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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 11, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines... the race to reach a deal — delegates enter the last 48 hours of the cop26 summit, to try to tackle climate change. the world is watching us, and they are willing us to work together and reach consensus. and we know that we cannot afford to fail them. the nhs under stress — paramedics tell the bbc lives are at risk because of growing waits for ambulances. we'll be speaking to the vice president of the college of paramedics, in 15 minutes' time. white mcmorris scandalise club ceo becomes the latest to be signed. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe says his meeting with a foreign office minister
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was "depressing"and left him stuck in the "same status quo". richard ratcliffe says his hunger strike outside the foreign office will continue. communities across the uk come together for armistice day — a year after commemorations were disrupted by the pandemic. the cop26 climate change summit in glasgow has entered its last 48 hours — with countries being urged to step up their efforts and reach a meaningfulfinal deal. just a short while ago we heard from the president of the summit, alok sharma, who said ministers and negotiators are "rolling up their sleeves" and working hard to find solutions to some of the most intractable issues. let's cross now to glasgow and my colleague christian fraser.
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warm welcome back where delegates at cap 26 summit are hamming away at a final agreement that needs to be signed off by nearly 200 countries. the summit officially ends on friday, and in the last hour, the president of cap 26 says there is an awful lot more work to be done. —— on. negotiations are continuing to tomorrow and possibly into the beacon delegates try to find compromise on some of the most contentious issues that are outstanding. let's take a look at some of the key areas that are still in brackets. i say brackets, i mean still to be negotiated. the first is finance. many to help reduce emissions help countries adapt to climate change. that could mean for instance, more solar panels in certain countries. it could mean moving away from coal into other technologies. it could mean flood to sense systems. there will be a battle overlap. —— over that. the
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wealthy nations pledged to help foreign nations —— poorer nations. and there is within the documents i'm planning to get a lot more than that, maybe $600 billion past 2025. in the third area is article six. that's the rules governing the paris climate agreement. will there be greater transparency? how do we check what other countries are doing? how often do countries update their plans? all of those kinds of rules critically important so that countries feel they have a stake in this and feel it's fair. all that immensely technical and complex, but if you can get some of that detail into the final cover agreement, then that will be seen as a success. let's speak to isabella, the co—chair of the international... she is also the former brazilian environment test. brazil has such an important role to play at the summit. nice to see you. first off, tell us about the international resources panel. me
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tell us about the international resources panel.— tell us about the international resources panel. we are fairly dedicated _ resources panel. we are fairly dedicated to _ resources panel. we are fairly dedicated to managing - resources panel. we are fairly dedicated to managing data . dedicated to managing data resources. how we can manage efficiently at that race race and address global crisis is like biodiversity loss and climate change. 56% of global emissions are greenhouse gas. 9% of the biodiversity loss and 90% of distress. so we need to know how to use better natural resources as a bridge to collect lowball solutions. we are fully dedicated for the scientist panel and bring climate science and by a diverse science to give new scientist. that science and by a diverse science to give new scientist.— give new scientist. that sounds re give new scientist. that sounds pretty complex _ give new scientist. that sounds pretty complex to _ give new scientist. that sounds pretty complex to a _ give new scientist. that sounds pretty complex to a layman - give new scientist. that sounds| pretty complex to a layman like give new scientist. that sounds - pretty complex to a layman like me, but i want to put some context to it, we are stripping out of the world resources three times faster since 1970. and we have only grown
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twice as much. so we are stripping out three to times as fast as we did 50 years ago, and we have only grown twice. so, we need to know how to do it better. so what sort of information do you supply to companies that will help them manage resources better? how companies that will help them manage resources better?— resources better? how to cap this environmental _ resources better? how to cap this environmental impact, _ resources better? how to cap this environmental impact, how- resources better? how to cap this environmental impact, how to - resources better? how to cap this| environmental impact, how to use better at supply chains, to have valid supply change date next supply chains. step—by—step how to have simplicity. we don't have enough resources to deal with the operation as it is, it's impossible. they need to reinvent a way to have economic growth. this means that we need to use our resources more efficiently and to have no waste. this is the clear message, how we are going into the business sector, how we offer a
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scientific knowledge to allow new business models and economic growth and the public sector, how can we regulate better to bring the private sector with a robust framework to go in the right direction. that sector with a robust framework to go in the right direction.— in the right direction. that is ureat, in the right direction. that is great. but — in the right direction. that is great. but as _ in the right direction. that is great, but as a _ in the right direction. that is great, but as a former - in the right direction. that is i great, but as a former brazilian environment minister, people would say, well, let's take a look at brazil, where you are cutting down the rain forest. in record amounts. do you make anything of the plan that president paulsen arrow has set out here? , , �* ., ~ ., , ., out here? during my brazil knows how to tackle deforestation. _ out here? during my brazil knows how to tackle deforestation. in _ out here? during my brazil knows how to tackle deforestation. in a _ out here? during my brazil knows how to tackle deforestation. in a sense - to tackle deforestation. in a sense because brazil's population is around 90%, 90% of brazilian society supports the end of deforestation. not only in the amazon region, but brazil. brazil doesn't need deforestation to have a powerful
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economy. brazil doesn't need deforestation to promote regional development or national development, so that must stay in the past. the?c so that must stay in the past. they si . ned so that must stay in the past. they sinned u- so that must stay in the past. they signed up to _ so that must stay in the past. they signed up to the — so that must stay in the past. they signed up to the other _ so that must stay in the past. they signed up to the other day, brazil, to this agreement to reverse deforestation by 2030. there is $19 billion behind that plan. the very next day brazilian senators came here and said that on the applies to illegal logging, not to illegal logging, and they were already in picking the deal that they had signed the day before. it’s picking the deal that they had signed the day before. it's not in it bolsonaro's _ signed the day before. it's not in it bolsonaro's interest _ signed the day before. it's not in it bolsonaro's interest to - signed the day before. it's not in | it bolsonaro's interest to address the solutions because the proposed plan based on the linear phasing out, that is not the dynamics of deforestation or how to tackle it. my deforestation or how to tackle it. my feeling is that they are here to have a damage control of nh, not necessary to bring robust policy or bring brazil back based on credibility. so we know how to do this. the national players are
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coming, came here to say we want to solve the problems, but unfortunately, i think that bolsonaro, the federal government, don't have an idea on their own mistakes. this is an efficient way to have the rays of the rates on different stations and they exclude all the civil society engagement and participation, and the weakness of institutions that they use to attack deforestation. they have a new midol, this is deforestation. they have a new midol, this i— deforestation. they have a new midol, this i deforestation. they have a new midol,thisi ., ., , midol, this is bolsonaro delivers. i don't believe _ midol, this is bolsonaro delivers. i don't believe this. _ midol, this is bolsonaro delivers. i don't believe this. you _ midol, this is bolsonaro delivers. i don't believe this. you are - midol, this is bolsonaro delivers. i don't believe this. you are the - don't believe this. you are the international resources panel. you send the brazilian government the satellite images of the rain forest thatis satellite images of the rain forest that is being decimated. what sort of reaction do you get when you present that to the president and his staff? we present that to the president and his staff? ~ , , ., his staff? we present two institutions. _ his staff? we present two institutions. they - his staff? we present two institutions. they have i his staff? we present two institutions. they have a l his staff? we present two - institutions. they have a robust satellite systems, one of the best
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science in brazil, but bolsonaro government doesn't believe in science and scientific solutions. they took a decision to put this aside. it's not only the environmental institution, the government is not interested in and tackling deforestation. they are the opportunities, they want to review the model, then review it, but to be efficient. but probably next week, with the rate of deforestation, it will be large, probably, again, they don't have the reduction in deforestation. so my feeling... we are going to document tomorrow, there will be all sorts of bald premises and its command you are telling us that one of the leaders of one of the most important countries in this battle is just paying lip service to an agreement that has just been signed? it’s paying lip service to an agreement that hasjust been signed? that has 'ust been signed? it's easy to sa that hasjust been signed? it's easy to sa that that hasjust been signed? it's easy to say that bolsonaro _ that hasjust been signed? it's easy to say that bolsonaro came - that hasjust been signed? it's easy to say that bolsonaro came here i that hasjust been signed? it's easy to say that bolsonaro came here to| to say that bolsonaro came here to show industry, to cut emissions from the 2005 baselined by 2030. this ambition is the same number that i gave in 2015. it's the same number.
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this is a numerical regimens. review the numbers, it's right, ok, but it's not ambition. for brazil, this is what doesn't make sense. deforestation is something that is illegal in rural brazil, so deforestation is a moral imperative, a legal imperative. ok, to go develop in the climate change agenda means opportunities for developing in brazil. so it doesn't make sense that the governments, that has this disaster in our hands, that they are not listening to science. they have opportunity to really drive ambition agenda based on the mitigation, brazil has other conditions, and what they are doing here is the damage control of nh but public policies, i think we have to wait for the next government so brazil
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will be back. i'm confident. isabella, we have to leave it there. thank you very much indeed. itjust shows you that there is an awful big gap between the long—term rhetoric that we are getting here and the short term action. a tangible action that we need up to and including 2030. in the last hour, the president of cop26 said there is still a lot more work to be done on that final. so let's have a listen. what we have always said is what we want coming out of cop26 is to be able to say with credibility that we have kept 1.5 within beach. you will have kept 1.5 within beach. you will have seen in august the reports that came out, which made clear that a window and keeping 1.5 within beach is closing, it is still possible to get there, and that is why i and others have also talked about the decisive decade. what you will have seenin decisive decade. what you will have seen in the decision so far is setting out how we think parties
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should return and look again at the commitments they have made, ultimately, it is going to be up to parties to come forward with consensus on the cover decisions and indeed the other texts as well. we will be circulating a net around of the draught decisions later on tonight at the end of the night, but i have been very clear. archie young has been very clear, we are urging ambition, and i have held meetings with quite a number of the negotiating groups, and i have been told by groups, individual parties, that they want to see ambition in the outcome of cop26. bile}. that they want to see ambition in the outcome of cop26. alex pointing out at that press _ the outcome of cop26. alex pointing out at that press conference - the outcome of cop26. alex pointing out at that press conference that i out at that press conference that they set the bar very high in their view with the first draught that they put out, but clearly he's got a battle on his hands to keep every thing in there, particularly that that that relates to coal and fossil fuels. he was saying in the press conference there was one country leading a small group of countries who wanted the entire section on medication taken out of the document. so, there will be trench
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warfare over the next few hours to keep dates and that they want to maintain, to embellish an flesh out, other parts that will be so important when the final document is published. plenty administer meetings going on over the next few hours. we will bring you all of the details from glasgow, but for the moment, i will hit you back to the studio. christian, thank you very much. patients across the uk are facing unacceptably long waits for amublances, which is putting lives at risk — that's according to the college of paramedics. health concerns that went untreated in the pandemic, as well people requiring care for covid, are leading to more people needing urgent help as the nhs faces increasing winter pressures. the latest nhs figures show the average response time in england for the most serious incidents was nine minutes and 20 seconds — the longest since current records began in 2017. the average ambulance wait for people having heart attacks or strokes was more than 50 minutes, almost three times the target time of 18 minutes. but in some cases, people are waiting hours for help to arrive. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports.
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across the length and the breadth of the uk, ambulances are queueing, unable to hand over the sick and injured patients they have on board because hospitals have no room. and ambulances stuck in queues aren't available to attend other emergencies, leaving patients in need waiting at home. i called an ambulance at 11.50 and they said they were going to send help asap. just over two weeks ago, christina found her grandmother, who lives in cheltenham spa, slumped in a chair having a stroke. it was a blue—light emergency. the ambulance should have arrived in 18 minutes, but instead it took nearly six hours. it then queued outside hospital for another three. it was then that an ambulance lady, i asked her how long it was going to take for my nan to get a ct because ijust needed to know whether or not it was a stroke, and she told me,
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"oh, your nan's event happened last night, so we would only administer the medication that would have reversed any permanent damage within that three—hour window." how did you feel? ijust broke down in tears on the floor. whistle—blowers from inside the ambulance services have told the bbc the system is at breaking point. this 999 call handler said even patients whose hearts have stopped are facing delays. there was a call for a cardiac arrest, where the nearest available crew was 50 minutes away and this guy was in arrest, and for every minute they say 10% of your life expectancy will decrease. this is life threatening and we just don't have the crews to respond like we should do. and have you got the pain in the chest at the moment? all 1a ambulance services in the uk have escalated to the highest level of alert and some have even gone beyond, like here at south central, which recently declared a critical
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incident when managers said the service had become unsafe. stuart, a paramedic, was working that night. i had a conversation with the control room in the early hours and they said how manyjobs were outstanding, how many incidents were outstanding, and i was like, "oh, my god." you just sit there thinking you will never ever get rid of that backlog for days. for the last three months, these handlers have answered an additional 21,000 999 calls compared to two years ago. and just before the critical incident was declared here, instead of having an average of 20 patients waiting for an ambulance, they had 120 patients waiting. south central has now asked the government for military support. armed forces have helped ambulance services in other parts of england, wales and scotland, and have supported hospitals in northern ireland.
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governments in all parts of the uk say they are aware of the challenges and are doing their best to support services, but with winter coming, the pressure is likely only to get worse. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. i'm joined by paul younger, vice president of the college of paramedics. thank you very much forjoining us. just explain to us if you wed what it is like at the moment for front line paramedics. 50. it is like at the moment for front line paramedics.— it is like at the moment for front line paramedics. it is like at the moment for front line aramedics. ., , , ., line paramedics. so, our members are re-uortin line paramedics. so, our members are reporting that — line paramedics. so, our members are reporting that they _ line paramedics. so, our members are reporting that they are _ line paramedics. so, our members are reporting that they are seeing, - line paramedics. so, our members are reporting that they are seeing, you i reporting that they are seeing, you know, i timed that they have never seen before. they are waiting for— six hours to hand patients over in the emergency department, and they are unable to get back out onto the road to pick up more patients. thea;r road to pick up more patients. they are used to — road to pick up more patients. they are used to it _ road to pick up more patients. they are used to it being _ road to pick up more patients. they are used to it being busy towards this time of year. how much harder is it this year?— is it this year? well, you know, what we are — is it this year? well, you know, what we are seeing _ is it this year? well, you know, what we are seeing today i is it this year? well, you know, what we are seeing today are l is it this year? well, you know, i
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what we are seeing today are figures released by nhs england for patients heart attacks, strokes and other major illnesses and injuries that it is taking up to three times longer than the 18 minutes that it's targeted. than the 18 minutes that it's tarueted. ~ ., ., , , than the 18 minutes that it's tarueted. ., ., , , ., targeted. what does this mean, then, in terms of the _ targeted. what does this mean, then, in terms of the kind _ targeted. what does this mean, then, in terms of the kind of— targeted. what does this mean, then, in terms of the kind of choices - in terms of the kind of choices and compromises that your members are having to make? for compromises that your members are having to make?— having to make? for our colleagues and control — having to make? for our colleagues and control rooms, _ having to make? for our colleagues and control rooms, they _ having to make? for our colleagues and control rooms, they are - having to make? for our colleagues and control rooms, they are having| and control rooms, they are having to triage these calls and decide which one they should send the next available vehicle to enter paramedics on vehicles, they are often, you know, stuck at the emergency department with patients, unable to hand over, and they are hearing the calls out on the radio for life—threatening calls that they are unable to respond to. in for life-threatening calls that they are unable to respond to. in terms of what they _ are unable to respond to. in terms of what they would _ are unable to respond to. in terms of what they would say, _ are unable to respond to. in terms of what they would say, what i are unable to respond to. in terms of what they would say, what your| of what they would say, what your members would say to patients, then, very, very worrying time. if you think you are a member of your family has had something serious happened to you, like a heart
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attack, what reassurance can you offer? ~ ., , attack, what reassurance can you offer? ~ . , ., . , ., offer? well, as paramedics, we are t in: to offer? well, as paramedics, we are trying to get _ offer? well, as paramedics, we are trying to get to _ offer? well, as paramedics, we are trying to get to these _ offer? well, as paramedics, we are trying to get to these patients i offer? well, as paramedics, we are trying to get to these patients as i trying to get to these patients as quickly as he can. the ambulance services are trying to get as quick as we can. please, don't not ring for an ambulance if you require one. let us try and do ourjobs and try to get there to help you. we are just reporting that to me you know, we are under increased strain at the moment, the whole system is under strain. ., moment, the whole system is under strain. . , ., . , strain. there are instances where eo - le strain. there are instances where people are _ strain. there are instances where people are told — strain. there are instances where people are told if _ strain. there are instances where people are told if you _ strain. there are instances where people are told if you can - strain. there are instances where people are told if you can get i strain. there are instances where people are told if you can get outj people are told if you can get out to hospital, don't wait for an ambulance, but how much risk does not carry with it?— not carry with it? well, that is a risk that as _ not carry with it? well, that is a risk that as paramedics - not carry with it? well, that is a risk that as paramedics we i not carry with it? well, that is a risk that as paramedics we have not carry with it? well, that is a i risk that as paramedics we have to make a decision over. if you come if a patient can make their own way to hospital quicker than what we can get an ambulance to them, then what we will see is the risk is less of them making their own weight and waiting for an ambulance, which could be several hours longer than men taking themselves to hospital. surely that depends on the kind of condition they are coping with. yes. condition they are coping with. yes, that's why we _
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condition they are coping with. yes, that's why we ask _ condition they are coping with. yes that's why we ask patients, still ring 999, let us talk to you, let us talk to the bystanders, make a decision about what is most appropriate, because we want you to be seen appropriately and we don't want anyone's condition to get works, but if we think that it is suitable in the risk is acceptable, we will ask you to make your own weight air. we will ask you to make your own weight air-— weight air. what would enable your members to _ weight air. what would enable your members to do _ weight air. what would enable your members to do their _ weight air. what would enable your members to do theirjobs _ weight air. what would enable your members to do theirjobs to - weight air. what would enable your members to do theirjobs to the i weight air. what would enable your i members to do theirjobs to the best of their ability? it’s of their ability? it's multifactorial i of their ability? it'sl multifactorial what's of their ability? it�*s multifactorial what's going on at the moment across the system. what we are asking for it is we need multiyear funding to allow it, you know, the ambulance services to employee and asked staff and have the staff over a period of time. it takes three years to train a paramedic. at the ambulance service don't have the funding in the next couple of years, they want to be able to employ that staff and have those vehicles and paramedics available. ., ~ those vehicles and paramedics available. ., ,, , ., those vehicles and paramedics available. ., ~' , ., ., those vehicles and paramedics available. ., ., available. thank you for your time. thank you- — well, alongside those concerns about waiting times
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for ambulances across the uk, new nhs figures show hospital waiting lists in england have hit another record high. there were 5.8 million people waiting to start treatment in england at the end of september. that's the highest number since records began in 2007 — and up from 5.7 million people waiting in august. the number of people waiting more than a year for treatment was also up slightly, tojust over 300,000. the latest coronavirus figures have been published in the uk, which show that 42,1108 new cases were recorded today, and a further 195 deaths within 28 days of a positive test. that marks an increase in cases for the fourth day in a row, though cases in the last seven days are down overall. in the past half hour, the chief executive the queen will attend the service on sunday the 14th of november. our royal correspondent sarah
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campbell is with me now: this will be music to many people's he is. she has been forced to withdraw from a few engagements lately. withdraw from a few engagements latel . . ~ ., ., , lately. the background to this, three weeks — lately. the background to this, three weeks ago _ lately. the background to this, three weeks ago that - lately. the background to this, three weeks ago that the i lately. the background to this, | three weeks ago that the queen lately. the background to this, i three weeks ago that the queen had to pull out of that trip to northern ireland, and a couple of days later, it emerged that she spent the night in hospital in central london. she had been taken after preliminary investigations. no further details about what those investigations are for, but certainly doctors had told her that she should rest. so she didn't go to cop26 in person. she didn't go to cop26 in person. she did of course give that address, and has been seen over the last couple of weeks out and about around windsor. she had a meeting break and it was all he said that although she wouldn't be at the festival of remembrance on saturday nights, it was all he said it was her firm intention that she wanted to be at 39 there ends sunday as she always is. we have the official statement from buckingham palace and advisory sing the queen will indeed attend
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the annual remembrance day service on the 14th of november, as in previous years, we become used to this rather than laying the beaten person, she will be on the foreign office balcony. as i say, she's been doing that for about four years. they also say this is mindful of her doctor's advice. she is 95 years old. the queen has decided not to attend the general service on tuesday the 16th of november at the —— the earl of wessex will plan to attend. the main news there, the queen will attend the annual remembrance day service and i'm sure lots of people who will have been concerned about the queen and her condition will be relieved to hear that news. ., condition will be relieved to hear that news-— condition will be relieved to hear that news. ., _ ,,. ., that news. into the bay well. sarah, thank you- — in the past half hour, the chief executive of yorkshire county cricket club, mark arthur, has become the latest senior figure there to resign — in response to the row over racism engulfing the club. let's talk to our sports correspondent, jane dougal. another resignation then, jane.
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remind us of how we got here. yes. remind us of how we got here. yes, another senior— remind us of how we got here. ye: another senior resignation as all from yorkshire county cricket club, and on the week of this racism scandal which was exposed by the former player as he and rafik. and as chief executive officer who has stepped down with immediate effect. —— azeem rafiq. this comes on the day that the england captain and yorkshire playerjoe root said that cricket need to educate and reset. this is the first time that he has spoken about the fair and said that it had fractured the game and touring lives apart. it significantly when asked if he had seen any racism at yorkshirejoe root said not that i can recall, no, but it's clear that things have happened at the club. at the centre of all of this is the farmer yorkshire cricketer, azeem rafiq, who responded on social media saying that he was incredibly hurt thatjoe root said he could not recall ever witnessing racism at yorkshire. he treated "disappointed is not even
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the feeling. incredibly hurt but uncomfortable truths are hard to accept, it seems."joe root uncomfortable truths are hard to accept, it seems." joe root did however call for change and actions, and it seems that that is happening because of this latest resignation. if you remember, this all happened because of her report found that azeem rafiq had been the victim of racial harassment and bullying at rex chart —— yorkshire cricket club, but the club said they would not discipline anyone. last friday, the yorkshire chairman was one of several board members to resign over the club's response to racism experienced by azeem rafiq. but then on monday, the new chair, lord patel, said that azeem rafiq should be praised for his bravery and should never have been there —— put through this racism scandal. on tuesday, they announced that the head coach had been suspended as part of a separate investigation into a tweet that he sent in 2010. azeem rafiq and also senior yorkshire officials will be giving evidence at digital culture media
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sport select committee hearing on the 16th of november. the farmer yorkshire chairman will be questioned by mps along with the chief executive of the former chief executive, mark arthur, so the latest in a long line of resignations at yorkshire cricket club over this racism scandal. jane. club over this racism scandal. jane, thank you very much. the husband of the jailed british iranian woman held in tehran, nazanin zagari ratcliffe says he is "stuck in the same status richard ratcliffe is on day 19 of a hunger strike camping quo" after meeting officials at the foreign office. richard ratcliffe is on day 19 of a hunger strike camping outside the foreign office to protest his wife's continued detention in iran. he said the meeting had been quite depressing and he had not been given much hope for her release. nazanin was arrested during a holiday to the country in 2016. if i'm honest, it's felt like it was perfectly nice, sincere, caring, everyone in the room was carrying, but, you know, we are stuck in the
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same status quo. we are still stuck in the same problems that lead us to the hunger strike. i don't feel they have given a clear enough message to iran that hostage taking is wrong. i don't think there are any consequences to iran at present for its continuing taking hostage of british citizens and using them. there was acknowledgement that she is being held as leverage, no readiness to change course. it are your suggestions, we think about what they will mean, but, yeah, it felt like groundhog day.— felt like groundhog day. richard ratcliff. felt like groundhog day. richard ratcliff- -- _ felt like groundhog day. richard ratcliff. -- so _ felt like groundhog day. richard ratcliff. -- so concerned - felt like groundhog day. richard ratcliff. -- so concerned aboutl felt like groundhog day. richard i ratcliff. -- so concerned about the ratcliff. —— so concerned about the behaviour of mps that they reported it back to the ministry of defence in london. our political correspondent is following the story and joins us now. tell us mark, chris. , , ., , and joins us now. tell us mark, chris. , , ., ., and joins us now. tell us mark, chris. , ., . chris. this is a trip that a bunch of mps back _ chris. this is a trip that a bunch of mps back in _ chris. this is a trip that a bunch of mps back in -- _ chris. this is a trip that a bunch of mps back in -- about - chris. this is a trip that a bunch of mps back in -- about 15 i chris. this is a trip that a bunch of mps back in -- about 15 mps|
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of mps back in —— about 15 mps redoing to gibraltar. this is a kind of regular thing to try to bolster relationships between parliamentarians in the military so that mps understand what the armed forces get up to. they flew out there the other day, these 15 of them, they had two military chaperones, as he say, what then, he was sufficiently concerned about their behaviour, their drinking, that they let their bosses back at the ministry of defence know about it. in addition to that, when witness tells us that these three mps are drinking in the airport lounge, drinking on the plane itself and were drunk when the plane got to gibraltar. so who are we talking back to? a labour mp and two s&p mps. a labourmp back to? a labour mp and two s&p mps. a labour mp charlotte nichols, she was drinking, she returned back to the uk pretty soon after arriving in gibraltar after what is described as a mental health episode. she has posttraumatic stress disorder. she is unhappy medication. the two s&p mps, pretty robust responses from
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the two of them, and indeed from scotland's first minister, nicholas sturgeon this afternoon, suggesting that this is something of a tory smear operation to try and distract attention from all of the questions that have been asked aboutjeffrey cox, the conservative mp. ellen pattison, the former conservative mp, but we do have those two military at cachet is not party political operatives. —— owen paterson plus an additional witness telling us that they were drinking and drinking heavily on that plane. they don't deny drinking, but they do deny being drunk. aha, they don't deny drinking, but they do deny being drunk.— do deny being drunk. a very important — do deny being drunk. a very important distinction. i do deny being drunk. a veryj important distinction. chris, do deny being drunk. a very i important distinction. chris, thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. it's about to turn where, that scene, and indeed in other parts of the uk as well as low pressure is moving in. although, not everyone will see a huge amount of rain out there, even though it will be
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turning windier in many areas. in fact, this evening into night and it's mostly northern ireland across scotland and northwest england. we will see a lion's share of any rain moving in. also this band of rain that move across southern england later in the night. it's a mild night to come, double figure temperatures in some areas. the wind picking up in all areas as well, so a blustery friday to come. low pressure will move right across scotland. this is where we will see the longest spell of rain, but showery rained fire northern ireland, england, for central eastern england, uae see a special rain in the morning and then brightens up for a time with the chance of showers after that. it will be a blustery day committees are average wind speeds. some coasts gusting around 14 mph. as for the temperature, another mild day up to around 15 celsius in southeast england. over that weekend, around 15 celsius in southeast england. overthat weekend, it around 15 celsius in southeast england. over that weekend, it stays mild, with high—pressure building and, it is and calmer.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... the race to reach a deal — delegates enter the last 48 hours of the cop26 summit, to try to tackle climate change. the world is watching us, and they are willing us to work together and reach consensus. and we know that we cannot afford to fail them. the nhs under stress — paramedics tell the bbc lives are at risk because of growing waits for ambulances. more developments in the racism scandal surrounding yorkshire county cricket club, as their ceo mark arthur resigns. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe says his meeting with a foreign office minister was "depressing" and left him stuck in the "same status quo". richard ratcliffe says his hunger strike outside the foreign office will continue. buckingham palace has confirmed the queen elizabeth will attend the
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rumoured stay service at the cenotaph. fw de klerk, the last white president of south africa, and a key figure in the country's transition to democracy, has died at the age of 85. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport center, here's catherine. good evening. yorkshire county cricket club have announced that their chief executive mark arthur has resigned. he's the latest senior figure to leave the club in the wake of claims from four former players that they were victims of racist abuse there. yorkshire say they want to move forward with new leadership. england captainjoe root, who plays for yorkshire as his county side, agrees its time for the club and for cricket to have a rethink: i think the most important thing we have to do that right now is how we move forward as a squad, and how we move forward as a society, and i think what we need to do
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is address what's happened, and find ways of educating more and find ways of moving forward and really looking at areas in which we as a sport and beyond that as well can really look to better society and better the game. at the t20 world cup, pakistan and australia are battling for the chance to take on new zealand in the final. australia won the toss and put pakistan into bat — an incredible innings saw them set a target of 177 to win. australia lost captain aaron finch to the first ball as they set out in reply — they're on 57—2. they need 22 on the last balls. england manager gareth southgate has sent his best wishes to steven gerrard, as he makes the move from rangers to aston villa. the former liverpool captain leaves the scottish champions after three years in charge, having guided them to a first league title in ten years last season.
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he replaces dean smith, who was sacked on sunday after a run of five successive defeats. southgate has been speaking to the media this afternoon and gave his thoughts on the move. stephen has always had fantastic leadership qualities. i was 30 when he came into the england squad, he was a talent but always had great drive. he's had a fabulous start to his managerial career. he leaves one massive football club to join another. and i'm sure it's a challenge that he is looking forward to, it's a great opportunity for him. frank lampard could soon be joining steven gerrard in the premier league. the former chelsea boss is among a number of candidates in talks with norwich about becoming their new manager. the canaries sacked daniel farke last week. england rugby union head coach eddiejones says he's written to emma raducanu to explain comments he made about her over the weekend. jones was accused of being "uninformed and sexist" after using the us open champion
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as an example when warning his players about dealing with distractions. he's said his words were not meant as criticism and have been taken out of context. it is just an example of what can happen. and i don't know whether she was distracted or not because i haven't followed tennis since. i know it's difficult for those players. it's really difficult and they have to be aware of that. and i'm certainly aware of it with this group of young players coming through that we want to make sure we minimise the distractions. sure, we want them to enjoy what they can get, that's very important. but at the same time, they've got to be able to focus 100% on the sport. i don't have any misgivings about what i said. i'm disappointed it was taken out of context, and i to be disappointed if emma was upset by it. dan evans has been knocked out of the stockholm open at the quarterfinal stage by francis tiafoe.
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evans started the match in brilliant form, taking first set 6—1 — but that was a good as it got for the bristish number two and tiafoe came roaring back, and won the next two. andy murray will be in action later at the event against america's tommy paul. u nfortu nately unfortunately he is 3—1 down in the first set. we'll have more for you in sportsday at 6.30pm. the pace of the uk's economic recovery slowed in the three months to september, according to new figures from the office for national statistics. gdp grew by i.3%, down from 5.5% in the previous three months, with supply issues contributing to slower growth. ramzan karmali reports. are the wheels of the economy slowing down? the latest official data shows the economy is still growing, but at a much more measured pace than earlier in the year. at this somerset toiletry company, the boss was confident enough to invest hundreds of thousands
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of pounds on a new soap—making machine, as he's seen a big upturn in business, but he is still wary of some of the challenges ahead. i think we all expect some tailing off because the price of containers and shipping has gone through the roof, so we are expecting a drop off because the consumer will have to get used on the new retail prices that will start hitting the high street. some have already hit, some won't be hitting until the beginning of next year. like many businesses, he's also struggling to hire people as the economy has opened up, but the chancellor insists these are issues being faced all across the world. i think what you are seeing is an economy that is continuing to grow and that is a good thing. we are on the right path but there are global challenges ahead and that's why the budget set out a plan to build a stronger economy with support for working families at its heart. the economy is still growing, but that rebound between july and september is a lot less than many had predicted. if you look at this chart,
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it shows the losses we made during the pandemic still haven't been caught up. the service sector has now almost made up almost all of its losses, a sign the vaccine roll—out helped with the reopening, but the challenge for the government and other policymakers now is how to deal with an environment where taxes and energy bills are on the rise. last week the bank of england decided not to raise interest rates, but many economists expect them to go up from their historic lows before the end of the year. the risk is, obviously, if the bank of england start raising rates too quickly and that could depress demand quite significantly at a time when the economy is still vulnerable. the reason those rates may have to go up is to help combat the threat rising prices, so even though consumer spending rose as we emerged from lockdown, that demand may soften as businesses start to face much higher costs. ramzan karmali, bbc news.
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buckingham palace has confirmed queen elizabeth will attend the remembrance day... following medical checks last month. it comes as communities around the uk came together earlier to memory armistice day after last yea r�*s together earlier to memory armistice day after last year's ceremonies were disrupted by the pandemic. the two minute silence was held to mark the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month when fighting ceased in iith month when fighting ceased in the first world war. the duchess of cornwall placed a cross amongst poppies outside west dash was mr allie as people remembered those who died in the conflict. sarah campbell reports. on the 11th hour of the 11th month in 1918, the guns of the first world war fell silent.
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more than a century later the nation paused to remember those who sacrificed so much in service to their country.
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today we remember places with names synonymous with places of conflict... last year the pandemic prevented many from coming together to remember. not so this year. so many lost lives to honour, given special mention at the cenotaph today, walter tull, britton�*s first black officer in the british army who died in 1918, invited to lay a wreath on his behalf his great—nephew. this is a fantastic event to come to the point where i'm able to lay a wreath on behalf of my grand uncle at the cenotaph, it's a great honour and a great honour to him. young and old, ensuring sacrifices will never be forgotten. sarah campbell, bbc news.
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rising sea levels are one of the most significant consequences of climate change. now, a study of a restored coastal marsh in scotland has shown the issue could have some benefits if managed correctly. our science correspondent victoria gill reports. digging into a changing environment. in an area that's surrounded by scotland's coal mining past and its industrial present, there's a transformation happening beneath our feet. just three years ago, this area was re—engineered to bring the coastal wetland back to its natural state. you breach the coastal defences and let the water back in. and at that point, we kind ofjust step back and let nature do its thing. and we're really seeing the wildlife respond. as well as a diverse wetland habitat this marsh has become a natural tool in our fight to reduce emissions of greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. marshland plants absorb one of those key planet warming gases, carbon dioxide, which then becomes buried in the mud. yay!
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that's the big one. this is some of the most organic rich soils we find in the uk compared to agricultural land, forestry land. the scientists studying this site say it's revealing a way to work with nature to manage one of the inevitable impacts of climate change — sea level rise. the threats of sea level rise are very serious. and i think where there are positive opportunities, particularly for nature, that we should be thinking about sea level rise as an opportunity for coastal wetland habitat creation. we can see a source of greenhouse gas emissions from here, from the fossil fuel industry. there's grangemouth refineryjust in the distance and we still need to slash emissions. but making space for natural stores of carbon, places like this, that suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere will help us rebalance that. allowing the sea to reclaim this stretch of land has provided a glimpse of how we can help nature
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to help us tackle the climate crisis. victoria gill, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... the race to reach a deal — delegates enter the last 48 hours of the cop26 summit, to try to tackle climate change. the nhs under stress — paramedics in the uk tell the bbc lives are at risk because of growing waits for ambulances. more developments in the racism scandal surrounding yorkshire county cricket club, as their ceo mark arthur resigns. fw de klerk, the last president of apartheid south africa and a key figure in the country's transition to a multi—racial democracy, has died. he was 85. caroline hawley looks back at his life. today we have closed the book on apartheid, and that chapter is finally closed.
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the force of history would have ended white supremacy in south africa eventually. but without fw de klerk the transformation to non—racial democracy might have been more painful. he saw that his country had to change and he delivered. mr de klerk knew very well what lay behind the chaos and violence in black townships, provoked by rigid racial segregation. for years he helped entrench apartheid, as a minister in south africa's white minority governments. then he became president in 1989, replacing pw botha, the last apartheid dinosaur, and president de klerk�*s approach could not have been more different. the prohibition of the african national congress, the pan africanist congress, the south african communist party and a number of subsidiary organisations is being rescinded. within a year, nelson mandela
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finally walked to freedom. fw de klerk had ordered his release and unbanned the african national congress, acts he knew would number his own days in power. but talks to end white minority rule opened old wounds in black politics. there was appalling township violence between the anc and its zulu rivals. violence actively fermented by the white security apparatus. and white extremists were up in arms at the prospect of a black government. de klerk sensed the threat and outmanoeuvred them by offering a whites—only referendum in 1992. he craved backing and he won it. now change was unstoppable. the world acknowledged it. in 1993, fw de klerk wasjointly awarded the nobel peace prize, along with the man who would replace him as president. although nelson mandela
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was sometimes infuriated by fw de klerk, he called him "a man of integrity". president mandela's inauguration in 1994 was partly a tribute to mr de klerk�*s vision. the country's last white president remained loyal to his afrikaner heritage. some of his former colleagues complained he'd been opportunistic, merely seizing a moment. but seize it he did. never again on one inch of the soil of the republic of south africa will there ever be racial discrimination again. and so, for white south africans, fw de klerk can stand tall in history. david steward is chairman of the fw de klerk foundation, and his former chief of staff. thank you very much forjoining us. it can be a very bruising world, politics. what was mr de klerk like
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behind—the—scenes, one to he was a man of great conviction succulent once he decided something was wrong, he was absolutely _ once he decided something was wrong, he was absolutely committed _ once he decided something was wrong, he was absolutely committed to - he was absolutely committed to rectifying the problem. he had great self—confidence, he listened to advice, which was unusual for many presidents, and he was a modest man. he didn't go for the pomp and ceremony of office. a nice guy, unusual in terms of one's expectations of politicians at some point he had been a firm believer in our part tied, though. what changed his mind was white did hejust our part tied, though. what changed his mind was white did he just see things had changed and that writing was on the wall was he grew up as a staunch afrikaner nationalist. he believed his people had a right to
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national self—determination. and that was the mevlja with which he grew up. but in the 805, it became very clear to him and other leaders that it would not be possible for them to maintain a right to national self—determination in a country where they were a diminishing minority. so he took the whole process of reform that his predecessor had started and said, no, we can't reform our apartheid, we must have transformation. in his great contribution was to realise that there would never again be such a good opportunity to start negotiations than the beginning of 1990, just after the fall of the berlin wall. and he then led the process, and he stuck to it, there
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were many, many crises, there was violence from all sides — but, despite all that, after four years, december 1993, we emerged with our first nonracial constitutional democracy, interim constitution, and that opened the way to our first fully representative elections on 27 april, 1994, and to the inauguration of a government which represented all the people of south africa. that was his journey. all the people of south africa. that was hisjourney. find all the people of south africa. that was his journey-— all the people of south africa. that was his journey. was his 'ourney. and to those of us who was his journey. and to those of us who lived through _ was his journey. and to those of us who lived through it, _ was his journey. and to those of us who lived through it, we _ was his journey. and to those of us who lived through it, we can - who lived through it, we can hardly believe what we were witnessing, it was such a momentous time. but he left a posthumous apology that i believe is on your foundation's website — what does he say in it and why did he feel the need to leave it behind? he why did he feel the need to leave it behind? ., ., , ., , behind? he felt that it was really im ortant behind? he felt that it was really important to _ behind? he felt that it was really important to make _ behind? he felt that it was really important to make it _ behind? he felt that it was really important to make it perfectly i behind? he felt that it was really i important to make it perfectly clear
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to everybody that he deeply regretted the harm, the suffering that was caused to millions of south africans over so many generations by apartheid and by colonialism. he wanted to make that absolutely clear. so he dedicated his presidency to abolishing apartheid. apologies are easy, words are easy — but what you really have to do if something is wrong is to change it, and he changed it dramatically and radically, and for the better. basic! radically, and for the better. david stewart, thank _ radically, and for the better. david stewart, thank you _ radically, and for the better. david stewart, thank you very _ radically, and for the better. david stewart, thank you very much - radically, and for the better. david stewart, thank you very much for joining us here on bbc news. sirjohn major has issued a statement on fw de klerk, saying that he was a man who realised apartheid was wrong and work to
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bring it to an end. he faced down hostility in his own party. he worked with mr mandela to fully dismantle him to like her apartheid, and he deserves to be rendered as a brave politician who helped change the future of his country for the better. attribute therefrom sirjohn major. a student from lancashire has been found guilty of murdering his step—grandmother three years after an inquest ruled it had been an accident. preston crown court heard that 21—year—old tiernan darnton confessed to the killing during a game of truth or dare with his friends. our north of england correspondent fiona trott gave us this update a little earlier. for years, it was believed that mary gregory's death was accidental. there was a fire at her home in lancashire in 2018. she was found crouched under a table in her bungalow and taken to hospital, and she died four days later. there was an investigation at the time, and the fire service believed that the fire was caused by a discarded cigarette.
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an inquest ruled that the death was accidental. but then later, tiernan darnton, her step—grandson who was 17 at the time, was playing a game of truth or dare with his friends, and he told them he had a dark secret. he said, "i have a secret i haven't told anyone. i may have killed someone." and they pressed him on this, and he said that he started the fire because he didn't want his stepgrandmother to suffer any longer from dementia. now, after that, the court also heard that he told a counsellor a year later that he also started the fire. but during this trial at preston crown court, tiernan darnton's lawyer said he made the confession to his friends because it was a misguided attempt to impress them, and he said the omission he made to the council was pure fiction. we also heard that tiernan darnton's stepfather, mrs gregory's own son,
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said the student had been suffering from depression for a number of years and was plagued by intrusive and disturbing thoughts. but today, the jury found him guilty of murder. he is due to be sentenced on friday. a new species of dinosaur with an unusually large nose has been discovered by a retired doctor. the remains of the brighstoneus simmondsi were found on the isle of wight in 1978. they'd been in storage until drjeremy lockwood decided to reconstruct the skull of the animal, and realised the bones belonged to an undiscovered species. jeremy is now a phd student at the natural history museum and the university of portsmouth and he told me what happened. well, yes, it was about a year ago. so i was going through — i had this thought that maybe there was more diversity, there was more species
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of the type of dinosaur so that we were looking at which, was a plant—eating dinosaur. and so i decided to go through all the bones, and there were massive collections in the natural history museum, and also the dinosaur museum on the isle of wight, which had been gathered over the last 200 years. so it was a very tedious business, really, of going through boxes of bones and measuring them, and looking at them and learning the anatomy. and, during lockdown last year — i suspect it was one of the highlights of my year last year — i was just altering a nasal bone and put it into a position. and i noticed there was a definite bulbous nose on this dinosaur, which was completely different from the two main species that we knew existed on the island. so, we started looking at the skeleton in much more detail, and we found it had a lot more teeth than the other two main types of dinosaur that we found.
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and, as we started looking in more detail at the skeleton, we found quite a few differences where, yes, it definitely proved this was a new species. i suspect when it was excavated, it was lying next to a huge meat—eating dinosaur. i think that was one of the great discoveries of its day back in 1978, so i think it was a bit overshadowed, and it was put in a box and thought to be just another iguanodon, but it's actually turned out to be something quite different. in a moment, the bbc news at 6pm with sophie raworth. but first, it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. the cloud has been rolling in today, low pressure is approaching from the west, it's been another mild day out there, the wind is freshening as well. here's the area of low
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pressure, moving right across the uk as we go through tonight and tomorrow, clearing into the weekend, we will look at the weekend weather forecast in a moment. but this evening, epics of rain in northern ireland, scotland, into northern parts of england and west of the power lines, many of the areas are dry. we will see this then the area of rain working its way through wales into the middle and some parts of southern england later in the night. some temperatures holding into double figures, turning breezy right across the uk. so tomorrow, here's the centre of the low pressure. in scotland, there'll be a speu pressure. in scotland, there'll be a spell of rain moving through, shall remain in northern ireland and northern england, wales. for the midlands in southern england, a splash of rain in the morning but it brightens up for a time before the chance of showers later. all areas will be windier but we will see costs around 40—50 mph in some spots here, antipater is quite widely into double figures, around 14—15 c. ——
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temperatures quite widely into double figures. they are all starting to move to the south and east as the low pressure system ends up east as the low pressure system ends up in the north sea. still quite breezy along the north sea coasts and still some showers lingering in the first part of saturday, it will be another mild night. much cooler in scotland where they could be a few mist and fog patches to begin on saturday. high—pressure building and the weekend, meaning drier and calmer conditions are on the way. a lot of cloud around on saturday, the chance of picking up a shower early on across eastern coastal parts, the breeze continuing to moderate, maybe the odd shower elsewhere. but overall, and a lot of dry weather and cloud, but a few bright and sunny spells breaking through at times. for part two of the weekend on sunday, the weather front approaching the north and western isles, the far north and northwest of mainland scotland picking up the breeze and bring in some outbreaks of rain. again, the chance of a
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shower with cloud for cleaning up, but a few bright and sunny spells around, and temperatures several degrees above average for the time of year, staying milder until at least the start of next week. then there's the forecast for wherever you are this weekend online.
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at six — nhs leaders warn the strain on the health service is unsustainable. almost 6 million people are now waiting for routine hospital treatment in england, and ambulance services are under pressure, with a record number of 999 calls last month. things are already very, very difficult in the health service. it is compromising patient safety. it is compromising quality of service. also tonight... more turmoil at yorkshire cricket club over azeem rafiq's racism allegations. england's joe root speaks out and another boss resigns. today, we have closed the book on apartheid. south africa's former president fw de klerk — the last white man to lead the country — has died at the age of 85.
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