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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 12, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. a new draft agreement is negotiated at the cop26 climate summit here in in glasgow — as talks enter their final scheduled day. it steps up calls on governments to urgently tackle climate change. commitments to reducing fossil fuels have been softened but it has stronger language about helping poorer countries we also have a special report from the us on the devastation of long—lasting wildfires, caused by drought and heat — we speak to the people whose homes have burned down "it's running down the road towards you." "get out now." we grabbed the dogs, and we grabbed our suitcases. and we got in the truck, and we left.
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we'll have expert analysis of that draft climate deal and assess how much it weakens the committments to cut fossil fuels. iam i am victoria derbyshire. we are live at the foreign office, in the rain. it is day 20 oh richard ratcliffe�*s rain. it is day 20 oh richard ratcliffe's hunger strikes, in protest at what he says is the government's in action to secure the freedom of his wife from iran. he has told us this morning he is outraged at that in action and has called on borisjohnson, the prime minister, to keep his promise and help get his white home. the accountability _ help get his white home. he: accountability gap, the help get his white home. fie: accountability gap, the lack of explanation for government decisions that have an impact on ordinary people's lives, and that you can just get away with it. you can just say we don't want to talk about it. what can i do about it? it's extraordinary. and i'm luxmy gopal with this
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morning's other top stories on the bbc news channel... polish border guards prevent a group of women and children crossing from belarus, as migrants endure another night in close to zero temperatures. charities urge the uk government for new safe routes and a fair asylum system after a record number of migrants cross the channel in a single day. britney spears could regain control of her personal life and finances today — when a court decides whether to overturn an order which put her father in charge. good morning from glasgow and bbc news coverage of cop26 — the united nations climate change conference. in the last couple of hours, a new draft agreement
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has been published — it hasn't been signed off yet — but it's our latest update on where negotiations, going on behind me, appear to be heading. one change in the new draft is an apparent softening of government requirements to reduce fossilfuel and coal use. but there is stronger language about helping and paying poorer countries to fight climate change. and a request for countries to update their climate action plans on an annual basis remains in play. the un chief antonio guterres has already said today that the summit would probably not achieve its aims and the goal of limiting global warming to i.5c is on "life support". with that in mind, let's remind ourselves of what this summit set out to achieve. delegates from all over the world came here to glasgow with four goals in mind. the first is to "secure global net zero by the mid—century and keep 1.5 degrees within reach". net zero is the point
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at which the amount of greenhouses gases being produced is no greater than the amount being removed. countries will need to phase out coal more rapidly, stop deforestation and speed up the switch to electric vehicles. the second is to "adapt to protect communities and natural habitats". this is about protecting or restoring ecosytems, as well as developing a more resilient infrastructure, to protect communities from the impacts of climate change. the third goal is to "mobilise finance". developed countries are being asked to pledge at least $100 billion in climate finance per year including working with private sector. the final goal is the "world together to delvier". this is focussed on governments collaborating to finalise what's known as the paris rule book — agreed in the paris climate accord in 2015. so, the world working together to deliver. those are the four goals
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that have been at the heart of the negotiations over the past 12 days. the ongoing challenge has been to get nearly every country in the world, all with their own individual set of circumstances, to agree on a common pathway forward. it's hoped that agreement will be reached by the end of the summit, which is today — although things could slip into the weekend. our science correspondent victoria gill is with me now. victoria, gill is with me now. you have been in glasgow all victoria, you have been in glasgow all the way through the summit. the key question, i guess, on the final, official day is, does what we have seenin official day is, does what we have seen in this new draft agreement which is not signed off, but the latest version of the draft, does it keep the world on track to limit global warming? keep the world on track to limit globalwarming? it keep the world on track to limit global warming?— keep the world on track to limit global warming? it gets is on track to limit global _ global warming? it gets is on track to limit global warming _ global warming? it gets is on track to limit global warming to - global warming? it gets is on track to limit global warming to lower i to limit global warming to lower thanit to limit global warming to lower than it was before we started. so before we came to glasgow, the scientific consensus was that we were on a trajectory to a 2.7 degrees celsius rise by the end of the century. upward curve has been
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squashed by postal agreements and what has not been signed off, as you say, but but what has been put forward in the document. but it is not squashed down enough. it has not brought us to the critical point of 1.5. that is what they were talking about being on life support. we have accelerated the journey to reduce our emissions, but the physics of climate change is happening faster than agreements can be reached. remind us why1.5 than agreements can be reached. remind us why 1.5 degrees than agreements can be reached. remind us why1.5 degrees is so important? it remind us why 1.5 degrees is so important?— important? it is not a cut-off oint, important? it is not a cut-off point. not — important? it is not a cut-off point. not a _ important? it is not a cut-off point, not a binary _ important? it is not a cut-off point, not a binary thing, - important? it is not a cut-offj point, not a binary thing, but important? it is not a cut-off. point, not a binary thing, but it important? it is not a cut-off- point, not a binary thing, but it is because, and i have been going on about it for the last two weeks, because this is the point at which scientists agree that if we stick within that threshold, we limit the most dangerous impacts of climate change. the difference between 1.5 and 2 degrees, the key figures mentioned in the paris agreement, thatis mentioned in the paris agreement, that is a world with no coral reefs and with some coral reefs remaining.
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it's about hundreds of millions of people being under threat of extreme heat, drought and billions of people. so, every single degree counts. it is all about basically turning down that thermostat. and the problem is that this process goes slower than the pace at which the planet is warming up. if goes slower than the pace at which the planet is warming up. ii the the planet is warming up. if the negotiators _ the planet is warming up. if the negotiators across _ the planet is warming up. if the negotiators across the - the planet is warming up. if the negotiators across the river - the planet is warming up. if the negotiators across the river clyde do not get it right in glasgow, dealing with coal and other fossil fuels, how crucial will that be to the overall aim? i will ask viewers to bear with me, if we consider the first draft, this is what it said about coal and fossil fuels. it asked countries to speed up the phasing out of coal, and to speed up the phasing out of fossil fuels. phasing out of coal, and to speed up the phasing out of fossilfuels. the latest draft asks countries to speed up latest draft asks countries to speed up the development of new technology for the transition to cleaner energy, and to accelerate the phase—out of unabated coal power and inefficient subsidies for fossil
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fuels. those words, unabated and inefficient, it gives them some wiggle room? inefficient, it gives them some wiggle room— wiggle room? and that is the concern- _ wiggle room? and that is the concern. there _ wiggle room? and that is the concern. there is _ wiggle room? and that is the concern. there is a _ wiggle room? and that is the concern. there is a lot - wiggle room? and that is the concern. there is a lot of- concern. there is a lot of positivity in just the inclusion of the terms fossil fuels and coal. they weren't mentioned in the paris agreement. this is the first draft agreement. this is the first draft agreement that looks to negate greenhouse gas emissions. that is a real positive. if we address that, these un processes are taken very seriously, they are voluntary agreements, everybody is here to take part in global peer pressure. we are comparing notes on holding fee to the fire. if we can actually name global warming in that agreement, it is a massive step forward, a real positive. at the language is critical. particularly this mention of inefficient
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subsidies forfossilfuels. one subsidies for fossil fuels. one energy subsidies forfossilfuels. one energy policy expert i spoke to this morning picked out that word and basically said it gives countries a get out ofjail basically said it gives countries a get out of jail free basically said it gives countries a get out ofjail free card. you can essentially say that you're subsidies are efficient, and therefore maintain that. so, that language is really critical, and it dials down the urgency somewhat. victoria, thank you very much for explaining that. yes, the language is really technical in places, but it is absolutely important to what emerges here. and your regular reminder, which we will be doing throughout the day, is at this point we don't have agreement yet on all of these points. this is a draft statement, a draft agreement. will it be finalised today? the official, final day of cop26? we simply don't know is the answer. the discussions may spill over into tomorrow. advisers to the president of the un climate summit have warned that the negotiations — due to end today — won't prevent global temperatures rising more than one point five degrees above pre—industrial levels. the experts — known
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as friends of cop — say the current text is too weak. they've called for a clear admission that emissions will continue to rise under current policies. graham satchell reports. we are calling on world leaders to grasp this final chance. it is crunch time at the glasgow conference. protesters making it clear, the outcome couldn't be more important. a matter of life and death. time is running out. we are not there yet on the most critical issues. there is still a lot more work to be done. that work is going on in quiet corners. the draft agreement pored over, line by line, by every country in the world. so what still needs to be decided? the most fundamental question, cutting greenhouse gases. they're still going up when the science is clear they need to be falling.
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financial aid for the poorest nations. it was promised more than a decade ago, but still hasn't been delivered. and how often countries should update their plans for going green. should it be every year? there have been some successes. a plan to cut methane, although not all countries have signed up. a call to end the use of coal, the dirtiest fossil fuel, but again, no binding agreements. and an assurance to end deforestation by 2030. will it happen? we don't believe that promises made by financial companies to end deforestation will actually prevent trees from being cut or burned down. we simply don't believe it. i'm actually here to beg you to prove us wrong. we desperately need you to prove us wrong. please prove us wrong. another protest as climate activists sound the alarm. the worry for these protesters, that there is no agreed date for ending the use of oil and gas. the fact that we are not talking about phasing fossil fuels, even at any stage, to us indicates that the process has
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fundamentally failed. because that is probably the largest issue we have to confront. it's not even on the table. this morning, a warning from one of the key advisory groups at the conference that what's been agreed so far won't be enough to stop temperatures rising. graham satchell, bbc news. the economist and climate change expert lord stern says the new cop26 draft is an improvement but won't be enough to limit temperature rises to the target of 1.5 celsius it. of what one would hope for, in a sense of driving to 1.5 on tackling clean development. but, actually, i think it goes beyond where i thought it might be a few days ago. i think this new text is stronger, a greater
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sense of urgency, looking at all forms of finance. the importance of getting it in place next year, when we have to both deliver on the 100 billion and put in place something which is much bigger and better. well i'm joined now by stephen cornelius who is the chief climate change adviser at the world wide fund for nature. he's also been a former uk negotiator at previous summits. great to have you with us. ijust want to ask you about that previous role as a negotiator, first of all, if i may. just give us a sense of what it is like at this stage of a huge summit. many of the negotiators have been working through the night. they are tired, yet they have to work on something of huge importance. work on something of huge importance-— work on something of huge importance. work on something of huge im ortance. , , ., ., importance. yes, the rhythm of a cop, we importance. yes, the rhythm of a cop. we had _ importance. yes, the rhythm of a cop, we had the _ importance. yes, the rhythm of a cop, we had the leaders - importance. yes, the rhythm of a cop, we had the leaders come i importance. yes, the rhythm of a cop, we had the leaders come atj importance. yes, the rhythm of a - cop, we had the leaders come at the beginning, we had the technical work being done by the negotiators last week. this week, the ministers have got involved. so, last night, the night before, it was late nights for them. it is basically the more
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political issues are being discussed by the leaders, by the environment ministers. and then, you know, what happens is we have this new text this morning. alok sharma, the cop president will show it this morning at 11 o'clock, and then invite views from parties, and then we will go all over again.— all over again. you really have to have some _ all over again. you really have to have some stamina _ all over again. you really have to have some stamina for— all over again. you really have to have some stamina for that - all over again. you really have to - have some stamina for that process, don't you? it have some stamina for that process, don't ou? , ., ., ., ., ., ., don't you? it is a marathon, not a srint. don't you? it is a marathon, not a sprint. absolutely. _ don't you? it is a marathon, not a sprint. absolutely. let— don't you? it is a marathon, not a sprint. absolutely. let me - don't you? it is a marathon, not a sprint. absolutely. let me talk i don't you? it is a marathon, not a sprint. absolutely. let me talk to| sprint. absolutely. let me talk to ou now, sprint. absolutely. let me talk to you now. with — sprint. absolutely. let me talk to you now, with your _ sprint. absolutely. let me talk to you now, with your world - sprint. absolutely. let me talk to you now, with your world wide i sprint. absolutely. let me talk to l you now, with your world wide fund for nature hat on. i want to get your reaction to the latest form of the agreement, the draft agreement. i think it is welcome that it has come out. it shows that countries are still talking, and things are moving forward. actually, in a lot of areas this text is weaker than before. so, you talked about the fact it still includes coal and fossil fuels, fact it still includes coal and fossilfuels, those fact it still includes coal and fossil fuels, those key words about coal and inefficient subsidies. they do give real room for countries to
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maybe do not as much as they should do. the idea that coal, the fossil fuels are causing climate change, thatis fuels are causing climate change, that is to be welcomed in there. but there is too much wriggle room at there is too much wriggle room at the moment. there is too much wriggle room at the moment-— the moment. you wanted the first draft, which _ the moment. you wanted the first draft, which we _ the moment. you wanted the first draft, which we saw _ the moment. you wanted the first draft, which we saw on _ the moment. you wanted the first i draft, which we saw on wednesday, if i've got my day is correct, i think it was wednesday, to be the absolute minimum, didn't you? yes. it was wednesday, to be the absolute minimum, didn't you?— minimum, didn't you? yes, we said this was a floor _ minimum, didn't you? yes, we said this was a floor and _ minimum, didn't you? yes, we said this was a floor and not _ minimum, didn't you? yes, we said this was a floor and not a _ minimum, didn't you? yes, we said this was a floor and not a ceiling. i this was a floor and not a ceiling. but they have managed to dig into the basement in some areas. there are areas around nature which i think have improved. so, the idea that it shows that protecting, restoring and conserving nature, thatis restoring and conserving nature, that is key to 1.5 degrees. you can't get to 1.5 degrees unless you're doing that in protecting nature. the idea that nature is part of the pledges is good. but it is going backwards and a lot of other areas. . , going backwards and a lot of other areas. ., , ., areas. nature being part of the solution. in _ areas. nature being part of the solution. in practical— areas. nature being part of the solution. in practicalterms, i areas. nature being part of the i solution. in practicalterms, from solution. in practical terms, from what you have seen so far, what does it mean for organisations like
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yourself, working to protect nature? what will come out of this cop, do you hope, that will help you in your work? i you hope, that will help you in your work? ~ . you hope, that will help you in your work? ~' ., , ., , ., work? i think there are signals that climate change _ work? i think there are signals that climate change and _ work? i think there are signals that climate change and biodiversity i climate change and biodiversity loss, two sides of the same coin, you can't deal with one without dealing with the other. so, you can't effectively protect biodiversity without tackling climate change, you can't global warming without conserving nature. we had an interesting discussion yesterday about where some states and cities are setting more ambitious targets in dealing with climate change than some national governments. do you feel that a similar things happening in environmental activism, protecting nature, that organisations like wwf are leading the way on this and that you are trying to get governments to almost catch up with what you are doing? i almost catch up with what you are doinu ? ~ . almost catch up with what you are doing? i think having organisations like wwf having _ doing? i think having organisations like wwf having people _ doing? i think having organisations like wwf having people out - doing? i think having organisations like wwf having people out on i doing? i think having organisations like wwf having people out on the | like wwf having people out on the street, they have been out in glasgow all week, chanting and putting pressure on. i think that is
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really important, because it does make a difference, it does push cities, it does push business, it does push countries to do more than they would otherwise do.— does push countries to do more than they would otherwise do. really good to talk to you- — they would otherwise do. really good to talk to you. thank _ they would otherwise do. really good to talk to you. thank you _ they would otherwise do. really good to talk to you. thank you very - they would otherwise do. really good to talk to you. thank you very much. | to talk to you. thank you very much. stephen cornelius, chief adviser on climate change for the wwf. earlier i spoke to dr ben strauss, ceo and chief scientist of climate central. as part of his work he has created projections of what some famous landmarks around the world would look like if temperatures reached three degrees of warming. here, you are looking at the world's tallest building. and yet if we allow warming to progress to three degrees celsius, a business as usual scenario, close to what countries are doing now with their actions, its toes would get wet. the whole of
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downtown dubai would be underwater if we follow that path. here we are looking at an important museum of history in mumbai. mumbai is also extremely vulnerable to sea level rise. even this century, this image shows, again, where we could get, after several hundred years, but we make that choice right now. loath? after several hundred years, but we make that choice right now. why do ou think make that choice right now. why do you think it — make that choice right now. why do you think it is _ make that choice right now. why do you think it is so _ make that choice right now. why do you think it is so important - make that choice right now. why do you think it is so important to i you think it is so important to produce these visualisations? well, eo - le produce these visualisations? well, --eole are produce these visualisations? well, people are just _ produce these visualisations? well, people are just very _ produce these visualisations? well, people are just very visual. - produce these visualisations? -ii people are just very visual. when we talk about numbers, 1.5 degrees, two or three, talk about numbers, 1.5 degrees, two orthree, $100 talk about numbers, 1.5 degrees, two or three, $100 billion or talk about numbers, 1.5 degrees, two orthree, $100 billion ora trillion, those are abstract, it is hard for people to understand. but climate impacts are going to be world shaking. they are already beginning to be and we want to give it ina beginning to be and we want to give it in a picture so we can really see. we have a choice, a or b. what we do at this meeting and this decade will make an enormous
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difference for generations to come. lets look at some more images, we have the site of the australian open in melbourne. what is the projection for this? in melbourne. what is the pro'ection for this? �* ., ., , for this? again, the whole site would be underwater, - for this? again, the whole site would be underwater, in i for this? again, the whole site would be underwater, in the l for this? again, the whole site i would be underwater, in the long run, if we don't take action to transition to a clean economy and do it rapidly. while the sea level will take time to unfold, there are a series of one—way gates. if we warm up series of one—way gates. if we warm up the planet enough, ice corks holding back the glazier in greenland will be destroyed, and degraded. underthe greenland will be destroyed, and degraded. under the ice is going to come out. even if we pull down the planet afterwards.— come out. even if we pull down the planet afterwards. one-way gates, if we to planet afterwards. one-way gates, if we go through _ planet afterwards. one-way gates, if we go through the — planet afterwards. one-way gates, if we go through the gate _ planet afterwards. one-way gates, if we go through the gate we _ planet afterwards. one-way gates, if we go through the gate we can't i planet afterwards. one-way gates, if we go through the gate we can't go l we go through the gate we can't go backin we go through the gate we can't go back in the other direction again, it was in? . v back in the other direction again, it was in?_ i - back in the other direction again, it was in?_ i guess i it was in? that's right. i guess --eole it was in? that's right. i guess people might _ it was in? that's right. i guess people might ask, _ it was in? that's right. i guess people might ask, how - it was in? that's right. i guess people might ask, how do i it was in? that's right. i guess people might ask, how do youj it was in? that's right. i guess i people might ask, how do you know that the projections are right on this? that the pro'ections are right on this? , , ., . ., , ., that the pro'ections are right on this? , . ., this? these pro'ections are based both on this? these projections are based both on modelling _ this? these projections are based both on modelling going - this? these projections are based both on modelling going forward, j this? these projections are based i both on modelling going forward, but
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also looking back in the deep history of the planet. over the last couple of million years, there have been a whole series of ice ages and warm periods in between them. we can look at how warm those warm periods were, how high the sea levels were, and we can see the sea levels are extremely sensitive to warming, and our projections match that pattern. finally, let's look at the image of london, buckingham palace, what do you project could happen here? what you pro'ect could happen here? what is you project could happen here? what is interesting — you project could happen here? what is interesting about _ you project could happen here? “mat is interesting about the you project could happen here? wrist is interesting about the imagery from buckingham palace is while three celsius warming looks terrible, 1.5 degrees does not look very good either. in fact, if we stop polluting today we would already have to metres of sea level rise in the pipeline. so, there is an incredible amount of momentum, inertia, in the system. but what i think is important to remember is that we have a huge amount of choice for most of these landmarks, and, really, the people alive today, the
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leaders, they are the only ones in history who have had the chance in what we do over ten years to really affect the next 10,000 years. ben strauss from _ affect the next 10,000 years. ben strauss from climate central. here is the shot showing the other side of the river from where we are sitting in our studio, to where the negotiations are taking place. they went through the night in glasgow. the president of cop, alok sharma, arrived back for the negotiations very early this morning, local time, around 7am local time, and we are expecting to get some sort of breathing, i think, expecting to get some sort of breathing, ithink, in expecting to get some sort of breathing, i think, in the next couple of hours from him. a stock—taking of where we are at. all of that theme, let's pick up with our reality check correspondent chris morris, in the studio. so, the aim of this summit is to try to stop global warming, to put it simply, to try to keep the rise in the average temperature of the world below 1.5
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celsius. to make serious steps to do that within this decade. where are we on that?— we on that? that is the critical oint. we on that? that is the critical point- the _ we on that? that is the critical point. the negotiators - we on that? that is the critical point. the negotiators acrossl we on that? that is the critical i point. the negotiators across the river are going through texts line by line. that is theirjob and what they have been doing for months or years. taking a step back, the aim of this conference was to see what could be done right now to make a difference to greenhouse gas emissions during this conference. the aim is to keep the 1.5 degrees goal alive, so they need to cut it by half by 2030, and we are nowhere near that, with all of the pledges put together that have been made here, with everything that has come before. we are a long way away from meeting that path to 2030. in that sense, this conference has struggled. but, unfortunately, the way these things work are these are baby steps. what they are doing here is try to write the rules of the paris agreement into practice. why
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thatis paris agreement into practice. why that is important is that it is an international treaty. once you agree the rules, at a meeting like this, those are binding rules on everyone. one of the things that is in the draft text still is what they call the ratchet of agreeing to review, and if necessary update, national pledges on greenhouse gas emissions much more regularly. so it looked like it might become an annual process, the paris agreement, and they say it should happen every five years. every five years, a lot of people saying, if we are trying to make a goal by 2030, that is really long. but some countries are saying that doing it every year would take a lot of resources, from things that could be spent elsewhere. but without the pressure on the big emitters, the process will not be fast enough. emitters, the process will not be fast enough-— emitters, the process will not be fast enough. really interesting to see what happens _ fast enough. really interesting to see what happens with _ fast enough. really interesting to see what happens with that i fast enough. really interesting to see what happens with that part i fast enough. really interesting to | see what happens with that part of the draft agreement. we said at the beginning of cop to follow the money. you've got to follow the money, that is what is going to
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drive so many of the projects, to try to combat climate change. how are those discussions going? i think the are are those discussions going? i think they are really _ are those discussions going? i think they are really difficult, _ are those discussions going? i think they are really difficult, because i they are really difficult, because it is about money, national budgets. you know, activists get incredibly frustrated, saying can't they see above that, rise above that and see the future of the planet is at stake here? but governments get elected and they have a limited out of money to spend. now, the argument is that they should be spending far, far more. at stake here? but governments get elected and they have a limited out of money to spend. now, the argument is that they should be spending far, far more. and the big argument has been, for some time, how much money as the rich world going to give to the developing world to help them adapt to what climate change is already doing to their countries? and also, to enable their countries? and also, to enable their economies, as they develop, to do so in a sustainable way. now, one of things that has also come to the fore here, it has been around for a long time, but it is at the forefront of now, what they are calling loss and damage. essentially a euphemism for reparations. the adaptation money is dealing with what is happening now. building a sea wall. making sure freshwater can
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get to areas affected by drought, that sort of thing. but loss and damages really look, for decades, a couple of hundred years, you, the rich world, have been pumping out these omissions, which means we have lost our coral reefs, we have lost our protection from the sea, we have lost part of our land. we want to be compensated for that. and countries are worried about their liability? work at that amount of money and, yes. there is reluctance in some quarters to deal with that. but it is a demand which i think is only going to grow louder. and it is something which is being looked at and negotiated during the course of the day, the developing countries pushing very strongly for some sort of recognition of loss and damage in the text. it may not have a figure put next to it. but to make sure that it put next to it. but to make sure thatitis put next to it. but to make sure that it is on the agenda, because, as you are talking with your previous guest, this is a marathon, not a sprint, and already thoughts are turning towards the next cop in are turning towards the next cop in a year. for now, they have to get
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through today and probably tonight. thank you very much. as chris was saying, if you're going through a text, the representatives of 200 countries, going through a text, line by line, it is probably no great surprise that the negotiators are working through the night here in glasgow, and probably will be tonight as well, by the looks of things. perhaps it takes that sort of pressure to actually reach an agreement. we are not at that point yet. we will watch it really closely for you, and much more on climate throughout the day. at right now, let's go to my colleague victoria derbyshire, who is in london. thank you, and it. we are at the foreign office this morning. richard ratcliffe is on day 20 of his hunger strike in protest at what he says his government in action about the detention, the continued detention of his wife in tehran, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. the postman has
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just been, and people from all over the country, potentially all over the country, potentially all over the world, sending letters to richard. i don't know if you can see what the address is that they have written on it, richard ratcliffe, care of the pavement, king charles street, outside the foreign office, london, england. this one says, richard ratcliffe, tent opposites the foreign office. this one says richard ratcliffe, outside the foreign office. whitehall, london. and this says gabriella radcliffe, thatis and this says gabriella radcliffe, that is their seven—year—old daughter, carol richard ratcliffe, please deliver to hunger striker. these are some of the cards that he has been receiving while he has been living outside the foreign office for the past three weeks. we have spent quite a bit of time talking to richard this morning. for obvious reasons. but his wife isn't the only one detained by iran at the moment.
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there is also a british national, 67—year—old anoosheh ashoori. his name and face is not as well—known as mrs currie radcliffe, but there is no less a committed and serious campaign by his family to get him released from the notorious jail in tehran. his daughter is here. hello to you. thank you for talking to our audience around the world. tell our audience around the world. tell our audience what happened to your dad. in august 2017, he went on a routine trip to iran, his mum was 87 and was having surgery. so he went back to nurse her. one day, i think the third week of his visit, he just went for a shopping trip, just a normal shopping trip, and a van pulled up and asked if he was anoosheh ashoori. when he confirmed
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that, they put a bag over his head and took him for interrogation. and thatis and took him for interrogation. and that is how everything started. he was charged with spying, which he said was absurd. he was given a ten yearjail said was absurd. he was given a ten year jail sentence. said was absurd. he was given a ten yearjailsentence. how said was absurd. he was given a ten yearjail sentence. how many years as he into that? he yearjail sentence. how many years as he into that?— yearjail sentence. how many years as he into that? he served 'ust over four and a halfi as he into that? he served 'ust over four and a half years i as he into that? he served 'ust over four and a half years of i as he into that? he served 'ust over four and a half years of hisi four and a half years of his sentence now. but he was served with the same sentencing as mrs ratcliffe. there is a known fact in the jail where they say that the judge, the samejudge the jail where they say that the judge, the same judge as nazanin's, who delivers the verdict, he does it by the kilo. hejust has who delivers the verdict, he does it by the kilo. he just has a who delivers the verdict, he does it by the kilo. hejust has a kilo who delivers the verdict, he does it by the kilo. he just has a kilo of paper verdict he puts on his desk and charges everybody with spying. your dad 67. is he has been retired team in the years. he was an engineer. how is he coping in that jail?
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it's very difficult. he hasn't been given much for low. that's temporary leave. a lot of people in prison during coronavirus were sent home as a precautionary measure. he was not one of them. we a precautionary measure. he was not one of them-— one of them. we believe strongly he contracted coronavirus _ one of them. we believe strongly he contracted coronavirus in _ one of them. we believe strongly he contracted coronavirus in prison. i contracted coronavirus in prison. there's almost basic hygiene. they have bug infestation because the men's ward is in the basement, it is done, they have cockroaches, rats, it's notjust one or two macro, its infestations of these bugs and they do not have sanitisers or facemasks. they are given one facemask for the whole week so it's very precarious situation for someone of his age to be in. especially for someone, he's very scientific, very creative. for him to be cooped up in a cell for that long, it must be maddening for him. ., ., , ., that long, it must be maddening for him. ., ., i. ., ., that long, it must be maddening for him. ., ., ., ., , him. how are you and how is your mother and _
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him. how are you and how is your mother and your _ him. how are you and how is your mother and your brother? - him. how are you and how is your mother and your brother? you i him. how are you and how is your. mother and your brother? you know, we have learned _ mother and your brother? you know, we have learned to _ mother and your brother? you know, we have learned to go _ mother and your brother? you know, we have learned to go by _ mother and your brother? you know, we have learned to go by living i we have learned to go by living day—to—day. we have to try and wake up day—to—day. we have to try and wake up each day and fight that day and see what we can do to make him not be forgotten. it's very difficult to do. because obviously there are certain factors that have not allowed our campaign to be as well—known as the others. it's been an uphill battle to try and get attention and keep the momentum going for his situation.— going for his situation. initially, the foreign _ going for his situation. initially, the foreign office _ going for his situation. initially, the foreign office told - going for his situation. initially, the foreign office told you i going for his situation. initially, the foreign office told you and| going for his situation. initially, i the foreign office told you and the family, as with richard ratcliffe, to say nothing about the detention of your dad. why, what was that like for you? for of your dad. why, what was that like for ou? ., , , ., ., for you? for the first year or so, we had to _ for you? for the first year or so, we had to be _ for you? for the first year or so, we had to be silent _ for you? for the first year or so, we had to be silent because i for you? for the first year or so, | we had to be silent because they encourage that by being silent, they would be able to do negotiations easier and that if we are not in the
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public eye, they could get a deal made quickerfor him, for things to resolve. but after a year, it was the iranians mediate themselves that published my dad �*s name in their media. and we found outjust by waking up one morning and seeing his name everywhere so we decided to control the narrative and speak about it. so i regret to this day not having gone public sooner because we would have had way more attention if we had acted faster and we would have been in touch with other family sooner.— we would have been in touch with other family sooner. your family and richard 's family _ other family sooner. your family and richard 's family offered _ other family sooner. your family and richard 's family offered support i richard �*s family offered support and love to each other and try to keep each other going, don't you? that keep each other going, don't you? git first, i think the foreign office did not want the families to meet but it was inevitable that we do and richard has been very helpful, he has been campaigning for a year when we started hours. he has given us tips, advice. shared his experience with us, his contacts. mentally,
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it's very good to have a family going through the exact same thing as us because not many people would understand what it feels like because there is no guidebook for how to deal with a hostage situation for a family that had nothing to do with anything. this for a family that had nothing to do with anything-— with anything. as the government workin: on with anything. as the government working on behalf— with anything. as the government working on behalf of— with anything. as the government working on behalf of your - with anything. as the government working on behalf of your family, | working on behalf of your family, your dad, to try and get him out? what are they doing? they say they do. just like it is with nazanin, we have been told the same things over and over again forfour and a half years, and richard, it's five years. they are doing the best they can, that they are doing what they think is best. but their strategy has failed. note british nationals have been freed, no negotiations have been freed, no negotiations have been made so whatever the government is claiming to be doing is not working. judging by their reaction to this hunger strike, i mean, working. judging by their reaction to this hungerstrike, i mean, in note civilised first world country
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should it come to this for someone to demand human rights for something thatis to demand human rights for something that is as basic as a money transaction between to countries. the bottom line, everyone knows that is what it is. the bottom line, everyone knows that is what it is-— is what it is. thank you so much for talkin: to is what it is. thank you so much for talking to us- _ is what it is. thank you so much for talking to us. stay _ is what it is. thank you so much for talking to us. stay there. _ is what it is. thank you so much for talking to us. stay there. people i talking to us. stay there. people are turning up here, strangers, supporters, politicians. there is a young woman who has come down. tell us our young woman who has come down. teii us your name. young woman who has come down. tell us your name- i — young woman who has come down. tell us your name. i and _ young woman who has come down. tell us your name. i and sicily. _ young woman who has come down. tell us your name. i and sicily. why - young woman who has come down. tell us your name. i and sicily. why are i us your name. i and sicily. why are ou us your name. i and sicily. why are you here? — us your name. i and sicily. why are you here? i — us your name. i and sicily. why are you here? i wanted _ us your name. i and sicily. why are you here? i wanted to _ us your name. i and sicily. why are you here? i wanted to come - us your name. i and sicily. why are you here? i wanted to come and i you here? i wanted to come and support richard, the whole family, letters head him know they are cared for. and we stand in solidarity with them. and with your family, for. and we stand in solidarity with them. and with yourfamily, of course. it is notjust this injustice for nazanin, there's other people who are unfairly detained and we want you to know that we care and we want you to know that we care and we are trying to put pressure on the government. i we are trying to put pressure on the government-— government. i feel you are emotional. _ government. i feel you are emotional. it _ government. i feel you are emotional. it is, _ government. i feel you are emotional. it is, it- government. i feel you are emotional. it is, it is- government. i feel you are emotional. it is, it is an i government. i feel you are i emotional. it is, it is an awful nightmare — emotional. it is, it is an awful nightmare they _ emotional. it is, it is an awful nightmare they are _ emotional. it is, it is an awful nightmare they are going i emotional. it is, it is an awful-
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nightmare they are going through. they arejust a nightmare they are going through. they are just a normal family. in this horrifically unfair situation. i am a mother, just like nazanin. and our children are actually really close in age. it's unbearable to think of being separated from my child. i cannot really begin to imagine the pain that she is going through and the pain for the whole family. we think about her very often. we have a picture of her on ourfridge. and she is in our thoughts and prayers and you know, notjust thoughts and prayers and you know, not just at a thoughts and prayers and you know, notjust at a time like this. but all of the time. in fact, she was detained when i was on maternity leave and i had become a new mother. so we follow her story closely. we really wish them all the very best and hope that the nightmare will end. . g and hope that the nightmare will end. ., ~ , ., and hope that the nightmare will end. ., ~ i. . and hope that the nightmare will end. ., ~ . ~ ., ~ end. thank you so much. and thank ou for end. thank you so much. and thank you for telling _ end. thank you so much. and thank you for telling us _ end. thank you so much. and thank you for telling us about _ end. thank you so much. and thank you for telling us about your- you for telling us about your father. thank you. let's talk to the
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shadow foreign secretary, lisa nandy from the labour party. i hope you can hear me. thank you for talking to us. i want to ask you do you think nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, her case, and the case of anoosheh ashoori can only be resolved now if the prime minister grips this? i think so. every minister i have spoken to who has been involved in this case privately over the last 11 years has said this will be resolved at the highest levels of government. it means prime minister in the foreign secretary need to get a handle on the case. we need to show the iranians that this is a top priority for britain. and i was really concerned to hear that richard had been asked to meet with a junior minister rather than with the newly installed foreign secretary recently. i have written to lustrous to ask that she gives
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this and cases like this, anoosheh ashoori, you have been talking about, priority that they deserve. in the end, these things are only resolved by personal intervention by the prime minister. —— written to liz truss. there have been cases resolved by the political intervention of prime minister, wet tarmac whether conservative or labour prime ministers. it is important the prime minister gets a handle on this.— handle on this. does that involve -a in: handle on this. does that involve paying the _ handle on this. does that involve paying the £400 _ handle on this. does that involve paying the £400 million - handle on this. does that involve paying the £400 million debt i handle on this. does that involve| paying the £400 million debt this country owes to iran for that failed tank order?— tank order? look, we do not negotiate — tank order? look, we do not negotiate with _ tank order? look, we do not. negotiate with hostage-takers tank order? look, we do not- negotiate with hostage-takers and negotiate with hostage—takers and thatis negotiate with hostage—takers and that is what the situation is. morad tahbaz, nazanin, anoosheh ashoori, they are all hostages being detained in iran, being held by the iranian government but there is no question, a court order determined the debt 13
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years ago, jeremy hunt, the former foreign secretary has talked openly about the difficulties he had in pursuing negotiations with the iranians, notjust on this issue but on the iranian nuclear deal and others. because of the outstanding bad will that was felt towards britain because we would not meet our international obligations and the government accepts that debt is owed and must be paid, somehow, whether that is paid in kind or not. the barriers that existed before towards paying that debt are now much reduced. the american government under donald trump is very clear that if britain paid that debt, they would view that as trade with iran and would suffer sanctions and penalties as a consequence. the biden administration has taken a different approach six months ago. antony blinken, the leading foreign affairs spokesperson in the white house said very clearly that they
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would not stand in the way of britain resolving that issue. and i think you can see why richard and his family are so utterly frustrated as are the other families as well. the family of anoosheh ashoori, and others. there does not seem to be a seriousness in government, no one has gripped this from the highest level so when i went to speak to richard last week, to show him some support, it was pretty clear that while the public is absolutely touched by what has happened to this family and to other families as well, the barriers have gone up in the foreign office. and they had been reduced to meeting withjunior ministers, they cannot even go into the foreign office to use the toilet even though richard is on hunger strike outside. it does not feel this is a foreign office showing the humanity and urgency that is needed. at the moment. ok. humanity and urgency that is needed. at the moment.— at the moment. ok. thank you very much for your— at the moment. ok. thank you very much for your time, _ at the moment. ok. thank you very much for your time, lisa _ at the moment. ok. thank you very much for your time, lisa nandy. i much for your time, lisa nandy.
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shadow foreign secretary. let's talk to the head of amnesty. and a representative from the bbc persian service. let me ask you about the other layers of these stories. it's not simply about a british iranian dual nationality individual being in a jail in dual nationality individual being in ajail in tehran, dual nationality individual being in a jail in tehran, it's to do with potentially the nuclear deal, sanctions, these debts. fill our audience in about the context. obviously there is a dispute with the the west and iran, the enrichment of uranium, iranian ballistic missiles, adventures in the region, equipping the middle east. that has been the issue concerning the west but the iranian point of view, if you talk to them, they say ourjudicial point of view, if you talk to them, they say our judicial system point of view, if you talk to them, they say ourjudicial system is independent but we know from the experience from the past that happened people like nazanin and
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anoosheh ashoori, they have been used as bargaining chips, leverage by iranian officials to settle this political dispute. or sometimes even releasing some of their nationals who had been accused of assassination or bomb plots are other issues, to be released. there is a number of issues but we know in the case of nazanin, a british dual national, it is more about this $400 billion, the interest in the last year, the shah of iran, iranians were paid up before the revolution happened in the british government refused to send the consignment and the iranians say, you did not give us the equipment, the military hardware and now you had to pay back the money plus the interest. and we understand there have been many signals from iranian officials, if you signals from iranian officials, if y°u pay signals from iranian officials, if you pay this money, those dual nationals will be released. sasha,
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from the amnesty _ nationals will be released. sasha, from the amnesty point _ nationals will be released. sasha, from the amnesty point of- nationals will be released. sasha, from the amnesty point of view, i nationals will be released. sasha, i from the amnesty point of view, what can you do to help nazanin and anoosheh ashoori.— can you do to help nazanin and anoosheh ashoori. many supporters around the country _ anoosheh ashoori. many supporters around the country have _ anoosheh ashoori. many supporters around the country have been i around the country have been campaigning and communicating to mp5, _ campaigning and communicating to mp5. the _ campaigning and communicating to mp5, the prime minister. ithink those _ mp5, the prime minister. ithink those voice5 mp5, the prime minister. ithink those voices do really matter. we have _ those voices do really matter. we have heard — those voices do really matter. we have heard for many years, the government say they want to do all they can, _ government say they want to do all they can, they are trying to do all they can, they are trying to do all they can — they can, they are trying to do all they can but there has not been the action_ they can but there has not been the action behind these words. we they can but there has not been the action behind these words. we have a foreian action behind these words. we have a foreign office — action behind these words. we have a foreign office statement _ action behind these words. we have a foreign office statement saying - action behind these words. we have a foreign office statement saying wheni foreign office statement saying when we meet the iranians, we say, this is unacceptable, these people must be released. that is not enough? the government needs to have a clear strategy— government needs to have a clear strategy in — government needs to have a clear strategy in relation to the release of the _ strategy in relation to the release of the british nationals, it's important for us to remember these are british _ important for us to remember these are british nationals, four nationals that amnesty international is working _ nationals that amnesty international is working with, you have been talking — is working with, you have been talking to — is working with, you have been talking to the family of nazanin, richard — talking to the family of nazanin, richard was here, and the family of an ashoori — richard was here, and the family of an ashoori have been here. the
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government does not appear to have a clear strategy in relation to their release — clear strategy in relation to their release and i do not think there is that clarity— release and i do not think there is that clarity and kind of action behind — that clarity and kind of action behind those words at the moment. thank— behind those words at the moment. thank you. — behind those words at the moment. thank you, both of you. thank you so much for your insight and contributions, we appreciate that. so many messages have been sent to richard here. on my twitterfeed. you can see the kind of outpouring of love and solidarity and demands that the government really focus on this now and that this should be an urgent priority. but the moment, as richard told us earlier, his hunger strike goes on, he is very weary. it is potentially drawn to an end but at the moment, he wants to carry on. let's bring you some of the other stories today. the leader of belarus has threatened to cut off gas supplies to europe if sanctions are imposed over an escalating migrant crisis
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at the country's border. a state of emergency has been declared near eastern poland, with a ban preventing journalists and aid agencies from entering the country, as it tries to contain the growing numbers. our europe correspondent nick beake has spent the week travelling along the restricted area. in belarus's capital minsk, they keep arriving. from far and wide. given visas by the regime, and the hope that life will be much better when they soon cross into the eu. some people told the bbc they realised president lukashenko was using them to try to create new european migrant crisis. this president, he wants to solve it by using us. he thinks we are terrorists, and we are not terrorists, —— he thinks we are tools. and we are not tools.
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we just want to cross the border to have a better life. but this is what awaits them in the makeshift camps that have been set up on the border. most of those trapped between belarus and poland are men, but there are women and children too, and they're at the heart of a growing international crisis. this is the dense woodland where at least nine migrants have died from hypothermia in recent weeks, trying to reach the eu. poland's hoping the european union will pay for a fence to protect large parts of its long border with belarus, which has come under unprecedented strain. well, we've made our way deep into the forest and this is what we've just found. bottles of water, food packaging, boots, lots of warm clothes. it's all been lumped together and left next to this tree, and it appears to be yet more evidence that people are getting across the border. of course, where they are now, we simply don't now. but there are signs of where they came from. this is a negative covid test, stamped in iraq, from just two weeks ago. poland has more than 15,000 troops trying to stop the latest surge of people.
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just beyond this checkpoint, at least 150 migrants were spotted and detained in the past 2a hours. but human rights groups and some polish politicians are concerned about the tactics the government is using. we are facing a humanitarian crisis. the situation is definitely tough for poland, no one disputes that. but we should be dealing with it in a humanitarian way, in line with the geneva convention, in line with european law, not pushing people back, not playing ping—pong with human beings. this is what's actually happening right now. but there does seem to be support for the hardline warsaw is taking, especially at this far right rally in the polish capital to mark independence day. the government here has eu and nato backing in how it's dealing with the crisis they all say belarus is fuelling. away from the politics, on the ground, it is an increasingly bleak picture. nick beake, bbc news,
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on the poland belarus border. around 3.2 million children are expected to suffer from malnutrition in afghanistan by the end of this year, with i million of them at risk of dying, according to a new warning from the world health organisation. many of those affected will be migrants displaced since the taliban takeover in august. an estimated 5.5 million people are now �*internally displaced'— living in temproary shelters without access to basic services including healthcare let's speak to ashley carl. he is deputy chief of the international organization for migration which advises governments on policy regarding migrants, including how to offer humanitarian help. thank you forjoining us. first of all, three months on from the taliban takeover, what is the situation like on the ground
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regarding the displaced people? thank you for having me. unfortunately, i wish i could report the situation was getting better. unfortunately, the situation is getting far worse. as you rightly said, 5.5 million afghans are internally displaced within the country. that includes over 682,000 already this year. it is really a multidimensional crisis that we are facing in afghanistan. we have an approaching winter which is very severe. temperatures can drop below 20 celsius. there is a massive food insecurity need. most afghan families are now missing meals. not receiving nutritional meals. in addition to an ongoing drought, which is also exacerbating this multidimensional crisis. has which is also exacerbating this multidimensional crisis. as you mentioned _ multidimensional crisis. as you mentioned with _ multidimensional crisis. as you mentioned with winter - multidimensional crisis. as you -
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mentioned with winter approaching, it is a race against time. how much does that urgency add to the challenges of providing help? winter is fast approaching _ challenges of providing help? winter is fast approaching and _ challenges of providing help? winter is fast approaching and many - challenges of providing help? winter is fast approaching and many of- is fast approaching and many of those roads will become blocked by snow and ice which will prevent us logistically from delivering assistance to those, particularly the remote areas so we are working with very quickly with other partners in the un and non—governmental organisations to deliver winter assistance. 50 that includes special shelter as well as blankets, kitchen sets and other materials that will help keep afghans warm during this very tough few months ahead of them. what afghans warm during this very tough few months ahead of them. what more do ou few months ahead of them. what more do you think — few months ahead of them. what more do you think is — few months ahead of them. what more do you think is needed _ few months ahead of them. what more do you think is needed to _ few months ahead of them. what more do you think is needed to enable - few months ahead of them. what more do you think is needed to enable the i do you think is needed to enable the success of the rolling out of aid? certainly the economy has been in freefall. it was already reeling from the covid—i9 restrictions. and then, after of course the takeover
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by the taliban and the suspension of a lot of international development assistance, it has created a banking disruption which is a severe liquidity crisis for the country. our ability to give out cash to those much needed families, afghan families around the country, is critical. in addition to being able to have more flexibility in the way we can do our work. in line with this significant humanitarian imperative. this significant humanitarian imperative-— this significant humanitarian imerative. . . ., imperative. thank you so much for takin: the imperative. thank you so much for taking the time _ imperative. thank you so much for taking the time to _ imperative. thank you so much for taking the time to give _ imperative. thank you so much for taking the time to give us - imperative. thank you so much for taking the time to give us a - imperative. thank you so much for| taking the time to give us a picture of what it is like there. thank you. a court in myanmar has sentenced an americanjournalist to eleven years in jail on charges brought by the militay junta who seized power in february. danny fenster was convicted of endangering the reputation of the armed forces and associating with illegal organisations. he faces further charges of terrorism and sedition which could result in a life sentence. the us state department has described his detention as unacceptable and demanded his
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release. three migrants are missing after attempting to cross the channel on kayaks. the french coastguard called off the search for them last night. it comes as 1,000 migrants are believed to have reached the uk after making the crossing by boat yesterday — a record figure for a single day. the home office has described the number as "unacceptable". last year the home secretary priti patel promised to make make the route "unviable". a ninth person has died as a result of last friday's crush at the astroworld music festival in texas. bharti shahani, a university student, was 22—years—old. police are investigating the stampede, when fans pushed towards the stage during a performance by the rapper travis scott. hundreds of people were injured. as the end of the climate change conference in glasgow approaches, the devastating effects of extreme weather continue to affect people across the world. in the unites states, drought and heat —
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combined with historic bad land management — have led to intense, long—lasting wildfires. our climate editorjustin rowlatt has been to greenville, a town in northern california, that was completely destroyed by a fire in september. nicole faris's home was utterly destroyed by the dixie fire. we found peace and joy every day in our heart being here and i want to come home, but i want to come home to the day before the fire. this was supposed to be nicole and her husband paul's forever home. it took all the colour out of my life. look at it, everything is just a shade of grey. years of climate—induced drought have left the vegetation tinder dry. add in a policy of suppressing small fires which allowed dead wood to build up and now fires are faster and hotter than ever before. on august 4th, nicole got a text from the sheriff saying everyone still in town
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was in imminent danger. my friend said, it's coming, it'sjust, it's running down the road towards you, get out now. we grabbed the dogs and we grabbed our suitcases, and we got in the truck and we left. fire consumed the entire town injust two hours. and the mightiest trees are burning too. the world's last remaining giant sequoia are under threat. largest individual organism in the world. they are amazing, they sequester gigatons of carbon every year. so let me try and give you an idea ofjust how enormous this tree is. these trees are ancient. up to 3,000 years old. but there are just 70 groves left, all in this mountain range. so look at that, 31 metres. wow.
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they are vulnerable, but they are also very resilient. so they are picky, they are the goldilocks of the forest. but they survive fire, they survive drought, they live for thousands of years. the flames came within a quarter of a mile of the biggest tree. others weren't so lucky. we're the firstjournalists who have been invited into this sequoia grove since fire ripped through here in september. some trees have been totally incinerated. this is terrible. this is the worst thing i've seen all year. before 2015, no one saw a sequoia that looked like this. it's emotionally heartbreaking, you know. you never saw a tree torched like this, become a candle and burn up in this way before climate change and fire suppression. there's nothing i can do about these trees.
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they are gone, and we will plant new ones but it takes 1,000 years. and they won't be that for hundreds of years? no, they won't be this for a long, long time. but it isn't too late, says christie, not yet. climate change is here now and it is killing things that we care about that should not be dying. bringing climate change under control is what the conference in glasgow is all about. the lesson from california is that the world needs more thanjust long—term promises from governments. it needs practical action now. justin rowlatt, bbc news, in the sierra nevada mountains. the pop star britney spears could regain control of her personal life and finances later today — when a court in los angeles decides whether to overturn an order which originally put her father and lawyers in charge. the singer has been fighting to revoke the so—called conservatorship, which was imposed 13 years ago
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amid concerns for her mental health. you're watching bbc news. more news at the top of the hour. now it's time for a look at the weather. here is matt taylor. hello. a predominantly dry weekend awaits for most of you, but there is wet weather around. some gusty winds as well but those winds are still bringing in some relatively mild air for this stage in november, wrapped around this area of low pressure dominating the weather today, pushing east across scotland. around the centre is where we see the heaviest on the rain, across parts of scotland, there is rain at times into the afternoon, trying out into the south—west, but more downpours working in. rain at times in northern england, the west of the pennines and into wales but here things will dry up now and again.
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around these coasts on the north and west we could see winds gusting as high as 50 miles an hour, the winds gusting across eastern areas, after the rain this morning, match of the day will be dry but look at the temperatures, 11—15 , day will be dry but look at the temperatures, 11—15, higher than we expect but this time of year. this evening and overnight the mountain continues, the worst of the rain out of the way, but as we dragon north—westerly winds we still see some showers dotted around especially across parts of england but with clear skies in the west, temperatures into mid single figures, in south—west scotland and northern ireland. for most, a pretty man started the day. still breezy on the east of england, some showers around coastal counties but for most it's a dry day on saturday, misty and murky over the hills, some of that breaking, some sunny spells winning through for most of you at times. winds lighter, temperatures similar to today, it may feel a touch warmer at times. throughout saturday night into sunday, high pressure building across most of the
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uk, not many isobars on the chart means light winds, mist and fog is a problem but in the far north—west of scotland and northern ireland, there is thickening cloud, weak weather fronts bringing rain at times. most places will be dry, the chance of a shower across parts of kent and sussex but with some sunny breaks winning through, again, feeling relatively mild although a little cooler today and tomorrow. as we go into next week, the overall man continues. further south, you are likely to stay dry through the bulk of the week, mist and fog could be an issue in the morning, rain developing from the north midweek onwards and it may be cooler next weekend.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11. a new draft agreement is negotiated at the cop26 climate summit in glasgow as talks enter their final scheduled day. we'll have expert analysis of that draft climate deal and assess how much it weakens the committments to cut fossil fuels. we'll have a special report from the us on the devastation of long—lasting wildfires, caused by drought and heat. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe enters his 20th day on hunger strike, as his wife's detention in iran continues. he's given us an interview about how the case has dragged on: i mean, i'm outraged. the fact that, the fact that this has been allowed to last 5.5 years, you know, the fact, let's be honest, naznin was taken hostage over a government debt.
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government knew that we did. charities urge the uk government for new safe routes and a fair asylum system after a record number of migrants cross the channel in a single day. our primary a ten—year—old boy who was killed by a dog at a friend's house died of severe injuries to the head and neck , an inquest has heard. britney spears could regain control of her personal life and finances today — when a court decides whether to overturn an order which put her father in charge. in the last few hours, a new draft agreement has been published in glasgow
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at the cop 26 summit. it hasn't been signed off yet — but it's our latest update on where negotiations appear to be heading. one change in the new draft is an apparent softening of government requirements to reduce fossilfuel and coal use. but there is stronger language about helping and paying poorer countries to fight climate change. and a request for countries to update their climate action plans on an annual basis remains in play. the un chief antonio guterres has already said today that the summit would probably not achieve its aims and the goal of limiting global global warming to 1.5c is on "life support". so with that in mind, let's remind ourselves of what this summit set out to achieve. delegates from all over the world went to glasgow with four goals in mind. the first, to "secure global net zero by the mid—century and keep 1.5 degrees within reach".
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net zero is the point at which the amount of greenhouses gases being produced is no greater than the amount being removed. countries will need to phase out coal more rapidly, stop deforestation and speed up the switch to electric vehicles. the second, to "adapt to protect communities and natural habitats". this is about protecting or restoring ecosytems, as well as developing a more resilient infrastructure, to protect communities from the impacts of climate change. the third goal is to "mobilise finance". developed countries are being asked to pledge at least 100 billion dollars in climate finance per year including working with private sector. the final goal is to "work together to deliver". this is focussed on governments collaborating to finalise what s known as the paris rulebook — agreed in the paris climate accord
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in 2015. those goals have been at the heart of negotiations over the past 12 days. the ongoing challenge has been to get nearly every country in the world, all with their own individual set of circumstances, to agree on a common pathway forward. it's hoped that agreement will be reached by the end of the summit, which is today — although things could slip into the weekend. well, advisers to alok sharma — who's the president of the un climate summit — have warned that the negotiations will fail to prevent global temperatures rising more than 1.5 degrees above pre—industrial levels. the experts — known as friends of cop — say the current text is too weak. they've called for a clear admission that emissions will continue to rise under current policies. graham satchell reports. we are calling on world leaders to grasp this final chance. it is crunch time at the glasgow conference. protesters making it clear, the outcome couldn't be more important. a matter of life and death.
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time is running out. we are not there yet on the most critical issues. there is still a lot more work to be done. that work is going on in quiet corners. the draft agreement pored over, line by line, by every country in the world. so what still needs to be decided? the most fundamental question, cutting greenhouse gases. they're still going up when the science is clear they need to be falling. financial aid for the poorest nations. it was promised more than a decade ago, but still hasn't been delivered. and how often countries should update their plans for going green. should it be every year? there have been some successes. a plan to cut methane, although not all countries have signed up. a call to end the use of coal, the dirtiest fossil fuel, but again, no binding agreements. and an assurance to end deforestation by 2030. will it happen? we don't believe that promises made
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by financial companies to end deforestation will actually prevent trees from being cut or burned down. we simply don't believe it. i'm actually here to beg you to prove us wrong. we desperately need you to prove us wrong. please prove us wrong. another protest as climate activists sound the alarm. the worry for these protesters, that there is no agreed date for ending the use of oil and gas. the fact that we are not talking about phasing fossil fuels, even at any stage, to us indicates that the process has fundamentally failed. because that is probably the largest issue we have to confront. it's not even on the table. this morning, a warning from one of the key advisory groups at the conference that what's been agreed so far won't be enough to stop temperatures rising. graham satchell, bbc news.
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with me now is climate change protester lauren macdonald. she's part of the stop cambo campaign group and green new deal rising environmental campaigns. it's a group working together to try to stop the government approving the oilfield and future to stop the government approving the oil field and future ones. it's approximately 75 miles to the west of shetland. she is also part of the green new deal rising environmental campaign. welcome. thanks for joining us. how are you feeling as cop26 almost gets to an end? thanks for havin: cop26 almost gets to an end? thanks for having me- — cop26 almost gets to an end? thanks for having me. i'm _ cop26 almost gets to an end? thanks for having me. i'm feeling _ cop26 almost gets to an end? thanks for having me. i'm feeling very - for having me. i'm feeling very frustrated, as you can imagine. we have had some commitments but i think it is safe to say that what we are seeing just does not go far enough. something i'm particularly angry about today is that beyond the
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oil and gas alliance is an alliance that was announced a few days ago at cop26 as a concrete way to phase out fossil fuels and both the uk government and scottish government have so far refused to join this alliance and only around ten countries have joined alliance and only around ten countries havejoined it. and it's so frustrating because they are there, all these governments, politicians, negotiators, they are there to solve the climate crisis but only around ten countries have actually signed up to this beyond oil and gas alliance which is trying to provide a concrete way to phase out fossil fuels, so to provide a concrete way to phase out fossilfuels, so if to provide a concrete way to phase out fossil fuels, so if they're not going tojoin us, what are out fossil fuels, so if they're not going to join us, what are they doing there? fossilfuel going to join us, what are they doing there? fossil fuel is the biggest contributor to the climate crisis. , ., , , biggest contributor to the climate crisis. , ., _ , . ., crisis. obviously the situation has been a long _ crisis. obviously the situation has been a long time _ crisis. obviously the situation has been a long time in _ crisis. obviously the situation has been a long time in the _ crisis. obviously the situation has been a long time in the making . crisis. obviously the situation has l been a long time in the making and there are, as you are saying, vested
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interests and there are systems in place that are difficult to turn around quickly and i hear you are saying that you are frustrated, but do you think, in reality, things could move more quickly than they are moving when so many people have to come together and make these agreements?— to come together and make these aureements? ~ , , . . agreements? absolutely and in a uk context we can _ agreements? absolutely and in a uk context we can really _ agreements? absolutely and in a uk context we can really see _ agreements? absolutely and in a uk context we can really see that - agreements? absolutely and in a uk context we can really see that the i context we can really see that the uk government is not doing as much as it possibly can and earlier this year the international energy agency warned us that there must be no new investment in fossil fuels if we are to keep global temperatures rises below 1.5 degrees, and these fossil fuel projects that are being given the green light all over the world but in the uk, the uk government is trying to approve 1a new coal, oil and gas projects by 2025 and one of which is the cambo oilfield which
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i'm campaigning again. if any government was a climate leader and cared about the climate crisis they would not be pushing new fossilfuel infrastructure. would not be pushing new fossil fuel infrastructure.— would not be pushing new fossil fuel infrastructure. where do you go from here then? i — infrastructure. where do you go from here then? i just _ infrastructure. where do you go from here then? ijust have _ infrastructure. where do you go from here then? ijust have to _ infrastructure. where do you go from here then? ijust have to keep - here then? i 'ust have to keep anoin. here then? i 'ust have to keep going. we — here then? ijust have to keep going- we got _ here then? ijust have to keep going. i've got it _ here then? ijust have to keep going. i've got it in _ here then? ijust have to keep going. i've got it in my- here then? ijust have to keep going. i've got it in my head i here then? ijust have to keep i going. i've got it in my head that the cambo oilfield is not going ahead and it might sound optimistic but i genuinely feel like i don't have a choice other than to be optimistic. it makes me really frustrated when world leaders look at the situation as if it's an abstract issue that we need to balance phasing out fossilfuels with the economy, or whatever it may be. what they are saying to me as a young person is that they need to balance safeguarding my future with retaining their position and profit. what is more important question market will be uncomfortable to phase out fossil fuels and all the destructive industries and create a new world, it will be uncomfortable and difficult but we have two
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options and world leaders can rise to the challenge and take accountability for the climate crisis or they can ruin my future and the future of everyone i love. why is it, and you said you got it in your head and you feel like it may be in your head and you feel like it may he being too idealistic that cambo won't go ahead. what got you focused on cambo and why does this matter so much to you?— matter so much to you? specifically what not matter so much to you? specifically what got me — matter so much to you? specifically what got me focused _ matter so much to you? specifically what got me focused on _ matter so much to you? specifically what got me focused on cambo - matter so much to you? specifically what got me focused on cambo is l matter so much to you? specifically i what got me focused on cambo is that everybody knows about it by now but it is an offshore oil field to be situated off the north coast of scotland and i've lived in scotland my whole life and i think it's really important that when we are fighting against the climate crisis as activists or concerned citizens, we think local because although governments around the world are failing to meet the needs around the climate crisis there's very little i can do as a citizen and a uk citizen about countries on the other side of
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the world that are failing to also meet climate targets. we are failing to meet these targets in the uk and we can actually have some power over decisions that happen in our own country by standing up and by not accepting in action so that's what i'm trying to do. and it feels like life or death, for me, and everyone i love and also importantly, for people in the global south who are already experiencing devastating impacts of the climate crisis due to extreme heat and weather—related incidents and pollution and as a white person in the uk, i have an immense response ability for those people who are already suffering at the hands of the climate crisis. i would call on viewers today to please get involved in the climate justice movement because people are already dying and it's not a future issue. ,., already dying and it's not a future issue. _, . ,, already dying and it's not a future issue. ,., . ,, ., . already dying and it's not a future issue. . ~ ., ., ,., already dying and it's not a future issue. . ~ ., ., y., ., issue. going back to what you are sa in: issue. going back to what you are saying about _ issue. going back to what you are saying about making _ issue. going back to what you are
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saying about making difficult - saying about making difficult choices to make a difference. what level of discomfort due to be prepared to tolerate in your own life? what do you think, how would you define this discomfort and difficulty that potentially everybody would need to kind of live with in terms of changes to their lives? how do you see that? i with in terms of changes to their lives? how do you see that? hind lives? how do you see that? i find it difficult to — lives? how do you see that? i find it difficult to find _ lives? how do you see that? i find it difficult to find a _ lives? how do you see that? i find it difficult to find a boundary - lives? how do you see that? i f “if. it difficult to find a boundary on what i'd be willing to accept. it's not really something i think about because what i do think about is the fact that my future is genuinely at risk with the current targets that have been put forward at cop26 and before and the targets we have right now. of all of those were met we would seal ? still see 2.4 degrees of global temp who doesn't know a lot about the climate crisis, 2.4 might seem like a small number but it means devastation and death and suffering for millions of people,
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maybe yourself included to the viewers, so i find it difficult to think in terms of what i'd be willing to accept now because i know that my future is not going to exist if we don't do this, so it's not a case of what are we willing to accept and what are we not, it's a case of, are we willing to safeguard the future of humanity.— the future of humanity. thank you very much — the future of humanity. thank you very much for— the future of humanity. thank you very much forjoining _ the future of humanity. thank you very much forjoining us, - the future of humanity. thank you very much forjoining us, lauren l very much forjoining us, lauren mcdonnell. charities — including the red cross — have urged the uk government for new safe routes and a fair asylum system after a record number of migrants crossed the channel yesterday. around 1,000 people reached british soil using small boats and other makeshift means to cross the channel. and now the authorities in france say three migrants are missing after setting off to attempt to cross the channel this morning.
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well, last year the home secretary priti patel promised to make make the route "unviable". simonjones reports. arriving by boat in record numbers. group after group of migrants were escorted ashore yesterday by five lifeboats and four border force vessels. home office officials had hoped that the onset of autumn would see a big decline in the number of people making the crossing. the period of calm and mild weather has meant that hasn't happened. yesterday, around 1000 people made the journey. 150 more than the previous highest figure for a single day. it brings the total for this year to more than 23,000 migrants arriving by boat. but the numbers arriving by lorry are comparatively small and in the past year, asylum claims in the uk actually fell by 4%. it's a dangerous crossing, navigating the world's busiest shipping lane. a spokesperson for the home office said the british public have had enough of seeing people die in the channel while ruthless criminal gangs profited from their misery. france is insisting it is preventing a large proportion of the crossings. last week, it received the first tranche of the £54 million promised by britain to increase patrols on the beaches of northern france. but the uk has said further money is dependent upon results. and a whitehall source has accused the french authorities of totally
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losing control of the situation. simon jones, bbc news. the leader of belarus has threatened to cut off gas supplies to europe if sanctions are imposed over an escalating migrant crisis at the country's border. a state of emergency has been declared near eastern poland, with a ban preventing journalists and aid agencies from entering the country, as it tries to contain the growing numbers. our europe correspondent nick beake has spent the week travelling along the restricted area. in belarus's capital minsk, they keep arriving. from far and wide. given visas by the regime, and the hope that life will be much better when they soon cross into the eu. some people told the bbc they realised president lukashenko was using them to try to create new european migrant crisis. this president, he wants
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to solve it by using us. he thinks we are terrorists, and we are not terrorists, we just wants to cross the border to have a better life. but this is what awaits them in the makeshift camps that have been set up on the border. most of those trapped between belarus and poland are men, but there are women and children too, and they're at the heart of a growing international crisis. this is the dense woodland where at least nine migrants have died from hypothermia in recent weeks, trying to reach the eu. poland's hoping the european union will pay for a fence to protect large parts of its long border with belarus, which has come under unprecedented strain. well, we've made our way deep into the forest and this is what we've just found. bottles of water, food packaging, boots, lots of warm clothes. it's all been lumped together and left next to this tree,
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and it appears to be yet more evidence that people are getting across the border. of course, where they are now, we simply don't now. but there are signs of where they came from. this is a negative covid test, stamped in iraq, from just two weeks ago. poland has more than 15,000 troops trying to stop the latest surge of people. just beyond this checkpoint, at least 150 migrants were spotted and detained in the past 24 hours. but human rights groups and some polish politicians are concerned about the tactics the government is using. we are facing a humanitarian crisis. the situation is definitely tough for poland, no one disputes that. but we should be dealing with it in a humanitarian way, in line with the geneva convention, in line with european law, not pushing people back, not playing ping—pong with human beings. this is what's actually happening right now.
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but there does seem to be support for the hardline warsaw is taking, especially at this far—right rally in the polish capital to mark independence day. the government here has eu and nato backing in how it's dealing with the crisis they all say belarus is fuelling. away from the politics, on the ground, it is an increasingly bleak picture. nick beake, bbc news, on the poland belarus border. the headlines on bbc news. a new draft agreement is negotiated at the cop26 climate summit in glasgow — as talks enter their final scheduled day. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe enters his 20th day on hunger strike, as his wife's detention in iran continues. he's given us an interview about how the case has dragged on: a ten—year—old boy who was killed by a dog at a friend's house died of severe injuries to the head and neck , an inquest has heard.
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a student has been sentenced to life in prison— after being found guilty of killing his step—grandmother, by starting a house fire three years ago. tiernan darnton confessed to killing mary gregory after being asked for his 'darkest secret�* during a game of truth or dare. he also later admitted his crime it to a counsellor. he will now serve a minimum of 15 years in prison. an inquest has heard how the ten year old boy — who was killed by a dog in caerphilly — died as a result of �*severe injuries to the head and neck�*. jack lis suffered what were described as �*unsurvivable�* injuries when he was attacked by the animal on monday. the opening of the inquest today heard how jack was outside playing with a friend before going to their home where he was attacked by the dog. the inquest is set to resume in march next year. richard ratcliffe, the husband of iranian detainee nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, has been on hunger strike in westminster since 24 october, demanding the government does more to secure her release.
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mrs zaghari—ratcliffe, a british—iranian dual national, was firstjailed in tehran in 2016 on spying charges, which she has always denied. today is richard�*s 20th day of hunger strike. victoria derbyshire spoke to him and his mother outside the foreign office earlier this morning. she asked him how his daugther had been impacted by her mother�*s imprisonment. i think it is right in some ways that you can�*t explain and clearly very traumatised and we would cry every night and would go to the picture on the mantelpiece in the house and points of the wedding photo of mummy and we would go to the door to go and see daddy and at some point she adjusted to the reality of being brought up by her grandparents for a bit and that became a life and we got to see
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nazanin in prison, where she had been taken into solitary confinement and she was so small and she didn�*t understand that and the interrogators would insist on taking her and playing with herfirst before they let her mum do it and i knew at some point that she picks up emotionally she should not play with them but she should play with mummy and daddy but at the beginning she was a baby. over the years, when she came back, and she came back when she was past five, that was a real shock for us. she could speak parsee fluently and had lost english and she came back to school and threw herself into school and threw herself into school and threw herself into school and threw herself into being english and in the way migrant children often do in that they don�*t want to speak their former language outside or anywhere near school and show that they are english. and i think now she is feeling settled into being part of
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the community where we live and feeling that but she�*s definitely desperate to be normal rather than to be outside but she will ask when mummy is coming home and when will she pick me up from the school gates. how do you answer that question mark when mummy is coming home i don�*t know and we got to the end of the sentence which as you are saying earlier was in march and we were counting down and it was almost like an advent calendar, crossing off the days and that was very hard for her when we got to the end and mummy did not come. and i didn�*t have an answerfor mummy did not come. and i didn�*t have an answer for her and obviously that disorientation, it didn�*t happen and christmas didn�*t come, effectively. now i think she takes or promises about mummy coming home with a pinch of salt. you or promises about mummy coming home with a pinch of salt.— with a pinch of salt. you said you not cross with a pinch of salt. you said you got cross in _ with a pinch of salt. you said you got cross in the _ with a pinch of salt. you said you got cross in the meeting and - with a pinch of salt. you said you i got cross in the meeting and you've got cross in the meeting and you�*ve always come across are so calm and composed. you are angry now?
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marielle yes, i�*m outraged. that this has been allowed to last five and half years ? yes the fact it�*s i�*ve been the fact it�*s lasted five and she was taken hostage over government debt and the the government debt and the the government knew that before we did and the government�*s first response was to downplay and deflect it and for the longest time they would acknowledge she was innocent and do anything other than hide behind the iranians legal system and hide behind due process and even now with all the parliamentary statements, they still talk about the fact they are dual nationals as though they are dual nationals as though they are sons of second—tier citizenship in this country and all along it�*s been about their debt. do you want richard to stop this hunger strike now? i richard to stop this hunger strike now? ., ., ., , ., , now? i would love him to stop right now. now? i would love him to stop right novv- before — now? i would love him to stop right now. before he _ now? i would love him to stop right now. before he does _ now? i would love him to stop right now. before he does damage i now? i would love him to stop right now. before he does damage to i now. before he does damage to himself— now. before he does damage to himself but i know he will carry on until he _ himself but i know he will carry on until he thinks it's the right time. so until he thinks it'5 the right time. so as— until he thinks it's the right time. so as long — until he thinks it's the right time. so as long as we have got a doctor with him _ so as long as we have got a doctor with him and if we haven't, if i
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think— with him and if we haven't, if i think he — with him and if we haven't, if i think he is— with him and if we haven't, if i think he is ill, that will be it. i shall— think he is ill, that will be it. i shall call— think he is ill, that will be it. i shall call 999, ora think he is ill, that will be it. i shall call 999, or a cab, to get him to a hospital. shall call 999, or a cab, to get him to a hosoital-_ shall call 999, or a cab, to get him to a hospital. what do you think, as his mum, to a hospital. what do you think, as his mum. of — to a hospital. what do you think, as his mum, of what _ to a hospital. what do you think, as his mum, of what he _ to a hospital. what do you think, as his mum, of what he is _ to a hospital. what do you think, as his mum, of what he is doing i to a hospital. what do you think, as his mum, of what he is doing to i to a hospital. what do you think, as his mum, of what he is doing to try| his mum, of what he is doing to try to get the uk government to change its strategy to get his wife home? we are absolutely so proud of him. can't _ we are absolutely so proud of him. can't believe really we have produced a child like that, a man like that — produced a child like that, a man like that. what else can he do? we are all— like that. what else can he do? we are all at— like that. what else can he do? we are all at desperate points and this isjust_ are all at desperate points and this isjust to _ are all at desperate points and this isjust to show are all at desperate points and this is just to show he really does care and we _ is just to show he really does care and we do — is just to show he really does care and we do mean to get her back, and gabriella _ and we do mean to get her back, and gabriella knows that she has got a mummy— gabriella knows that she has got a mummy and a daddy. the shadow foreign secretary, lisa nandy told the bbc this needs to be dealt with at the highest level. you can see why richard and his family are so utterly frustrated, as are the other families as well
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and others because there just doesn�*t seem to be seriousness in government. nobody has gripped this from the highest level. i went down to speak to richard last weekjust to show a bit of support. it was pretty clear that while the public is absolutely touched by what has happened to this family and to other families as well, the barriers have gone up in the foreign office and they have been reduced to meeting withjunior ministers. they can�*t go into the foreign office even to use the toilets, even though richard is on a hunger strike outside. itjust doesn�*t feel like this is a foreign office that is showing the humanity and the urgency that is needed. the pop superstar britney spears could regain control of her personal life and finances later today when a judge in los angeles hears arguments to end the complex legal arrangement she�*s been under since 2008. a court removed the singer�*s father
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from running her affairs last month after she described the arrangement as abusive. our us correspondent sophie long reports. cheering. it�*s now six weeks since britney spears�*s fans cried tears ofjoy as her estranged father was suspended from his role running her $60 million estate. chanting: free britney now! free britney now! he�*s since asked the court for an immediate and unconditional end to the arrangement, which gave him control over her life, saying he�*ll hand over all related documents because he has nothing to hide. there are many who disagree with that, and are calling for a full investigation and an end to the system they say is corrupt. i think nothing short of a full congressional hearing, where we break it down step—by—step and interrogate the attorneys that were present, i think that will give us a great deal of insight as to what is going wrong, what went wrong for britney but also
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what is going wrong for other people facing conservatorship as well. after 13 years of what the international superstar called a toxic, abusive arrangement, her voice has finally been heard. crucial, notjust for her but for many others trapped in the conservatorship system who could never even hope to be handed a microphone. i think it's critically important, because conservatorship as a rule takes away your voice. it happens that britney was able to retain some voice because of her celebrity, and she's raising it. but for all the others, they can't testify, they can't pay people, they can't even choose who to meet with if their conservator objects. so there's no vehicle for them. the hope is there will be now. and the result of this hearing that could finally, definitively free britney,
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could also lead to betterjustice for all those who have had their freedom curtailed. britney says she�*s never prayed more. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. it�*s a little bit windier and also wetter out there for some of you compared for the past few days. an area of low pressure centred across scotland. this is where we have seen some of the heaviest of the rain, working its way northwards and eastwards. so it does dry out a little bit in western areas after that wet start, a bit brighter too at times for northern ireland compared for this morning, but further rain at times for northern england, north and west wales. some rain at times for east anglia, the south east and the south midlands, but here overall, many places will stay largely dry for the rest of the day and a very mild day at that. mild night to come tonight, further rain at times, particularly across england in the form of showers, but across some western areas, some clear skies and in the south of scotland, that could lead to temperatures going back down
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to mid—single figures, so cooler here than last night, but overall, still for the stage in november, still a mild start to the weekend. it�*s a weekend though with a bit of a breeze across eastern areas to begin with, one or two showers in eastern england, most on saturday though having a dry day, mist and fog over the hills, breaking up some sunny spells wading through, but mist and fog return through saturday night, but another dry day for many on sunday. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... a new draft agreement is negotiated at the cop26 climate summit in glasgow — as talks enter their final scheduled day. we�*ll have a special report from the us on the devastation of long—lasting wildfires, caused by drought and heat. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe enters his 20th day on hunger strike, as his wife�*s detention in iran continues. he�*s given us an interview about how
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the case has dragged on: charities urge the uk government for new safe routes and a fair asylum system after a record number of migrants cross the channel in a single day. a ten—year—old boy who was killed by a dog at a friend�*s house died of "severe injuries to the head and neck", an inquest has heard. britney spears could regain control of her personal life and finances today — when a court decides whether to overturn an order which put her father in charge. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here�*s chetam. good morning. we start with some breaking news in the last hour — england have been dealt another blow in the build up to their autumn international with australia tomorrow after prop ellis genge tested positive for covid 19. genge featured for 67 minutes in the win over tonga last weekend, but his replacement in that match — joe marler — is unavailable after returning a positive covid test on monday. sale prop bevan rodd will replace genge.
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owen farrell didn�*t play last weekend after a test said he had covid, but it was later found to be a false positive. the rfu says genge is isolating and that no other positive results have been returned by players or staff who were all tested today. meanwhile, england�*s women�*s coach simon middleton has made seven changes to his squad ahead of their match against canada on sunday. captain sarah hunter returns to the starting 15, there are debuts given to sadia kabeya and heather cowell, whilst abbie ward and poppy cleall are in line to win their 50th caps. next to football — gareth southgate says england must put in an improved performance against albania at wembley tonight as they look to qualify for next year�*s world cup. after that disappointing draw against hungary — england need four points from their last two games to guarantee their place at qatar 2022. they�*re away at san marino on monday. injuries and illness have affected england�*s preparations ahead of albania this evening — and the england manager says they won�*t be
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underestimating their opponents we are obviously very aware of the team from, our only game there but from all in the group which we have watched closely, so very well organised team. we neverfocus watched closely, so very well organised team. we never focus too much on individual players, we are always talking about the collective way of playing, but we prepared the same way for every game that we play and i think we always have that respect for the opposition. some sad news to bring you this morning, the former england and wolves midfielder ron flowers has died at the age of 87. he earned 49 caps for england, scoring all six of the penalties he took for his country and also made 515 appearances for wolves where he won three first division titles. flowers was a non—playing member of the england squad which won the 1966 world cup and was later awarded a winners�* medal in 2009. wales are officially guaranteed at least a place, in the world cup play—offs
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after spain beat greece 1—0 and that affects the nations league places wales face belarus in their qualifying tomorrow. northern ireland play lithuiania, with their qualification hopes already over, but by seven o�*clock tonight, scotland could have qualified for the play—offs. they take on moldova at five, and victory will ensure they finish second in their group, behind denmark who have already qualified. second place will mean they�*ll be in the hat for the play—off draw in zurich at the end of the month. i have spoken quite a lot over the last 12 months, really, about the progression of the team, the way we are improving. i think i probably recognised as a little bit earlier than some other people. and we have put ourselves in a really good position, but we haven�*t finished the job yet, so it�*s to stay focused, stay humble. steven gerrard will get to work on his new aston villa squad today, saying he�*s "immensely proud" to become their new manager. the former liverpool captain left his rangers job, to take the helm at villa. he inherits a team just two places off the relegation zone.
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his first game is the visit, of brighton next saturday. well, steven warnock played with gerrard at liverpool and he says that the former england captain will demand high standards from his players. anywhere he stood, he had a glare about him. i think we have seen that on the football pitch in the past but, i mean, high standards to know where you�*re at, what you�*re doing. i think there have been rangers players who have come out and spoken that he can be tough at times but that he can be tough at times but thatis that he can be tough at times but that is the standard that he drives, not only for himself, but for the players in and around him. that�*s all the sport for now. i�*ll have more for you in the next hour. nearly two weeks ago around 40,000 elegates from 200 countries gathered in glasgow to try and work out how to cut greenhouse gas emissions. in that time, there have been plenty of pledges, and promises of global co—operation, but is it enough? our science correspondent victoria gill, looks back at what�*s
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been achieved so far. climate and socialjustice! there have been protests on the streets. a two—week long celebration of business as usual and blah, blah, blah. thousands gathered, determined their voices would be heard. i strident pledges from world leaders. we are ending the great chainsaw massacre. royalty... ladies and gentlemen. climate royalty... the world is looking to you, and why you are here. and some very stark reminders of what�*s at stake. we all have a responsibility at cop26 to address climate change. and in the midst of this vast summit, taking place in the shadow of the coronavirus pandemic, negotiations that will shape the future of this planet. in the second and final week of the climate conference, we started to get a sense of what a glasgow agreement might look like.
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there was a proposal to phase out coal and subsidies to fossil fuels, and to ask countries to come back with even more ambitious emission cutting plans within a year. it�*s all in the pursuit of limiting global temperature rise to 1.5 celsius, the threshold beyond which scientists agree we face much more dangerous impacts of climate change. before the conference, countries�* emission cutting pledges put the world on track to a temperature increase of 2.7 celsius by the end of the century. while the projections now vary, the most optimistic estimate of the effect of all the promises made here in glasgow are they put us on course for a 1.8 degrees increase. and that�*s if all the pledges to do things like phase out coal and move to zero carbon vehicles, and stop deforestation, are stuck to and delivered on time. but a final plan, a road map for what countries will agree to to help turn down the planet�*s thermostat, will need everyone here to agree.
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every nation with its own economy, culture and vested interests. the whole point of bringing negotiators from nearly 200 countries together to glasgow under the same roof is all about consensus. every single country has to sign off on every line of that agreement, about what next steps will be taken to tackle climate change. so, what will the conclusion of all this talking look like? it�*s a good question. in my team we all made bets about how it�*s going to, when it�*s going to finish. it�*s unlikely that we finish on friday. as the final hours approach, there is going to be a lot of compromising among ministers in particular, at the highest level. and we do hope that it is not going to be a zero—sum game. for some countries represented here, everything is riding on that final agreement. our commitment until the very last minute of these negotiations is to keep coming back to the table, to secure a package that protects
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the interests of everyone, and especially the most vulnerable. when those on the front line are protected, everyone's futures are made more secure. as the clock ticks down towards the weekend, negotiators are working through this crucial agreement line by line. and the world is watching. victoria gill, bbc news, glasgow. as the end of the climate change conference in glasgow approaches, the devastating effects of extreme weather continue to affect people across the world. in the unites states, drought and heat — combined with historic bad land management — have led to intense, long—lasting wildfires. our climate editorjustin rowlatt has been to greenville, a town in northern california, that was completely destroyed by a fire in september. nicole�*s home was utterly destroyed
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by the dixie fire. taste nicole's home was utterly destroyed by the dixie fire.— by the dixie fire. we found peace and 'o by the dixie fire. we found peace and joy every _ by the dixie fire. we found peace and joy every day _ by the dixie fire. we found peace and joy every day in _ by the dixie fire. we found peace and joy every day in our- by the dixie fire. we found peace and joy every day in our hard i by the dixie fire. we found peace i and joy every day in our hard being here and i want to come home to the day before the fire. this here and i want to come home to the day before the fire.— day before the fire. this was supposed — day before the fire. this was supposed to _ day before the fire. this was supposed to be _ day before the fire. this was supposed to be nicole i day before the fire. this was supposed to be nicole and i day before the fire. this was i supposed to be nicole and her husband paul�*s forever home. it supposed to be nicole and her husband paul's forever home. it took all the colour— husband paul's forever home. it took all the colour out _ husband paul's forever home. it took all the colour out of— husband paul's forever home. it took all the colour out of my _ husband paul's forever home. it took all the colour out of my life. - all the colour out of my life. look, everything isjust all the colour out of my life. look, everything is just a shade of grey. years of climate induced droughts have left vegetation tinder dry, adding a policy of suppressing small fires which are now dead wood to build up and fires are now faster and hotter than ever before. in august the 4th, nicole got a text from the sheriff saying that everyone still in town was in imminent danger. mr; everyone still in town was in imminent danger.— everyone still in town was in imminent danger. everyone still in town was in imminent dancer. g �*, imminent danger. my friend said it's cominu , imminent danger. my friend said it's coming. it's — imminent danger. my friend said it's coming, it's running _ imminent danger. my friend said it's coming, it's running down _ imminent danger. my friend said it's coming, it's running down the i imminent danger. my friend said it's coming, it's running down the road i coming, it�*s running down the road towards you, get out now. we grabbed the dogs and we grabbed our suitcases and we got in the truck and we left.
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suitcases and we got in the truck and we left-— and we left. fire consumed the entire town _ and we left. fire consumed the entire town ended _ and we left. fire consumed the entire town ended just - and we left. fire consumed the entire town ended just two i and we left. fire consumed the i entire town ended just two hours. and the mightiest trees are burning also, the world�*s last remaining giant sequoias are under threat. largest individual organism in the world _ largest individual organism in the world. they are amazing, they sequester— world. they are amazing, they sequester gigatons of carbon every year~ _ sequester gigatons of carbon every year~ let— sequester gigatons of carbon every ear. , ., sequester gigatons of carbon every ear. , . , ., . year. let me try and give you an idea of how _ year. let me try and give you an idea of how enormous _ year. let me try and give you an idea of how enormous the i year. let me try and give you an i idea of how enormous the street is. these trees are ancient. up to 3000 years old, but there are just 70 groves left all in this mountain range. so look at that, 31 metres. wow. they are vulnerable but they are also _ wow. they are vulnerable but they are also very resilient, so they are picky _ are also very resilient, so they are picky. they— are also very resilient, so they are picky. they are the goldilocks of the forest. — picky. they are the goldilocks of the forest, but they survived the fire, _ the forest, but they survived the fire, they— the forest, but they survived the fire, they survive drought, they lived _ fire, they survive drought, they lived for— fire, they survive drought, they lived for thousands of years. the
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flames came _ lived for thousands of years. tue: flames came within lived for thousands of years. tte: flames came within a lived for thousands of years. tt9: flames came within a quarter of a mile of the biggest tree. others weren�*t so lucky. we are the first journalist who have been in the into this sequoia grove since fire ripped through here in september. some trees have been totally incinerated. this is terrible. this is the worst thing _ this is terrible. this is the worst thing i_ this is terrible. this is the worst thing i have _ this is terrible. this is the worst thing i have seen all year. before 2015. _ thing i have seen all year. before 2015, no — thing i have seen all year. before 2015, no one saw a sequoia that look like this _ 2015, no one saw a sequoia that look like this it _ 2015, no one saw a sequoia that look like this it is — 2015, no one saw a sequoia that look like this. it is emotionally heartbreaking. you never saw a tree torched _ heartbreaking. you never saw a tree torched like — heartbreaking. you never saw a tree torched like this become a candle and burn— torched like this become a candle and burn up in this way before climate — and burn up in this way before climate change and fire suppression. there _ climate change and fire suppression. there is— climate change and fire suppression. there is nothing i can do about these — there is nothing i can do about these trees. they are gone and we will plant _ these trees. they are gone and we will plant new ones but it takes 1000 _ will plant new ones but it takes 1000 years. will plant new ones but it takes 1000 years— will plant new ones but it takes 1000 ears. :, , , 1000 years. there will one bidders for hundreds _ 1000 years. there will one bidders for hundreds of— 1000 years. there will one bidders for hundreds of years. _ 1000 years. there will one bidders for hundreds of years. no, - 1000 years. there will one bidders for hundreds of years. no, they i 1000 years. there will one bidders| for hundreds of years. no, they will be this for a — for hundreds of years. no, they will be this for a long, long _ for hundreds of years. no, they will be this for a long, long time. it i for hundreds of years. no, they will be this for a long, long time. it is i be this for a long, long time. it is too ea, be this for a long, long time. it is too yea. not _ be this for a long, long time. it is too yea, not climate _ be this for a long, long time. it 3 too yea, not climate change is
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be this for a long, long time. it 2 too yea, not climate change is here now and it is killing things that we care about that should not be dying. bringing climate change under control is for the conference in glasgow is all about. the lesson from california is at the world needs more than just long—term promises from government, it needs practical action now. bbc news, the sierra nevada mountains. a close advisor to the prince of wales has stood down as chief executive of one of his charities. michael fawcett has resigned from his post at the prince's foundation. it follows claims that he helped secure a knighthood and british citizenship for a saudi billionaire who donated to the charity. he had temporarily stepped down when the allegations were made in september. clarence house has said prince charles had "no knowledge of the alleged offer". students at a secondary school in wales are being told they will not be allowed any more school meals if they are more than a penny in debt, according to a letter sent to parents. the decision was made
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by the headteacher of the school in gwynedd, who says there is a deficit in their school meals budget. our reporter george herd has more. according to the head teacher at the school, there is almost £2000 outstanding in school dinner money, and include some pupils of earning over £100 for unpaid meals at the school. now it is crunch time. in the letter, parents have been told to clear all doubts. all school canteen staff have been ordered not to serve the students. one father said he had been previously warned over £36 debt and feels the letter is heavy—handed. i over £36 debt and feels the letter is heavy-handed.— over £36 debt and feels the letter is heavy-handed. i feel pity for the canteen staff. _ is heavy-handed. i feel pity for the canteen staff, to _ is heavy-handed. i feel pity for the canteen staff, to be _ is heavy-handed. i feel pity for the canteen staff, to be honest - is heavy-handed. i feel pity for the canteen staff, to be honest with i canteen staff, to be honest with you. the stress put on them and i know one or two of them. the stress he has put on them for them to say no to a child, having no food in that afternoon. they are there for six hours from nine until three. it's a long time, isn't it? it six hours from nine untilthree.
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it's a long time, isn't it? it needs to be looked _ it's a long time, isn't it? it needs to be looked into. _ it's a long time, isn't it? it needs to be looked into. the _ it's a long time, isn't it? it needs to be looked into. the school's i to be looked into. the school's strategic head teacher isn't backing down. he strategic head teacher isn't backing down. , ., , strategic head teacher isn't backing down. ,, , .,, ., strategic head teacher isn't backing down. , ., , ., down. he says he has to act. it is a difficult balance _ down. he says he has to act. it is a difficult balance to _ down. he says he has to act. it is a difficult balance to strike. - down. he says he has to act. it is a difficult balance to strike. we - difficult balance to strike. we don't — difficult balance to strike. we don't want to see children going hungry— don't want to see children going hungry but at the same time we can tolerate _ hungry but at the same time we can tolerate a _ hungry but at the same time we can tolerate a situation where we are effectively subsidising a number of parents. _ effectively subsidising a number of parents, many of whom i'm sure can pay. _ parents, many of whom i'm sure can pay, but _ parents, many of whom i'm sure can pay. but are — parents, many of whom i'm sure can pay, but are simply not paying and don't _ pay, but are simply not paying and don't respond to the correspondence we semi _ don't respond to the correspondence we send. ., , don't respond to the correspondence we send. . , ,., don't respond to the correspondence we send. . , , ., we send. clearly, some parents are unha-- we send. clearly, some parents are unhappy and _ we send. clearly, some parents are unhappy and unhappy _ we send. clearly, some parents are unhappy and unhappy with - we send. clearly, some parents are unhappy and unhappy with the - we send. clearly, some parents are i unhappy and unhappy with the wording of the letter. what unhappy and unhappy with the wording of the letter. ~ ., ., , ., unhappy and unhappy with the wording of the letter. ~ ., ., i. unhappy and unhappy with the wording of the letter. ~ ., ., ., of the letter. what would you say of that? if it has — of the letter. what would you say of that? if it has caused _ of the letter. what would you say of that? if it has caused offence, - that? if it has caused offence, obviously— that? if it has caused offence, obviously that is something we would regret _ obviously that is something we would regret the _ obviously that is something we would regret. the wording was discussed with the _ regret. the wording was discussed with the authority before it was sent _ with the authority before it was sent out — with the authority before it was sent out and it wasn't intended to cause _ sent out and it wasn't intended to cause offence but parents must realise — cause offence but parents must realise we have reached a situation where _ realise we have reached a situation where we _ realise we have reached a situation where we try to do with the parents of children— where we try to do with the parents of children and they have simply ignored — of children and they have simply ignored the correspondence that we have sent — ignored the correspondence that we have sent. the ignored the correspondence that we have sent. . ., . . have sent. the council which oversees _ have sent. the council which oversees meals _ have sent. the council which oversees meals across - have sent. the council which oversees meals across the l have sent. the council which - oversees meals across the county is said that any parents with concerns should speak to them or the school. it said it does not operate a blanket policy of refusing meals and will be discussing the matter with school officials.
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that was our reporter george herd. the headlines on bbc news... a new draft agreement is negotiated at the cop26 climate summit in glasgow — as talks enter their final scheduled day. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe enters his 20th day on hunger strike, as his wife's detention in iran continues. he's given us an interview about how the case has dragged on: an inquest has heard how the ten —year—old boy — who was killed by a dog in caerphilly — died as a result of 'severe injuries to the head and neck�*. jack lis suffered what were described as 'unsurvivable' injuries when he was attacked by the animal on monday. the opening of the inquest today heard how jack was outside playing with a friend before going to their home where he was attacked by the dog. the inquest is set to resume in march next year.
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today the court heard that jack was playing outside with a friend before returning to that friend's home. the coroner said that when he entered the property, he was attacked by a dog. the court heard paramedics were called butjack dog. the court heard paramedics were called but jack had sustained on survivable injuries and he was pronounced dead just after 4pm in the afternoon. the today the court heard a postmortem examination has been carried out and a provisional cause of death has been given as severe injuries to jack's head and neck. the coroner said the circumstances surrounding jack's death were violent and unnatural and so she formally opened the inquest into his death. she then adjourned the inquest so further enquiries could be made. officers have described the dog on the day as a very large and very aggressive. and the dog was destroyed at the scene ijy the dog was destroyed at the scene by firearms officers and gwent police are still working to establish the breed of the dog.
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gwent police have also arrested a 28—year—old woman from the in connection with their enquiry and she has been released on bail. today owain wyn evans, the bbc north west tonight weather presenter is taking on an incredible children in need challenge: to drum, constantly for 2h hours, raising money for children in need. bbc children in need is currently supporting over 2,500 local charities and projects in communities across the uk that are helping children and young people facing a range of disadvantages such as living in poverty, being disabled or ill, or experiencing distress, neglect or trauma. we can go to him right now. i think there will be a drum roll, of course. no, he is talking to someone else. owain, can you hear me? drum roll, please. ok, that worked really
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well. i think we willjust try and see if he can hear us. owain, it is here at the studio, can you hear me? he is too busy drumming. we can't distract him. obviously, we shouldn't try to distract him because he is supposed to keep drumming. you can see the timer, three hours and 12 minutes gone already. now, we are having absolutely no joy breaking in there. we are going to go back and try to see if we can interrupt him for a few moments in a little while. that jonathan is under way at immediate city in salford and we will be back there a little bit later on. scientists in the united states say they're a step closer to reversing paralysis in humans after they successfully administered a new injectable therapy in mice. the drug was inserted into their spinal cords and the mice
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learned to walk again within four weeks. the injection encouraged molecules in the spinal cord to 'dance' — promoting nerve regeneration. the team hopes to begin patient trials within two years. mark lobel reports. spot the difference. this is a mouth before treatment and after. walking again. before treatment and after. walking a . ain. before treatment and after. walking aaain. , ., ., ., again. over the period of about three or four _ again. over the period of about three or four weeks, _ again. over the period of about three or four weeks, we - again. over the period of about i three or four weeks, we were able to observe that an initially paralysed mouse, as a result of severe spinal cord injury, regained great ability to walk. 50 cord injury, regained great ability to walk. ., ,. , , to walk. so how did the scientists do it? i treatment _ to walk. so how did the scientists do it? i treatment packed - to walk. so how did the scientists do it? i treatment packed with i do it? i treatment packed with hundreds of thousands of molecules was injected to the tissue around the spinal cord to repair cells. crucially, this watery therapy kept everything moving. irate crucially, this watery therapy kept everything moving. we discovered that the motion _ everything moving. we discovered that the motion of _
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everything moving. we discovered that the motion of the _ everything moving. we discovered that the motion of the molecules l everything moving. we discovered l that the motion of the molecules in side this filament is critical in their ability to signal cells in the spinal cord in order to initiate repair. to spinal cord in order to initiate re air. ., , repair. to trigger the experiment, an incision — repair. to trigger the experiment, an incision was _ repair. to trigger the experiment, an incision was made _ repair. to trigger the experiment, an incision was made in _ repair. to trigger the experiment, an incision was made in the i repair. to trigger the experiment, i an incision was made in the mammal's spine. that to replicate what happens to humans after they suffer a car crash, sports injury, gunshot wound from a disease. it is hoped human trials could be approved next year. human trials could be approved next ear. , . ,, human trials could be approved next ear. , . , , , human trials could be approved next ear. , ., human trials could be approved next ear. , . ,, , . ., ., year. this therapy is also going to affect other _ year. this therapy is also going to affect other targets _ year. this therapy is also going to affect other targets that - year. this therapy is also going to affect other targets that are i affect other targets that are related to the central nervous system, for example the brain. we hope to be able later to use it also for stroke treatments and for neurodegenerative diseases. for now thouuh, neurodegenerative diseases. for now though. this — neurodegenerative diseases. for now though, this exciting _ neurodegenerative diseases. for now though, this exciting discovery, i neurodegenerative diseases. for now though, this exciting discovery, a i though, this exciting discovery, a unique assembly of many molecules, may soon offer hope to hundreds of thousands of people living with spinal injuries with a simple injection in the back, if human
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testing stands up to scrutiny also. mark lobel, bbc news. have you ever got so lost, you ended up absolutely miles away from where you were meant to be? that's what's happened to a rare penguin. this adelie penguin, was found in new zealand, 2,000 miles from its natural habitat of antarctica. it was found by a local resident who thought he was a "soft toy". the animal has been rescued and will eventually be released in a safe area. a vincent van gogh landscape has sold at an auction for nearly $36 million. it's a record for a watercolor by the dutch impressionist. the 1888 work was seized by the nazis during their second world war occupation of france. it depicts a haystack in arles, france, where van gogh lived for more than a year in the 18805.
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i thank ithank —— i thank —— i think that owain might be ready for us to talk with him during his drum are fun so we will go to whether early. while we wait for that here is matched with the weather. hello. a predominantly dry weekend awaits for most of you, but there is wet weather around. some gusty winds as well but those winds are still bringing in some relatively mild air for this stage in november, wrapped around this area of low pressure dominating the weather today, pushing east across scotland. around the centre is where we see the heaviest on the rain, across parts of scotland, there is rain at times into the afternoon, trying out into the south—west, drying out... but more downpours working in. into the south—west, rain at times in northern england, the west of the pennines and into wales but here things will dry up now and again. around these coasts on the north and west we could see winds gusting as high as 50 miles an hour,
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the winds gusting across eastern areas, after the rain this morning, much of the day will be dry but look at the temperatures, 11—15, higher than we expect but this time of year. this evening and overnight the mountain continues, the worst of the rain out of the way, but as we drag in north—westerly winds we still see some showers dotted around especially across parts of england but with clear skies in the west, temperatures into mid single figures, in south—west scotland and northern ireland. for most, a pretty man started the day. still breezy on the east of england, some showers around coastal counties but for most it's a dry day on saturday, misty and murky over the hills, some of that breaking, some sunny spells winning through for most of you at times. winds lighter, temperatures similar to today, it may feel a touch warmer at times. throughout saturday night into sunday, high pressure building across most of the uk, not many isobars on the chart means light winds, mist and fog is a problem but in the far north—west of scotland
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and northern ireland, there is thickening cloud, weak weather fronts bringing rain at times. most places will be dry, the chance of a shower across parts of kent and sussex but with some sunny breaks winning through, again, feeling relatively mild although a little cooler today and tomorrow. as we go into next week, the overall man continues. further south, you are likely to stay dry through the bulk of the week, mist and fog could be an issue in the morning, rain developing from the north midweek onwards and it may be cooler next weekend. i think we can talk to owain, who was doing that children in need challenge drumming for 2h hours and raising money for children in need. this is him in action. he isjust
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performing with someone else so we are going to listen and watch for a moment and hope that in a moment, he will be ready to have a quick chat with us. he isjust over will be ready to have a quick chat with us. he is just over three with us. he isjust over three hours in to the challenge and obviously we have a few questions to ask him about what that means for eating, drinking, comfort breaks, i don't know, we need to find out for him about that. and also, why he is so passionate about drumming because while we were watching him in action from here in the studio, we have been talking about give some of the talent to be a drummer. can anyone learn or can you be ? bore a drummer? let's, ithink learn or can you be ? bore a drummer? let's, i think you can hear me. ., y ., drummer? let's, i think you can hear me. . , ., ., drummer? let's, i think you can hear me. . i. ., ., drummer? let's, i think you can hear me. can you hear me? i can hear you. i can 'ust me. can you hear me? i can hear you. i caniust hear— me. can you hear me? i can hear you. i caniust hear you _ me. can you hear me? i can hear you. i can just hear you over _ me. can you hear me? i can hear you. i can just hear you over the _ i canjust hear you over the drumming. you have slowed it down but you're still going. you drumming. you have slowed it down but you're still going.— but you're still going. you can sto - ? but you're still going. you can stop? now. — but you're still going. you can stop? now. i— but you're still going. you can stop? now, i can't, _ but you're still going. you can stop? now, i can't, i- but you're still going. you can stop? now, i can't, i have- but you're still going. you can stop? now, i can't, i have to| stop? now, i can't, i have to carry on. i havejust come off the back stop? now, i can't, i have to carry on. i have just come off the back of a with my excellent colleague and
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so, yes, so doing this is such an honour, i think that when the drum of an idea came about and when we thought that this would be great to raise money for children in need potentially, i didn't think of the gravity of playing the drum for 2h hours, but here we are, three hours and 20 minutes into it and still going all right. but and 20 minutes into it and still going all right-— and 20 minutes into it and still going all right. but there is a long wa to going all right. but there is a long way to go- — going all right. but there is a long way to go- when _ going all right. but there is a long way to go. when you _ going all right. but there is a long way to go. when you talk- going all right. but there is a long way to go. when you talk with i going all right. but there is a longj way to go. when you talk with the gravity of it, when i was researching for this interview, i came across an exclusive headline which i feel i need to get your comment on. and it said in the mirror that you have been pumping iron to build up your dainty arms for that drumathon, is this true? it is so true. if i am honest, the risks are still fairly dainty, but i've been working with greg white off camera here on getting the stamina up and the strength up and the fitness up because going from a standstill to be angled to play the
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drums for 2h hours is impossible, really, and there are so many things to think of, but yes, i have been in the gym a lot over the last couple of months and i've been drumming a lot as can imagine. hagar of months and i've been drumming a lot as can imagine.— lot as can imagine. how are you auoin to lot as can imagine. how are you going to manage _ lot as can imagine. how are you going to manage it? _ lot as can imagine. how are you going to manage it? we saw i lot as can imagine. how are you | going to manage it? we saw you lot as can imagine. how are you i going to manage it? we saw you in action they are performing properly, it's obviously quite physically gruelling. right now, you can keep that ticking over for quite a while without it being too arduous, so what would the pace be over the 2a hours? it’s what would the pace be over the 24 hours? �* , , what would the pace be over the 24 hours? 3 , , hours? it's definitely peaks and trouahs. hours? it's definitely peaks and troughs. what _ hours? it's definitely peaks and troughs. what i _ hours? it's definitely peaks and troughs. what i want _ hours? it's definitely peaks and troughs. what i want to - hours? it's definitely peaks and troughs. what i want to do i hours? it's definitely peaks and troughs. what i want to do is i hours? it's definitely peaks and i troughs. what i want to do is make sure i am playing the drums for 2h hours and playing some sort of heat so it will go from something like this to something a bit more complicated and something that is heavier. �* ., ., ., ., complicated and something that is heavier. ., ., ., ., ., heavier. before i go, i am told to ask ou. heavier. before i go, i am told to ask you- food. — heavier. before i go, i am told to ask you. food, comfort _ heavier. before i go, i am told to ask you. food, comfort breaks, l heavier. before i go, i am told to i ask you. food, comfort breaks, how does this happen? i ask you. food, comfort breaks, how does this happen?— does this happen? i have been fed whilst playing _ does this happen? i have been fed whilst playing the _ does this happen? i have been fed whilst playing the drums, - does this happen? i have been fed whilst playing the drums, but i does this happen? i have been fed | whilst playing the drums, but there will be a lot of... i have to have a five—minute break every hourjust to stretch my and use the toilet and
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haveit stretch my and use the toilet and have it how the safety front, but the bulk of the 2a hours is going to be here either in front of this drum kit or that read drum kit there. i don't know if you can see, i had us marching drum thing that i wear when i am moving around, so, marching drum thing that i wear when lam moving around, so, yes, a lot of drumming to come but i am feeling good and the reason we are doing this is to hopefully raise money for children in need and i have learned so much about it. irate children in need and i have learned so much about it.— so much about it. we have to go, because we _ so much about it. we have to go, because we are _ so much about it. we have to go, because we are heading - so much about it. we have to go, because we are heading to i so much about it. we have to go, because we are heading to the i so much about it. we have to go, | because we are heading to the top so much about it. we have to go, i because we are heading to the top of the hour and has been a joy to speak to you and good luck. well, that drumathon is going on for 2h hours and we will keep checking in with him.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. a new draft agreement is negotiated at the cop26 climate summit in glasgow — as talks enter their final scheduled day. i'm live in glasgow where we are going to be analysing the detail of the latest draft agreement at the un climate change summit and asking what it means for the fight against climate change. we'll have a special report from the us on the devastation of long—lasting wildfires, caused by drought and heat. it's running down the road towards you, get out now. we grabbed the dogs and we grabbed our suitcases and we got in the truck and we left. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe enters his 20th day on hunger strike, as his wife's detention in iran continues. he's given us an interview about how
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the case has dragged on: lam i am outraged. the fact that it has been allowed to last for five and a half years, you know, the fact, let's be honest, she was taken hostage over government debt. the government knew that before we did. charities urge the government for new safe routes and a fair asylum system after a record number of migrants cross the channel in a single day thank you, very much. and welcome to
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glasgow and the bbc news coverage of cop26, the united nation's climate change conference. in the last couple of hours a new draft agreement has been published but has not been signed off yet but it is the latest update on where negotiations going on on the other side of the river behind me appeared to be heading. one change in the new draft is an apparent softening of government requirements to reduce fossilfuel government requirements to reduce fossil fuel and government requirements to reduce fossilfuel and coal use. government requirements to reduce fossil fuel and coal use. there government requirements to reduce fossilfuel and coal use. there was strong aloud about helping and paying poorer countries to fight climate change and they need to update their climate plans on an annual basis which remains in play. the un chief has already said today that the summit would probably not achieve its aims and the goal of limiting global warming to 1.5 celsius on life support. so, with that in mind, let's remind ourselves what the summit set out to achieve.
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delegates from all over the world came into glasgow around a fortnight ago with four goals in mind. the first to secure global net zero by mid—century and the second key 1.5 degrees within reach. net zero is the point at which the amount of greenhouse gas produced is no greater than the amount being removed. countries will need to phase out coal more rapidly, stop deforestation and switch up the speed to electric vehicles to achieve this. the second goal is to adapt to protect communities and natural habitats. this is about protecting or restoring ecosystems as well as developing a more resilient infrastructure to protect communities from the impact of climate change. the third goal is to mobilise finance. developed countries are being asked to pledge at least $100 billion in climate finance per year including working with the private sector. and then the final goal is to work together to deliver. this is focused on governments collaborating to
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finalise what is known as the paris rule book, agreed in the paris climate court in 2015. these have been the four goals at the heart of the negotiations in the past days and the continuing challenge as to be to get every country in the world with their own individual sets of circumstances to agree on a common pathway forward. it is of course hoped that agreement will be reached by the end of the summit which is today, officially, although that timetable could slip into the weekend. and our science correspondences with me now. and you've been here all the way through cop26 and today is the most fundamental question is, looking at the detail of this draft agreement, which we have to work with right now, is that enough in the fight against climate change? is it enough to stop global warming going beyond 1.5 degrees? it to stop global warming going beyond 1.5 decrees? , , ., .,
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1.5 degrees? it depends on who you talk to and analysis _ 1.5 degrees? it depends on who you talk to and analysis of _ 1.5 degrees? it depends on who you talk to and analysis of this - talk to and analysis of this particular draft and at the moment the pledges and promises when you crunch— the pledges and promises when you crunch the _ the pledges and promises when you crunch the numbers, everything being done now— crunch the numbers, everything being done now and signed up to, that doesn't — done now and signed up to, that doesn't put it on a trajectory towards _ doesn't put it on a trajectory towards limiting global temperature towards limiting global temperature to 15— towards limiting global temperature to 15 but _ towards limiting global temperature to 1.5 but what it does is accelerate the journey to lower emissions comic mentions for the first time — emissions comic mentions for the first time the staff of greenhouse -as first time the staff of greenhouse gas emissions and fossil fuels and coal and this is the stuff that puts those _ coal and this is the stuff that puts those emissions into the atmosphere and the _ those emissions into the atmosphere and the planet problems, it talks about— and the planet problems, it talks about ending subsidies for fossil fuel and — about ending subsidies for fossil fuel and phasing out coal and the language — fuel and phasing out coal and the language on that in this draft has been _ language on that in this draft has been softened and there is a keyword about— been softened and there is a keyword about the _ been softened and there is a keyword about the fossil fuel subsidies which — about the fossil fuel subsidies which is — about the fossil fuel subsidies which is the end of inefficient subsidies and i spoke to an alice this morning that it's a get out of 'ail this morning that it's a get out of jail free _ this morning that it's a get out of jail free card in some countries can say we _ jail free card in some countries can say we have — jail free card in some countries can say we have efficient fossil fuel subsidies. majri out so it would be
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”p subsidies. majri out so it would be up to— subsidies. majri out so it would be up to the — subsidies. majri out so it would be up to the individual countries to judge _ up to the individual countries to judge themselves that it is efficient or inefficient? this is a process— efficient or inefficient? this is a process that's been going on for decades— process that's been going on for decades and taken seriously by every party in _ decades and taken seriously by every party in the _ decades and taken seriously by every party in the room, but it's still a voluntary— party in the room, but it's still a voluntary agreement and this kind of wriggle _ voluntary agreement and this kind of wriggle room in the language, that is why— wriggle room in the language, that is why we — wriggle room in the language, that is why we are picking through the language — is why we are picking through the language and looking at the difference between urging and promising and these kind of nuances that sound _ promising and these kind of nuances that sound so granular and obligated, that's all because if you can pick— obligated, that's all because if you can pick that apart, you can sort of move _ can pick that apart, you can sort of move the — can pick that apart, you can sort of move the rule book a bit to suit your— move the rule book a bit to suit your own — move the rule book a bit to suit your own economy, so one of the big concerns— your own economy, so one of the big concerns about whether countries are being _ concerns about whether countries are being pushed to come back with no milk 7 _ being pushed to come back with no milk ? naturally determine contributions of their plans on how to reduce — contributions of their plans on how to reduce emissions. and we are on a faster— to reduce emissions. and we are on a faster track— to reduce emissions. and we are on a faster track to — to reduce emissions. and we are on a faster track to try and present updated — faster track to try and present updated plans to do that, and that's very hopeful and that accelerates us on an— very hopeful and that accelerates us on an emission cutting trajectory. a brief on an emission cutting trajectory. brief word on the activists on the
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streets and elsewhere, they are not happy with this. they don't think it goes far enough, fast enough. exactly, and some of the weakening we were _ exactly, and some of the weakening we were talking about in the language of phasing out coal and subsidies— language of phasing out coal and subsidies for fossil fuels, that really— subsidies for fossil fuels, that really does, that feeds into that frustration and the sense it does not go _ frustration and the sense it does not go far— frustration and the sense it does not go far enough to turn these promises — not go far enough to turn these promises into action because it's not promises that cut emissions it is policies — not promises that cut emissions it is policies and actions.— is policies and actions. victoria, thank you _ is policies and actions. victoria, thank you very _ is policies and actions. victoria, thank you very much. _ advisers to the president due to end today have said it won't prevent global temperatures rising more than 1.5 degrees above preindustrial levels. , , ,, ., levels. the experts, known as ffiends levels. the experts, known as friends of— levels. the experts, known as friends of com _ levels. the experts, known as friends of cop26 say - levels. the experts, known as friends of cop26 say the i levels. the experts, known as i friends of cop26 say the current text is too weak. they have called for a clear admission that emissions will continue to rise under current policies. graham satchell reports. we are calling on world leaders to grasp— we are calling on world leaders to grasp this~ —
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we are calling on world leaders to grasp this. it we are calling on world leaders to a-ras this. , . . ., grasp this. it is crunch time at the glasaow grasp this. it is crunch time at the glasgow conference _ grasp this. it is crunch time at the glasgow conference with - grasp this. it is crunch time at the | glasgow conference with protesters making it clear that the outcome could not be more important. a matter of life and death.- could not be more important. a matter of life and death. time is runnina matter of life and death. time is running out- _ matter of life and death. time is running out. we _ matter of life and death. time is running out. we are _ matter of life and death. time is running out. we are not - matter of life and death. time is running out. we are not there i matter of life and death. time is | running out. we are not there yet matter of life and death. time is i running out. we are not there yet on the most critical issues. there are still a lot more work to be done. that work is going on in quiet corners. the draft agreement poured over line by line by every country in the world. so what still needs to be decided? the most fundamental question, cutting greenhouse gases. they're still going up when the science is clear they need to be falling. financial aid for the poorest nations. it was promised more than a decade ago, but still hasn't been delivered. and how often countries should update their plans for going green. should it be every year? there have been some successes. a plan to cut methane, although not
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all countries have signed up. a call to end the use of coal, the dirtiest fossil fuel, but again, no binding agreements. and an assurance to end deforestation by 2030. will it happen? we don't believe that promises made by financial companies to end deforestation will actually prevent trees from being cut or burned down. we simply don't believe it. i'm actually here to beg you to prove us wrong. we desperately need you to prove us wrong. please prove us wrong. another protest as climate activists sound the alarm. the worry for these protesters, that there is no agreed date for ending the use of oil and gas. the fact that we are not talking about phasing fossil fuels, even at any stage, to us indicates that the process has fundamentally failed. because that is probably the largest issue we have to confront. it's not even on the table. this morning, a warning from one of the key advisory groups at the conference that what's been agreed so far won't be enough
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to stop temperatures rising. graham satchell, bbc news. lam iamjoined by i am joined by the co—chair of the paris agreement implementation committee. thank you for your time today. i'd love to get a sense from you of what it's like at the end stages of huge negotiation like this and we know negotiators have been working through the night and they would be tired but they need a huge amount of stamina to focus on the detail. so give us a viewpoint on that. it detail. so give us a viewpoint on that. , ., , ., _ ., that. it is loud, it is noisy and definitely _ that. it is loud, it is noisy and definitely the _ that. it is loud, it is noisy and definitely the pressure i that. it is loud, it is noisy and definitely the pressure is i that. it is loud, it is noisy and definitely the pressure is on. | that. it is loud, it is noisy and i definitely the pressure is on. the countries here have to deliver on many different elements of the overall package and as we know there are some outstanding technical issues on transparency and on the timeframe on markets, but also most
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importantly there are cover decisions. where the most important political signals will come from and we receive the new text earlier which is under discussion and in their outstanding issues to be resolved today. bind their outstanding issues to be resolved today.— their outstanding issues to be resolved today. their outstanding issues to be resolved toda . . ., , . , resolved today. and how difficult is it to find a form _ resolved today. and how difficult is it to find a form of _ resolved today. and how difficult is it to find a form of words _ resolved today. and how difficult is it to find a form of words that i resolved today. and how difficult is it to find a form of words that so i it to find a form of words that so many different countries can sign up to? it many different countries can sign up to? , , , . �* , to? it is very difficult. it's alwa s to? it is very difficult. it's always been _ to? it is very difficult. it's always been very - to? it is very difficult. it's| always been very difficult. to? it is very difficult. it's i always been very difficult. we to? it is very difficult. it's - always been very difficult. we know that, it's nothing new, but what's important here is to find the right balance between all of these different elements of being between mitigation and keeping 1.5 alive and closing the ambition and getting adaptation and so many elements and they are equally important or differently important for countries but finding that balance and finding that satisfies every stake will be really difficult and as i said, we will probably still be looking down
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a couple of hours today and into tomorrow. a couple of hours today and into tomorrow— a couple of hours today and into tomorrow. . ., , , tomorrow. some climate activists say it's almost the _ tomorrow. some climate activists say it's almost the wrong _ tomorrow. some climate activists say it's almost the wrong way _ tomorrow. some climate activists say it's almost the wrong way to - tomorrow. some climate activists say it's almost the wrong way to go i it's almost the wrong way to go about it, that you should have a really strong form of words and challenge countries to sign up to that form of words, and if they won't or can't then exclude them from any final agreement. what do you think of that idea? it’s from any final agreement. what do you think of that idea?— you think of that idea? it's a very inclusive process _ you think of that idea? it's a very inclusive process we _ you think of that idea? it's a very inclusive process we are - you think of that idea? it's a very inclusive process we are seeing l you think of that idea? it's a very i inclusive process we are seeing now where the uk presidency is consulting with all groups and all states constantly. they are coming forward with draft text and we got one yesterday and they've been consulting all day yesterday and deep into the night and came with a new proposal this morning consulting again and it is exactly to ensure everybody has their say but by the end of the day it will be difficult to find the compromise but i see the presidency and many parties to find
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agreement. does that end up benefiting arguably more powerful countries and disadvantaging poorer countries and disadvantaging poorer countries and disadvantaging poorer countries and often those on the front line of climate change? i don't think so. as you know, we are negotiating — don't think so. as you know, we are negotiating based on groups primarily. we have strong voices from _ primarily. we have strong voices from small— primarily. we have strong voices from small island developing states and developing countries and they are represented equally around the negotiation table, and they are being _ negotiation table, and they are being heard and consulted, like everyone — being heard and consulted, like everyone else and it is an inclusive process— everyone else and it is an inclusive process but — everyone else and it is an inclusive process but the pressure is on, and ithink— process but the pressure is on, and i think everybody feels it but everybody feels it in different ways and small— everybody feels it in different ways and small island developing states are vulnerable to the impacts of climate — are vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and they need to ratchet _ climate change and they need to ratchet up their ambition and finance — ratchet up their ambition and finance and to agree on all of these different— finance and to agree on all of these different interests in the final
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text is— different interests in the final text is what we are working on but i think— text is what we are working on but i think so— text is what we are working on but i think so far— text is what we are working on but i think so far it is a very inclusive process— think so far it is a very inclusive process we _ think so far it is a very inclusive process we have been silly and hopefully we will states till the wee hours today.— hopefully we will states till the wee hours today. christina, thank ou so wee hours today. christina, thank you so much _ wee hours today. christina, thank you so much and _ wee hours today. christina, thank you so much and we _ wee hours today. christina, thank you so much and we will- wee hours today. christina, thank you so much and we will say i wee hours today. christina, thank i you so much and we will say goodbye to viewers now on bbc two. let's bring you up—to—date with some other developments here in glasgow, in the us envoy at the cop26 climate conference, john kerry told the bbc that while there are still issues floating around, he believes this has the potential to be a very important statement. i has the potential to be a very important statement.- has the potential to be a very important statement. i think we are cominu important statement. i think we are coming together — important statement. i think we are coming together and _ important statement. i think we are coming together and always - important statement. i think we are coming together and always in i important statement. i think we are | coming together and always in these kind of— coming together and always in these kind of negotiations, there are always— kind of negotiations, there are always a — kind of negotiations, there are always a few issues floating around and there _ always a few issues floating around and there are usually a hundred rumours — and there are usually a hundred rumours regarding that thing and i feel very— rumours regarding that thing and i feel very good that this has the potential— feel very good that this has the potential to be an important statement. big
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potentialto be an important statement-— potentialto be an important statement. �* . , ., statement. big arguments over finance. some _ statement. big arguments over finance. some arguments i statement. big arguments over finance. some arguments over| finance. some arguments over finance. some arguments over finance- i _ finance. some arguments over finance. i don't _ finance. some arguments over finance. i don't how— finance. some arguments over finance. i don't how big - finance. some arguments over finance. i don't how big they i finance. some arguments overi finance. i don't how big they are but we _ finance. i don't how big they are but we have to come up with a mechanism that provides more money and we _ mechanism that provides more money and we want _ mechanism that provides more money and we want to support more money for adaptation and more money for the overall— for adaptation and more money for the overall effort to mitigate because we can't win if we don't have _ because we can't win if we don't have the — because we can't win if we don't have the funding to be able to implement. there are always expectations and we will work through— expectations and we will work through it and come up with an agreement. through it and come up with an agreement-— through it and come up with an aareement. . ., _ agreement. the argument for line by line, do agreement. the argument for line by line. do you — agreement. the argument for line by line, do you think— agreement. the argument for line by line, do you think the _ agreement. the argument for line by line, do you think the sentence i line, do you think the sentence about fossil fuels and coal will survive this last stage? the g20 su orted survive this last stage? the g20 supported it _ survive this last stage? the g20 supported it and _ survive this last stage? the g20 supported it and it's _ survive this last stage? the g20 supported it and it's very - survive this last stage? the g20 supported it and it's very much l supported it and it's very much taken — supported it and it's very much taken from the 620. the 620 had china, _ taken from the 620. the 620 had china, russia, india, a bunch of countries — china, russia, india, a bunch of countries at _ china, russia, india, a bunch of countries at the table and they sign off on— countries at the table and they sign off on the _ countries at the table and they sign off on the language so it would be hard to— off on the language so it would be hard to be — off on the language so it would be hard to he suddenly going backwards and a _ hard to he suddenly going backwards and a minority put out in the context _ and a minority put out in the context of— and a minority put out in the context of the 20 biggest economies in the _ context of the 20 biggest economies in the world. context of the 20 biggest economies in the world-— in the world. what is the american osition in the world. what is the american position because _ in the world. what is the american position because you _ in the world. what is the american position because you have - in the world. what is the american position because you have a i in the world. what is the american position because you have a huge l position because you have a huge fossil fuel industry and yesterday there was an initiatives by costa rica and denmark to look to phasing
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out fossilfuels rica and denmark to look to phasing out fossil fuels entirely. the marketplace _ out fossil fuels entirely. the marketplace is _ out fossil fuels entirely. the marketplace is already doing that in fact. marketplace is already doing that in fact in— marketplace is already doing that in fact in the — marketplace is already doing that in fact. in the us and in europe, fora number— fact. in the us and in europe, fora numberof— fact. in the us and in europe, fora numberof years, fact. in the us and in europe, fora number of years, the marketplace is not funding — number of years, the marketplace is not funding coal and china just signed — not funding coal and china just signed on _ not funding coal and china just signed on to say that they will not find external coal initiatives around _ find external coal initiatives around the world, so it seems there is a global— around the world, so it seems there is a global understanding that we have to _ is a global understanding that we have to be serious about dealing with emissions and pollution. this is pollution. what we are trying to do is _ is pollution. what we are trying to do is reduce pollution and have a safer, _ do is reduce pollution and have a safer, cleaner, healthierworld to live in— safer, cleaner, healthierworld to live in and— safer, cleaner, healthierworld to live in and that is the responsible thing _ live in and that is the responsible thing to— live in and that is the responsible thing to do— live in and that is the responsible thing to do and we are asking for people _ thing to do and we are asking for people to — thing to do and we are asking for people to be responsible and i think most countries are stepping up. i have _ most countries are stepping up. i have not— most countries are stepping up. i have not been personally talk to do about _ have not been personally talk to do about that — have not been personally talk to do about that at this point about this clause _ about that at this point about this clause but— about that at this point about this clause but i do know that these countries — clause but i do know that these countries signed on to it in rome 'ust countries signed on to it in rome just a _ countries signed on to it in rome just a few— countries signed on to it in rome just a few days ago and hopefully in the span— just a few days ago and hopefully in the span of— just a few days ago and hopefully in the span of a few days we are not iosing _ the span of a few days we are not iosing the — the span of a few days we are not losing the momentum and to continue
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what we _ losing the momentum and to continue what we are _ losing the momentum and to continue what we are doing. president biden has set _ what we are doing. president biden has set an— what we are doing. president biden has set an aggressive goal in the us and which _ has set an aggressive goal in the us and which the utilities and others are all— and which the utilities and others are alljoined in on that by 2035 we will have _ are alljoined in on that by 2035 we will have a — are alljoined in on that by 2035 we will have a carbon free power sector in the _ will have a carbon free power sector in the us, _ will have a carbon free power sector in the us, so— will have a carbon free power sector in the us, so these are important things— in the us, so these are important things that — in the us, so these are important things that we need to do in order to deal— things that we need to do in order to deal with the crisis of climate and you — to deal with the crisis of climate and you can't talk about it and then fakir— and you can't talk about it and then fakir and _ and you can't talk about it and then fakir and not and you can't talk about it and then fakirand not do and you can't talk about it and then fakir and not do things, particularly saying one thing they're _ particularly saying one thing they're not another the next. that was john kerry — they're not another the next. trust was john kerry speaking to the bbc's wasjohn kerry speaking to the bbc's science editor. just to let you know we are expecting an update from the cop26 presents an hour's time and the timing has been moving a bit on that but we will bring the details of that when it happens. much more from glasgow throughout the day but for now, back to the studio. the headlines on bbc news. a new draft agreement is negotiated at the cop26 climate summit in glasgow — as talks enter their final scheduled
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day. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe enters his 20th day on hunger strike, as his wife's detention in iran continues. he's given us an interview about how the case has dragged on: charities urge the government for new safe routes and a fair asylum system after a record number of migrants cross the channel in a single day. sport now. we start with some breaking news in the last hour — england have been dealt another blow in the build up to their autumn international with australia tomorrow after prop ellis genge tested positive for covid 19. genge featured for 67 minutes in the win over tonga last weekend, but his replacement in that match — joe marler — is unavailable after returning a positive covid test on monday. sale prop bevan rodd
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will replace genge. owen farrell didn't play last weekend after a test said he had covid, but it was later found to be a false positive. the rfu says genge is isolating and that no other positive results have been returned by players or staff who were all tested today. meanwhile, england's women's coach simon middleton has made seven changes to his squad ahead of their match against canada on sunday. captain sarah hunter returns to the starting 15, there are debuts given to sadia kabeya and heather cowell, whilst abbie ward and poppy cleall are in line to win their 50th caps. next to football, and gareth southgate says england must put in an improved performance against albania at wembley tonight as they look to qualify for next year's world cup. after that disappointing draw against hungary — england need four points from their last two games to guarantee their place at qatar 2022. they're away at san marino on monday. injuries and illness have affected england's preparations ahead of albania this evening — and the england manager says they won't be underestimating their opponents.
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some sad news to bring you this morning, the former england and wolves midfielder ron flowers has died at the age of 87. he earned 49 caps for england, scoring all six of the penalties he took for his country and also made 515 appearances for wolves where he won three first division titles. flowers was a non—playing member of the england squad which won the 1966 world cup and was later awarded a winners' medal in 2009. for the world cup play—offs. they take on moldova at 5 — and victory will ensure they finish second in their group, behind denmark who have already qualified. second place will mean they'll be in the hat for the play—off draw in zurich at the end of the month. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour.
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around one thousand migrants are believed to have reached the uk after crossing the english channel by boat yesterday — a record figure for a single day. the home office has described the number as "unacceptable". simonjones is in doverfor us. tell us more about what has happened. aha, tell us more about what has happened-— tell us more about what has happened. a hugely busy day yesterday _ happened. a hugely busy day yesterday for _ happened. a hugely busy day yesterday for the _ happened. a hugely busy day yesterday for the lifeboats, l happened. a hugely busy day i yesterday for the lifeboats, five lifeboats out there in the channel picking up migrants. and conditions have changed today and it's really choppy out there in the channel and no crossings we have seen so far today, conditions completely different, incredibly mild and calm for november and i think that is why we saw a record number of people arriving. the home office has certainly been hoping that with the onset of autumn the number of people coming would drop and that is what we saw happen over the past couple of years, so that hasn't happened at
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all this year and what we are seeing now is people over in calais in the hundreds wanting to make the crossing and are simply waiting until the right weather window to do that so any hope that the issue might potentially go away over the weekend ? by the winter have been dashed by the figures we saw yesterday. dashed by the figures we saw yesterday-— dashed by the figures we saw esterda . ~ . , , ., yesterday. what is being done in france to stop _ yesterday. what is being done in france to stop migrants - yesterday. what is being done in | france to stop migrants crossing? britain has recently given france the first part of £54 million that was promised to increase patrols on the beaches in northern france. there had been a bit of a row over that money and when it was going to be released and britain is dependent upon results, so there will be be some questioning over that money. for example, yesterday, 1000 people making it across the channel but the french picked up just making it across the channel but the french picked upjust 54 people in the channel on their side of the channel in french waters. the french authorities have always made it
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clear that they have a huge stretch of coastline to try to control, so it isn't easy to stop the boats launching in the first place and also the french authorities will not turn boats back at sea. they feel thatis turn boats back at sea. they feel that is dangerous and migrants could threaten to jump that is dangerous and migrants could threaten tojump on that is dangerous and migrants could threaten to jump on the water, so they will only intervene if a boat breaks down or if it starts to sink, if the migrants are in immediate danger and we saw the dangers of yesterday. yesterday morning a couple of migrants were found trying to get to the uk in a kayak and didn't make it. but they said three of their colleagues were also in kayaks were missing and they did not know where they were so there was a huge search launched on the french side of the channel that went on all day and the missing people could not be found and with conditions like they are today, i think hopes of finding them alive are now finding. more broadly, charities are calling on the government, with more safe routes to enable migrants to come
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here through safer means. what does the government say on that? the charities say _ the government say on that? the: charities say the system the government say on that? tu9 charities say the system is simply not working and they say for people to want to claim asylum in the uk, the majority of them have to get to the majority of them have to get to the uk in the first place. so that is forcing people, they say, to get on boats to risk their lives and they believe that people should be allowed to claim asylum in the uk from french soil, for example if they want to be reunited with family members but the government says they are not planning to do that and in fact they have a new immigration bill currently going through the commons which will make it more difficult for people who enter the uk via boats across the channel to be granted asylum and there will be an assumption that asylum will not be given and instead the government wants to take people direct from conflict zones such as afghanistan or syria as they have done in the
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past with syria and bring people directly from those areas rather than allowing people to come of their own accord. but charities are saying that that won't stop the problem and the reality is that many things have been tried in the past but it hasn't stopped people waiting overin but it hasn't stopped people waiting over in calais desperate to get to the uk. :, ~ y. over in calais desperate to get to the uk. :, ~ i. ,, :, ., over in calais desperate to get to the uk. :, ~ ,, :, ., , the uk. thank you, simon, and 'ust some confirmation i the uk. thank you, simon, and 'ust some confirmation on i the uk. thank you, simon, and 'ust some confirmation on the i the uk. thank you, simon, andjust some confirmation on the numbers| the uk. thank you, simon, andjusti some confirmation on the numbers of migrants coming in yesterday as we hear from migrants coming in yesterday as we hearfrom lucy morton migrants coming in yesterday as we hear from lucy morton of the immigration services union has told bbc news that more than 1000 migrants slept on the floor of the makeshift hub detention facility in dover last night. david henderson, the businessman convicted over organising the flight that crashed into the english channel killing footballer emiliano sala, has been sentenced at cardiff crown court to 18 months in prison. he was found guilty of endangering the safety of an aircraft last month and admitted to a charge of trying to arrange a flight for a passenger
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without permission or authorisation. emiliano sala without permission or authorisation. emiliano sale and the pilot david ibbotson both died injanuary 2019 in the crash in the english channel. our correspondent hywel griffith is in cardiff. tell us more about what you have heard at the court this morning. david henderson was the man who arranged about flight and he arranged about flight and he arranged with a pilot who wasn't qualified to fly at night or indeed licensed commercially to carry passengers with him but he knew the risks and he encouraged the pilot to blag his way through on what was a return flight from cardiff and was then to be back to cardiff to bring emiliano sala then to be back to cardiff to bring emiliano sale to play in the premier league that the plane went missing in winter weather over the english channel and emiliano sala's body was found in the english channel and the body was never recovered of the pilot. today the judge said he body was never recovered of the pilot. today thejudge said he had acted recklessly and that he knew of the risks but was driven by profit and therefore he had no option but
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to sentence david henderson to an 18 month jail term. to sentence david henderson to an 18 month jailterm. it's to sentence david henderson to an 18 month jail term. it's important to point out that he is not accused of causing the death. indeed, the inquest into emiliano sala's death is due to take place next year and we know that he had a large amount of carbon dioxide in his body. what david henderson was accused of was ignoring, wilfully ignoring the rules surrounding flights and showing a cavalier attitude, as the judge put it, towards those regulations and ultimately arranging this flight which resulted in two deaths. an inquest has heard how the ten year old boy — who was killed by a dog in caerphilly — died as a result of 'severe injuries to the head and neck�*. jack lis suffered what were described as 'unsurvivable' injuries when he was attacked by the animal on monday.
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the opening of the inquest today heard how jack was outside playing with a friend before going to their home where he was attacked by the dog. today the court heard that jack was playing outside with a friend before returning to that friend's home and the coroner said when he entered the property, he was attacked by a dog. the court heard that paramedics were caught butjack had the court heard that paramedics were caught but jack had sustained and survivable injuries and was pronounced dead just after four in the afternoon. today the court heard that a pause modern examination has been carried out and the provisional cause of death has been given as severe injuries to jack's head and neck. the coroner said that the circumstances surrounding jack's death were violent and unnatural and so she formally opens the inquest into his death and then adjourned the inquest so further enquiries could be made. now, officers have described the dog on the day as very large and very aggressive and the
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dog was destroyed at the scene by firearms officers and gwent police are still working to establish the breed of the dog and gwent police have also arrested a 28—year—old woman from the carefully area in connection with their enquiry and she is released on bail. let's catch up she is released on bail. let's catch up with the weather. looking a little bit grey and drizzly out there for many of us but still mild for the time of year and quite breezy conditions for many of us through the remainder of the day as well. we had quite a bit of rain already parts of scotland, northern ireland and that is shifting eastwards in some a few drizzly showers through the course of the afternoon and more showers following on for the rest of scotland and temperature still in the mid teens, so mild for the time of year and you will notice the strength of the breeze around hills and close in the south and west of the evening and overnight it remains breezy as well but slightly would lighter winds and
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clearer skies for scotland and parts of northern england so temperatures into single figures but for most of the same i'll start and double figures from the word go tomorrow. a lot of cloud for most areas and breezy close to the east coast and ploughed moving on from the west but some sunshine in between and temperatures between ten up to 15 degrees on saturday. most of us looking dried, settled and still mild for the time of year into sunday, remembrance sunday.
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and we will keep checking in with him. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... a new draft agreement is negotiated at the cop26
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climate summit in glasgow — as talks enter their final scheduled day. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe enters his 20th day on hunger strike, as his wife's detention in iran continues. he's given us an interview about how the case has dragged on. charities urge the government for new safe routes and a fair asylum system after a record number of migrants cross the channel in a single day. a ten—year—old boy who was killed by a dog at a friend's house died of "severe injuries to the head and neck", an inquest has heard. britney spears could regain control of her personal life and finances today — when a court decides whether to overturn an order which put her father in charge.
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let's go back to scotland and my colleague is at cop26. thank you very much. welcome back to glasgow. it is officially the final day here or perhaps not the final day of negotiations, when we look back to paris, the climate agreement there of 2015 overran the official timetable and the thought is that could happen here in glasgow. what we have today is a newer version, a second draft agreement but of course, the key word there is draft, it doesn't mean anything has been agreed that will be formally announced at the end of this summit. the economist and climate change expert lord stern says the new cop26 draft is an improvement, but won't be enough to limit temperature rises to the target of 1.5 celsius. it will fall short of driving to 1.5 and tackling clean development. but, actually, i think it goes
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beyond where i thought it might be a few days ago. i think this new text is stronger, a greater sense of urgency, looking at all forms of finance. the importance of getting it in place next year, when we have to both deliver on the 100 billion and put in place something which is much bigger and better. what could a world with climate change allowed to run away look like? earlier i spoke to dr ben strauss, ceo and chief scientist of climate central. as part of his work he has created projections of what some famous landmarks around the world would look like if temperatures reached three degrees of warming. here, you are looking at the world's tallest building. and yet if we allow warming to progress to three degrees celsius, a business as usual scenario, close to what countries are doing now with their actions, its toes would get wet.
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the whole of downtown dubai would be underwater if we follow that path. here we are looking at an important museum of history in mumbai. we are looking an important period of history — we are looking an important period of history. mumbai is also extremely vulnerable to sea level rise. even this century, this image shows, again, where we could get, after several hundred years, but we make that choice right now. why do you think it is so important to produce these visualisations? well, people are just very visual. when we talk about numbers, 1.5 degrees, two or three, $100 billion or a trillion, those are abstract, it is hard for people to understand. but climate impacts are going to be world shaking. they are already beginning to be and we want to give it in a picture so we can really see. we have a choice, a or b. what we do at this meeting and this decade will make an enormous
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difference for generations to come. let's look at some more images, we have the site of the australian open in melbourne. what is the projection for this? again, the whole site would be underwater, in the long run, if we don't take action to transition to a clean economy and do it rapidly. while the sea level will take time to unfold, there are a series of one—way gates. if we warm up the planet enough, ice corks holding back the glazier in greenland will be destroyed, and degraded. and the ice is going to come out. even if we pull down the planet afterwards. one—way gates, if we go through the gate we can't go back in the other direction again, it was in? that's right. i guess people might ask, how do you know that the projections are right on this?
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these projections are based both on modelling going forward, but also looking back in the deep history of the planet. over the last couple of million years, there have been a whole series of ice ages and warm periods in between them. we can look at how warm those warm periods were, how high the sea levels were, and we can see the sea levels are extremely sensitive to warming, and our projections match that pattern. finally, let's look at the image of london, buckingham palace, what do you project could happen here? what is interesting about the imagery from buckingham palace is while three celsius warming looks terrible, 1.5 degrees does not look very good either. in fact, if we stop polluting today we would already have to metres —— twomack metres... of sea level rise in the pipeline. so, there is an incredible amount
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of momentum, inertia, in the system. but what i think is important to remember is that we have a huge amount of choice for most of these landmarks, and, really, the people alive today, the leaders, they are the only ones in history who have had the chance in what we do over ten years to really affect the next 10,000 years. ben strauss from climate central. i'm sure you will agree some striking images with the projections he has created. over the other side of the river clyde, where we are sitting in our studio, that is where the negotiations are continuing. the negotiators working through the night and they must be incredibly tired but perhaps it takes that pressure to really come to a final agreement. let's discuss where we asked whether reality check correspondent. so, the aim of this summit is to try to stop global warming, to put it simply, to try to keep the rise in the average temperature of the world below 1.5 celsius.
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when know the mention of fossil fuels is in the text for the first time but that mention has been watered down compared with the first draft and you can understand why some climate activists are disappointed or dismayed even by that because, taking a step back, the vast majority of man—made global warming has been caused by our use of fossil fuels since the start of the industrial revolutions, and accelerated in the last few decades and if you keep taking fossil fuels out of the ground, you cannot stop global warming, out of the ground, you cannot stop globalwarming, certainly out of the ground, you cannot stop global warming, certainly not at a pace that scientists say is necessary during the next few years and yet there are countries whose economies rely on the use of fossil fuels, there are very big influential companies who want to keep taking fossil fuels out of the ground and earlier this week, the bbc revealed that if you take all the fuel fossil fuel lobby is here and put them into one place, it's a bigger delegation than any single country has at this summit, so there are powerful interests that want to keep using fossil fuels. other
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countries are saying that if you keep doing that, our countries are in danger of disappearing. let’s in danger of disappearing. let's look at the _ in danger of disappearing. let's look at the wording, _ in danger of disappearing. let's look at the wording, it - in danger of disappearing. let's look at the wording, it is i in danger of disappearing. let's look at the wording, it is detailed but worth doing. the first draft produced on wednesday asked countries to speed up the phasing out of coal and speed up the phasing out of coal and speed up the phasing out of coal and speed up the phasing out of the subsidies for fossil fuels. this latest draft asked for countries to speed up the development and use of technology which would lead to greener energy, clean energy and it asks them to accelerate the phase—out of unabated coal power and of inefficient subsidies. so it's of those two words, unabated and inefficient that are really softening the language around this. explain in detail your take on this language? it around this. explain in detail your take on this language?— around this. explain in detail your take on this language? it gives more win ale take on this language? it gives more wiggle room — take on this language? it gives more wiggle room for— take on this language? it gives more wiggle room for those _ take on this language? it gives more wiggle room for those who _ take on this language? it gives more wiggle room for those who want i take on this language? it gives more wiggle room for those who want to i wiggle room for those who want to keep using fossil fuels. call for some time has been separated off and when we talk about subsidies for fossilfuels when we talk about subsidies for fossil fuels separately, we are talking with oil and gas and we know that oil and gas companies are desperate to keep taking gas,
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certainly out of the ground for as long as they can and when you look around the world, many people rely on gas in their everyday life all the time. the vast majority of houses in this country are heated by gas boilers. so we know there has to be a transition, i think the argument really that is going on there when we are going through line by line is how quickly the transition is going to take place and there are big companies. if you're an explore for a new gas field, you are looking at a 10—1020, 30 year timescale where you are looking an argument for climate commentators to say you must do that much more quickly and stop it and those who have the big philosophical arguments and urgency of them which are being translated into this line — byline dissection of the tax year working on. - byline dissection of the tax year working on— - byline dissection of the tax year working on. and of course how you -a for working on. and of course how you pay for the — working on. and of course how you pay for the transition. _ working on. and of course how you pay for the transition. john - working on. and of course how you pay for the transition. john kerry i pay for the transition. john kerry mentioned briefly that he was asked specifically about the money and he said it's going to be ok, we will sort it, which sounded very
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optimistic i thought.- sort it, which sounded very optimistic i thought. yes, from the american perspective, _ optimistic i thought. yes, from the american perspective, the - optimistic i thought. yes, from the american perspective, the money. american perspective, the money looks ok but from the perspective of some small leased developments it doesn't look ok. we now have the money that was promised by 2020 hasn't been delivered and now, really, that money will probably arrive not next year but they are after but the bigger question about where you go from there, because the experts have said that 100 billion, as much as it sounds, is the basic amount another ceiling and we are talking now about potentially more than $1 trillion a year being transferred to developing countries by 2030 if they are to basically adapt to what is happening to them and completely transform their economies which they cannot afford to do on their own without that size of financial assistance.— of financial assistance. thank you very much. _ of financial assistance. thank you very much, chris. _ of financial assistance. thank you very much, chris. we _ of financial assistance. thank you very much, chris. we do - of financial assistance. thank you very much, chris. we do hope i of financial assistance. thank you very much, chris. we do hope we of financial assistance. thank you i very much, chris. we do hope we are going to get some sort of idea as to how the negotiations are going in a little under one hour when we are expecting to hear from the kop
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president and we will hear you and give you the details of that. coronavirus infections in england have fallen to about1 in 60 people in the week ending the 6th november. that's according to data from the covid—19 infection survey by the office for national statistics. infections are down from what had been 1 in 50 the previous week. here to tell us more about those figures is out health correspondent catherine da costa. this sounds good, catherine. overall, infections are high across the uk but it is an improving picture so infections are falling in england and wales and they are flatter in scotland and northern ireland. the biggest fall was a long secondary age pupils. rates there started falling for half term that is speed things along and it will be interesting to watch what happens in the next few weeks and whether things start to increase or not. there have also been falls in other age groups particularly over age groups over 50s and 605 age groups particularly over age groups over 505 and 605 and there
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early encouraging signs that are starting to show that things might be falling faster in the over 805, which were some of the groups that were first in line for the booster. the situation in the uk is very different to what we are seeing in europe. austria, netherlands, germany are some of the countries are seeing a surge in cases and some countries are looking to bring in a partial lock downs. here, we opened up partial lock downs. here, we opened up a little bit earlier, experts say that our vaccination rates and prior infection mean that we are reaching an equilibrium, which means we are more stable state. hospital admissions here and deaths are falling but there are still more than eight and a half thousand covid patients in hospital and that has a knock—on effect. it is notjust covid, the rap record demand for emergency care and backlog in operations and there are staff shortages and so the pressure on nhs remains incredibly high going into the winter months when traditionally the winter months when traditionally the nhs is at its busiest.—
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the nhs is at its busiest. thank ou. tell us more about this house fire. this man thought he had got away with murder when a house fire that led to the death of his stepgrandmother was a result of a discarded cigarette but he later confessed a year later to the killing at a police investigation also found that he had made the same confession to friends in a game of truth or dare. today he was sentenced here at preston county crown court and was told that he clearly had planned this murder and was fascinated by serial killers and their crimes. he had put a lot of effort into planning this killing, there are detailed maps of her house and entrance and exit points labelled. neighbours heard her
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screams, but a conservatory doors were blocked and she couldn't believe that building. in a victim impact statement, herson believe that building. in a victim impact statement, her son said those images of her in herfinal days still haunt him and his family. he was sentenced here to 15 years a minimum term in a life sentence, but it also emerged that he had in fact made plans to stalk and attack are women and that he had made a kill list. :, ~ women and that he had made a kill list. :, ,, , :, the court of appeal has declined to increase the sentence of sam pybus, who was jailed for four years and eight months for choking his lover to death during sex, finding his sentence was not "unduly lenient". let's speak to our correspondent, megan paterson. the background to this case is sophie was choked during sex and we know the couple had a casual sexual relationship on the night of her death, sam drove around to her home,
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he had been drinking and had consumed 24 cans of lager and he says his memory of that night is not clear, but he told police that he woke up next to an unresponsive sophie moss, he got dressed and sat in his carfor15 sophie moss, he got dressed and sat in his carfor 15 minutes and then he drove to the local police station. a5 he drove to the local police station. as part of his defence, the court heard that the couple had engaged in sex before, and that during the six, sophie moss had encouraged him to put pressure on her neck previously. there was considerable concern from women's rights campaigners, from herfamily from that use of the so—called rough sex defence. the sentence of four years and eight months was refers to the attorney general and the attorney general upheld that and suggested that the sentence was unduly lenient but within the last half—hour we have heard from the high court that will not be upheld and at that sentence will not be increased. this is significant for sophie moss's family and this has
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been a devastating time for them. they always say sophie is a victim of this and was a vulnerable person who was taking advantage of so difficult for them. and also difficult for them. and also difficult for them. and also difficult for campaigners who say that this rough sex defence needs to be addressed and needs to be an examination about how that can be used in court, particularly since changes to the domestic abuse act in july last year were supposed to try and iron that out, but that news today from the high court for the of sam after the death of sophie moss in this year will not be re—examined and will not be extended. britney spears could regain control of her personal life and finances later when a judge in los angeles hears arguments to end the complex legal arrangement she has been under since 2008. on social media the singer has said she's been praying as she prepares for the crucial court hearing which could bring the termination of her conservatorship. our us correspondent sophie long reports.
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free britney now. he has since asked the court for an immediate and unconditional end to the arrangement which gave him control over her life saying he will hand over all related documents because he has nothing to hide. there are many who disagree with that and a calling for a full investigation and an end to the system they say is corrupt. i think nothina system they say is corrupt. i think nothing short _ system they say is corrupt. i think nothing short of— system they say is corrupt. i think nothing short of a _ system they say is corrupt. i think nothing short of a full— nothing short of a full congressional hearing where we break it down step—by—step and interrogate the attorneys that were present. i think that will give us a great deal of insight as to what is going wrong, what went wrong for britney, but what is going wrong for other people facing conservatorship as well. : :, , :, :, well. after 13 years of what the international _ well. after 13 years of what the
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international superstar - well. after 13 years of what the international superstar called i well. after 13 years of what the international superstar called a toxic, abusive arrangement, her voice has finally been heard. crucial, notjust for her, but for many others trapped in the conservatorship system who could never even hope to be handed a microphone. i never even hope to be handed a microphone-— microphone. i think it's critically im ortant microphone. i think it's critically important because _ microphone. i think it's critically i important because conservatorship is a rule _ important because conservatorship is a rule that— important because conservatorship is a rule that takes away a voice, it happens — a rule that takes away a voice, it happens that britney was able to retain— happens that britney was able to retain some voice because of her celebrity— retain some voice because of her celebrity and she was raising it, but for— celebrity and she was raising it, but for all— celebrity and she was raising it, but for all the others, they have no avenue, _ but for all the others, they have no avenue, they can't testify or pay people _ avenue, they can't testify or pay people and they can't even choose whom _ people and they can't even choose whom to _ people and they can't even choose whom to meet with if there are conservatory objects. there is no vehicle _ conservatory objects. there is no vehicle for— conservatory objects. there is no vehicle for them. the conservatory objects. there is no vehicle for them.— conservatory objects. there is no vehicle for them. the hope is there will be now- _ vehicle for them. the hope is there will be now. and _ vehicle for them. the hope is there will be now. and the _ vehicle for them. the hope is there will be now. and the result - vehicle for them. the hope is there will be now. and the result of i vehicle for them. the hope is there will be now. and the result of this. will be now. and the result of this hearing that could finally definitively free britney could also lead to betterjustice for all those who have had theirfreedom curtailed. britney says she has never prayed more. sophie lunn, bbc
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news, los angeles. california has been besieged by fire this year. nearly 2.5 million acres had burned in the us state by early november, nearly double the average over the past five years. the fires are burning bigger and hotter than ever, say firefighters, and it has been taking a terrible toll on both wildlife and human communities. our climate editor, justin rowlatt, has been to the wreckage of a gold—rush era town that was burnt to the ground in september by this year's biggest fire. here's his report from california. i want to come home to the day before the fire.— i want to come home to the day before the fire. this was supposed to be nicole _ before the fire. this was supposed to be nicole and _ before the fire. this was supposed to be nicole and her— before the fire. this was supposed to be nicole and her husband i before the fire. this was supposed to be nicole and her husband paul| to be nicole and her husband paul forever home. it to be nicole and her husband paul forever home.— to be nicole and her husband paul forever home. it took all the colour out of my life- _ forever home. it took all the colour out of my life. everything _ forever home. it took all the colour out of my life. everything is - out of my life. everything is a shade of grey. he
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out of my life. everything is a shade of grey-— out of my life. everything is a shadeofure. , :, : . shade of grey. he years of climate induced droughts _ shade of grey. he years of climate induced droughts have _ shade of grey. he years of climate induced droughts have left - induced droughts have left vegetation tinder dry and add in a policy of suppressing for fires which are deadwood to build up and the fires are now faster and hotter than ever before. in august the 4th, nicole got a text from the sheriff saying everybody in town was in imminent danger. mr; saying everybody in town was in imminent danger.— saying everybody in town was in imminent danger. my friend said it's cominu and imminent danger. my friend said it's coming and it's _ imminent danger. my friend said it's coming and it'sjust _ imminent danger. my friend said it's coming and it'sjust running - imminent danger. my friend said it's coming and it'sjust running down i coming and it'sjust running down the road towards you so to get out now. we grabbed the dogs and we grabbed our suitcases and we got in the truck and we left. fire consumed the truck and we left. fire consumed the entire town _ the truck and we left. fire consumed the entire town ended _ the truck and we left. fire consumed the entire town ended just _ the truck and we left. fire consumed the entire town ended just two i the entire town ended just two hours. the entire town ended 'ust two hours. ~ :, the entire town ended 'ust two hours. ~ . :, , , the entire town ended 'ust two hours. . . . , , , hours. what we are seeing is this chance in hours. what we are seeing is this change in almost _ hours. what we are seeing is this change in almost the _ hours. what we are seeing is this change in almost the fire - change in almost the fire regime type were — change in almost the fire regime type were these forests are burning hotter, _ type were these forests are burning hotter, more severe and at greater areas _ hotter, more severe and at greater areas and — hotter, more severe and at greater areas and proportions. and hotter, more severe and at greater areas and proportions.— areas and proportions. and of the miahtiest areas and proportions. and of the mightiest trees _ areas and proportions. and of the mightiest trees are _ areas and proportions. and of the mightiest trees are burning i areas and proportions. and of the mightiest trees are burning also, | mightiest trees are burning also, the world's last remaining giant
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sequoias are under threat. largest individual organism _ sequoias are under threat. largest individual organism in _ sequoias are under threat. largest individual organism in the - sequoias are under threat. largest individual organism in the world. l individual organism in the world. they— individual organism in the world. they are — individual organism in the world. they are amazing, _ individual organism in the world. they are amazing, they - individual organism in the world. i they are amazing, they sequester gigatons — they are amazing, they sequester gigatons of— they are amazing, they sequester gigatons of carbon _ they are amazing, they sequester gigatons of carbon every- they are amazing, they sequester gigatons of carbon every year. - they are amazing, they sequester�* gigatons of carbon every year. let me t gigatons of carbon every year. me try and give you an idea of gigatons of carbon every year.- me try and give you an idea ofjust how enormous this tree is. these trees are ancient, up to 3000 years old, but there are just 70 groves left, all in this mountain range. look at that, 31 metres.- left, all in this mountain range. look at that, 31 metres. wow. they are vulnerable _ look at that, 31 metres. wow. they are vulnerable but _ look at that, 31 metres. wow. they are vulnerable but they _ look at that, 31 metres. wow. they are vulnerable but they are - look at that, 31 metres. wow. they are vulnerable but they are also - are vulnerable but they are also very resilient _ are vulnerable but they are also very resilient. they— are vulnerable but they are also very resilient. they are - are vulnerable but they are also very resilient. they are picky, . are vulnerable but they are also i very resilient. they are picky, they are the _ very resilient. they are picky, they are the goldilocks _ very resilient. they are picky, they are the goldilocks of— very resilient. they are picky, they are the goldilocks of the _ very resilient. they are picky, they are the goldilocks of the forest, i are the goldilocks of the forest, but they— are the goldilocks of the forest, but they survived _ are the goldilocks of the forest, but they survived a _ are the goldilocks of the forest, but they survived a fire, - but they survived a fire, they survive — but they survived a fire, they survive drought, _ but they survived a fire, they survive drought, they- but they survived a fire, they survive drought, they lived . but they survived a fire, they. survive drought, they lived for thousands _ survive drought, they lived for thousands of— survive drought, they lived for thousands of years. _ survive drought, they lived for thousands of years. the - survive drought, they lived for thousands of years. the flames came within a quarter _ thousands of years. the flames came within a quarter of _ thousands of years. the flames came within a quarter of a _ thousands of years. the flames came within a quarter of a mile _ thousands of years. the flames came within a quarter of a mile of - thousands of years. the flames came within a quarter of a mile of the - within a quarter of a mile of the biggest tree, others weren't so lucky. where the firstjournalist biggest tree, others weren't so lucky. where the first journalist to have been invited into the sequoia grove since fire ripped through here
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in september. some trees have been totally incinerated. this in september. some trees have been totally incinerated.— totally incinerated. this is terrible- _ totally incinerated. this is terrible. this _ totally incinerated. this is terrible. this is _ totally incinerated. this is terrible. this is the - totally incinerated. this is terrible. this is the worst| totally incinerated. this is - terrible. this is the worst thing i have _ terrible. this is the worst thing i have seen— terrible. this is the worst thing i have seen all_ terrible. this is the worst thing i have seen all year. _ terrible. this is the worst thing i have seen all year. before - terrible. this is the worst thing i have seen all year. before 2015, terrible. this is the worst thing i. have seen all year. before 2015, no one saw _ have seen all year. before 2015, no one saw a _ have seen all year. before 2015, no one saw a sequoia _ have seen all year. before 2015, no one saw a sequoia that _ have seen all year. before 2015, no one saw a sequoia that looked - have seen all year. before 2015, no one saw a sequoia that looked like i one saw a sequoia that looked like this _ one saw a sequoia that looked like this it _ one saw a sequoia that looked like this it is _ one saw a sequoia that looked like this. it is emotionally— this. it is emotionally heartbreaking, - this. it is emotionally heartbreaking, you i this. it is emotionally- heartbreaking, you know. you this. it is emotionally— heartbreaking, you know. you never saw a _ heartbreaking, you know. you never saw a tree _ heartbreaking, you know. you never saw a tree torched _ heartbreaking, you know. you never saw a tree torched like _ heartbreaking, you know. you never saw a tree torched like this - heartbreaking, you know. you never saw a tree torched like this becomel saw a tree torched like this become a candle _ saw a tree torched like this become a candle and — saw a tree torched like this become a candle and burn _ saw a tree torched like this become a candle and burn up _ saw a tree torched like this become a candle and burn up in _ saw a tree torched like this become a candle and burn up in this- saw a tree torched like this become a candle and burn up in this way- a candle and burn up in this way before _ a candle and burn up in this way before climate _ a candle and burn up in this way before climate change - a candle and burn up in this way before climate change and - a candle and burn up in this way before climate change and fire i before climate change and fire soppression _ before climate change and fire suppression. there _ before climate change and fire suppression. there is - before climate change and fire suppression. there is nothingl before climate change and fire | suppression. there is nothing i before climate change and fire - suppression. there is nothing i can do about— suppression. there is nothing i can do about these _ suppression. there is nothing i can do about these trees. _ suppression. there is nothing i can do about these trees. they - suppression. there is nothing i can do about these trees. they are - suppression. there is nothing i can. do about these trees. they are gone and we _ do about these trees. they are gone and we witi— do about these trees. they are gone and we will plant _ do about these trees. they are gone and we will plant new— do about these trees. they are gone and we will plant new ones - do about these trees. they are gone and we will plant new ones but - do about these trees. they are gone and we will plant new ones but it - and we will plant new ones but it takes _ and we will plant new ones but it takes a _ and we will plant new ones but it takes a thousand _ and we will plant new ones but it takes a thousand years. - and we will plant new ones but it takes a thousand years. find - and we will plant new ones but it takes a thousand years.- takes a thousand years. and you won't see _ takes a thousand years. and you won't see this _ takes a thousand years. and you won't see this for _ takes a thousand years. and you won't see this for hundreds. - takes a thousand years. and you won't see this for hundreds. no, the will won't see this for hundreds. no, they will not _ won't see this for hundreds. no, they will not be _ won't see this for hundreds. no, they will not be this _ won't see this for hundreds. no, they will not be this for a long, tong _ they will not be this for a long, tong time _ they will not be this for a long, long time-— they will not be this for a long, lona time. �* , �* ., , long time. but it isn't too late she sa s. not long time. but it isn't too late she says not yet- _ long time. but it isn't too late she says. not yet. climate _ long time. but it isn't too late she says. not yet. climate change - long time. but it isn't too late she says. not yet. climate change is l says. not yet. climate change is here now and — says. not yet. climate change is here now and it _ says. not yet. climate change is here now and it is _ says. not yet. climate change is here now and it is killing - says. not yet. climate change is here now and it is killing things | here now and it is killing things that we — here now and it is killing things that we care _ here now and it is killing things that we care about _ here now and it is killing things that we care about that - here now and it is killing things that we care about that shouldl here now and it is killing things i that we care about that should not be dyind — that we care about that should not be dyind and _ that we care about that should not be dyind and it _ that we care about that should not be dying. and it is _ that we care about that should not be dying. and it is also _ that we care about that should not be dying. and it is also telling - that we care about that should not be dying. and it is also telling us i be dying. and it is also telling us that we _ be dying. and it is also telling us that we need _ be dying. and it is also telling us that we need to _ be dying. and it is also telling us that we need to act _ be dying. and it is also telling us that we need to act on _ be dying. and it is also telling us that we need to act on climate . that we need to act on climate change — that we need to act on climate change now— that we need to act on climate change now and _ that we need to act on climate change now and every- that we need to act on climate change now and every little i that we need to act on climate j change now and every little bit
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counts — change now and every little bit counts. , , ., counts. there is 'ust nothing left. and despite — counts. there is 'ust nothing left. and despite her— counts. there isjust nothing left. and despite her loss, _ counts. there isjust nothing left. and despite her loss, nicole - counts. there isjust nothing left. i and despite her loss, nicole believe something good could rise from the ashes of her community. this something good could rise from the ashes of her community.— ashes of her community. this could actually be — ashes of her community. this could actually be a _ ashes of her community. this could actually be a lighthouse _ ashes of her community. this could actually be a lighthouse communityj actually be a lighthouse community of sustainability and climate adaptation and how we can live in our new normal because a big fires are now the new normal.- are now the new normal. bringing climate change _ are now the new normal. bringing climate change under _ are now the new normal. bringing climate change under control- are now the new normal. bringing climate change under control is i are now the new normal. bringing i climate change under control is what the conference in glasgow is all about. the lesson from california is that the world needs more than just long—term promises from governments, it needs practical action now. just rowlett, bbc news, the sierra nevada mountains. it has been a fairly grey and breezy picture of therefore many of us. we have had outbreaks of rain already today and a little bit more rain before the day is out. this is a picture in cumbria is that a lot of cloud around but breezy conditions
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there as well. through the rest of there as well. through the rest of the afternoon we will be seeing some dry interludes and the weather but some spots of rain at times and it is feeling mild and breezy for the rest of the day. an improving picture later on, we have this pressure with us and it is eclairs to the east we will see the rain becoming light and patchy were still some lingering for parts of south—west scotland and northern ingot and in the midlands as well and the gusts of wind at 40—45 mph in exposed coasts and hills and in the west on the english channel as well. 6pm this evening we are seeing temperatures between nine and 13 degrees so it is mild as we head in to the evening but with cloud and splashes of light and patchy rain and that will become drizzly as we had to do tonight. clear skies developing tonight in parts of scotland and north—west england so temperatures here getting too made single figures but for many other areas we are going to be staying in double figures as we start saturday morning. a little bit gloomy first thing, we have a few splashes of drizzly rain around for east anglia
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and the south—east and it's going to be breezy land the east coast to start the morning but actually, saturday has a lot of dry weather on the cards with the best of sunshine in the central slice of the uk south scotland, north western england and down to the isle of wight but either side of that we are expecting more clout to lingerfor side of that we are expecting more clout to linger for the most of the day with temperatures between ten and 15 degrees, 7 degrees higherfor the average of the time of year. once a low pressure has cleared the rest of the weekend will have high—pressure dominating and that is in the south. there is a weather front —— weather front approaching and on remembrance day we have rain moving in to northern ireland and later in the day with the western isles and northerners also the bulk of the uk be predominantly dry with a lot of cloud yes but there will be some brighter spells in eastern scotland and southern and eastern england as well. temperatures out degree or so down on saturday with 10-14 degree or so down on saturday with 10—14 on sunday. looking next week now and quite a lot of dry and settled weather but it will be mild for the time of year and we will see
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some rain arriving in the north around about mid week and onwards. goodbye for now.
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the race to reach a deal on climate change — crucial talks in glasgow enter theirfinal hours. there is a draft agreement calling on governments to speed up plans on cut emissions — and the pressure is on to do a deal that will cut global warming. if we don't reduce enough in the next ten years, we can't get to 1.5. we didn't get to net zero 2050. everybody here understands those stakes, so, we have to get there. the wildfires, blamed on climate change, that raged this summer in california. we have a special report from one town that was engulfed in flames burned to the ground. we'll bring you the latest from glasgow where it's the closing stage of the negotiations. also this lunchtime...
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a new record for the number of migrants crossing the english

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