john kerry. let's listen. , . ., ., listen. they are going to meet their commitments _ listen. they are going to meet their commitments under _ listen. they are going to meet their commitments under going - listen. they are going to meet their commitments under going to i listen. they are going to meet their commitments under going to bring | commitments under going to bring business into this fight. i repeat this. no government in the world has enough money in their budget or outside of it publicly to be able to
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affect the transition that we need to

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