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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 12, 2021 11:30pm-11:46pm GMT

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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be as the un climate summit in glasgow runs into extra time, delegates are considering a third draft of an agreement to try to put a limit on global warming. the conference president, alok sharma, has called for a final injection of "can—do spirit." the summit should have ended on friday evening, but negotiators are now expected to work through the night, with the aim of formally finishing on saturday afternoon. steve bannon — a former aide to donald trump — has been indicted by a federal grand jury. he's charged with contempt of congress, after refusing to give evidence to the committee investigating the january the sixth assault on the capitol. britney spears has been handed back control of her life and career by a los angeles court. a judge has agreed to terminate a guardianship order imposed thirteen years ago, in the wake of concerns for her mental health.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are broadcaster penny smith and martin bentham, home affairs editor of the evening standard. let me bring you up—to—date of the front pages as we have them so far. the daily mail has new polling putting labour six points ahead of the conservatives. the paper says sleaze allegations are putting pressure on the prime minister. elsewhere, the guardian alleges that the villa boris johnson stayed in during a recent holiday in marbella has been linked to tax evasion — the lawyer for the company says the case was not one of tax evasion. the i has a special report on how the government expects
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the pandemic to end — saying the most likely scenario would see the world moving on from covid late next year. new plans to lower the threshold at which graduates start paying back their student loans could see them pay up to £475 extra a year, according to the daily telegraph. the financial times has a report claiming that a number of emails were exchanged between the ex—barclays boss, jes staley, and jeffrey epstein. who died injailjust over a year ago. the times leads with calls for french authorities to take more action to stop people crossing the channel, after a record 12 hundred migrants made thejourney in one day and the front page of the mirror claims meghan markle said prince harry was �*constantly berated' by the royal family over her relationship with her father. so let's begin... rather her lack of a relationship with her father, rather her lack of a relationship with herfather, i suppose. mark, rather her lack of a relationship with herfather, isuppose. mark, do you want to kick us with herfather, isuppose. mark, do you want to kick us off with herfather, isuppose. mark, do you want to kick us off this time with the guardian? cop26 still no
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deal is deadline passes but they are still talking. deal is deadline passes but they are still talkina. , , ., deal is deadline passes but they are still talkin. , , ., ~ , still talking. yes, they are. as we discussed the _ still talking. yes, they are. as we discussed the reason _ still talking. yes, they are. as we discussed the reason that - still talking. yes, they are. as we discussed the reason that the - still talking. yes, they are. as we i discussed the reason that the papers haven't got big on this theguardian is the only one that's got it on the front page in any way shape or form and that's only a very cursory mention is precisely that reason, that the draught statements and the final agreements is not can happen until tomorrow. therefore it's quite hard for the papers to actually say something new and constructive about it. clearly there's been lots of coverage on tv all day, including your own channels. your own programmes and so on. and therefore from everybody�*s point of view what can you tell your readers that are new and tomorrow? ethic it's very hard for them. there is doubt there's going to be plenty of analysis inside of what's been debated and what might happen, so to speak. but as a story i think they
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want their readers have something different which is what you will see in the papers across the spectrum today. in the papers across the spectrum toda . . , , ., in the papers across the spectrum toda. . ~ today. yeah, i guess a paper like the ft scores _ today. yeah, i guess a paper like the ft scores because _ today. yeah, i guess a paper like the ft scores because it - today. yeah, i guess a paper like the ft scores because it is - today. yeah, i guess a paper like the ft scores because it is a - the ft scores because it is a weekend edition. it doesn't pretend that it's weekend edition. it doesn't pretend that its front page is going to be one full of on the button news stories, it's more analysis and thinking style. where is the guardian obviously want you to buy the guardian on saturday, and by the observer on sunday.— the guardian on saturday, and by the observer on sunday. absolutely. also the guardian — observer on sunday. absolutely. also the guardian without _ observer on sunday. absolutely. also the guardian without being _ observer on sunday. absolutely. also the guardian without being on - observer on sunday. absolutely. also the guardian without being on the - the guardian without being on the left and _ the guardian without being on the left and i'm very much going on the green _ left and i'm very much going on the green side — left and i'm very much going on the green side of this, i did like, there — green side of this, i did like, there was_ green side of this, i did like, there was a line on apparently there is a lot_ there was a line on apparently there is a lot of— there was a line on apparently there is a lot of people hanging about wearing — is a lot of people hanging about wearing coats but not even leaving and eating — wearing coats but not even leaving and eating beige food. we all know those, _ and eating beige food. we all know those, the — and eating beige food. we all know those, the closing of the party and everybody's got yeah but it sums can
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happen, _ everybody's got yeah but it sums can happen, but — everybody's got yeah but it sums can happen, but i need to get home. but the thing _ happen, but i need to get home. but the thing is, — happen, but i need to get home. but the thing is, this is such a majorm _ the thing is, this is such a majorm it— the thing is, this is such a major... it is such a major issue. we've _ major... it is such a major issue. we've got— major... it is such a major issue. we've got they are saying that targets — we've got they are saying that targets are too weak to stop a disaster. — targets are too weak to stop a disaster. the language is being softened. so many people complaining about this _ softened. so many people complaining about this is not what they wanted, not what _ about this is not what they wanted, not what they were hoping for. but greenpeace sank the places flooded with what— greenpeace sank the places flooded with what they call greenwashing saying _ with what they call greenwashing saying the problem is that we have to look_ saying the problem is that we have to look at — saying the problem is that we have to look at this even bigger than just talking about climate change. when _ just talking about climate change. when you — just talking about climate change. when you talk about climate change, if you're _ when you talk about climate change, if you're talking about vast areas of this— if you're talking about vast areas of this beautiful blue planet of ours— of this beautiful blue planet of ours being devastated through drought— ours being devastated through drought then those people are going to have _ drought then those people are going to have to— drought then those people are going to have to go somewhere because they can't farm _ to have to go somewhere because they can't farm any more because there is no water~ _ can't farm any more because there is no water~ so— can't farm any more because there is no water. so you're talking about mass migration. and they're talking about— mass migration. and they're talking about instability in regions where
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they immigrate to or they migrate to. they immigrate to or they migrate to then_ they immigrate to or they migrate to. then you're talking about massive _ to. then you're talking about massive food shortages because of course _ massive food shortages because of course this— massive food shortages because of course this will be that there are certain— course this will be that there are certain places where they won't be able to— certain places where they won't be able to grow food. you have to look at it in _ able to grow food. you have to look at it in a _ able to grow food. you have to look at it in a much bigger wayjust rather— at it in a much bigger wayjust rather than saying, it can be terrible. _ rather than saying, it can be terrible, we can have more floods, more _ terrible, we can have more floods, more fires — terrible, we can have more floods, more fires there. i�*m terrible, we can have more floods, more fires there.— more fires there. i'm laughing, i 'ust read more fires there. i'm laughing, i just read the _ more fires there. i'm laughing, i just read the eight _ more fires there. i'm laughing, i just read the eight cartoon. - more fires there. i'm laughing, i just read the eight cartoon. tell| more fires there. i'm laughing, i. just read the eight cartoon. tell us about the cartoon. it’s just read the eight cartoon. tell us about the cartoon.— about the cartoon. it's 'ust the drau:ht about the cartoon. it's 'ust the draught deals * about the cartoon. it's 'ust the draught deals with _ about the cartoon. it's 'ust the draught deals with up _ about the cartoon. it's just the draught deals with up and - about the cartoon. it'sjust the - draught deals with up and somebody pointing _ draught deals with up and somebody pointing to it and saying, can we water— pointing to it and saying, can we water down that blah blah blah? which _ water down that blah blah blah? which of— water down that blah blah blah? which of course is what greta thunberg... so much blah blah blah. can we _ thunberg... so much blah blah blah. can we water— thunberg... so much blah blah blah. can we water that down a bit? because — can we water that down a bit? because of the fact that she has been _ because of the fact that she has been watered down. | because of the fact that she has been watered down.— because of the fact that she has been watered down. i have to tell ou the been watered down. i have to tell you the amount _ been watered down. i have to tell you the amount of _ been watered down. i have to tell you the amount ofjoy _ been watered down. i have to tell you the amount of joy that - been watered down. i have to tell you the amount of joy that this i you the amount ofjoy that this cartoon is given over the years was up cartoon is given over the years was up no disrespect to the other cartoons but the fact that on the front pages, huge pressure for him
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as a cartoonist, i imagine. nine times out of ten probably, not even a headline writer does it ten times, no newspaper get it right nine times at the bank about nine times out of ten he is on the money. it’s at the bank about nine times out of ten he is on the money.— ten he is on the money. it's a skill, it's _ ten he is on the money. it's a skill, it's a — ten he is on the money. it's a skill, it's a skill— ten he is on the money. it's a skill, it's a skill and it's - ten he is on the money. it's a skill, it's a skill and it's a - skill, it's a skill and it's a pressure of doing it. but obviously somebody of that ability does matter regularly do it. somebody of that ability does matter regularly do it— regularly do it. that's why they're doinu regularly do it. that's why they're doin: the regularly do it. that's why they're doing the job- _ regularly do it. that's why they're doing the job. absolutely. - regularly do it. that's why they're j doing the job. absolutely. penny, doing thejob. absolutely. penny, another story, graduates to start paying back loans sooner. this had been flagged. we are talking about this a month or six weeks ago that this might happen. it this a month or six weeks ago that this might happen.— this might happen. it still ate might happen- _ this might happen. it still ate might happen. it _ this might happen. it still ate might happen. it is _ this might happen. it still ate might happen. it is still- this might happen. it still ate| might happen. it is still plans, this might happen. it still ate i might happen. it is still plans, it hasn't _ might happen. it is still plans, it hasn't actually been decided. at the moment— hasn't actually been decided. at the moment graduates have to pay back the loan _ moment graduates have to pay back the loan when they get around about £28,000 _ the loan when they get around about £28,000 a _ the loan when they get around about £28,000 a year, that's when they have _ £28,000 a year, that's when they have to _ £28,000 a year, that's when they have to start paying off the loan. so the _ have to start paying off the loan. so the average income is 25 grand and they— so the average income is 25 grand and they are saying that under the new plans —
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and they are saying that under the new plans they could start having to pay back— new plans they could start having to pay back their loans at 22,000. in other— pay back their loans at 22,000. in other words, pay back their loans at 22,000. in otherwords, underthe pay back their loans at 22,000. in other words, under the average income — other words, under the average income. there is a suggestion and somebody— income. there is a suggestion and somebody quoted who said it's unfair for taxpayers to fund these peoples higher— for taxpayers to fund these peoples higher education. but don't we all benefit _ higher education. but don't we all benefit from a more educated population?— benefit from a more educated population? and the point that the 're population? and the point that they're supposed _ population? and the point that they're supposed to _ population? and the point that they're supposed to pay - population? and the point that they're supposed to pay more | population? and the point that i they're supposed to pay more tax population? and the point that - they're supposed to pay more tax and they're supposed to pay more tax and they're paying back for that which people like me who graduated a year before this came in, nobody�*s ever asked me to pay back my education. of course i pay taxes but i'm not paying specifically for the benefit. of course the thing that had the fear that people from a background like mine which was no higher education, manual working household, subsidised support in grants, i got the full fees paid in subsistent grant would be put off going to university. i'd like to know whether people were put off or it people actually have used the loan and benefited from it. what do you make of the story? we
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benefited from it. what do you make of the story?— of the story? i've always been o- osed of the story? i've always been opposed to — of the story? i've always been opposed to loans _ of the story? i've always been opposed to loans for - of the story? i've always been opposed to loans for the - of the story? i've always been i opposed to loans for the reasons penny says. because of course the argument in favour of them the outset was one was all these graduates going on to lots of money and therefore they should be paying that money back, that they shouldn't be other people that don't go to university. first of all if we believe that a better educated society and workforce is good for us all and everybody�*s benefiting. certainly of course if they are better paid which not all of them are, increasingly that's not always the case then they wait paid more tax in general unless they've got some very clever accounting and manager avoid that. that's a whole different issue. so on. i agree with you. i think the figures unfortunately but perhaps fortunately necessarily shown that people have been deterred in broad numbers. although that's partly because somebody things now demand
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education. ., , �* , , because somebody things now demand education. ., , v , ., education. your eye, it's very hard to net education. your eye, it's very hard to let a education. your eye, it's very hard to get a first _ education. your eye, it's very hard to get a first job. _ education. your eye, it's very hard to get a first job, a _ education. your eye, it's very hard to get a first job, a decent - education. your eye, it's very hard to get a first job, a decent first - to get a firstjob, a decent first job without being a graduate. sometimes a job application and think, why on earth does this person need to be a graduate to do this basic leveljob? they need the application and commitment but did they really need to be a graduate? the fact of the matter is that the reason this is the current system is costing the taxpayer a fortune. because were not breaking even on it. all this money goes out loans, not many people are paying the full amount back. it's not break even, this is a way of trying to make it probably lose less money and still not break even. of course university who are cheerleaders for the system in the first place. they would get lot more freedom and actually in reality they've got a note lot more regulations. federal government can buy cuts. i think the whole thing...
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we had a bit of a joke blustar about the slightly odd headlines like win a free jigsaw puzzle and i talked to doctor pipeline. the telegraph has got three stories i really want to read tomorrow. johnson had a secret exit from number ten according to dominic cummings, he claims he is a way of getting out the back door without officials knowing he is out of the building. greek treasures going to loan them to the british museum if they give them back. natalie would sister revealing what really happened on board that boat when she fell off the boat and drowned. i mean, no shortage of self worth reading tomorrow. however i'm going to be boring and ask you to do politics and said with a bars praise price opposes the daily mail. such a shame because _ price opposes the daily mail. such a shame because i'd _ price opposes the daily mail. such a shame because i'd rather— price opposes the daily mail. such a shame because i'd rather enjoy - price opposes the daily mail. such a shame because i'd rather enjoy the | shame because i'd rather enjoy the marble _ shame because i'd rather enjoy the marble. the 2500 —year—old temple and that _ marble. the 2500 —year—old temple and that lord elgin actually was given— and that lord elgin actually was given permission by the empire at
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the start— given permission by the empire at the start of the 19th century. just so marvelously archaic, is in a? who knew? _ so marvelously archaic, is in a? who knew? expose did know. have you ever seen them _ knew? expose did know. have you ever seen them either? i knew? expose did know. have you ever seen them either?— seen them either? i must confess, i did to seen them either? i must confess, i did go look — seen them either? i must confess, i did go look at _ seen them either? i must confess, i did go look at them _ seen them either? i must confess, i did go look at them when _ seen them either? i must confess, i did go look at them when i - seen them either? i must confess, i did go look at them when i went - seen them either? i must confess, i did go look at them when i went to l did go look at them when i went to the museum. did go look at them when i went to the museum-— did go look at them when i went to the museum. 1, , , , . the museum. boris, praying the price at the polls- — the museum. boris, praying the price at the polls. meanwhile _ the museum. boris, praying the price at the polls. meanwhile boris- the museum. boris, praying the price at the polls. meanwhile boris in - at the polls. meanwhile boris in a special— at the polls. meanwhile boris in a special exit, he he skedaddled with anybody— special exit, he he skedaddled with anybody seeing them. this is the front— anybody seeing them. this is the front page — anybody seeing them. this is the front page of the mail and it says he bays— front page of the mail and it says he pays the price at the polls. and you read _ he pays the price at the polls. and you read this off a piece of paper because — you read this off a piece of paper because i— you read this off a piece of paper because i don't want to get it wrong. last week it was the tories and 38 _ wrong. last week it was the tories and 38 and — wrong. last week it was the tories and 38 and labour 35. labour on 40. that means — and 38 and labour 35. labour on 40. that means a — and 38 and labour 35. labour on 40. that means a three—point tory lead last week— that means a three—point tory lead last week is — that means a three—point tory lead last week is now a six—point deficit _ last week is now a six—point deficit. the point is that there is one mp — deficit. the point is that there is one mp there that saying he is even one mp there that saying he is even on the _ one mp there that saying he is even on the verge of submitting a full letter— on the verge of submitting a full letter of— on the verge of submitting a full letter of no confidence. i think the main _ letter of no confidence. i think the main thing. — letter of no confidence. i think the main thing, when i was talking to
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mates _ main thing, when i was talking to mates of— main thing, when i was talking to mates of mine on this discussion, i think— mates of mine on this discussion, i think the _ mates of mine on this discussion, i think the whole thing is it people are saying," why didn't he just first— are saying," why didn't he just first happened about breaking love euros, _ first happened about breaking love euros, was it nobody around him who said", _ euros, was it nobody around him who said", you _ euros, was it nobody around him who said", you know itjust a thought, 'ust said", you know itjust a thought, just a _ said", you know itjust a thought, just a thought how about we don't do that? _ just a thought how about we don't do that? then— just a thought how about we don't do that? then immediate u—turn and then refusing — that? then immediate u—turn and then refusing to apologise. i think apart— then refusing to apologise. i think apart from — then refusing to apologise. i think apart from anything else maybe he wasjust_ apart from anything else maybe he wasjust looking apart from anything else maybe he was just looking saying, apart from anything else maybe he wasjust looking saying, is there nobody— wasjust looking saying, is there nobody there who is saying, can't we 'ust nobody there who is saying, can't we just take _ nobody there who is saying, can't we just take the heat out of this? to stop that — just take the heat out of this? to stop that and back off and there are people _ stop that and back off and there are people that are saying the vast majority — people that are saying the vast majority think jeffrey cox people that are saying the vast majority thinkjeffrey cox should stand _ majority thinkjeffrey cox should stand down for the second job. there's— stand down for the second job. there's a — stand down for the second job. there's a whole other issue because if you _ there's a whole other issue because if you are _ there's a whole other issue because if you are talking about not allowing mps to have second jobs, what about doctors, for example. can't _ what about doctors, for example. can't guarantee that they can be
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there _ can't guarantee that they can be there for— can't guarantee that they can be there for longer than five years or whatever~ — there for longer than five years or whatever. are you going to say that loads _ whatever. are you going to say that loads of— whatever. are you going to say that loads of people then can't do it if they have — loads of people then can't do it if they have to stop their second job? it is they have to stop their second job? it is a _ they have to stop their second job? it is a mess — they have to stop their second job? it is a mess. it's a mess. and sleaze. — it is a mess. it's a mess. and sleaze. a _ it is a mess. it's a mess. and sleaze, a terrible word. presumably there are some _ sleaze, a terrible word. presumably there are some mps _ sleaze, a terrible word. presumably there are some mps that _ sleaze, a terrible word. presumably there are some mps that are - sleaze, a terrible word. presumably there are some mps that are rather| there are some mps that are rather angry at borisjohnson there are some mps that are rather angry at boris johnson because angry at borisjohnson because suddenly all their affairs of the object over again in a way we haven't seen since the expenses scandal. it's a self inflicted wound. it's like he shot himself in the foot. except he hit everybody else in the process.— the foot. except he hit everybody else in the process. yes. you had the whole — else in the process. yes. you had the whole issue _ else in the process. yes. you had the whole issue today _ else in the process. yes. you had the whole issue today that - else in the process. yes. you had the whole issue today that the . the whole issue today that the second terms of homes of those people that live in london in essence, they can't claim expenses for their own home for the therefore they are renting a second property because of what happened in 2010. things like that which is in line with the ruh, doesn't look great in a sense. obviously you got the jeffrey cox example. the problem with the jeffrey cox, jeffrey cox example. the problem with thejeffrey cox, it's not about
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the second jobs per se it's about... professional. it's the amount of time, isn't it? that's the problem. some people argue he should have second jobs at all but actually if you're a doctor, a teacher, a lawyer, a criminal barrister in the criminal court is of value to do that for example. clearly if you're spending all your time or a large chunk here time that's obviously... sorry. it's part of the generate cox thing is a generational thing, there was a time when being an mp was thought of as a part—time job. and the hours of the house were designed purposely, they no longer are but you started at two o'clock so you could do anotherjob in the morning. particularly if you are in court. now it's different for to put somebody like jeffrey was a hang now it's different for to put somebody likejeffrey was a hang on a minute, i'm a barristerfirst, i am an mp and do it was required but he doesn't preserve it so he might perceive it in the same way. trio. he doesn't preserve it so he might
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perceive it in the same way. no, he doesn't. perceive it in the same way. no, he doesn't- i can't— perceive it in the same way. no, he doesn't. i can't speak _ perceive it in the same way. no, he doesn't. i can't speak for _ perceive it in the same way. no, he doesn't. i can't speak for him - perceive it in the same way. no, he doesn't. i can't speak for him but i

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