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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 13, 2021 12:00pm-12:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. negotiators at the cop26 climate conference have published a draft agreement after talks in glasgow continued through the night. countries are urged to phase out coal and inefficient fossilfuel subsidies — and show plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2022. i'm luxmy gopal in london with the rest of your headlines. hundreds of migrants remain trapped along the border between belarus and poland, caught up in the middle of a political stand—off. it is official, the conservatorship of britney spears has been terminated. and the conservatorship that's controlled britney spears�* life for 13 years has been brought
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to an end. welcome to glasgow and the cop26 negotiations — which are now in overtime, as negotiators from nearly 200 countries try to strike a deal on tackling climate change. a new draft agreement has been published in the last hour. let's bring you some of the main points. most crucially, the reference to phasing out inefficient fossilfuel subsidies is still in the agreement, even after some countries reportedly wanted to remove it. the deal also asks all countries
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to upgrade their climate pledges next year. and rich countries are asked to double their climate adaptation finance by 2025 from 2019 levels. we are waiting for a plenary to start. what that means in practise is that dell greats from the almost 200 i can tri, they come and give us an update where they are at with this draft agreement. are they supporting it, are there issues they want sorting out. that should give us an idea of the direction of travel and whether we are close to it being signed off. the seats pretty empty at the moment but we expect it to start filling up soon.
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victoria gill with with me as she has been throughout all of this. vicks foria, i am very thankful for it! you have had time to look through the draft. let us talk about finance first of all, because there are two lots of finance to talk about. there is the finance going forward, dealing with adapting to climate change, there is the finance that talks about compensating for what has happened to them, but the text on that, the detail on that, seems to be missing and there are a lot of complaints about that today. yes, we are hearing a lot of push back from developing countries on that, so that will only know when negotiators sit down and start going through this and if objections are raised if that is an issue, i am hearing that is likely to be an issue, so you can think of what you explained there as these stoats of financing, from the developed world to the developing world, being about going forward, adapting, mitigating,
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protecting themselves against stranging climate. then damage that has happened so you look at the how the world has warmed and how that has been driven by greenhouse gas emissions and by industrialisation of developed nation, and this word compensation is tricky so the first draft talked about a tech any cal facility to set up almost like a globalfund —— technical. it didn't use the word compensate, to fund that loss and damage repair, now that loss and damage repair, now that has gone, now, and we are talking about discussions, and we are talking about what looks like a talking shop. we will discuss the possibility of this loss and damage, this technical facility. possibility of this loss and damage, this technicalfacility. e possibility of this loss and damage, this technical facility. e that is pretty woolly. it is nowhere near the level of detail that the developing world wants, is it? it looks like kicking it into the long grass, it looks basically like, yes, 0k we will have a discussion about this, ratherthan
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0k we will have a discussion about this, rather than we are addressing this, rather than we are addressing this as an issue that needs to be compensated now, and it is about how the language might suggest a liability for that damage that has already been caused, the developed nation it is a, particularly the us, to a lesser extent the eu nation also just not cope with that at all, that could be a real block, so there will be a lot of push back to bring that language much more strongly into this agreement, and that could be where, you know, where elbows are sharp on this h and where there is some real disagreement, so, that could be what holds up, that could be one of the issues we are hearing that could hold up this next set of line by line discussions about this plan. line by line discussions about this lan. ~ ., ., . plan. with whether someone watching us toda , plan. with whether someone watching us today, whether _ plan. with whether someone watching us today, whether they _ plan. with whether someone watching us today, whether they are _ plan. with whether someone watching us today, whether they are in - us today, whether they are in agreement, and that could be where, you know, where elbows are sharp on this h and where there is some real disagreement, so, that could be what holds up, that could be one of the issues we are hearing that could hold up this next set of line by
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line discussions about this plan. with whether someone watching us today, whether they are in south africa, the marshall "lands, here in the uk, the —— islands, the big common question for everyone round the world, is this summit doing enough to keep a lid on global warming and that has been the overarching question, i guess, all the way through this, and where are we on than particular question victoria? 50 we on than particular question victoria? , ,, , victoria? so the process, this onauoin victoria? so the process, this ongoing decades _ victoria? so the process, this ongoing decades long - victoria? so the process, this| ongoing decades long process victoria? so the process, this i ongoing decades long process is definitely dialling down that global temperature rise, but it is a case of whether we are keeping pace with how quickly the planet is heating up, and the answer to that question is no, when we leaked at the science before this cop, this conference started we were on a trajectory to about 2.7 degree the rise by the end of the century, that is if all of the pledges and agreements have that have been made and are kept and delivered on time. we have made more pledges and promises and there are more plans, a road map forward in this draft agreement, that dial down that temperature a little bit more, but it is still round about the 2, post most pessimistic 2.4 mark, we are nowhere near in this set of plan, we are nowhere near 1.5. the
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issueis plan, we are nowhere near 1.5. the issue is whether this puts us on an accelerated trajectory to cut emissions, clean up and get faster at that and that is where this finance, adaptation, shifting all the economies into a cleaner gear that, where that will make that faster and catch up with the fist suffix climate change. for faster and catch up with the fist suffix climate change.— suffix climate change. for the moment. _ suffix climate change. for the moment, thank _ suffix climate change. for the moment, thank you, - suffix climate change. for the moment, thank you, we - suffix climate change. for the moment, thank you, we will i suffix climate change. for the i moment, thank you, we will talk suffix climate change. for the - moment, thank you, we will talk more about the science of all of this throughout the rest of the day. i'm joined now by teresa anderson, climate policy coordinator, actionaid international. thank you very much forjoining us today, and i wanted first of all to get your reaction to this latest version of the draft agreement. well, we feel quite devastated at the fact that the text droevent reasons the need to help communities
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recover and rebuilt after they have been impacted by climate disaster, we came into this provailsly feeling a drum beat of expectation, messages coming from citizens across scotland, the uk, europe, the world really saying we understand that this is a global crisis, and we cannot leave communities on the front lines of the crisis to deal with the problems on their own. that is why we need this language of a funding facility to address loss and damage, and it is not there in the text now and it feels like a slap in the face. so, just to be clear for our viewer, this is about the compensation for damage already done, rather than money going forward, to deal with climate change? the money going forward, to deal with climate change?— climate change? the word compensation _ climate change? the word compensation doesn't - climate change? the wordl compensation doesn't even climate change? the word - compensation doesn't even need to climate change? the word _ compensation doesn't even need to be in the mix, it is about helping people to recover and repair after they have been through the disaster, if you have been hit by a cyclone,
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if you have been hit by a cyclone, if you have been hit by a cyclone, if you have been devastated by floods or if you have lost your income as a result of drought, then you need income to be able to bridge that crisis, and to be able to cope with moving forward, otherwise you are fall into deeper, intop a poverty spiral, experience migration, etc, we know the impact of climate change are getting much worse and the countries who are experiencing the worst problems are the ones who have done the the least cause the crisis, so that is why global financing facility to address loss and damage will help do what needs to be done, in order to recover in the aftermath. so began this summit here in glasgow talking at some length about climate justice, about the global north, the global south and whether there could be a coming together of minds, and a plan, an action plan to move forward. have you got any sense of after that? forward. have you got any sense of afterthat? based forward. have you got any sense of after that? based on what you have
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said, i am guessing not, after that? based on what you have said, iam guessing not, really? i said, lam guessing not, really? i think there was huge said, lam guessing not, really? i think there was huge expectation that this would be the cop about climate justice, that this would be the cop about climatejustice, about that this would be the cop about climate justice, about the global north, the global south and whether there could be a coming together of minds, and a plan, an action plan to move forward. have you got any sense of after that? based on what you have said, i am guessing not, really? i think there was huge expectation that this would be the cop when the world said "we are in this together", and then you know, this together", and then you know, this latest draft just this together", and then you know, this latest draftjust makes it feet like we are turning our backs on you, you are on your own. that is devastating _ you, you are on your own. that is devastating for _ you, you are on your own. that is devastating for you, _ you, you are on your own. that is devastating for you, i _ you, you are on your own. that is devastating for you, i can - you, you are on your own. that is devastating for you, i can see - you, you are on your own. that is devastating for you, i can see it l you, you are on your own. that is| devastating for you, i can see it in your face, devastating for you, i can see it in yourface, i can hear it in your voice, you are clearly bitterly disappointed with where we are at in this process. do you holdous any hope that in the hours —— hold out any hope in the hours remaining that something will change, because we are near the end of this cop? the last hours — are near the end of this cop? the last hours are _ are near the end of this cop? tue: last hours are critical are near the end of this cop? tte: last hours are critical and we really need those rich countries the ones that are blocking and refusing to move, to say we are willing to be held accountable for the century or more of pollution we have done, that we have wealthy off the backs of. we
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are willing to work with those on the front line, they have to hear this message and they have to move because it, this is the last, or this has been the best chance we have had to get a result, and we don't want to leave cop26 empty—handed. thank you very much for your time today. teresa anderson saying we came into this cop, this conference to a drum beat of expectation but clearly, speaking on behalf of actionaid she is very disappointed with what we have so far in this latest draft agreement. well, i've been speaking to professor rosalind cornforth who's director of the walker institute at the university of reading — a meteorologist with many years experience of working with communities in sub—saharan africa. i asked her what the draft agreement might mean to them. i think that is a very important question, and it reminds me of what
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the kenya minister was saying last night at the global stocktake, he talked about... so mitigation, adaptation and finance, but over the top of that, is implementation, and thatis top of that, is implementation, and that is really where we need to get to, with this cop. making it one of notjust to, with this cop. making it one of not just words to, with this cop. making it one of notjust words but of to, with this cop. making it one of not just words but of action, to, with this cop. making it one of notjust words but of action, so in terms of the communities, i was peek speaking to the madagascar delegation last week and they said this is one thing but how do we implement it. how do we take it down into the communities to make positive actions towards supporting their resilience, so we are approaching that point but implementation, that is what we want to look at next. the implementation, that is what we want to look at next-— to look at next. the chair of the committee _ to look at next. the chair of the committee on _ to look at next. the chair of the committee on climate - to look at next. the chair of the committee on climate change i to look at next. the chair of the i committee on climate change here to look at next. the chair of the - committee on climate change here in the uk told me earlier, that there wasn't enough yet in this text on transparency, accountability, measuring promises and pledge, measuring promises and pledge, measuring delivery, would you ray
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with that? t measuring delivery, would you ray with that? ~ ., measuring delivery, would you ray with that? ~ . ., , with that? i think that was the verdict of _ with that? i think that was the verdict of many _ with that? i think that was the verdict of many of _ with that? i think that was the verdict of many of the - with that? l think that was the | verdict of many of the ministers with that? i think that was the - verdict of many of the ministers at the stocktake yesterday, but i mean part of that is part having the tools in place to be able to do that measuring, and being able to evaluate for example the benefits of adaptation options and importantly for that, adaptation options and importantly forthat, having adaptation options and importantly for that, having the people round the table, who are taking the decisions and who the impacts of climate are affecting, so bringing them round the table to help really lead on adaptation planning, that is important and that enables us to really put the tools together that harness the science and enable us to understand the impacts of climate change, and evaluate the options that people have in front of them. but is the vision there, and is the momentum there, do you think, is that going in the right direction with what we have in this draft text? ,, ., ~ with what we have in this draft text? ~ ., ., , text? so, ithinki am leaving this co a bit text? so, ithinki am leaving this cop a bit more — text? so, ithinki am leaving this cop a bit more optimistic - text? so, ithinki am leaving this cop a bit more optimistic than - text? so, ithinki am leaving this cop a bit more optimistic than i l cop a bit more optimistic than i have in the last five. i think it is
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heading in the right direction, but... t heading in the right direction, but... , , ., , heading in the right direction, but. . ._ well, - heading in the right direction, but. . ._ well, we heading in the right direction, - but. . ._ well, we just but... i sense a but. well, we 'ust need to put — but... i sense a but. well, we 'ust need to put the i but... i sense a but. well, we 'ust need to put the details * but... i sense a but. well, we 'ust need to put the details into i but... i sense a but. well, wejust need to put the details into the i need to put the details into the process, i mean, just speaking to the kenyan government yesterday, we do a lot of work on the ground in pulling through the science, to support the decision making, and there are still issues in terms of accessing finance, converting it from loans to grants, the maldives minister earlier this week was speaking about applying for a project in 2008, and not getting the funds till 2015, so, there is detail. �* ., ., ., , detail. and in one of the paragraphs notes with concern _ detail. and in one of the paragraphs notes with concern is _ detail. and in one of the paragraphs notes with concern is the _ detail. and in one of the paragraphs notes with concern is the wording i notes with concern is the wording inincreased indebtedness as a consequence of the coronavirus pandemic, you have that indebtedness, the indebtednesses from loans taken out to try to deal with climate change, so it is more about giving people pots of money
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they don't have to pay back. absolutely. and again, this was another discussion i had with a different delegation, the indebtedness is a real issue because they are facing one crisis after another, trying to build their resilience and yet another crisis hits, they are in debt and then it is harder to access the funds they need. d0 is harder to access the funds they need. , ., is harder to access the funds they need. ,, ~ , ., ., , need. do you think it is going to be ossible, need. do you think it is going to be possible, obvious _ need. do you think it is going to be possible, obvious there _ need. do you think it is going to be possible, obvious there is - need. do you think it is going to be possible, obvious there is the i need. do you think it is going to be i possible, obvious there is the money go foger ward to deal with the impact of cling, but in terms of compensation for what has happened, that has been pushed into another talks process. is it going to be possible to come up with an equitable agreement on that, because where do you, where do you measure, how do you louise mensch your how much compensation there should be for what has happened? that much compensation there should be for what has happened?— for what has happened? that is a very difficult _ for what has happened? that is a very difficult question, _ for what has happened? that is a very difficult question, and i i for what has happened? that is a l very difficult question, and i mean, the hope here is that the countries are coming back again, next year, and i think that is really important. attribution science has made some head way in terms of being
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able to assess an at guet specific events, which is important in terms of helping to have the tools in place, to make those assessments. let us look back in the conference hall where that plenary is due to happen. it is still looking pretty empty there but it will be really important to hear what the delegates say once they are gathered there, to get a sense of how close we might be, or not, to a final deal. what we are hearing, is that issue of loss and damage that we have been talking about, so that is about giving money to countries most affected by climate change, generally in the developing world, to help people get back on their feet essentially before they can move forward and adapt to climate change. it is the lack of detail on that, the lack of money to help with that, that seems
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to be a real sticking point and could delay at this stage, a deal being reached, so we will keep a very close eye on whether that moves or not. but for the moment, it is back to luxmy in the studio. the humanitarian crisis along the border between belarus and poland continues to escalate, as more migrants head to the border, only to be caught in a political limbo between the two nations. polish police say they found the body of a young syrian man on the polish side of the border overnight. it's estimated that at least eight people have died near the border — and without proper access to food, water and medical aid, there are fears dozens more could die in the coming weeks. 0ur correspondent steve rosenberg was able to access migrants on the belarus side of the border. by day, the scale of this migrant crisis becomes clear. belarus's border with poland transformed into a camp for those desperate to get to europe.
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tonight, for the first time, belarusian border guards agreed to take us into the camp, right up to the border. behind the barbed wire, the european union, just metres away. many here are kurds from the middle east. the eu believes that belarus helped them get here, that the country is facilitating illegal migration into europe — revenge for sanctions. but poland won't let them in. we are like homeless, we don't have any place to stay there. it is about whether it's too cold, we just collect fire and burning trees to make our bodies heat. but still we hope, we never give up. we've been told there are more than 2000 people in this camp,
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living in pretty basic conditions. this story is a very human drama, but the backdrop, that's geopolitics. the migrant crisis is ratcheting up east—west tension. near the border, paratroopers from belarus and russia held joint exercises, signalling whose side the kremlin�*s on. increasing, too, is alexander lukashenko's rhetoric. this week he threatened to block the flow of russian gas to europe if the eu imposes more sanctions on belarus. but those who see belarus as a stepping stone to the eu, they couldn't care less about sanctions or geopolitics. they just want a better future. many of them have paid thousands of dollars for package tours that bring them to belarus and deliver them to the border with europe. but no further. for most, the journey stops here. and so they have to wait, in
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the cold, while governments argue. waiting and hoping to be let through. in an interview with russia's state broadcaster, president vladimir putin has denied moscow's involvement in the migrant crisis on the belarus—poland border. poland and other western countries accused moscow of working with minsk to orchestrate the sending of thousands of migrants to the border. he also said that alexander lukashenko never consulted him before raising the possibility of belarus cutting russian gas supplies to europe, and said such a prospect would damage russia's ties with bealrus and the european union. 0n the recent military drills by the us and nato in the black sea, he condemned the activities and said this was a serious challenge to moscow.
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one of donald trump's former aides, steve bannon, has been indicted by a federal grand jury. he's charged with two counts of contempt of congress, in connection with his failure to comply with a summons issued by a house select committee, which is investigating the storming of the capitol in january. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes reports. one of donald trump's closest political allies, steve bannon, a conservative firebrand and one—time white house strategist for the former president, has been charged with criminal contempt of congress. he refused to co—operate with the congressional committee investigating this, the violent assault on the us capitol. he faces two charges. one that he failed to provide documents the panel believes are relevant to its enquiry, and a second for not appearing in person for a deposition. both counts carry a maximum sentence of one year in prison. the committee made it clear last
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month that it would hold mr bannon to account. no—one in this country, no matter how wealthy or how powerful, is above the law. left unaddressed, this defiance may encourage others to follow mr bannon down the same path. the panel wants to question steve bannon about the events leading up to the riot, including a comment he made the day before that "all hell was going to break loose". based on the committee's investigation it appears that mr bannon had substantial advanced knowledge of the plans forjanuary 6th, and likely had an important role in formulating those plans. steve bannon�*s refusal to co—operate with the committee cited donald trump's argument that he was shielded by executive privilege. the confidentiality that sometimes applies to documents and conversations at the highest level of us government. but the claim is widely disputed
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and will be considered by an appeal court later this month, in relation to the former president's attempt to deny the committee access to white house documents. what is clear is that the pressure is now on others who have been called to give evidence for the investigation. in a statement, the us attorney general merrick garland said the indictment of steve bannon reflected thejustice department's "steadfast commitment" to the rule of law. mr bannon is expected to appear in court on monday but this could turn to a long legal battle. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. the legal arrangement which has controlled the personal and financial affairs of the pop star britney spears for the past 13 years has been ended by a judge in los angeles. the conservatorship allowed her father to make decisions for her, following a series of mental breakdowns. 0ur los angeles correspondent
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sophie long reports. this was the moment they'd been dreaming of, everything they'd been fighting for. it does not feel real. it feels like i'm kind of in an out—of—body experience but it's just so incredible that we were able to actually help make this happen. after more than 13 years, the pop star was finally granted herfreedom in a hearing that lasted just 30 minutes. so proud of britney today and for the #freebritney movement, which is going to continue. the singer was not in court but her lawyer repeated her words — "i just want my life back". thejudge gave it to her, and the man who helped her get it was cheered as he paid tribute to his client's strength and courage, and thanked herfans for their fight to free her. you guys are absolutely the best. you're essential. woman: yes! britney loves you. cheering and applause.
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you were essential in terms of the suspension ofjames p spears... cheering and applause. and you were also essential in regards to what happened today. cheering and applause. both sing: #i want to scream and shout. # free britney now. britney has been released from the restrictions imposed when she was a new mother struggling with her mental health, immediately and without any further evaluation, but this is just the beginning of the end. her lawyer has called for an investigation into her father's handling of her $60 million estate and allegations he bugged her bedroom. the star said on social media, she loves herfans so much it's crazy and that it was the best day ever. as for what's next for britney, well, that now it is up tojust one person — britney. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles.
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you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. after those blustery conditions of yesterday, things looking much quieter today and this weekend. it is going to be pretty mild for this stage in november, but still a lot of cloud around at times, the best of those breaks through this afternoon across the central swathe, as i'll show you. it's because we are between two weather systems. this area of low pressure which brought the windy weather yesterday, this is one which will bring weather fronts to the north and west, particularly through tomorrow. advancing cloud into northern ireland through today, so this afternoon turning greyer, and patchy rain or drizzle from the west, particularly late afternoon into the evening. still got cloud from yesterday's low pressure system, eastern counties of england, so staying rather grey here for many, with some occasional rain or drizzle, but in between, and that means the vast majority of the country, we'll see some of the cloud break up, some sunny spells
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through the afternoon. temperatures between 11 and 15 degrees. to put that into context, about two to four degrees above where we normally are at this stage in november. here are the sort of averages we expect this time of year, ten to 12 celsius. and it also means we've still got a fairly mild night with us. cooler tonight, particularly in this central strip we have the clearer skies to begin with. closing in, though, through the night, as cloud advances from east and west. some mist and fog patches, temperatures in mid single figures in that zone, but thickening cloud out towards western scotland, northern ireland and these irish sea coasts. it's going to make for a rather grey, misty and for some, drizzly morning. heavier bursts of rain through the day in towards the western isles on sunday. still a few showers in east anglia and the south—east, most of you again dry, and it's across east wales, good parts of england and around the moray firth we'll see the best of your sunday sunshine. temperatures like today, ten to 15 degrees. then, as we go into sunday night and monday, after outbreaks of rain across scotland and northern ireland, that weather front is on the move only very slowly south and east. there's not much wind around again on monday. it does mean brighter conditions gradually developing across scotland and northern ireland. more sunshine than we will see this
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weekend, but it will be a rather grey day for parts of northern, western england and wales, some rain and drizzle, mist and fog over the hills, further southwards and eastwards still the chance of cloud breaks and a bit of sunshine. temperatures down a degree or two on this weekend, but overall mild. and that mild story continues into next week. a bit of a battle, high pressure to the south, low pressure to the north. the closer you are to that low pressure system, the windier things will be at times, the wetter as well. you can see in 0ban, western scotland will see rain on and off throughout this week. some rain into northern ireland, although many places will be largely dry, especially in the south.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines... negotiators at the cop26 climate
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conference have published a draft agreement after talks in glasgow continued through the night.

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