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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  November 12, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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the race to reach a deal on climate change — crucial talks in glasgow enter theirfinal hours. there is a draft agreement calling on governments to speed up plans on cut emissions — and the pressure is on to do a deal that will cut global warming. if we don't reduce enough in the next ten years, we can't get to 1.5. we didn't get to net zero 2050. everybody here understands those stakes, so, we have to get there. the wildfires, blamed on climate change, that raged this summer in california. we have a special report from one town that was engulfed in flames burned to the ground. we'll bring you the latest from glasgow where it's the closing stage of the negotiations.
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also this lunchtime... a new record for the number of migrants crossing the english channel in a single day — 1,000 people made the journey yesterday. the young carers who may not be getting the support they need because the authorities don't even know they exist. and could this be independence day for britney spears? a judge is expected to end the legal arrangment which has controlled her life. and coming up in sport on the bbc news channel... 0n the eve of the autumn international with australia, england are dealt a blow, with ellis genge out after testing positive for covid.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. a new draft agreement at the climate change summit in glasgow calls on governments around the world to do more to tackle global warming. it's the last scheduled day of the crucial cop26 conference — though the talks may stretch into the weekend. the draft deal asks countries to cut greenhouse gas emissons at a faster pace, but softens commitments to reduce the use of fossil fuels. some campaigners have said it's nowhere near ambitious enough. from glasgow, our science correspondent rebecca morelle. from the vast amounts of ice we are losing in the polar regions, to the droughts caused as temperatures continue to rise. and devastating floods that are destroying homes and lives. we are already seeing the impacts of climate change now. what hangs in the balance in glasgow is whether we can stop things getting
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worse. butjohn kerry, special climate envoy for the united states, is optimistic. i climate envoy for the united states, is optimistic— is optimistic. i feel very good that this has the _ is optimistic. i feel very good that this has the potential _ is optimistic. i feel very good that this has the potential to _ is optimistic. i feel very good that this has the potential to be - is optimistic. i feel very good that this has the potential to be a - is optimistic. i feel very good that this has the potential to be a veryi this has the potential to be a very important statement. acceleration is the key word coming out of here. and we've all got to work harder and faster to get it done. that's a fact. , , ., , fact. this is the latest document that has been _ fact. this is the latest document that has been published. - fact. this is the latest document that has been published. it's - fact. this is the latest document | that has been published. it's only fact. this is the latest document i that has been published. it's only a few pages long, but it gives us a sense of what is on the table. it's the second draft. 0n sense of what is on the table. it's the second draft. on this morning, everyone here has been pouring through it, sentence by sentence, word by word, to see what's in it and, importantly, what is not. commitments on coal have a soft end. instead of phasing it out completely, cole will be allowed if technology to soccer permissions is used, too. countries are being asked to come back next year with better remission cutting pledges. but it's a request, not a demand. and there is recognition that financial help is recognition that financial help is needed for developing countries. low lying countries in the pacific are facing some of the worst impacts
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of climate change. they say richer nations, with their polluting past, are responsible, should help. for those of us _ are responsible, should help. for those of us in _ are responsible, should help. fr?" those of us in vulnerable countries, we just don't have the resources to respond in a way that our partners from the developed countries can respond. and so, we are here, we are here to raise our voice, to be seen, to be heard, and also to be responded to.— to be heard, and also to be responded to. to be heard, and also to be resonded to. ., , ., , , responded to. so, other plans being offered in the _ responded to. so, other plans being offered in the draft _ responded to. so, other plans being offered in the draft agreement - offered in the draft agreement enough to stop dangerous climate change? enough to stop dangerous climate chan . e? ., , enough to stop dangerous climate chance? ., , , enough to stop dangerous climate chan . e? . , , ., enough to stop dangerous climate chance? , ., . change? there has been an increase in ambition — change? there has been an increase in ambition on _ change? there has been an increase in ambition on emissions _ change? there has been an increase in ambition on emissions reduction. | in ambition on emissions reduction. however, the science is extremely clear that we are no way on target for staying within 1.5 degrees. is the absolutely critical thing for nature, and for people all over the world, that we stay well within that goal. in world, that we stay well within that coal. . ., . . goal. in the conference centre, the state goal. in the conference centre, the sta . e was goal. in the conference centre, the stage was handed _ goal. in the conference centre, the stage was handed over— goal. in the conference centre, the stage was handed over to - goal. in the conference centre, the stage was handed over to the - goal. in the conference centre, the i stage was handed over to the people. our ancestors survived many
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apocalypses. and when we talk about this climate apocalypse, we are going to survive it too. but it's going to survive it too. but it's going to survive it too. but it's going to come from the people. the? going to come from the people. they want to make — going to come from the people. they want to make sure _ going to come from the people. they want to make sure their voices are heard by the negotiators here. with only a few hours left to get an agreement finalised, the pressure really is on. rebecca morelle, bbc news, glasgow. one of the clearest effects of climate change has been intense and long—lasting wildfires, caused by drought, heat and poor land management. the dixie fire in california this summer left communities razed to the ground. 0ur climate editor, justin rowlatt has been to greenville, a town that was destroyed after being engulfed by flames in august. nicole faris's home was utterly destroyed by the dixie fire. we found peace and joy every day in our heart being here and i want to come home. but i want to come home to the day before the fire. this was supposed to be nicole and her husband paul's forever home. it took all the colour
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out of my life. look at it, everything is just a shade of grey. years of climate—induced droughts have left the vegetation tinder dry. add in a policy of suppressing small fires which allowed dead wood to build up and fires are nowfaster and hotter than ever before. my friend said, it's coming, it'sjust, it's running down the road towards you, get out now. we grabbed the dogs and we grabbed our suitcases, and we got in the truck and we left. fire consumed the entire town injust two hours. what we're seeing is this change in almost fire regime type where these forests are burning hotter, more severe at greater areas and proportions. and the mightiest trees are burning, too. the world's last remaining
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giant sequoias are under threat. before 2015, no one saw a sequoia that looked like this. it's emotionally heartbreaking, you know. you never saw a tree torched like this, become a candle and burn up in this way before climate change and fire suppression. there's nothing i can do about these trees. they're gone, and we will plant new ones but it takes 1,000 years. and they won't be this for hundreds of years? no, they won't be this for a long, long time. but it isn't too late, says christie — not yet. climate change is here now and it is killing things that we care about that should not be dying. and it's also telling us, we need to act on climate change now. and every little bit counts. bringing climate change under control is what the conference in glasgow is all about. the lesson from california is that the world needs more thanjust long—term
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promises from governments. it needs practical action now. justin rowlatt, bbc news, in the sierra nevada mountains. let's speak to our correspondent, rebecca morelle, in glasgow. 0fficiallyjust a few hours left, is time running out to get a meaningful agreement? yes, the clock really is taking here. the negotiations are supposed to officially finish at six o'clock today. alok sharma, the cop president, all the way through has said this will finish on time. but will a be thrashed by them? i think it is probably going to be delayed. these conferences have been known to run over by a day or even two. and there is so much wrangling going on right now. one of the hot issues is coal. some countries are saying we much —— must be much stronger in the
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wording. 0ther much —— must be much stronger in the wording. other countries don't want it mentioned in the agreement at all. there is also the issue of when countries report back with their climate pledges. how much they are going to cut their emissions by. some country saying we have got to come back next year and be more ambitious. 0ther come back next year and be more ambitious. other countries are saying, no, let's leave it until 2025, the original plan. and money too, always a big issue, especially for developing countries who want some financial recompense for what is happening in their countries. they are the worst impacted by climate change. but who is going to pay for that? the challenge here, as always, if you have nearly 200 countries here, all coming up this from totally different directions. getting them all to agree on something is going to be an enormous challenge. the number of migrants arriving in the uk in small boats from france has hit a new peak for a single day. about a thousand people crossed the channel yesterday. the government says france has lost
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control of the situation. simonjones reports from dover. 0na on a beach near dover, the latest arrivals. this group made it all the way across the world's busiest shipping lane yesterday without being detected. the border force lifeboat seemed overwhelmed dealing with other boats will stop the local mp says things must change. it is mp says things must change. it is not credible _ mp says things must change. it is not credible that _ mp says things must change. it 3 not credible that 1000 people are on a french beach under french not them, getting on a small boat. they have money provided from the british taxpayer, drones and security intelligence, they need to get the people, the people, the french police, down on the beach is to put a stop to these boats leaving french shores. , ._ a stop to these boats leaving french shores. , ., ., ':: :: :: shores. yesterday, around 1000 eo - le shores. yesterday, around 1000 people made — shores. yesterday, around 1000 people made the _ shores. yesterday, around 1000 people made the journey. - shores. yesterday, around 1000 people made the journey. 150 i shores. yesterday, around 1000 i people made the journey. 150 more people made thejourney. 150 more than the previous highest figure for a single day. this year, more than 23,000 migrants have arrived by boat. at the number arriving by lorry is relatively small. in the
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past year, asylum claims in the uk actually fell by 4%. the home office had been hoping that the number of crossings would come down now we are in autumn, as they have done in the past couple of years. but that hasn't happened. down there, you can see some of the boats used in previous days. it seems the boats are getting bigger, carrying on average, now, of more than 30 people per boat. three migrants who attempted the journey on thursday morning on kayaks are missing. the home office says the british public have had enough of seeing people dying in the channel, while ruthless criminal gangs profit from their misery. but the calais mp says patrolling mile after mile of coastline to try to stop them setting offers challenging. we have hundreds of border— setting offers challenging. we have hundreds of border forces, - setting offers challenging. we have hundreds of border forces, but i setting offers challenging. we have hundreds of border forces, but we | hundreds of border forces, but we have 300 kilometres offshore to monitor at night, that is quite impossible, to stop all of the crossings. impossible, to stop all of the crossings-— impossible, to stop all of the crossinus. �* , ., crossings. the british government wants to try _
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crossings. the british government wants to try to _ crossings. the british government wants to try to turn _ crossings. the british government wants to try to turn some - crossings. the british government wants to try to turn some boats i crossings. the british government i wants to try to turn some boats back at sea. last week, the uk gave france the first instalment of £54 million promised to try to stop the crossings. but groups working with refugees in cant say it is not the solution. ~ ., refugees in cant say it is not the solution. ~ . ., , , solution. what we are seeing is chaos. solution. what we are seeing is chaos- we _ solution. what we are seeing is chaos. we have _ solution. what we are seeing is chaos. we have seen _ solution. what we are seeing is chaos. we have seen a - solution. what we are seeing is chaos. we have seen a number| solution. what we are seeing is i chaos. we have seen a number of different initiatives proposed. we are seeing a lot of money spent. none of it is having any effect. we are now seeing deaths here in the channel. we have to provide a safe way for people to make this journey. the wind has whipped up in the channel today, making crossings unlikely. when the weather improves, more are expected, along with questions about how best to prevent them. simonjones, bbc news, dover. western nations have accused belarus of sending migrants to its border with poland to try to destabilise neighbouring countries. thousands of people have gathered at the crossing, enduring freezing conditions in the hope of entering the european union. belarus — a key ally of russia — has threatened to block gas supplies to europe if the west imposes more sanctions. nick beake reports.
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in belarus's capital, minsk, they keep arriving from far and wide. given visas by the regime, and the hope that life will be much better when they soon cross into the eu. some people told the bbc they realised president lukashenko was using them to try to create a new european migrant crisis. this president, he wants to solve it by using us. he thinks we are tools. and we are not tools. we just want to cross the border, to have a better life. but this is what awaits them in the makeshift camps that have been set up on the border. most of those trapped between belarus and poland are men, but there are women and children, too. and they are at the heart of a growing international crisis. this is the dense woodland where at least nine migrants have died from hypothermia in recent
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weeks, trying to reach the eu. poland's hoping the european union will pay for a fence to protect large parts of its long border with belarus, which has come under unprecedented strain. well, we have made our way deeper into the forest. and this is what we've just found. bottles of water, food packaging, boots, lots of warm clothes. it's all been lumped together and left next to this tree. and it appears to be yet more evidence that people are getting across the border. of course, where they are now, we simply don't know. but there are signs of where they came from. this is a negative covid test, stamped in iraq, from just two weeks ago. poland has more than 15,000 troops trying to stop the latest surge of people. just beyond this checkpoint, at least 150 migrants were spotted and detained in the past 2a hours. but human rights groups and some polish politicians are concerned about the tactics the government is using.
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we are facing a humanitarian crisis. the situation is definitely tough for poland. no one disputes that. but we should be dealing with it in a humanitarian way, in line with the geneva convention, in line with european law, not pushing people back, not playing ping—pong with human beings. this is what is actually happening right now. but there does seem to be support for the hard line warsaw is taking, especially at this far—right rally in the polish capital, to mark independence day. the government here has eu and nato backing and how it is dealing with the crisis that they say belarus is fuelling. away from the politics, on the ground, it is an increasingly bleak picture. an inquest has been told that the ten—year—old boy who was killed by a dog in south wales on monday died
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as a result of severe injuries to his head and neck. jack lis was attacked when he went into a friend's house in caerphilly to play. the gwent coroner has adjourned the hearing while further inquiries are carried out. the latest covid survey from the office for national statistics suggests one in 60 people in the uk would have tested positive for coronavirus in the week ending 6th november. it continues the downward trend for infections in england and wales. 0ur health correspondent, katharine da costa, is here. well, infections are still high across the uk but it is an improving picture, they are falling in england and wales and flatter in scotland and wales and flatter in scotland and northern ireland. the biggest falls have been among secondary age pupils, rates started to fall before half—term, that has continued and will be closely watched to see if they rise again. infections have fallen in most age groups and that backs up what we have seen in the
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daily figure, which question see from the chart, they have been bouncing round sincejuly but the situation in the uk is very different to some parts of europe. austria, the netherlands and germany are among those seeing a surge in cases, with some nations looking to introduce partial lockdowns, the uk opened up a bit earlier than other nations, some experts say that our vaccination rates and prior infection means we recloser to reaching an equilibrium which means things would be more stable. here hospital admissions and deaths are falling but there are still 8,500 patients in hospital, it is notjust covid. there is pressure from extra demand, record demand on urgent and emergency care, huge backlogs of non—urgent operation and staffing shortage, the pressure remains high on the nhs, going into the wint we're the health service is at its busiest. ., ., we're the health service is at its busiest. ., ~ , ., .,
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thank you catherine. our top story this lunchtime. a draft agreement at the cop26 climate summit in glasgow has watered down commitments to end the use of coal and other fossil fuels, as countries race to reach a deal after two weeks of talks. and coming up. veterans welcome the announcement that the queen will attend the service of remembrance at the cenotaph on sunday. and coming up in sport on the bc news channel. he was part of the world cup winning squad in 1966. tributes are paid to former england and wolves midfielder ron flowers, who has died at the age of 87. ajudge in los angeles is expected to start the process of freeing britney spears from the legal arrangement that has controlled her life for the last 13 years. the conservatorship was originally put in place because of fears for the singer's mental health, and it meant her father was in charge of her affairs.
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but britney spears said the arrangement was abusive, and herfans have campaigned for her to be given back her independence. sophie long's report contains flashing images. cheering. it's now six weeks since britney spears's fans cried tears ofjoy as her estranged father was suspended from his role running her $60 million estate. chanting: free britney now! free britney now! he's since asked the court for an immediate and unconditional end to the arrangement, which gave him control over her life, saying he'll hand over all related documents because he has nothing to hide. there are many who disagree with that, and are calling for a full investigation and an end to the system they say is corrupt. i think nothing short of a full congressional hearing, where we break it down step—by—step and interrogate the attorneys that were present, i think that will give
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us a great deal of insight as to what is going wrong, what went wrong for britney but also what is going wrong for other people facing conservatorship as well. after 13 years of what the international superstar called a toxic, abusive arrangement, her voice has finally been heard. crucial, notjust for her but for many others trapped in the conservatorship system who could never even hope to be handed a microphone. i think it's critically important, because conservatorship as a rule takes away your voice. it happens that britney was able to retain some voice because of her celebrity, and she's raising it. but for all the others, they can't testify, they can't pay people, they can't even choose who to meet with if their conservator objects. so there's no vehicle for them. the hope is there will be now.
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and the result of this hearing that could finally, definitively free britney, could also lead to betterjustice for all those who have had their freedom curtailed. britney says she's never prayed more. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. the operator of the plane which crashed, killing the footballer emiliano sala, has been sentenced to 18 months in prison. 67—year—old david henderson was found guilty of recklessly endangering the aircraft, which came down over the english channel in 2019. let's go live to cardiff where our correspondent, hywel griffith who has the latest. er where the health service is at its busiest. thank you catherine. ben, yes, it is almost two years now suns that flight which i was due to bring emiliano sala from france to wales to play in the premier league disappeared over the channel. two weeks later it was found on the sea bed alongside with his body, that of the pilot was neverfound. it should never have taken place because the
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pilot wasn't qualified to fly at night, or have a commercial license, now the operator david henderson knew all that, but carried on regardless. the 67—year—old, the court was told, worked, despite knowing the regulations meant the pilot shouldn't have been flying. now he was found guilty at a trial last month. thejudge now he was found guilty at a trial last month. the judge today in sentencing him said he had been reckless, that he had shown a cavalier attitude, reckless, that he had shown a cavalierattitude, knew reckless, that he had shown a cavalier attitude, knew he was breaching the rules but carried on. he said there was no choice gou sentence him to 18 months injail. a sentence him to 18 months injail. a sentence the legal team say they will challenge. it is important to note that his actions aren't, he isn't accused of causing the death of either to men, emiliano sala's inquest and the cause of his death will be investigated next year. thank you. tens of thousands of young carers in england may be missing out
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on support because councils don't even know they exist. young carers are under the age 18 and they look after a family member or friend with a physical or mental health illness or disability. local authorities have a duty to identify, assess and support children who provide a caring role, usually for a parent or sibling. it often falls to schools or health services to alert councils to children who may be caring at a high level. but analysis by bbc news suggests that 75% of young carers are not known to councils. jeremy cooke reports... mummy, how many potatoes do you want? two, please. it is a home filled with faith. # he has done so much for me...# and with love. thank you, kin. thank you, kim. you're welcome. do you cook for your mum every night, pretty much? yeah. at 13 and 10 years old, amy and kimberly are young carers. do you need help? oh, no, i don't need help.
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dedicated to their mum, julie, who has severe kidney failure. i can't really cook now, because i can't stand up for long. i have pains. by law, because these girls are caring at a high level, they should get help from their council. but they have had no assessment and get no support. what are we, what are we? 4lifers. they are missing from the system. bring her up herfood, i wash her back, clean her bed. clean the room. i help with finance and all of her business stuff. maybe help out with some medication if she needs to. she sleeps with my mum. if something goes wrong in the night, she is always there. that's done. you must be so proud of them, julie? i'm proud of them. at the same time, i'm guilty... ..that i've taken their independence away from them. raise your hand if you are a young carer, or a young adult carer.
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in hereford, a relaxed gathering of young carers. their young lives, touched by adult responsibilities. but who are they caring for? mum. what is it you do for your mum? medication. help her get up the stairs. sometimes you feel like you are not getting recognised enough. - at least these children are getting some help from this charity. but most of them haven't been officially assessed. our research suggests that 75% of young carers in england aren't even known to their local council. so they may be missing, unsupported and unheard. the more awareness we can raise, the more young carers we can reach. there'll be children sitting at home tonight who are doing caring roles and don't even have this, and it matters, doesn't it? it matters hugely for their future life opportunities. bethany and paige are among those so—called missing young carers, and we estimate across england there are 180,000 of them. do you know if you have had an assessment, do you know
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you are officially regarded as young carers or don't you know. ? carers or don't you know? no. do you even know what that is, an assessment? i've heard of it. i haven't. more or less, i don't think we really had an assessment. i feel quite isolated... ..as a young person and as a young carer. back in bristol, a rare chance for kim and amy to take a break. while their mum gets dialysis. i don't think there is any time where i'm not thinking about, is my mum 0k? i can't go out with my friends that much as i would like to. how was it? it's not too bad. julie's exhausted, and worried for her girls. i wish it was different. i want them to have a normal life, like other children. since we filmed them, amy and kim are getting some help from a young carer's charity. thank you, kim. welcome. but they are still simply focussed on helping their mum. we love her and we want her to stay for as long as possible, so she can see us grow up and she can be happy
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and live a long life. are you 0k? yeah, i'm all right, thank you. the government stresses this is a matter for local councils. the councils say with more money they could give more help. but how can young carers be supported, if they aren't being counted? jeremy cook, bbc news. england world cup winner ron flowers has died at the age of 87 the former has died at the age of 87. the former wolves midfielder won 49 caps — he was in the england squad which won the 1966 world cup but didn't play. he was belatedly awarded a winner's medal in 2009, along with other squad players who didn't feature in the final. veterans have welcomed the announcement that the queen will attend the service of remembrance at the cenotaph on sunday. it will be her first public engagement since she spent a night in hospital last month. doctors had advised the monarch to rest until mid—november. here's our royal correspondent, daniela relph.
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ever present when we remember. even before she was queen. newsreel: as princess . elizabeth followed the king in paying her tribute, there were few among the silent crowd who did not recall the comradeship of war years. during her reign, the rhythm of remembrance has barely changed. the queen represents a generation now fighting to ensure memories don't fade. veterans david godwin and peter turner showed me around their home, the royal hospital in chelsea. they feel a deep responsibility to keep rememberance relevant, and believe the queen is an important part of that. she is so much front and centre.
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she is everything what remembrance is about. she's — because she served in the war, she earned her medals. she wore the uniform, and she wore the uniform as a female in the services and as part of the royal family. we owe her a great gratitude. when we signed up in the services, we signed up an oath of allegiance to the queen, and not necessarily the country, but the queen. the queen is the head of the armed forces, the queen is who we work for, and a lot of what we do is to maintain what she stands for. when the queen cancelled a number of engagements last month on the advice of her doctors, one event remained in the diary. remembrance sunday is a non—negotiable part of her schedule. for the queen, remembrance is her duty, personally and professionally. she will remember those
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in her own family who have served, as well as the wider forces community she leads. i know that for all the veterans and all of us who are standing on whitehall, we all stand a little taller, knowing that her majesty is watching us. as she approaches the year of her platinum jubilee, the silent sombre ritual of remembrance remains sacred to the queen. daniela relph, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. sarah is with us, what is it going to be like for remembrance sunday? remembrance sunday across the country looking fairly dry and settled. we have dry weather in store for much of the week. it will be quietening down today, we have got a lot of cloud round and out that cloud some rain. this is the picture earlier on from one of our weather watchers in cumbria. a bit of rain to come in the afternoon, it
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is breezy out there too but still very mild

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