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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 11, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines: two days to reach a deal — delegates enter the last 48 hours of the cop26 summit, to try and tackle climate change. the world is watching us and they are willing us to work together and reach consensus. and we know that we cannot afford to fail them. optimism for a deal rises after last night's surprise agreement between the us and china to work together to tackle global warming. on climate, cooperation is the only way to get this job done. here — nhs under stress — paramedics tell the bbc lives are at risk because of growing waits for ambulances. three mps have been accused
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of "undermining respect for parliament" after they allegedly got drunk on a flight to visit uk forces in gibraltar. fw de klerk, the last white president of south africa, and a key figure in the country's transition to democracy, has died at the age of 85. communities across the uk come together for armistice day, a year after commemorations were disrupted by the pandemic. the cop26 climate change summit in glasgow has entered its last hours — with countries being urged to step up their efforts and reach a meaningfulfinal deal. let's cross now to glasgow
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and my colleague annita mcveigh. welcome back to glasgow. the president of cop26, alok sharma, has told negotiators that the "world is watching" — and that they "cannot fail them" by not securing a climate deal. mr sharma said the latest draft text is a significant step forward, but urged countries to step up their efforts on the penultimate day of talks. we won't get an update on that draft until friday, by the way. it comes as borisjohnson said commitments from china and the us to step up climate action this decade are a boost to negotiations. our global science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. the pace is picking up in glasgow as the climate talks move in to their frantic final stretch and we see if the world can reach an agreement. but there was also a pause for reflection to mark remembrance day.
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the work here, though, goes on. the world is watching us and they are willing us to work together and reach consensus. and we know that we cannot afford to fail them. there have been some signs of hope. a surprise announcement from china's top negotiator on a joint climate declaration with the united states. the united states and china have no shortage of differences, but on climate... on climate, cooperation is the only way to get this job done. so, what is in the china us declaration? the world's two biggest polluters have agreed to move towards using clean energy, they said they would reduce methane, and do more to tackle the issue of deforestation. it's important that two biggest emitters in the world actually agreed to cooperate. it's a good signal. it isa
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it is a good symbolic signal, but it is very weak on the details. several countries have also come together to announce an ambitious initiative, a plan to phase out oil and gas led by costa rica and denmark. more than ten nations, but not the uk, have said they will set a date to end their use. for most countries that are oil and gas producers, this is a huge step. if we mean it serious when we say we want to fulfil the paris agreement, if we want to keep 1.5 alive, then there is no way around phasing out oil and gas in the future. the challenge is getting nearly 200 countries to agree. each comes to the table with different economies, different problems and very different agendas. there's going to be a lot of wrangling over the coming days and sleepless nights for the negotiators trying to thrash out a deal. time is running out. what's at stake is keeping temperatures below 1.5 degrees
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to prevent dangerous climate change. the talks are balanced on a knife edge. rebecca morelle, bbc news, glasgow. this is officially the penultimate day of cop26, supposed to end on friday but it could stretch into the weekend. what are the outstanding issues as we count down the clock. our reality check correspondent, chris morris is here. it is worth remembering the overall aim, one of the big aims of this conference is to keep the 1.5 degrees temperature rise within view. everything is geared towards that target. what is important to remember, while we have had announcements about methane and deforestation, these are basically voluntary, but what is keeping the negotiators up at night is writing the binding rules to put the paris agreement of 2015 into practice but thatis agreement of 2015 into practice but that is an international treaty and
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those rules will be binding on those who sign it and that is why it is important. one of the things they are trying to do is to put more pressure on countries to update emissions, for example, a lot of countries say the paris agreement only means that countries need to review and update their pledges for cutting emissions every five years. one part of one draft of the text says that should happen annually, thatis says that should happen annually, that is what a lot of developing countries are pushing for because if you want to halve global emissions compared to 2010 by the end of this decade, an annual target is going to be much more effective than a five year target, these people argue, so thatis year target, these people argue, so that is one thing which is in the draft at the moment but again, everything is up for grabs until the final document appears. lots of countries final document appears. lots of countrie ~ ., , countries like the developing countries. — countries like the developing countries, they _ countries like the developing countries, they want - countries like the developing countries, they want greater| countries, they want greater accountability, so an annual target, they believe, would give that. as we discussed last week that we have got to follow the money in all of this
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and as we predicted, money is proving to be one of the thorniest issues to sort out. $in proving to be one of the thorniest issues to sort out.— proving to be one of the thorniest issues to sort out. alok sharma said he is concerned _ issues to sort out. alok sharma said he is concerned about _ issues to sort out. alok sharma said he is concerned about how - issues to sort out. alok sharma said he is concerned about how much - issues to sort out. alok sharma said i he is concerned about how much there is still to do on the issue of climate finance, and this is basically about the rich world providing money for poorer countries to adapt to climate change and to then build greener economies in the future. we have spoken about the target of $100 billion per year which was first promised in 2009 and was supposed to be delivered by 2020 but we know that promise has not been met. with the pledges that have taken place during and in the run—up to the summit, we think it might get to the summit, we think it might get to about 96 billion by the end of next year but the 100 billion target probably won't be met until 2023. a lot more is needed. one of the suggestions in the draft at the moment is that the new target should be as high as by 2030, one $.3 trillion per year, and that is again
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what a lot of developing countries are talking about because they say, you are asking us to reorganise our economies incredibly quickly at a time when we are trying to develop and unless that kind of money is put out there and more of it is put on adapting the climate change now, thatis adapting the climate change now, that is going to be very difficult. there is strong language in the draft about putting more money towards adaptation which means dealing with the issues that climate change is already causing to countries which sometimes don't have enough money to deal with them on their own. we enough money to deal with them on their own. ~ . , ., their own. we will look closely at their own. we will look closely at the final wording _ their own. we will look closely at the final wording of— their own. we will look closely at the final wording of any - their own. we will look closely at i the final wording of any subsequent draft before we get to a final document here at cop26. for the moment, thanks forjoining us. i guess, when you talk about something like deforestation, that is probably a more tangible idea when you consider what needs to be done to tackle climate change. talking about climate finance, may be less tangible, but nevertheless absolutely crucial and one of the
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key goals here at cop26 in glasgow. now another report. this is about restored coastal marshes in scotland and the benefits it can bring if they are managed correctly. our science correspondent victoria gill reports. digging into a changing environment. in an area that's surrounded by scotland's coal mining past and its industrial present, there's a transformation happening beneath our feet. just three years ago, this area was re—engineered to bring the coastal wetland back to its natural state. you breach the coastal defences and let the water back in. and at that point, we kind ofjust step back and let nature do its thing. and we're really seeing the wildlife respond. as well as a diverse wetland habitat this marsh has become a natural tool in our fight to reduce emissions of greenhouse gas into the atmosphere.
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marshland plants absorb one of those key planet warming gases, carbon dioxide, which then becomes buried in the mud. yay! that's the big one. this is some of the most organic rich soils we find in the uk compared to agricultural land, forestry land. the scientists studying this site say it's revealing a way to work with nature to manage one of the inevitable impacts of climate change — sea level rise. the threats of sea level rise are very serious. and i think where there are positive opportunities, particularly for nature, that we should be thinking about sea level rise as an opportunity for coastal wetland habitat creation. we can see a source of greenhouse gas emissions from here, from the fossil fuel industry. there's grangemouth refineryjust in the distance and we still need to slash emissions. but making space for natural stores of carbon, places like this, that
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suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere will help us rebalance that. allowing the sea to reclaim this stretch of land has provided a glimpse of how we can help nature to help us tackle the climate crisis. victoria gill, bbc news. i'm joined now by aditya uddhav thackeray, who's the minister of tourism and environment for maharashtra in india. the second most populous state in india. perhaps you could begin, minister, by telling us about the impact of climate change in the state and how you are trying to counteract it? we state and how you are trying to counteract it?— state and how you are trying to counteract it? we are the second laruest counteract it? we are the second largest state _ counteract it? we are the second largest state in _ counteract it? we are the second largest state in terms _ counteract it? we are the second largest state in terms of - counteract it? we are the second i largest state in terms of population and we are the financial powerhouse. mumbai is in your state? and we are the financial powerhouse. mumbai is in yourstate? yes. mumbai is in your state? yes, exactl . mumbai is in your state? yes, exactly- in _ mumbai is in your state? yes, exactly. in the _ mumbai is in your state? yes, exactly. in the past _ mumbai is in your state? yes, exactly. in the past year - mumbai is in your state? yes, exactly. in the past year we i mumbai is in your state? yes, i exactly. in the past year we have had to spend almost $2 billion in terms of compensation for events
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relating to climate change, hailstorms, thunderstorms, unseasonable rainfall, cloudburst, thatis unseasonable rainfall, cloudburst, that is in the last year, but in the last decade we have seen so many regions facing a drought for the first half of the decade, cloudburst and floods, so obviously climate is changing and we are facing the brunt of it. 51% urbanised, 43 cities with a huge population but we also have a mix of the rural economy with the industrialised state, so we are feeling the brunt and that is why we are keeping our ambition is high and trying to build resilience and also work with mitigation before we look at adaptation because the first step for any of us should be climate change mitigation. find for any of us should be climate change mitigation.— for any of us should be climate change mitigation. and then look at what ou change mitigation. and then look at what you have _ change mitigation. and then look at what you have to _ change mitigation. and then look at what you have to do _ change mitigation. and then look at what you have to do to _ change mitigation. and then look at what you have to do to adapt - change mitigation. and then look at what you have to do to adapt to - change mitigation. and then look at what you have to do to adapt to the | what you have to do to adapt to the impacts? what you have to do to adapt to the im acts? , .. �* , what you have to do to adapt to the imacts? , �* , impacts? yes, we can't give up hope and sit there- _ impacts? yes, we can't give up hope and sit there. the _ impacts? yes, we can't give up hope and sit there. the priority _ impacts? yes, we can't give up hope and sit there. the priority is - impacts? yes, we can't give up hope and sit there. the priority is to - and sit there. the priority is to deal with climate _ and sit there. the priority is to deal with climate change - and sit there. the priority is to deal with climate change in - and sit there. the priority is to | deal with climate change in the first instance but obviously to take account of the fact that adaptations may be needed to be made to the way
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people lived to cope with the impacts of climate change. mention 43 cities and you said before the interview they are in a race to net zero. the sense of competition, how useful is that? will that made many cities in india are outstripping the national government in terms of climate change ambitions? we have got to do itjust and fair, thatis we have got to do itjust and fair, that is how we are working in our state and we are a highly populated state and we are a highly populated state and we are a highly populated state and the complications matter more because if we start facing the brunt of climate change, it will affect our economy and it will affect our economy and it will affect the cities and the rural areas both together so it's important we decarbonise the energy sector and the transport sector and look at net zero by 2030 or may be
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ahead of that but we are looking at all the 43 cities, looking at better waste management, betterfootprints waste management, better footprints in waste management, betterfootprints in terms of carbon emissions and transport energy, all of this together. transport energy, all of this together-— transport energy, all of this touether. ., .,., ., , together. can you do all of this while also _ together. can you do all of this while also growing _ together. can you do all of this while also growing the - together. can you do all of this i while also growing the economy? india is the third largest emitter of greenhouse gases. that india is the third largest emitter of greenhouse gases.— india is the third largest emitter of greenhouse gases. that is the effort. of greenhouse gases. that is the effort- we _ of greenhouse gases. that is the effort. we can't _ of greenhouse gases. that is the effort. we can'tjust _ of greenhouse gases. that is the effort. we can'tjust give - of greenhouse gases. that is the effort. we can'tjust give up - of greenhouse gases. that is the effort. we can'tjust give up on l effort. we can'tjust give up on hope, and with the human race, we have seen technology and innovation and disruption, but if we can keep growing with a sense of sustainable development because development is needed for everyone to live but for survival we need sustainable development and if we can manage both, that is what we are trying, that would be a breakthrough. minister, thanks forjoining us. the minister, thanks forjoining us. the ministerfor tourism and minister, thanks forjoining us. the minister for tourism and environment for the state of maharashtra. you are watching bbc news. i spoke to portugal's environment minister,
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joao pedro matos fernandes a short time ago, and asked him how he was feeling about the outcome of the negotiations. expectation is big but i think things are running better than i expected ten days ago. i think all the commitments from the first few days were really important, and the commitment yesterday between china and the united states is quite important, and what i see compared with madrid, and this is my sixth cop, all the parties are moving so i do believe that definitely we could end the rule book from paris which is the most important thing that we have to do right now and have the first draft which comes from the presidency and the uk presidency, an important document and it will be best to try and keep it as similar as we have it right now at the end of the conference.
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the portuguese environment minister talking to me earlier. i'm joined now by nico tyabji from sunfunder — which specialises in solar energy. tell us who you are helping with sunfunder? we tell us who you are helping with sunfunder?— tell us who you are helping with sunfunder? ~ ., ., , ., . sunfunder? we are a debt financing rovider sunfunder? we are a debt financing provider for — sunfunder? we are a debt financing provider for those _ sunfunder? we are a debt financing provider for those of _ sunfunder? we are a debt financing provider for those of grid _ sunfunder? we are a debt financing provider for those of grid and - sunfunder? we are a debt financing provider for those of grid and the i provider for those of grid and the companies we are working with our delivering clean energy to people living in off grid areas, and a different kind of electrification. you are talking about smaller solar energy companies? that you are talking about smaller solar energy companies?— you are talking about smaller solar energy companies? that is right. the sector not energy companies? that is right. the sector got started _ energy companies? that is right. the sector got started really _ energy companies? that is right. the sector got started really about - energy companies? that is right. the sector got started really about ten i sector got started really about ten years ago and everyone is early stage but we have seen a lot of scale, delivering the kind of energy access that had been stagnant really and that is a function of the economics of solar improving and a great deal of partnerships in the sector. ., . ~'
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great deal of partnerships in the sector. ., ., ,, ., , sector. you talk about debt financing — sector. you talk about debt financing so _ sector. you talk about debt financing so how _ sector. you talk about debt financing so how much - sector. you talk about debt financing so how much is i sector. you talk about debt l financing so how much is the sector. you talk about debt - financing so how much is the ability to get finance and to indeed manage debt hampering projects like this to grow? ten debt hampering pro'ects like this to a row? , ., , debt hampering pro'ects like this to crow? , ., , ., ., ., debt hampering pro'ects like this to crow? , ., ., ., grow? ten years ago that was the real bottleneck _ grow? ten years ago that was the real bottleneck and _ grow? ten years ago that was the real bottleneck and that - grow? ten years ago that was the real bottleneck and that is - grow? ten years ago that was the real bottleneck and that is why i grow? ten years ago that was the | real bottleneck and that is why we got started. we have seen a transformation since, hundreds of millions of people now have energy access thanks to these distributing service solutions but we are really approaching the next stage of this industry, so we are seeing an industry, so we are seeing an industry that is ready for scaling up industry that is ready for scaling up in the next decade. as we addressed the twin challenge of energy access and climate change. this is a perfect example, because finance or lack there of is stopping some projects from getting under way orfrom growing, so while it might not be as tangible as some of the things we are talking about, the finance is absolutely crucial, isn't it? ., , ,
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finance is absolutely crucial, isn't it? ., , it? that is right. it is across the board and _ it? that is right. it is across the board and we _ it? that is right. it is across the board and we work— it? that is right. it is across the board and we work with - it? that is right. it is across the board and we work with other. it? that is right. it is across the . board and we work with other solar companies and those providing solutions for businesses, factories whose production is interrupted by unreliable power supply and many countries in sub—saharan africa, so those objects make economic sense for those businesses to adopt but again is a question of getting the financing in place and that is what sunfunder exist today. you financing in place and that is what sunfunder exist today.— sunfunder exist today. you are talkin: sunfunder exist today. you are talking about _ sunfunder exist today. you are talking about businesses - sunfunder exist today. you are talking about businesses and i sunfunder exist today. you are - talking about businesses and people being able to cook and light their homes without adding to co2 emissions? homes without adding to c02 emissions?— homes without adding to c02 emissions? ~ , , . ., homes without adding to c02 emissions? ~ , . ., , emissions? absolutely. we are seeing innovations in — emissions? absolutely. we are seeing innovations in all— emissions? absolutely. we are seeing innovations in all sorts _ emissions? absolutely. we are seeing innovations in all sorts of _ innovations in all sorts of different sectors, and again driven by solar and storage and the underlying economics and an example would be agriculture, seeing fascinating start—ups that are using solar and storage to do cooling and processing in agriculture in a new way. processing in agriculture in a new wa . ~ ., processing in agriculture in a new wa , ~ ., ., " processing in agriculture in a new wa. ., ., ., processing in agriculture in a new way. we have talked a lot already about broken _ way. we have talked a lot already about broken promises _ way. we have talked a lot already about broken promises from - way. we have talked a lot already - about broken promises from wealthier nations to provide climate finance for developing nations. as far as
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you are concerned what would a successful outcome be? at you are concerned what would a successful outcome be?- you are concerned what would a successful outcome be? at the high level we need _ successful outcome be? at the high level we need to _ successful outcome be? at the high level we need to continue _ successful outcome be? at the high| level we need to continue ratcheting up level we need to continue ratcheting up ambition and the question of climate finance is outstanding and very important, questions ofjustice within that, but we also see a mobilisation especially private capital that wants to make these transitions to net zero, trillions of dollars of assets that are now being marked for that transition. one of the problem is that we also work towards is how you find the projects of these new investments on the ground. this is what sunfunder specialising zin, building a team to originate those transactions and structured them correctly and get them closed so we cannot make the financial as well as energy transition. ? so we can make. thanks for “oininr transition. ? so we can make. thanks
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forjoining us- — transition. ? so we can make. thanks forjoining us. before _ transition. ? so we can make. thanks forjoining us. before we _ transition. ? so we can make. thanks forjoining us. before we go - transition. ? so we can make. thanks forjoining us. before we go back- transition. ? so we can make. thanks forjoining us. before we go back to l forjoining us. before we go back to the studio in london, coming up soon i will be speaking to the mayor of london sadiq khan and the chair of the sea a0 cities group. ?. much more coming up later. studio: thanks forjoining us. patients across the uk are facing unacceptably long waits for amublances, which is putting lives at risk — that's according to the college of paramedics. health concerns that went untreated in the pandemic, as well people requiring care for covid, are leading to more people needing urgent help as the nhs faces increasing winter pressures. the latest nhs figures show the average response time in england for the most serious incidents was nine minutes and 20 seconds — the longest since current records began in 2017. the average ambulance wait for people having heart attacks or strokes was more than 50 minutes, almost three times
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the target time of 18 minutes. but in some cases, people are waiting hours for help to arrive. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. across the length and the breadth of the uk, ambulances are queueing, unable to hand over the sick and injured patients they have on board because hospitals have no room. and ambulances stuck in queues aren't available to attend other emergencies, leaving patients in need waiting at home. i called an ambulance at 11.50 and they said they were going to send help asap. just over two weeks ago, christina found her grandmother, who lives in cheltenham spa, slumped in a chair having a stroke. it was a blue—light emergency. the ambulance should have arrived in 18 minutes, but instead it took nearly six hours. it then queued outside hospital for another three.
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it was then that an ambulance lady, i asked her how long it was going to take for my nan to get a ct because ijust needed to know whether or not it was a stroke, and she told me, "oh, your nan's event happened last night, so we would only administer the medication that would have reversed any permanent damage within that three—hour window." how did you feel? ijust broke down in tears on the floor. whistle—blowers from inside the ambulance services have told the bbc the system is at breaking point. this 999 call handler said even patients whose hearts have stopped are facing delays. there was a call for a cardiac arrest, where the nearest available crew was 50 minutes away and this guy was in arrest, and for every minute they say 10% of your life expectancy will decrease. this is life threatening and we just don't have the crews to respond like we should do. and have you got the pain in the chest at the moment?
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all 1a ambulance services in the uk have escalated to the highest level of alert and some have even gone beyond, like here at south central, which recently declared a critical incident when managers said the service had become unsafe. stuart, a paramedic, was working that night. i had a conversation with the control room in the early hours and they said how many jobs were outstanding, how many incidents were outstanding, and i was like, "oh, my god." you just sit there thinking you will never ever get rid of that backlog for days. for the last three months, these handlers have answered an additional 21,000 999 calls compared to two years ago. and just before the critical incident was declared here, instead of having an average of 20 patients waiting for an ambulance, they had 120 patients waiting. south central has now asked
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the government for military support. armed forces have helped ambulance services in other parts of england, wales and scotland, and have supported hospitals in northern ireland. governments in all parts of the uk say they are aware of the challenges and are doing their best to support services, but with winter coming, the pressure is likely only to get worse. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. our health correspondent nick triggle explained the waiting times were partly down to an increase in calls and worsening health in vulnerable people. the busiest month ever and the numbers are up by more than a quarter since the pandemic began. nhs staff say there is a lot of pent—up demand. the health of the frail and vulnerable has deteriorated. their normal care and support has been disrupted during the pandemic.
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they've become less active and more isolated which is not good for an individual�*s health. but it's notjust about demand, there's finite capacity in the nhs, and it was struggling before the pandemic began. sophie's package was looking at the ambulance service, but if we look at what is going on inside hospitals, it's a similar story. in a&e, a quarter of patients are waiting longer than four hours to be seen and treated. and for those that need to be admitted into the hospital for more serious conditions, 30% of those face what is called
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a trolley wait, a wait of over four hours for a bed to be free, that is because the hospital wards are full. hospitals are struggling to release patients due to a lack of care in the community. it's just that the spill—over that is most visible is in the ambulance service. the duchess of sussex has apologised for misleading a court about information given by her aides to the authors of a biography. meghan sued the publisher of the mail on sunday over five articles. in her witness statement, meghan apologised and said that she did not intend to mislead the court about the role of an aide in providing information to the authors of the unauthorised biography. the pace of the uk's economic recovery slowed in the three months to september, according to new figures from the office for national statistics. gdp grew by 1.3%, down from 5.5% in the previous three months, with supply issues contributing to slower growth. ramzan karmali reports. are the wheels of the economy slowing down? the latest official data shows the economy is still growing, but at a much more measured pace than earlier in the year. at this somerset toiletry company, the boss was confident enough to invest hundreds of thousands of pounds on a new soap making machine, as he's seen a big upturn in business, but he is still wary of some of the challenges ahead. i think we all expect some tailing
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off because the price of containers and shipping has gone through the roof, so we are expecting a drop off because the consumer will have to get used on the new retail prices that will start hitting the high street. some have already hit, some won't be hitting until the beginning of next year. like many businesses, he's also struggling to hire people as the economy has opened up, but the chancellor insists these are issues being faced all across the world. i think what you are seeing is an economy that is continuing to grow and that is a good thing. we are on the right path but there are global challenges ahead and that's why the budget set out a plan to build a stronger economy with support for working families at its heart. the economy is still growing, but that rebound between july and september is a lot less than many had predicted. if you look at this chart, it shows the losses we made during the pandemic still haven't been caught up. the service sector has now almost made up almost all of its losses, a sign the vaccine roll—out helped with the reopening, but the challenge for the government and other policymakers now is how to deal with an environment where taxes and energy bills are on the rise. last week the bank of england decided not to raise interest rates, but many economists expect them to go up from their historic lows
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before the end of the year. the risk is, obviously, if the bank of england start raising rates too quickly and that could depress demand quite significantly at a time when the economy is still vulnerable. the reason those rates may have to go up is to help combat the threat rising prices, so even though consumer spending rose as we emerged from lockdown, that demand may soften as businesses start to face much higher costs. ramzan karmali, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. for the rest of the daylight hours todayit for the rest of the daylight hours today it will stay cloudy, mild, damp in places, where the cloud is thicker and you can see some glimmers towards the north—east of england, a few breaks in the cloud across the south, as well, and temperatures up to 15 in london, double figures across scotland, and temperatures in lerwick around eight. low pressure is approaching and you can see this vortex behind me, the weather front brings rain to western areas overnight and the winds will strengthen, up to gale force around the coastal areas, especially in the north—west, this is mild atlantic air so the temperatures are not going to dip much tonight. double figures in many towns and cities and tomorrow it is going to be a blustery day for many. nationwide, up to gale force around the west and we will see fleeting outbreaks of rain in some areas for a little while, others could be quite wet. that is it. goodbye.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. two days to reach a deal — delegates enter the last a8 hours of the cop26 summit, to try and tackle climate change. the world is watching us and they are willing us to work together and reach consensus. and we know that we cannot afford to fail them. optimism for a deal rises after last night's surprise agreement between the us and china to work together to tackle global warming.
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on climate, cooperation is the only way to get this done. here — nhs under stress — paramedics tell the bbc lives are at risk because of growing waits for ambulances. three mps have been accused of "undermining respect for parliament" after they allegedly got drunk on a flight to visit uk forces in gibraltar. fw de klerk, the last white president of south africa, and a key figure in the country's transition to democracy, has died at the age of 85 sport now, and for a full round up, from rangers to aston villa — steven gerrard has been confirmed as the new manager at villa park. the former liverpool captain leaves the scottish champions after three years, having guided them to a first league title in 10 years last season. he replaces dean smith, who was sacked on sunday after a run of five successive defeats. earlier i asked our reporter alex howell how big a job
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gerrard has on his hands it isa it is a massive job at a massive club but villa have paid £a.5 million to get steven gerrard to the club and given him a three and a half year deal which shows commitment. he would want to go there because they have an established premier league squad and he will have funds to spend. they are one of the wealthier clubs in the premier league. his first game will be brighton at home so people will be brighton at home so people will say that is a game he could get off to a winning start with but he will have to get them firing quickly. in the game he will be looking forward to in four weeks' time will be taking ability liverpool and it's the law of the premier league money and the chance to get aston villa back into the top half of the table that i think has attracted him down there. england test captainjoe root says the racism scandal at his home club yorkshire has "fractured
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the game and torn lives apart". root had pledged to support the new chair of yorkshire, lord patel, as he brings about change at the club — four former players have spoken publicly about their experiences of discrimination. i think the most important thing we have to look at right now is how we move forward as a sport and a society as well. i think this is deeper than just cricket. what we need to do is address what has happened and find ways of educating, and ways of moving forward and really look at areas in which we, as a sport and beyond that can really look to better society the game. meanwhile ben stokes has been training with his england teammates after a six month lay off from the game. stokes needed time to recover from mental—health issues, as well as a finger injury. he was a late addition to the ashes squad, but was right in the thick
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of it here on queensland's gold coast. the first test starts in brisbane on 8th december dan evans has been knocked out of the stockholm open at the quarter—final stage by francis tiafoe. evans taking the first set 6—1, but that was a good as it got for the bristish number 2 and tiafoe came roaring back, and won the match 1—6, 6—1, 6—1. andy murray will be in action later at the event against america's tommy paul. meanwhile kyle edmund is set to play his first matches for over a year when england take on scotland at the battle of the brits in december. the 2018 australian open semi—finalist had an operation on his left knee in march. marcus smith will start at fly half for england against australia with owen farrell shifting to inside centre. it will be smith's third start in stest matches there's a real surprise with the usual centre manu tuilagi moved to the wing
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despite only one start in that position in his previous aa england caps. newcastle's adam radwan drops out of the squad to make way for tuilagi. you can get the full line up on the bbc sport website scotland have also named their team for saturday”s test against south africa. leicester centre matt scott is one of four changes — he's not played international rugby since 2017. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. including the second semifinal between india ? pakistan and australia and pakistan were 50—0 after seven overs, so keep up—to—date with that on five live sports extra and the bbc sport website. back now to our top story — that delegates at the cop26 climate change summit have been told there is still more work to be done in order to secure an agreement. the summit�*s president alok sharma said the final a8 hours of talks must represent �*another
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gearshift�* in negotiations. let's cross to glasgow and my colleague annita mcveigh. thank you very much. the theme today, whether it is the penultimate day or not, the timetable may stretch, is cities, regions and the built environment and to talk about that, i'm joined now by the mayor of london sadiq khan. welcome back. i spoke to at the beginning of the summit and good to catch up with you again at this point. what have you made of the progress or lack thereof depending on your point of view so far. emir;r on your point of view so far. early last week — on your point of view so far. early last week i _ on your point of view so far. early last week i explained _ on your point of view so far. early last week i explained i _ on your point of view so far. early last week i explained i was - on your point of view so far. eat; last week i explained i was hopeful, upbeat, optimistic and with only a few hours to go, properly today and tomorrow, i am less so. it appears that our national leaders have not reached the agreements they need to be reaching to keep 1.5 alive. what we have been doing our ctc saint and national governments, it seems you
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set target for ten or 30 years time and cities are having plans and actions and are funded and doing things now and it is that urgency that government need rather than delay in doing it. it that government need rather than delay in doing it.— delay in doing it. it interesting lookin: delay in doing it. it interesting looking at _ delay in doing it. it interesting looking at the _ delay in doing it. it interesting looking at the states - delay in doing it. it interesting looking at the states if - delay in doing it. it interesting looking at the states if you - delay in doing it. it interesting i looking at the states if you think about australia which is set more ambitious targets than the national government and cities and examining why you think cities are able to move faster and further and be more nimble, in your words.— nimble, in your words. london has set a target _ nimble, in your words. london has set a target of _ nimble, in your words. london has set a target of net _ nimble, in your words. london has set a target of net zero _ nimble, in your words. london has set a target of net zero by - nimble, in your words. london has set a target of net zero by 2030 i nimble, in your words. london has. set a target of net zero by 2030 and so have manchester and glasgow have set it for 2038 a national government is talking about 2050 and similar stories in other countries from france to spain, to australia and the usa as well. they can move faster and they are nimble and pragmatic and closer to the people but also we are in the delivery business and we know we get voted out in four years time if we don't
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deliver and there's an appetite for action but cities, particularly in the global north are starting to see the global north are starting to see the consequence of climate change and you saw the flash floods in london and in new york and germany and we saw wildfires in greece and australia and we've seen the displacement of people to cities, not to the global north and places like dakar so cities respond to what their citizens are crying out for and it's frustrating for us to see national politicians, prime ministers and presidents kicking these urgent cans down the road. they might say that the politics is more complicated at government level. national governments, you have said, need to give cities more power and funding to meet climate change targets, so looking at the uk specifically, how far should the devolution of power go? b, specifically, how far should the devolution of power go? a simple exam - le, devolution of power go? a simple example. in _ devolution of power go? a simple example, in london _ devolution of power go? a simple example, in london in _ devolution of power go? a simple example, in london in the - devolution of power go? a simple example, in london in the last. devolution of power go? a simple l example, in london in the last four years, we had the largest number of electric buses of any city in western europe but to get all of our buses electrically need support from
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the government and the advantage of the government and the advantage of the government and the advantage of the government giving support financially is we would have all the buses electric which would mean zero carbon but also would be creating jobs in the bass factories in falkirk, scarborough and leeds. it's a virtuous circle and the same goes for investing in buses in manchester and liverpool and west yorkshire and so forth. i will give you another example. we are desperate in london to insulate our homes and office buildings, double glazing triple glazing, insulation, solar panels and so forth and if the government was to give us financial support and powers and resources we would have energy—efficient homes unless carbon emissions and we would address fuel poverty, cheaper bills and cheaper jobs around the country, so who will make the triple glazing and who will fit these really important items that will lead to zero carbon sooner rather than later. the that will lead to zero carbon sooner rather than later.— rather than later. the government has made an _ rather than later. the government has made an announcement - rather than later. the government has made an announcement on i rather than later. the government - has made an announcement on fitting air pumps in homes for eating, so
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what is the difference, and mayors seeing it through? the what is the difference, and mayors seeing it through?— what is the difference, and mayors seeing it through? the problem with governments — seeing it through? the problem with governments is _ seeing it through? the problem with governments is they _ seeing it through? the problem with governments is they are _ seeing it through? the problem with governments is they are further - seeing it through? the problem with | governments is they are further away from the public and civil servants. you can't have heat pumps in your home and expect overnight success when there are still single glazed windows and no insulation and when the building is not fit for purpose for the heat pumps. it's a good example of ministers and civil servants not understanding what needs to happen in relation to the retrofit revolution and if instead the government gave those monies to city mayors, council leaders, regional leaders who are more in contact and closely connected with their communities, they would know how to better spend the money and it would be morejobs created how to better spend the money and it would be more jobs created and how to better spend the money and it would be morejobs created and homes being warmer as well. you would be more jobs created and homes being warmer as well.— being warmer as well. you are talkin: being warmer as well. you are talking about _ being warmer as well. you are talking about buses _ being warmer as well. you are talking about buses a - being warmer as well. you are talking about buses a second i being warmer as well. you are i talking about buses a second ago being warmer as well. you are - talking about buses a second ago and it's interesting to see you've announced a $1 billion finance package for zero emission buses in latin america are coming from you
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with your a0 cities chair hat on. and what is interesting about that is cities have reached out to private finance and it seems that finance at this point is a sticking point in the talks. tithe finance at this point is a sticking point in the talks.— point in the talks. one of the thins i point in the talks. one of the things i said _ point in the talks. one of the things i said when _ point in the talks. one of the things i said when i - point in the talks. one of the things i said when i became. point in the talks. one of the - things i said when i became chair was that we had to address the inequalities, not responsible for climate change and what we face but the suffering the worst consequences and i wanted us to spend more money and i wanted us to spend more money and private sector money. and also using the power of the private sector and the economies of scale mean the cost of each bus will come down and it leads to electric buses to rio, to won and it will lead to less carbon being emitted in the global south in latin america and if the sea a0 group of mayors, if we can do this, why can't national governments? taste can do this, why can't national governments?— can do this, why can't national governments? we must leave our conversation — governments? we must leave our conversation but _ governments? we must leave our conversation but thank _ governments? we must leave our conversation but thank you - governments? we must leave our conversation but thank you for i governments? we must leave our. conversation but thank you for your time today chair of the sea a0
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cities group. and for the moment from glasgow and before i go, let me tell you we are expecting a briefing from the cop26 president at three o'clock, so we will bring you details of that when it happens but right now back to the studio in london. we look forward to that. a top iranian official is in the uk for talks expected to focus on efforts to revive the iran nuclear deal and the plight of british nationals detained in iran — in particular nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. it's a rare face—to—face meeting between british and iranian representatives, and metres away, outside the foreign office, nazanin's husband richard ratcliffe is on day 19 of a hunger strike to demand more be done to enable her to return home. she was first detained in tehran in 2016 on spying charges, which she has always denied. caroline hawley reports. a steady stream of well—wishers for richard ratcliffe as he continues this desperate bid to get his wife home.
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day 19 now, but it's been more than 2,000 days since he last saw nazanin, when she went to iran on holiday in 2006 to see her parents. today's meeting here with iran's deputy foreign minister is primarily about iran's nuclear deal and how it can be resurrected but the government says it is also pushing for the release of all british nationals unfairly detained in iran. we've had so many ups and downs. the reason we are camping here because we are on the precipice of another downland any day she could be back in prison so i'm not hopeful but yeah, it's definitely good news that the iranian deputy premier list is here and is the lead negotiator, definitely good news he is meeting the minister and let's hope that there is a breakthrough. but richard ratcliffe says there is a major obstacle. in the 1970s before nazanin was even born britain sold iran tanks, which it paid for upfront. then came the islamic resolution and they were not delivered. iran has explicitly linked
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the debt with the british nationals it is holding. it wants the money back, with interest. the sum of money is a very large one. it would be very difficult, i think, for the brits and the americans to agree a cash payment that the iranians could use for whatever they like. i'm sure we would prefer payment in kind, medicines have been mentioned. of course the iranians will resist that, so this is something that has to be unpicked and solved. with growing international alarm over iran's nuclear programme, tehran now seems to be also tying the fate of western hostages into a wider bargain, a deal that would see sanctions lifted in return for it complying with nuclear curbs. the detention of dual nationals has been a strategy used by iranian conservatives—macro for well over a decade now, using individuals as leverage and as pawns to pressure governments around the world. and in the middle of all this the agony of the families caught up in international events over which they have absolutely no control. caroline hawley, bbc news.
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and we hope to hearfrom richard ratcliffe later this afternoon. three mps have been accused of "undermining respect for parliament" after they allegedly got drunk on a flight to visit uk troops in gibraltar. defence secretary ben wallace said the snp's drew hendry and david linden and labour's charlotte nichols had put their hosts "in a difficult position". this was 15 mps on a flight to gibraltar and it was all part of scheme to find out how the armed forces do they thing on this allegation, corroborated by a witness who has spoken to the bbc of the three mps, two from the snp had one from labour drinking in the airport lounge prior to setting off, continuing to drink on the plane out
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to gibraltarfor another continuing to drink on the plane out to gibraltar for another couple of hours that the flight takes from london and being drunk when the plane landed. charlotte nichols, the shadow minister, the labour mp for warrington north, she was one of those mps and she returned to the uk early. the delegation of the remaining mps is still out there. i understand she had a mental health episode and returned early. and she is on heavy medication. the two snp mps have responded pretty robustly to the allegation, both of them say that they regard this as a tory smear operation because they say it's tory mps trying to take attention away from the swirl of headlines in the last few weeks with owen paterson's resignation as an elm ? mp. but the defence death ? a secretary getting involved in saying that this posed awkward questions as
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far as the military were concerned for the behaviour of parliamentarians, so awkward headlines for the three mps in the swirl of all of these headlines at the moment about the conduct of mps more generally. the headlines on bbc news. two days to reach a deal — delegates enter the last a8 hours of the cop26 summit, to try to tackle climate change. nhs under stress — paramedics tell the bbc lives are at risk because of growing waits for ambulances. three mps have been accused of "undermining respect for parliament" after they allegedly got drunk on a flight to visit uk forces in gibraltar. fw de klerk, the last white president of south africa and a key figure in the country's transition to a multi—racial democracy, has died. he was 85.
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paul adams reports. today we have closed the book on apartheid and that chapter is finally closed. the force of history would have ended white supremacy in south africa eventually, but without fw de klerk the transformation to non—racial democracy could have been a lot more pain. he saw his country had to change and he delivered. he knew very well what lay behind the chaos and violence in black townships, provoked by rigid racial segregation. for yea rs as a minister, he had helped entrench apartheid. then, fw de klerk became president in 1989, replacing the last apartheid dinosaur and his approach was very different. the prohibition of the
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african national congress, the pan—african congress, the south african communist party and subsidiary organisations is being rescinded. within a year, nelson mandela walked to freedom. he ordered his release and unbanned the national congress, acts that he knew would number his own day in power. but talks to end white minority rule opened old wounds and there was appalling township violence between the anc and zulu violence. violence that was actively fermented by the white security apparatus. and white extremists too were up in arms. upset at the prospect of a black government, de klerk sensed the threat and outmanoeuvred them by offering a whites—only referendum in 1992. he craved backing and he won it. now, change was unstoppable. the world acknowledged that.
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and in 1993, mr de klerk wasjointly awarded the nobel peace prize, along with the man who would replace him as president. although nelson mandela was sometimes infuriated by de klerk, he called him a man of integrity. so help me god. president mandela's inauguration was partly a tribute to mr de klerk�*s vision. the country's last white president remained loyal to his afrikaans heritage. some of his former colleagues claimed he had been opportunistic, merely seizing a moment but he did seize the moment. never again on one inch of the soil of the republic of south africa will there ever be racial discrimination again. and so for white south africans, de klerk can stand tall in history.
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a student from lancashire has been found guilty of murdering his step grandmother three years after an inquest ruled it had been an accident. preston crown court heard that 21—year—old tiernan darnton confessed to the killing during a game of truth or dare with his friends. let's cross to fiona trott in salford. for yea rs for years it was believed that mary gregory's death was accidental and there was a fire at her home back in 2018 in lancashire and she was found crouched under a table in her bungalow and taken to hospital and she died four days later. there was an investigation at the time and the fire service believed that the fire was caused by a discarded cigarette and an inquest ruled that the death was accidental but later, tiernan darnton, herstep was accidental but later, tiernan darnton, her step grandson, who was 17 at the time was playing a game of truth or dare with his friends and he told them that he had a dark secret and he said, i have a secret i have not told anyone. i may have killed someone. and they pressed him
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on this and he said he started the fire because he did not want his stepgrandmother to suffer any longer from dementia. after that, the court also heard that he told a counsellor also heard that he told a counsellor a year later that he also started the fire but during this trial at preston crown court, �*s lawyer said he made the confession to his friends because it was a misguided attempt to impress them and he said the admission he made to the counsellor was pure fiction. and we also heard at preston crown court that his stepfather, mrs gregory's own son, said the student had been suffering from depression for a number of years and was plagued by intrusive and disturbing thoughts. but today, the jury found him intrusive and disturbing thoughts. but today, thejury found him guilty of murder and he is due to be sentenced on friday.
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communities around the uk have come together to commemorate armistice day, after last year's ceremonies were disrupted by the pandemic. a two—minute silence was held to mark the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month, when fighting ceased in the first world war. the duchess of cornwall placed a cross amongst poppies outside westminster abbey, as people all over the country remembered those who died in conflict. sarah campbell reports. on the 11th hour of the 11th month in 1918 the guns of the first world war fell silent. more than a century later the nation paused to remember those who sacrificed so much in service to their country.
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reveille today, we remember places with names synonymous with places of conflict... last year the pandemic prevented many from coming together to remember.
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not so this year. so many lost lives to honour, given special mention at the cenotaph today, walter tull, britton's first black officer in the british army who died in 1918, invited to lay a wreath on his behalf his great—nephew. this is a fantastic event to come to the point where i'm able to lay a wreath on behalf of my grand uncle at the cenotaph, it's a great honour and a great honour to him. young and old ensuring sacrifices will never be forgotten. sarah campbell, bbc news. a new species of dinosaur with an unusually large nose has been discovered by a retired doctor. the remains of the brighstoneus simmondsi were found on the isle of wight in 1978. they'd been in storage until drjeremy lockwood decided
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to reconstruct the skull of the animal and realised the bones belonged to an undiscovered species. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. hello. for the rest of the day for most of us there is actually not an awful lot of change in the weather. it is going to stay cloudy out there, mild, a little bit of dampness around too, some of that cloud is thick enough today to produce rain but the real story is just how mild it is, and it has been mild for quite some time now, and this is not going to change in the next few days. we will keep seeing this mild, atlantic air arriving. this is the low pressure that will bring us the more blustery weather tomorrow, so the low pressure is just to the west of us right now. in fact, it is here. this is where the centre of the low is, this is where the gale force winds are, and ahead of it is a cold front moving across ireland eventually into northern ireland this evening ahead of it we have that increase in cloud and some of it thick enough to bring some rain.
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for example in south—western scotland and the lake district this afternoon. tonight, then, here comes the low, barrels in, this is the cold front here, now often behind the cold front, the air is colder. that's why it's called a cold front. but actually, not necessarily, on this occasion. this is still quite mild, atlantic air, blustery weather moving in, so the temperatures are not going to drop tonight, 11 degrees first in the morning, across many western areas, so the low pressure moves across the uk, it brings outbreaks of rain but you can see the bits and pieces of rain being pushed quite swiftly by that wind and it will be strong around some western coasts, gusting to 15 mph in places. we will feel the strength of the wind in the land as well. mild, 15 in london, double figures further north too and then the forecast, friday night into saturday, the low pulls away, in fact it sort of loses its impact, and in its place, briefly, high pressure builds in from the south. so that means that saturday is going to be much calmer.
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it is going to be a generally dry day, with some sunny spells. again, it is going to be mild, the mid—teens are quite possible across the south of the country. in the north, around 11 or 12. and i think sunday is going to be fairly similar too. again, generally dry weather, generally mild weather, and this calm, mild weather lasts through monday and tuesday, but from wednesday onwards i think the winds will pick up again and we will see bouts of rain coming off the atlantic later next week. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the race to reach a deal — delegates enter the last a8 hours of the cop26 summit, to try to tackle climate change. the world is watching us and they are willing us to work together and reach consensus. and we know that we cannot afford to fail them. optimism for a deal rises after last night's surprise agreement between the us and china to work together to tackle global warming. here — nhs under stress — paramedics tell the bbc lives are at risk because of growing waits for ambulances. fw de klerk, the last white president of south africa, and a key figure in the country's transition to democracy, has died at the age of 85. communities across
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the uk come together for armistice day — a year after commemorations were disrupted by the pandemic. the cop26 climate change summit in glasgow has entered its last a8 hours — with countries being urged to step up their efforts and reach a meaningfulfinal deal. the uk spokesperson said the next few hours will reveal whether we have got what it takes. alok sharma is expected to talk soon at a press conference. let's cross now to glasgow and my colleague annita mcveigh.
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thank you very much. we are waiting for that news conference with alok sharma, the president of cop26, we will bring that to you when it happens. alok sharma has told negotiators that the world is watching and that they cannot fail them by not securing a climate deal. mr sharma said the latest draft text is a significant step forward, but urged countries to step up their efforts on the penultimate day of talks. we have been told we won't get a new draft until tomorrow, until friday. it comes as borisjohnson said commitments from china and the us to step up climate action this decade are a boost to negotiations. our global science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. the pace is picking up in glasgow as the climate talks move in to their frantic final stretch and we see if the world can reach an agreement.
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but there was also a pause for reflection to mark remembrance day. the work here, though, goes on. the world is watching us and they are willing us to work together and reach consensus. and we know that we cannot afford to fail them. there have been some signs of hope. a surprise announcement from china's top negotiator on a joint climate declaration with the united states. the united states and china have no shortage of differences, but on climate... on climate, cooperation is the only way to get this job done. so, what's in the china us declaration? the world's two biggest polluters have agreed to move towards using clean energy, they said they would reduce methane, and do more to tackle the issue of deforestation. it's important that two biggest emitters in the world actually agreed to cooperate. it's a good signal.
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it is an important symbolic signal but what we need is more details. it is weak on the details in terms of how this will be delivered, with what cooperation and by when. several countries have also come together to announce an ambitious initiative, a plan to phase out oil and gas led by costa rica and denmark. more than ten nations, but not the uk, have said they will set a date to end their use. for most countries that are oil and gas producers, this is a huge step. we are going to pull away from that report. we can go to the president of cop26, alok sharma. mr; report. we can go to the president of cop26, alok sharma. my grateful thanks to all — of cop26, alok sharma. my grateful thanks to all colleagues _ of cop26, alok sharma. my grateful thanks to all colleagues who - of cop26, alok sharma. my grateful thanks to all colleagues who joined l thanks to all colleagues who joined us to pay our respects to the fallen. i want to turn to the negotiations. detailed the discussions have continued over the past 2a hours, and archie young
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chaired a meeting with heads of delegations yesterday to hear views on the draft decisions. i held a range of bilateral meetings with parties and groups and also received comprehensive briefings last night from my team of ministers. a tranche of a draft decision texts were published early this morning. these include draft texts on adaptation, loss of damage, finance, on the enhanced transparency framework and article six. i'm pleased to say that yesterday we concluded the discussions on the goal of adaptation, and i hope this will be adopted. text was also finalised on response measures and on the santiago network. as you will know i held a stock—taking pen this morning with all observers to set out the collective work programme over the
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next 2a—hour is. whilst we have made progress and i want to acknowledge the spirit of cooperation and civility that has been demonstrated by negotiators and ministers, we are not there yet on the most critical issues. there is still a lot more work to be done. cop26 is scheduled to close at the end of tomorrow. so time is running out. as i speak might ministerial co—facilitators and other ministers and negotiators are rolling up their sleeves and working hard to find solutions to some of the most intractable issues. solutions which so far have evaded us for six years. i will be holding meetings later today with all parties to find ways forward on matters specifically related to finance and article six. as i noted at the plenary, negotiations on
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finance really need to accelerate and they need to accelerate now. a further iteration of texts across a range of issues will be issued overnight and having engaged extensively with parties over the past year and at cop, i know everyone understands what is at stake for the future of our planet in glasgow. we still have a monumental challenge ahead. but collectively we have no choice but to rise to that challenge and strain every sin you to achieve a timely outcome that we can all be proud of stop because ultimately, this outcome, whatever it is, will belong to all of us. outcome, whatever it is, will belong to all of us— outcome, whatever it is, will belong to all of us.- thank _ outcome, whatever it is, will belong to all of us.- thank you. - outcome, whatever it is, will belong to all of us.- thank you. it i to all of us. nigel? thank you. it is cities and _ to all of us. nigel? thank you. it is cities and regions _ to all of us. nigel? thank you. it is cities and regions date - to all of us. nigel? thank you. it is cities and regions date so - to all of us. nigel? thank you. it is cities and regions date so just| to all of us. nigel? thank you. it| is cities and regions date so just a few highlights of a very busy agenda in that— few highlights of a very busy agenda in that action zone. to give you a
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sense _ in that action zone. to give you a sense of— in that action zone. to give you a sense of the _ in that action zone. to give you a sense of the scale of ambition and momentum from cities and subnational governments, we now 1049 cities in the un _ governments, we now 1049 cities in the un backed race to zero representing over at 7 million people — representing over at 7 million people with the potential to reduce emissions — people with the potential to reduce emissions by 1.2 gigatons by 2030 and that— emissions by 1.2 gigatons by 2030 and that work has been driven by c40 _ and that work has been driven by c40 in _ and that work has been driven by c40. in addition, underthe coalition— c40. in addition, underthe coalition which was founded when we were all— coalition which was founded when we were allaiming for under coalition which was founded when we were all aiming for under two, and has been_ were all aiming for under two, and has been chaired recently by scotland, california and others, it has changed their membership criteria — has changed their membership criteria to be net zero in line with the i5— criteria to be net zero in line with the 1.5 degrees future, and those 260 governments represent nearly half of — 260 governments represent nearly half of the world's gdp and a quarter— half of the world's gdp and a quarter of the population of the
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world _ quarter of the population of the world are — quarter of the population of the world are so many have updated their commitment and we expect the rest of them to— commitment and we expect the rest of them to do— commitment and we expect the rest of them to do so in the next year. a bil them to do so in the next year. a big emphasis on the most vulnerable in urban— big emphasis on the most vulnerable in urban contexts, we have seen the launch_ in urban contexts, we have seen the launch of— in urban contexts, we have seen the launch of the — in urban contexts, we have seen the launch of the uk germany back to 27.5 million urban climate action programme to provide technical assistance to at least 15 mayors of mega _ assistance to at least 15 mayors of mega cities in developing countries and many— mega cities in developing countries and many of you saw the film life on the front _ and many of you saw the film life on the front line about climate migration into dhaka and they will have a _ migration into dhaka and they will have a sense ofjust how much that money— have a sense ofjust how much that money is _ have a sense ofjust how much that money is needed. we have harassed, a state in india with a _ we have harassed, a state in india with a population of 124 million people — with a population of 124 million people 7 — with a population of 124 million people ? maharashtra. the task force has convened to champion investment,
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adaptation— has convened to champion investment, adaptation and reduced displacement in migrant— adaptation and reduced displacement in migrant communities including some _ in migrant communities including some initial support for work in africa, — some initial support for work in africa, and _ some initial support for work in africa, and to the built environment for today, _ africa, and to the built environment for today, we have seen a growing number— for today, we have seen a growing number of— for today, we have seen a growing number of businesses growing up with ? number of businesses growing up with 7 giving _ number of businesses growing up with ? giving updated commitments to reduce _ ? giving updated commitments to reduce emissions and a lot more momentum on carbon reductions. and cities _ momentum on carbon reductions. and cities including san francisco, los angeles, — cities including san francisco, los angeles, mexico, oslo and budapest, haveioined_ angeles, mexico, oslo and budapest, have joined as part of the c40 declaration to halve the construction emissions of new buildings _ construction emissions of new buildings by 2030, so lots more momentum from the cities and regions and the _ momentum from the cities and regions and the complex construction chain. thank— and the complex construction chain. thank you — and the complex construction chain. thank you. we and the complex construction chain. thank ou. ~ ., ~ and the complex construction chain. thank ou. ~ ., ,, , ., , thank you. we will take questions from the floor _ thank you. we will take questions
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from the floor now. _ thank you. we will take questions from the floor now. can _ thank you. we will take questions from the floor now. can you - thank you. we will take questions from the floor now. can you state | from the floor now. can you state your— from the floor now. can you state your name — from the floor now. can you state your name and _ from the floor now. can you state your name and where _ from the floor now. can you state your name and where you - from the floor now. can you state your name and where you are - from the floor now. can you state i your name and where you are from. from the floor now. can you state - your name and where you are from. we have a _ your name and where you are from. we have a standing — your name and where you are from. we have a standing microphone _ your name and where you are from. we have a standing microphone but - your name and where you are from. we have a standing microphone but try- have a standing microphone but try not to _ have a standing microphone but try not to touch — have a standing microphone but try not to touch it _ have a standing microphone but try not to touch it as _ have a standing microphone but try not to touch it as it _ have a standing microphone but try not to touch it as it is _ have a standing microphone but try not to touch it as it is passed - not to touch it as it is passed round — not to touch it as it is passed round the _ not to touch it as it is passed round. the man _ not to touch it as it is passed round. the man at _ not to touch it as it is passed round. the man at the - not to touch it as it is passed round. the man at the front. j not to touch it as it is passed - round. the man at the front. ben sencer round. the man at the front. ben spencer from _ round. the man at the front. ben spencer from the _ round. the man at the front. spencer from the sunday round. the man at the frontm spencer from the sunday times. round. the man at the front.“ spencer from the sunday times. you and others _ spencer from the sunday times. you and others have described this as the last— and others have described this as the last best chance to avert catastrophic climate change, and now we are _ catastrophic climate change, and now we are being told the best we can hope _ we are being told the best we can hope for— we are being told the best we can hope for here is a road map to next year and _ hope for here is a road map to next year and the — hope for here is a road map to next year and the year after, to talk about— year and the year after, to talk about it — year and the year after, to talk about it again, it has the conference failed?- about it again, it has the conference failed? ~ ., ., conference failed? what we have alwa s conference failed? what we have always said _ conference failed? what we have always said is — conference failed? what we have always said is that _ conference failed? what we have always said is that what - conference failed? what we have always said is that what we - conference failed? what we have always said is that what we want| always said is that what we want coming out of cop26 is to be able to say with credibility that we have kept 1.5 within reach. you will have seenin kept 1.5 within reach. you will have seen in august the report that came out which made clear that whilst a window on keeping 1.5 within reach
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is closing, it is still possible to get there, and that is why myself and others have talked about the decisive decade. what you have seen in the draft cover decisions so far is setting out how we think parties should return and look again at the commitments they have made. ultimately, it is going to be up to parties to come forward with consensus on the cover decisions and indeed the other texts, as well. we will be circulating another round of the draft cover decisions later on tonight, overnight, buti the draft cover decisions later on tonight, overnight, but i have been very clear. archie young has also been clear, we are urging ambition. we have had a number of the negotiating groups and i have been told by groups and individual parties that they want to see ambition in the outcome of cop26. the man in the second row with the red tie~ _
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the man in the second row with the red tie. ., , the man in the second row with the red tie. .,, , ., . , red tie. robert peston, itv. we 'ust heard from — red tie. robert peston, itv. we 'ust heard from france i red tie. robert peston, itv. we 'ust heard from france to i red tie. robert peston, itv. we 'ust heard from france to and i red tie. robert peston, itv. we 'ust heard from france to and he i red tie. robert peston, itv. wejust heard from france to and he said i heard from france to and he said that his — heard from france to and he said that his hope that the cover decisions would set in train a process— decisions would set in train a process such that within a year the contributions made by individual countries — contributions made by individual countries would have been toughened up countries would have been toughened up so that— countries would have been toughened up so that 1.5 would be achieved within— up so that 1.5 would be achieved within a — up so that 1.5 would be achieved within a year. we are right now seeing — within a year. we are right now seeing many countries trying to weaken — seeing many countries trying to weaken even some would say a fairly soft set _ weaken even some would say a fairly soft set of— weaken even some would say a fairly soft set of commitments that you set out in _ soft set of commitments that you set out in your— soft set of commitments that you set out in your initial cover declaration. what hope do you have that 15— declaration. what hope do you have that 15 will— declaration. what hope do you have that 1.5 will be kept alive in that meaningful sense that we will reach it within _ meaningful sense that we will reach it within a _ meaningful sense that we will reach it within a year?— it within a year? robert, i do think that the draft _ it within a year? robert, i do think that the draft decisions _ it within a year? robert, i do think that the draft decisions we - it within a year? robert, i do think that the draft decisions we put - it within a year? robert, i do think that the draft decisions we put outj that the draft decisions we put out were ambitious and i think if they
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are adopted as we intend, we will be able to say with credibility that we have kept 1.5 within reach. in the draft that was sat out, it makes very clear that countries should come back again ahead of the stock—take in 2023 and we talk about an annual census report and making up an annual census report and making up with ? meeting up with leaders on this issue. i will ask archie if he wants to come in because he had a long discussion with heads of delegation about the cover decisions and as i said, we will issue further texts overnight. do you want to comment? i texts overnight. do you want to comment?— texts overnight. do you want to comment? ., , ., _ comment? i would start by saying that keeping _ comment? i would start by saying that keeping 1.5 _ comment? i would start by saying that keeping 1.5 alive _ comment? i would start by saying that keeping 1.5 alive requires - comment? i would start by saying that keeping 1.5 alive requires a i that keeping 1.5 alive requires a whole _ that keeping 1.5 alive requires a whole series of actions and elements from this— whole series of actions and elements from this cop and as you know part of that, _ from this cop and as you know part of that, a _ from this cop and as you know part of that, a major part, is all the nationally— of that, a major part, is all the nationally determined contributions and long—term strategies and net zero commitments that were made in advance _ zero commitments that were made in advance of— zero commitments that were made in advance of cop thanks to the
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extensive encouragement by the cop president— extensive encouragement by the cop president and the global diplomatic effort _ president and the global diplomatic effort that went into encouraging countries — effort that went into encouraging countries to really come forward with their— countries to really come forward with their highest possible ambition. another element that can help keep _ ambition. another element that can help keep 1.5 alive and forgive me that i_ help keep 1.5 alive and forgive me that i always bring it back to the technical— that i always bring it back to the technical detail, is the rules, the mechanisms, that actually can give confidence — mechanisms, that actually can give confidence for countries that they will do _ confidence for countries that they will do what they say they will do but also — will do what they say they will do but also that can enable high ambition. a third element, yes, the political— ambition. a third element, yes, the political signal that comes from this cop. — political signal that comes from this cop, and a lot of that will come — this cop, and a lot of that will come from the cover decisions. as the cop_ come from the cover decisions. as the cop president said, i had consultations with all heads of delegation yesterday afternoon, and that was— delegation yesterday afternoon, and that was open to observers so i'm sure _ that was open to observers so i'm sure some — that was open to observers so i'm sure some of you will have followed that and _ sure some of you will have followed that and picked up some of what was said. that and picked up some of what was said there _ that and picked up some of what was said. there are very strongly diverging _ said. there are very strongly diverging views on a number of elements. _ diverging views on a number of elements, including some countries,
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one country— elements, including some countries, one country representing a group that represents several countries, suggesting that we should delete the whole section on mitigation. so that gives— whole section on mitigation. so that gives you _ whole section on mitigation. so that gives you a — whole section on mitigation. so that gives you a sense that there is not yet at _ gives you a sense that there is not yet at this— gives you a sense that there is not yet at this conference a consensus that we _ yet at this conference a consensus that we do— yet at this conference a consensus that we do need to collectively ramp up that we do need to collectively ramp up our— that we do need to collectively ramp up our ambition. but also, what is clear. _ up our ambition. but also, what is clear, underpinning that, a desire to see _ clear, underpinning that, a desire to see greater ambition across all elements— to see greater ambition across all elements of the paris agreement, and that is— elements of the paris agreement, and that is exactly what we are pushing for. ., ., ., ., thanks. lisa friedman from the new york times — thanks. lisa friedman from the new york times. could you tell us what sticking _ york times. could you tell us what sticking points there are at this point _ sticking points there are at this point on — sticking points there are at this point on loss and damage and i'm also wondering in terms of the us china _ also wondering in terms of the us china deal. — also wondering in terms of the us china deal, has that had any impact and shaking — china deal, has that had any impact
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and shaking anything loose in the actual— and shaking anything loose in the actual negotiations and if not, why not? _ actual negotiations and if not, why not? if— actual negotiations and if not, why not? if so, — actual negotiations and if not, why not? if so, anything specific? let me take those two and then archie can come in. on loss and damage, as i said can come in. on loss and damage, as isaid in can come in. on loss and damage, as i said in the opening remarks, we agreed text, it has been set out on the santiago network and the work programme that follows and i hope this will be something we can gather
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shortly. there is further work going on on the issue of loss and damage and i will ask archie if he wants to comment on that. on the issue of the us china agreement, i very much welcome the fact that this is an agreement that sets out cooperation between the biggest emitters and i think that is good news. what i hope is that the spirit of cooperation in that agreement is also going to drive forward negotiations here at cop26. i missed a crucial part is i noticed when _ i missed a crucial part is i noticed when i _ i missed a crucial part is i noticed when i looked across at niger, which is the _ when i looked across at niger, which is the incredible efforts of the high _ is the incredible efforts of the high level champions and other campaigns and initiatives that can accelerate — campaigns and initiatives that can accelerate action across all sectors and parts — accelerate action across all sectors and parts of society. apologies, nigel~ _ and parts of society. apologies, nigel~ |t— and parts of society. apologies, niel. , and parts of society. apologies, ni.el_ , ., , and parts of society. apologies, niel. ., , . , and parts of society. apologies, niel. , ., , . ,., nigel. it is actually the cities and re . ions, nigel. it is actually the cities and regions. but _ nigel. it is actually the cities and regions, but it _ nigel. it is actually the cities and regions, but it is _ nigel. it is actually the cities and regions, but it is worth _ nigel. it is actually the cities and| regions, but it is worth reminding everybody. — regions, but it is worth reminding everybody. the _ regions, but it is worth reminding everybody, the ambition - regions, but it is worth reminding everybody, the ambition we - regions, but it is worth reminding everybody, the ambition we saw. everybody, the ambition we saw yesterday. — everybody, the ambition we saw yesterday. what _ everybody, the ambition we saw yesterday, what is _ everybody, the ambition we saw yesterday, what is going - everybody, the ambition we saw yesterday, what is going to - everybody, the ambition we saw. yesterday, what is going to happen will not _ yesterday, what is going to happen will not be — yesterday, what is going to happen will not be reflected _ yesterday, what is going to happen will not be reflected in— yesterday, what is going to happen will not be reflected in many- yesterday, what is going to happenj will not be reflected in many ndcs, so there _ will not be reflected in many ndcs, so there is— will not be reflected in many ndcs, so there is another— will not be reflected in many ndcs, so there is another source - will not be reflected in many ndcs, so there is another source of- so there is another source of ambition— so there is another source of ambition enhancement - so there is another source of| ambition enhancement which so there is another source of. ambition enhancement which is outside — ambition enhancement which is outside of— ambition enhancement which is outside of current _ ambition enhancement which is outside of current national- ambition enhancement which isl outside of current national plans which _ outside of current national plans which is — outside of current national plans which is the _ outside of current national plans which is the real— outside of current national plans which is the real economy. - outside of current national plans which is the real economy. on. outside of current national plans which is the real economy. on loss and damage. _ which is the real economy. on loss and damage, the _ which is the real economy. on loss and damage, the cop _ which is the real economy. on loss and damage, the cop president i which is the real economy. on loss i and damage, the cop president asked and damage, the cop president asked a minister— and damage, the cop president asked a minister of luxembourg and one of
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jamaica _ a minister of luxembourg and one of jamaica to _ a minister of luxembourg and one of jamaica to consult on how the work on the _ jamaica to consult on how the work on the santiago network, the new entity— on the santiago network, the new entity that— on the santiago network, the new entity that can enable and be the catalyst — entity that can enable and be the catalyst for action on loss and damage — catalyst for action on loss and damage and how that could be strengthened... damage and how that could be strengthened. . ._ damage and how that could be strengthened... damage and how that could be strenathened... ,, , . ., ~ strengthened... studio: we can talk about what we _ strengthened... studio: we can talk about what we have _ strengthened... studio: we can talk about what we have heard _ strengthened... studio: we can talk about what we have heard from - strengthened... studio: we can talk about what we have heard from this | about what we have heard from this news briefing with our correspondent chris morris. interesting phrases used by alok sharma, talking about monumental challenges ahead, and one of the other speakers said there wasn't even get a consensus that we needed to ramp up ambition at this cop which will ring alarm bells for a lot of people. cop which will ring alarm bells for a lot of people-— cop which will ring alarm bells for a lot of people. yes. these meetings alwa s a lot of people. yes. these meetings always come — a lot of people. yes. these meetings always come down _ a lot of people. yes. these meetings always come down to _ a lot of people. yes. these meetings always come down to the _ a lot of people. yes. these meetings always come down to the wire, - a lot of people. yes. these meetings always come down to the wire, so i a lot of people. yes. these meetings i always come down to the wire, so we should not think this is unexpected and we know that negotiators have been working through the night and documents have been released in the early hours of the morning. that documents have been released in the early hours of the morning.— early hours of the morning. that is surrisin: early hours of the morning. that is surprising because _ early hours of the morning. that is surprising because surely - early hours of the morning. that is| surprising because surely everyone coming into this was thinking we
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need to be more ambitious on climate change. but need to be more ambitious on climate chance. �* , ., need to be more ambitious on climate chance. �* , .. ' change. but they have different ambitions and _ change. but they have different ambitions and that _ change. but they have different ambitions and that is _ change. but they have different ambitions and that is part - change. but they have different ambitions and that is part of i change. but they have different| ambitions and that is part of the problem because the process is essentially about re—engineering every national economy in the world. they are clearly different views about how that should be done but what we heard in that press conference was the overarching importance that we should not forget what this about, keeping the goal of limiting the temperature rise to 1.5 degrees within view and while we have had a series of announcements and all sorts of pledges which have been made, what is really important is what is happening behind the scenes and that is the efforts to write the rules that will put the paris agreement on climate action into practice. that is important because it is a formal international treaty which means those rules are binding on countries, not voluntary things they can say, yes, we will try, but these are binding rules they have to meet and a lot of the focus has been on how you persuade individual countries. how you
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persuade them to meet their pledges of cutting greenhouse gas emissions. interesting listening to archie young, he said it is about the rules and one of the things that they have discussed in the press conference, the paris agreement only says you have to review your carbon cutting pledges every five years, but what they are trying to write into this document is an agreement that it is reviewed and updated and if necessary every year because if they are going to be cut by nearly 50% by the end of the decade, a five year review is not enough, it has to be annual. �* ,, ., ., ., , , annual. alok sharma obviously mentioning — annual. alok sharma obviously mentioning the _ annual. alok sharma obviously mentioning the areas - annual. alok sharma obviously mentioning the areas which i annual. alok sharma obviously | mentioning the areas which are proving most difficult, climate finance is one of them, transparency, and if you have more transparency, and if you have more transparency that leads to greater accountability. and maybe some countries don't want to have that pressure put on them at this point. they seem to be the outstanding issues at the moment? you have countries with _ issues at the moment? you have countries with different - issues at the moment? you have countries with different political. countries with different political systems coming into this so it is not surprising that transparency is
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an issue but we know that climate finance has been something which coming into the conference has been theissue coming into the conference has been the issue for many developing countries. talking about the money which will go to those countries from the rich world, to help them adapt to climate change, and to make their economies green in the future and we know there's the promise made in 2009 of $100 billion per year from the rich world to poorer countries, by 2020, and that was not met. we think with the pledges that have been made in the last few days, that figure may be up to about 96 billion by the end of 2022 but 300 billion by the end of 2022 but 300 billion won't be met until 2023 in all likelihood and anyway, a lot more is needed. there are some ambitious words in the document, the draft document, they are looking for a new finance goal which many developing countries want, a target of aiming for developing countries want, a target ofaiming for $1.3 developing countries want, a target of aiming for $1.3 trillion of climate finance every year by 2030 and we don't know if that language
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will remain in a final document but thatis will remain in a final document but that is the kind of money that climate experts say is needed if you are going to get every country in the work at some of them with desperately little money, especially after the pandemic, to reengineer their economies and make them ready for a different world. for their economies and make them ready for a different world.— for a different world. for the moment. — for a different world. for the moment, chris _ for a different world. for the moment, chris morris, - for a different world. for the l moment, chris morris, thanks for a different world. for the - moment, chris morris, thanks for joining us. from glasgow, you are watching bbc news. we can now pick up watching bbc news. we can now pick up on the agreement reached yesterday between china and america for greater cooperation on climate change. i'm joined by kenneth gillingham, professor of economics at the school of the environment at yale university in the united states. professor, thanks for joining professor, thanks forjoining us. how much of a surprise was the announcement to you? it how much of a surprise was the announcement to you?- how much of a surprise was the announcement to you? it was quite a surrise, announcement to you? it was quite a surprise, actually. _ announcement to you? it was quite a surprise, actually. it— announcement to you? it was quite a surprise, actually. it is— announcement to you? it was quite a surprise, actually. it is very - surprise, actually. it is very interesting because there was a long set of work under way
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behind—the—scenes that made it possible that wasn't open to anyone, no one knew this was happening, although maybe you would have expected it to happen because there was a lot of agreement in the past and cooperation in the past under the obama administration on climate. although the relationship between the us and china has been quite acrimonious recently. so it was a definite surprise and i would say it is a jolt of fresh air.— is a jolt of fresh air. yes, that is what we are _ is a jolt of fresh air. yes, that is what we are all— is a jolt of fresh air. yes, that is what we are all talking - is a jolt of fresh air. yes, that is what we are all talking about, i is a jolt of fresh air. yes, that is i what we are all talking about, fresh air, the desire for fresh air, what we are all talking about, fresh air, the desire forfresh air, they say they will be working to reduce methane emissions and reduce the use of coal and given these countries are currently the biggest emitters of greenhouse gases, how tricky process is that to be? it is not just like turning off the tap. trio. just like turning off the tap. no, not at all- _ just like turning off the tap. no, not at all. one _ just like turning off the tap. no, not at all. one thing _ just like turning off the tap. firm, not at all. one thing to be clear,
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the agreement is quite vague on details. it is clear that there is going to be a stepping up of ambition, especially over the next decade and especially in phasing out coal, they will try to start the process of phasing out coal by 2026 and also the ambition of methane. these are important areas. areas that are potentially going to help us reach the goal of keeping 1.5 degrees within reach. but it is not going to be easy, and that is part of the reason why there is such a vagueness in the actual wording and details of the documents. there is a lot of political pressure both in the united states and in china to keep fossil fuel world is the united states and in china to keep fossilfuel world is running and to keep plants running and so it's not necessarily going to be easy to turn the ship ? fossil fuel
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well is. .. .. . . easy to turn the ship ? fossil fuel well is. ., ., ,, ., , well is. that vagueness worries eo - le well is. that vagueness worries --eole a well is. that vagueness worries people a lot — well is. that vagueness worries people a lot because _ well is. that vagueness worries people a lot because where - well is. that vagueness worries people a lot because where is l well is. that vagueness worries i people a lot because where is the transparency and accountability. because we are dealing with the us and china, do you think there's going to be the geopolitical pressure one on the other, to actually keep to some targets, to actually keep to some targets, to actually be accountable and to be fairly transparent about what is happening? i fairly transparent about what is happening?— fairly transparent about what is happening? fairly transparent about what is haueninu? . . , happening? i certainly hope so. i believe there _ happening? i certainly hope so. i believe there is _ happening? i certainly hope so. i believe there is a _ happening? i certainly hope so. i believe there is a real _ happening? i certainly hope so. i believe there is a real desire - happening? i certainly hope so. i believe there is a real desire onl believe there is a real desire on both parties to be serious and to take climate change seriously and to have some real cooperation. i can't say i'm entirely certain that there will be real targets which will be met but you have got to start somewhere. the relationship between the us and china has actually become quite acrimonious, it has been a difficult relationship, whether we are talking about hong kong, human rights violations, the biden
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administration has not had a smooth relationship and the trump administration did not have a smooth relationship ? trump. the restarting conversations and getting conversations and getting conversation going again is crucial to getting to a place where we can actually set some targets. ok. professor. _ actually set some targets. ok. professor, really _ actually set some targets. 0k. professor, really good to hear from you. at yale university there. you do have to start somewhere but many people would argue that it is a bit late in the day to be talking about starting somewhere. we don't know the impact of the new cooperation between the us and china will be in terms of meeting targets but as we heard from the president of cop, let me remind you of what we said ? he said. he said there are still monumental challenges ahead of the negotiators with the official end of cop due to be tomorrow but it could stretch into the weekend. previous
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events have these discussions have gone on and on, if the negotiators feel they are close to getting an agreement. there needs to be some sort of statement coming out of cop26 but the big question is how effective will the statement be? will it keep the goal of 1.5 alive? will it keep the goal of 1.5 alive? will it keep the goal of 1.5 alive? will it allow the average global temperature to stay below that 1.5 degrees above preindustrial levels, the point at which scientists say we would see even worse impacts of climate change question mark that is why you keep hearing people talk about 1.5 and why that is so crucial. we will be back in glasgow with more view very soon but now back to james in the studio in london. ? more foryou. on other news. patients across the uk are facing unacceptably long waits for amublances, which is putting lives at risk — that's according to the college of paramedics. health concerns that went untreated in the pandemic,
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as well people requiring care for covid, are leading to more people needing urgent help as the nhs faces increasing winter pressures. the latest nhs figures show the average response time in england for the most serious incidents was nine minutes and 20 seconds — the longest since current records began in 2017. the average ambulance wait for people having heart attacks or strokes was more than 50 minutes, almost three times the target time of 18 minutes. but in some cases, people are waiting hours for help to arrive. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. across the length and the breadth of the uk, ambulances are queueing, unable to hand over the sick and injured patients they have on board because hospitals have no room. and ambulances stuck in queues aren't available to attend other emergencies, leaving patients in need waiting at home. i called an ambulance at 11.50 and they said they were going to send help asap. just over two weeks ago, christina
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found her grandmother, who lives in cheltenham spa, slumped in a chair having a stroke. it was a blue—light emergency. the ambulance should have arrived in 18 minutes, but instead it took nearly six hours. it then queued outside hospital for another three. it was then that an ambulance lady, i asked her how long it was going to take for my nan to get a ct because ijust needed to know whether or not it was a stroke, and she told me, "oh, your nan's event happened last night, so we would only administer the medication that would have reversed any permanent damage within that three—hour window." how did you feel? ijust broke down in tears on the floor. whistle—blowers from inside the ambulance services have told the bbc the system is at breaking point. this 999 call handler said even patients whose hearts have stopped are facing delays. there was a call for a cardiac
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arrest, where the nearest available crew was 50 minutes away and this guy was in arrest, and for every minute they say 10% of your life expectancy will decrease. this is life threatening and we just don't have the crews to respond like we should do. and have you got the pain in the chest at the moment? all 1a ambulance services in the uk have escalated to the highest level of alert and some have even gone beyond, like here at south central, which recently declared a critical incident when managers said the service had become unsafe. stuart, a paramedic, was working that night. i had a conversation with the control room in the early hours and they said how many jobs were outstanding, how many incidents were outstanding, and i was like, "oh, my god." you just sit there thinking you will never ever get rid of that backlog for days. for the last three months, these handlers have answered an additional
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21,000 999 calls compared to two years ago. and just before the critical incident was declared here, instead of having an average of 20 patients waiting for an ambulance, they had 120 patients waiting. south central has now asked the government for military support. armed forces have helped ambulance services in other parts of england, wales and scotland, and have supported hospitals in northern ireland. governments in all parts of the uk say they are aware of the challenges and are doing their best to support services, but with winter coming, the pressure is likely only to get worse. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. joining me now is chris evans — his father had to wait 13 hours for an ambulance after having a stroke at his home in south wales last month. thank you forjoining us. how did you and yourfather cope
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thank you forjoining us. how did you and your father cope with a 13 hour wait? it you and your father cope with a 13 hour wait? .. . you and your father cope with a 13 hour wait?— hour wait? it was incredibly difficult. my— hour wait? it was incredibly difficult. my sister- hour wait? it was incredibly difficult. my sister was - hour wait? it was incredibly difficult. my sister was with hour wait? it was incredibly - difficult. my sister was with me and for those 13 hours we had to watch my father suffer and he was very agitated and frightened. and felt extremely helpless. itruihat agitated and frightened. and felt extremely helpless.— agitated and frightened. and felt extremely helpless. what kind of conversations _ extremely helpless. what kind of conversations where _ extremely helpless. what kind of conversations where you - extremely helpless. what kind of conversations where you are - extremely helpless. what kind of conversations where you are able extremely helpless. what kind of i conversations where you are able to have with 999 during that time? mr; have with 999 during that time? ii father's have with 999 during that time? ii; father's next—door neighbour had and i found a father's next—door neighbour had and ifound a quarter father's next—door neighbour had and i found a quarter past seven when i arrived in my sister had another conversation at nine o'clock and were told waiting times were between five and eight hours and that thorium iphone and i was told they were still very busy ? and then at fourin were still very busy ? and then at four in the morning i phoned and i was told that they were busy and there were people with conditions in front of him and people were waiting longer than my dad had waited for an ambulance. ~ , ., ., ., ambulance. when you are told there
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are --eole ambulance. when you are told there are people in — ambulance. when you are told there are people in more _ ambulance. when you are told there are people in more difficulty - ambulance. when you are told there are people in more difficulty than i are people in more difficulty than your 85—year—old father has had a stroke, what do you do? you your 85-year-old father has had a stroke, what do you do?— your 85-year-old father has had a stroke, what do you do? you try not to lose your — stroke, what do you do? you try not to lose your cool _ stroke, what do you do? you try not to lose your cool on _ stroke, what do you do? you try not to lose your cool on the _ stroke, what do you do? you try not to lose your cool on the phone - stroke, what do you do? you try not to lose your cool on the phone they| to lose your cool on the phone they are doing the best they can. and you get to a point where you cannot believe that help is not coming. were you able to explain to your father why help was not coming? brute father why help was not coming? we did father why help was not coming? - did try and at one point we had to manhandle him onto the bed because he had collapsed on the floor upstairs and my family came across to help and it took four of us, all of our strength to get him on the bed but i don't think his cognitive abilities were very good on the night. he was very frightened and agitated and i'm not sure if he understood everything being said. edit understood everything being said. of course. did you ever think you might just have to get him into a car and get him to the hospital or would that have been too dangerous? we've had a lot of debate _ that have been too dangerous? we've had a lot of debate on _
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that have been too dangerous? we've had a lot of debate on this _ that have been too dangerous? -- had a lot of debate on this and i've thought of this all through the night, but like i say, if you remember if you're trying to move someone who cannot move or help you to move them and getting my father down the stairs would have been a risk. if he had fallen down the stairs, he may well have died. how was your father now? at the moment he has more speech in very limited movement on his right hand side and he doesn't understand everything said to him, we don't think, but he still there somewhere and i had to with my dad and i think he is still in there somewhere. i with my dad and i think he is still in there somewhere.— in there somewhere. i think everybody _ in there somewhere. i think everybody watching - in there somewhere. i think everybody watching will - in there somewhere. i think| everybody watching will wish in there somewhere. i think - everybody watching will wish you and your dad all the best. thank you so much. it's important to save that the welsh ambulance services have apologise for what they say is an unacceptable way to help. they are saying it s not
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the service they aim to provide. they say prolonged hospital handovers, high call volumes and staff absences have significantly impacted their work. they also send their best to mr evans and say they want to speak with his family about what happened. meanwhile the welsh government says the ambulance service is working hard, and there s a plan in place to help improve things. well, alongside those concerns about waiting times for ambulances across the uk, new nhs figures show hospital waiting lists in england have hit another record high. there were 5.8 million people waiting to start treatment in england at the end of september. that's the highest number since records began in 2007, and up from 5.7 million people waiting in august. the number of people waiting more than a year for treatment was also up slightly, tojust over 300,000. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's katherine downes. from rangers to aston villa — steven gerrard has been confirmed as the new manager at villa park. the former liverpool
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captain leaves the scottish champions after three years, having guided them to a first league title in 10 years last season. he replaces dean smith, who was sacked on sunday after a run of five successive defeats. eartlier i spoke to our football reporter alex howell about the move... it is a massive job at a massive club but villa have paid £a.5 million to get steven gerrard to the club and given him a three and a half year deal which shows commitment. he would want to go there because they have an established premier league squad and he will have funds to spend. they are one of the wealthier clubs in the premier league. his first game will be brighton at home so people will say that is a game he could get off to a winning start with but he will have to get them firing quickly. and the game he will be looking forward to in four weeks' time will be taking villa to liverpool and it's the lure of the premier league money and the chance to get aston villa back into the top half of the table that i think has attracted him down there.
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england captainjoe root says cricket needs to educate, unify and reset following the racism scandal at his club yorkshire. addressing the situation for the first time, root said he wants to see change to harness a diverse environment. it comes as mps prepare to quiz those involved in parliament next week. here s our senior sports news reporter laura scott. joe root is four weeks out from leading england in the ashes but 10,000 miles from his australian quarantine the racism crisis consuming yorkshire, his county side and fracturing english cricket, compelled him to speak out. i've spent a long time reflecting on what has happened. i think more than anything it's really important that we recognise what has happened, we make sure that moving forward we never see this happen again. former player azeem rafiq was found to have been a victim of racial harassment and bullying at yorkshire and when no disciplinary action was taken and it emerged racial slurs had been dismissed as banter, it prompted protests, punishments and parliamentary scrutiny. azeem rafiq is not alone in making allegations and other investigations
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are being conducted. yorkshire's new chairman, lord kamlesh patel, is committed to taking action. after 158 years we are ready to change, we are ready to accept the past and we are ready to become a club which people can trust to do the right thing. joe root said racism must be called out straightaway, but insisted he had never witnessed discrimination during his time at yorkshire. i just wondered if this whole scandal engulfing yorkshire has affected your pride as a yorkshire player and perhaps maybe consider your future there? it's obviously deeply hurtful that it's happened at a club i'm so close to, and it means so much to me to go and play for yorkshire. in terms of my position, if you are not at the club, how can you make any change? how can you help move things forward? the hype will now build towards the ashes butjoe root�*s focus clearly split between matters of club and country as the ugly
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truths of cricket continue to require his attention. laura scott, bbc news. at the t20 world cup — pakistan and australia are battling for the chance to take on new zealand in the final. australia won the toss and put pakistan into bat — and pakistan have gone to town. pakistan unbeaten in the tournament so far. 162—3 after 19 overs. and they have just lost another wicket in that second semifinal, so keep up—to—date with that on the website. england rugby union head coach eddiejones says he's written to emma raducanu to explain comments he made about her over the weekend. jones was accused of being "uninformed and sexist" after using the us open champion as an example when warning his players about dealing with distractions. he's said his words were not meant as criticism and have been taken out of context.
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it's just an example of what can happen, and i don't know whether she is distracted or not because i haven't followed her tennis since, but i know it's difficult for those young players. it's really difficult and we have to be aware of that and i'm certainly aware of it with this group of young players coming through that we want to make sure we minimise the distractions. sure, we want them to enjoy what they can get. that is very important, but at the same time they have to be up to focus 100% on their sport. i don't have any misgivings about what i said. i'm disappointed it was taken out of context and i would be disappointed if emma was upset by it. dan evans has been knocked out of the stockholm open at the quarter—final stage by francis tiafoe. evans started the match in brilliant form, taking the first set 6—1, but that was a good as it got for the british number 2 and tiafoe came roaring back, and won the next two. andy murray will be in action later at the event against america's tommy paul.
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he says he's playing his best tennis of the year. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. back now to our top story — the last a8 hours is upon delegates at the cop26 climate change summit. let's cross to glasgow and my colleague annita mcveigh. we saw in the last few moments ago, the president of cop26, alec sharma, saying there were monumental challenges ahead for negotiators on the other side of the river from where i am in the blue zone at cop26 in glasgow —— alok sharma. we are officially on the last day of the gathering, so time is running out to come to a deal although it might not end tomorrow as planned and may stretch into the weekend. joining us now is farhana yamin, climate lawyer and expert adviser to the climate vulnerable forum.
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which is a global partnership of countries disproportionately impacted by the consequences of global warming. thank you for joining us on bbc news today. perhaps you could begin by giving us some examples of the countries in this forum and the situations they find themselves in because of climate change? thank you for having me. the chair of the climate vulnerable forum is bangladesh at the moment and it will soon pass to ghana and the other previous presidents, a group of 55 countries are the maldives, so these are highly vulnerable countries and they are at the front line of climate impacts which they are feeling today, whether it is drought or storms or salinisation, they are looking at some very serious problems affecting displacement. we've had 30 million people displaced in the last 30 years so these challenges are rising in all
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of these are problems on top of this as well as which has hit everyone very hard. obviously we are hearing in glasgow that finance is one of the trickier issues that negotiators are trying to sort out, and we know wealthier nations have already failed to meet on pledges to provide climate finance to developing nations and i want to ask how much of their gdp do the countries in the forum typically spend on dealing with climate change?— forum typically spend on dealing with climate change? some of them are now spending, _ with climate change? some of them are now spending, after _ with climate change? some of them are now spending, after a _ with climate change? some of them are now spending, after a major - are now spending, after a major cyclone, three, four, 5% of their gdp fixing their economies. life is not the same afterwards. lives and livelihoods are being lost so it's not like things can go back to any kind of normal and that is why they are asking for loss and damage here which is a recognition that there is
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no turning back after some of these massive impacts and there are slow onset events, mainly to agriculture as a result for increased droughts in large areas of land becoming uninhabitable, so routinely we see between five and 10% of gdp in the case of the maldives, which is a very high amount and they don't have deep pockets, these countries, they are living sometimes of tourism and agriculture which are hit hard by climate impacts. bhd agriculture which are hit hard by climate impacts.— agriculture which are hit hard by climate impacts. and it is obviously difficult to move _ climate impacts. and it is obviously difficult to move forward _ climate impacts. and it is obviously difficult to move forward and - climate impacts. and it is obviously difficult to move forward and adapt| difficult to move forward and adapt and move to a green economy if you cannot sort out the loss and damage in the first instance. ila. cannot sort out the loss and damage in the first instance.— in the first instance. no, and they are bein: in the first instance. no, and they are being hit _ in the first instance. no, and they are being hit repeatedly _ in the first instance. no, and they are being hit repeatedly on - in the first instance. no, and they are being hit repeatedly on top i in the first instance. no, and they are being hit repeatedly on top of| are being hit repeatedly on top of this, cyclone after cyclone, drought after drought is going to continue. it's not as if the emission cuts we were hoping for two decades ago and even now have happened, so the pace of climate impact is only going to
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increase, which is why they are arguing for a massive rise in emission reductions and what we call climate mitigation ambition, and also a recognition that more finance needs to flow to these countries as well as for loss and damage. briefly, you were saying that not only glasgow should be dealing with the climate crisis, but you are also saying and the expression you use, it was a litmus test as to whether wealthier nations really want to see a morejust wealthier nations really want to see a more just and wealthier nations really want to see a morejust and inclusive wealthier nations really want to see a more just and inclusive form wealthier nations really want to see a morejust and inclusive form of global governance. a more just and inclusive form of global governance.— a more just and inclusive form of global governance. absolutely. we have had covid _ global governance. absolutely. we have had covid that _ global governance. absolutely. we have had covid that has _ global governance. absolutely. we have had covid that has affected i global governance. absolutely. we. have had covid that has affected the whole globe and most countries that are developing countries have found covid very difficult and are facing high levels of debt and are still in the first phase of the health emergency and have not had massive vaccination roll—out programmes like we have had, so their economies are much more fragile and their pockets are not as deep as ours have been
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and that's why we need to have a different way of dealing with the global economy and we are asking for a justice reset, a full—scale re—examination of whether the current business as usual model is working for everyone and most of us realise it is not working.— realise it is not working. thank you ve much realise it is not working. thank you very much for— realise it is not working. thank you very much for your _ realise it is not working. thank you very much for your time. _ i'm joined now by professor emily shuckburgh, director of cambridge zero at the university of cambridge. her cv also includes more than a decade with british antarctic survey and she was awarded an obe in 2016 for services to science and public communication and also the co—author of the ladybird book of climate change. very good to have you with us. this is a critical moment, just to bring this back to the reason that everybody is here in glasgow. scientists have made it clear that
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if we don't keep a lid on the rise in global temperatures, we are going to see even more deadly impacts of climate change and i say even more deadly because we are there with some of these impacts, aren't we? absolutely. we've seen wild flyers, climate events and polar ice caps melting before our eyes and if we don't put a cap on the warming and keep the temperature rise below 1.5 degrees we will not be living on a planet with society as we know it and we know between 1.5 and 2 degrees of warming means we risk hundreds of millions of additional people being exposed to the risks of climate change and poverty and we know that for many species and entire ecosystems, this is a question of whether they become extinct or not. coral reefs might not exist at all at 2 degrees and
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the real concern is decade studying the real concern is decade studying the polar regions and one of the real concerns as we will pass tipping beyond which we can't return, and the collapse of the ice sheets covering and west antarctica which would eventually result in many metres of sea level rise and that will transform global coastlines.— that will transform global coastlines. . . that will transform global coastlines. , , ., coastlines. our viewers tell us that the want coastlines. our viewers tell us that they want to _ coastlines. our viewers tell us that they want to know _ coastlines. our viewers tell us that they want to know what _ coastlines. our viewers tell us that they want to know what cop26 - coastlines. our viewers tell us that i they want to know what cop26 means for them and their children and grandchildren, where they live. what would you say to that?— grandchildren, where they live. what would you say to that? cop26 makes a difference between _ would you say to that? cop26 makes a difference between whether _ would you say to that? cop26 makes a difference between whether their i difference between whether their children or grandchildren will live in the world that they themselves have been able to enjoy. it's decisions that get made here today, tomorrow, and the action that then results from that over the coming decades which will determine the climate for centuries to come. we
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know what has been pledged so far from countries is not sufficient to avert the worst impacts of climate change, and we need greater ambition, and that is why it is so important that if we don't see enough ambition out of this summit, at least we get some of the commitments to come together again next year to look and see if we can increase the ambition and continue that sense of momentum. we have had the ambition put forward in paris, and in some examples we have managed to move that with actions on phasing out of coal. and focus on cities, so we are starting to move towards an action plan, but not really fast enough, so we need to continue momentum out of here and accelerate to what hopefully is a cleaner, greener, and following on from the
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comments just greener, and following on from the commentsjust made, a more equitable future for everyone.— future for everyone. professor, thank you _ future for everyone. professor, thank you very _ future for everyone. professor, thank you very much _ future for everyone. professor, thank you very much for - future for everyone. professor, thank you very much for your i future for everyone. professor, i thank you very much for your time today. we know from the briefing from the president, alok sharma, that the negotiators will have another late night and into early hours ahead of them, and whether their labours will bring forward a text that there is another agreement on and has the right level of ambition to keep that ambition of 1.5 degrees to stop the planet warming beyond that 1.5 degrees, well, that, we wait to see. at the moment, from glasgow, back to you.
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three mps have been accused of "undermining respect for parliament" after they allegedly got drunk on a flight to visit uk troops in gibraltar. defence secretary ben wallace said the snp's drew hendry and david linden and labour's charlotte nichols had put their hosts "in a difficult position". our political correspondent chris mason gave us more detail about what happened with the mps. this was a delegation that set off to gibraltar earlier this year. 15 mps in total, part of a trip to get a better understanding of how the armed forces work, it's called the armed forces parliamentary scheme. a witness was collaborating that three mps, one from the labour party the snp, were drinking in the airport lounge and continued to drink on the plane for the couple of hours the flight takes from london and being drunk when the plane landed. charlotte nicole the labour mp, she returned to the uk early, and the delegation of remaining mps is still out there. we understand she had a mental health episode and
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returned early, and she is on heavy medication. the two snp mps have responded pretty robustly to the allegation, with both of them say that they regard it as a tory smear operation because they say it's tory mps trying to take attention away from the swell of allegations that have dominated the headlines in the last week or so following owen paterson's resignation as an mp. but as you mention, ben wallace, the defence secretary, getting involved in all of this, writing to labour and the snp saying it posed awkward questions as far as the military were concerned for the behaviour of parliamentarians, so awkward headlines in the swell of all of these headlines at the moment about these headlines at the moment about the conduct of mps more generally. a new species of dinosaur with an unusually large nose has been discovered by a retired doctor. the remains of the brighstoneus simmondsi were found on the isle of wight in 1978.
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they'd been in storage until drjeremy lockwood decided to reconstruct the skull of the animal and realised the bones belonged to an undiscovered species. i'm pleased to say we can speak to jeremy now. he's a phd student at the natural history museum and the university of portsmouth. i understand you did some of this during lockdown. the rest of us were watching netflix, but you were discovering a new species of dinosaur. when did you realise things were getting tasty? yes. dinosaur. when did you realise things were getting tasty? yes, it was about a _ things were getting tasty? yes, it was about a year— things were getting tasty? yes, it was about a year ago _ things were getting tasty? yes, it was about a year ago so - things were getting tasty? yes, it was about a year ago so i - things were getting tasty? yes, it was about a year ago so i was i things were getting tasty? yes, it i was about a year ago so i was going through, because i had this thought maybe there was more diversity and variety of species of the type of dinosaur we were looking at, which was a plant eating dinosaur and so i decided to go through all the bones, a massive collection in the natural history museum and also in the dinosaur museum on the isle of wight which had been gathered in the last
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200 years, so it was a very tedious business of going through boxes of bones and looking at them and looking at the anatomy and during lockdown last year and i suspect it was one of the highlights of my year last year, i was altering a nasal bone and i put it into a position and noticed there was a definite bulbous nose on this dinosaur which was completely different from the two main species that we knew existed on the island. bud two main species that we knew existed on the island.— existed on the island. and that bulbous nose, _ existed on the island. and that bulbous nose, did _ existed on the island. and that bulbous nose, did you - existed on the island. and that bulbous nose, did you start i existed on the island. and that i bulbous nose, did you start phoning people and saying you had a new species? what did you do at that point? we species? what did you do at that oint? ~ . .. species? what did you do at that oint? . , ., ., ., “ species? what did you do at that oint? ~ , ., ., point? we started looking at the skeleton in _ point? we started looking at the skeleton in much _ point? we started looking at the skeleton in much more - point? we started looking at the skeleton in much more detail. point? we started looking at the | skeleton in much more detail and found it had a lot more teeth than the other two main types of dinosaur we had found and as we started looking in more detail at the skeleton we saw quite a few
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differences, but it definitely proved that this was a new species. i suspect that when it was excavated it was lying next to a huge meat—eating dinosaur and i think that was one of the great discoveries of its day back in 1978, so i think it got a bit overshadowed and it was thought to be another iguanodon, but it turned out to be something quite different. isofas iguanodon, but it turned out to be something quite different.- iguanodon, but it turned out to be something quite different. was it a herbivore? yes, _ something quite different. was it a herbivore? yes, it _ something quite different. was it a herbivore? yes, it was _ something quite different. was it a herbivore? yes, it was a _ something quite different. was it a herbivore? yes, it was a herbivore| herbivore? yes, it was a herbivore and it has teeth _ herbivore? yes, it was a herbivore and it has teeth for _ herbivore? yes, it was a herbivore and it has teeth for chewing. i herbivore? yes, it was a herbivore and it has teeth for chewing. the . and it has teeth for chewing. the diet of things, there is no grass or flowering plants back then, so it was pine needles and ferns and tough things, so, yes another herbivore, but herbivores are still wonderful animals. ~ .. .. but herbivores are still wonderful animals. ., ., ., ,
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animals. what a lockdown discovery. it has animals. what a lockdown discovery. it has been — animals. what a lockdown discovery. it has been fascinating. _ animals. what a lockdown discovery. it has been fascinating. thank - animals. what a lockdown discovery. it has been fascinating. thank you i it has been fascinating. thank you so much. communities around the uk have come together to commemorate armistice day, after last year's ceremonies were disrupted by the pandemic. last post plays a two—minute silence was held to mark the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month, when fighting ceased in the first world war. the duchess of cornwall placed a cross amongst poppies outside westminster abbey, as people all over the country remembered those who died in conflict. now tomasz schaffernaker with the weather. for the rest of the daylight hours today it will stay cloudy, mild, damp in places, where the cloud is thicker and you can see some glimmers towards the north—east of england, a few breaks in the cloud across the south, as well, and temperatures up to 15c in london, double figures across scotland, and temperatures in lerwick around 8c.
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low pressure is approaching and you can see this vortex behind me — the weather front brings rain to western areas overnight and the winds will strengthen, up to gale force around the coastal areas, especially in the north—west. this is mild atlantic air so the temperatures are not going to dip much tonight. double figures in many towns and cities and tomorrow it's going to be a blustery day for many. nationwide, up to gale force around the west and we will see fleeting outbreaks of rain in some areas for a little while, others could be quite wet. that's it. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the race to reach a deal — delegates enter the last a8 hours of the cop26 summit, to try to tackle climate change. the world is watching us and they are willing us to work together and reach consensus. and we know that we cannot afford to fail them. the nhs under stress — paramedics tell the bbc lives are at risk because of growing waits for ambulances. fw de klerk, the last white president of south africa, and a key figure in the country's transition to democracy, has died at the age of 85. the husband of nazanin su gary radcliffe said his meeting with a minister said it was depressing. he
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said his hunger strike outside the foreign office will continue. last post plays. communities across the uk come together for armistice day — a year after commemorations were disrupted by the pandemic. the cop26 climate change summit in glasgow has entered its last a8 hours, with countries being urged to step up their efforts and reach a meaningfulfinal deal. just a short while ago we heard from the president of the summit, alok sharma, who said ministers and negotiators are "rolling up their sleeves" and working hard to find solutions to some of the most intractable issues. let's cross now to glasgow and my colleague christian fraser.
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delegates are hammering away at a final agreement that needs to be signed off by nearly 200 countries. the summit officially ends on friday and the president of cop26, alok sharma said there is more work to be done. negotiations will carry on tonight, and possibly into the weekend as delegates find solutions to some contentious issues. here is alok sharma speaking about the monumental challenges that lay ahead. ~ .. monumental challenges that lay ahead. ~ ., ., ., monumental challenges that lay ahead. ., ., ., monumental challenges that lay ahead. . ., ., ., , ahead. what we have always said is what we want _ ahead. what we have always said is what we want coming _ ahead. what we have always said is what we want coming out _ ahead. what we have always said is what we want coming out of - ahead. what we have always said is what we want coming out of cop26| ahead. what we have always said is i what we want coming out of cop26 is to be able to save it credibility we have kept 1.5 within reach. you will have kept 1.5 within reach. you will have seen in august the report that came out which made clear that whilst a window and keeping 1.5 within reach is closing, it is still possible to get there and that is
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why we have also talked about the decisive decade. what you will have seenin decisive decade. what you will have seen in the draft covered so far is setting out how far we think party should return and look again at the commitments they have made, ultimately it is going to be up to parties to come forward with consensus on the decisions and the other text as well. we will be circulating another round of the draft decisions later on tonight and overnight. but i have been very clear, archie young has been very clear, archie young has been very clear, we are urging ambition and i have held meetings with quite a number of the negotiating groups and i have been told by groups, individual parties that they want to see ambition in the outcome of cop26. �* , see ambition in the outcome of cop26. �*, ., ~ i, see ambition in the outcome of cop26. �*, .,~ ., see ambition in the outcome of cop26. �*, ., ~ ., ., see ambition in the outcome of cop26. �*, ., ., ., cop26. let's take a look at some of the key areas _ cop26. let's take a look at some of the key areas still _ cop26. let's take a look at some of the key areas still in _ cop26. let's take a look at some of the key areas still in the _ cop26. let's take a look at some of the key areas still in the cover- the key areas still in the cover agreement. brackets meaning it is
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still to be negotiated. first it is finance, money to reduce emissions and help countries cope with climate change. that could mean flood defence systems. the second is loss and damage. there is a battle for developing countries already affected by climate change. wealthy nations pledged $100 billion all the way back in 2009 to help the poorer nations, but that target is still being missed. richer countries are being missed. richer countries are being asked to commit more money pass 2025. the third area is article six. the rules governing the paris climate agreement, will there be greater transparency, how do we check what countries are doing and how often do countries update these plans? what of the rules for governing carbon markets in the future? all of it is immensely complex but if some of that detail can be ironed out and sticking to the document in the coming hours,
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that will enhance the final agreement. let's speak to ed miliband, shadow secretary for business and industry in the uk. i don't know if you've heard the press conference, but it seems to me he has got a real fight on his conference, but it seems to me he has got a realfight on his hands conference, but it seems to me he has got a real fight on his hands to keep the key elements in this document. document the critics would say is a of commitments? it is important _ say is a of commitments? it is important to _ say is a of commitments? it is important to take _ say is a of commitments? it is important to take a _ say is a of commitments? it 3 important to take a step back. inevitably at these events you have lots of hard negotiation at the end. taking a step back, we know what the task was for glasgow, which was to halve global emissions by 2030 to keep the critical 1.5 degrees alive. we know we are miles short of that. so the question is, what can we salvage from the summit? there's areas are incredibly important. i would add one other area to this which is, we are going to mandate countries to come back next year to do what they didn't do this year. the question is, on what basis are we mandating them to come back? are
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we mandating them to come back? are we urging them, which seems pretty weak to me. are we giving them a let out as to whether they are aiming for 1.5 degrees or 2 degrees. what are we sending a clear message, saying you have got to come back and do better next time. blah saying you have got to come back and do better next time.— saying you have got to come back and do better next time. alok sharma was asked about — do better next time. alok sharma was asked about the _ do better next time. alok sharma was asked about the word _ do better next time. alok sharma was asked about the word urgency - do better next time. alok sharma was asked about the word urgency and i asked about the word urgency and whether the word mandate would be better. but he said you have to appreciate there is a set of divergent opinions of the table. he said there is one country leading a group of other countries who want to take the entire section of mitigation out of it. if you are dealing with that sort of dissent, is there anything that the cops presidency can do? the is there anything that the cops presidency can do? the weapon they have at their — presidency can do? the weapon they have at their disposal, _ presidency can do? the weapon they have at their disposal, nobody i presidency can do? the weapon they have at their disposal, nobody wants to be responsible for this whole thing falling over. you have got to take it to the brink and say two countries, you can either be the
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spoiler, the wrecker or you can compromise and accept something that might not be idealfrom your point of view. you cannot negotiate with the science, we know what the science is telling us. but we can play really hard ball, i am sure alok sharma understands this, we can play hardball with countries and say we know what the world has got to do, what the science is telling us, we are way off and we have to give you a clear mandate to come back in a year. but coming back in a year, it doesn't sound very good but it is the best we are going to get in terms of the crucial 1.5 degrees and keeping it alive. it is terms of the crucial 1.5 degrees and keeping it alive.— keeping it alive. it is a perilous situation- _ keeping it alive. it is a perilous situation. there _ keeping it alive. it is a perilous situation. there is _ keeping it alive. it is a perilous situation. there is a _ keeping it alive. it is a perilous situation. there is a press i situation. there is a press conference under way that activates our app, the climate change minister from tuvalu and he is saying it is the united states standing in the way, they are naming and shaming countries that don't do enough of
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finance, they don't want to come back every year, not putting enough into the pot. it is a time the presidency in the final 2a—hour says we have to name and shame countries, those standing in the way. there does have _ those standing in the way. there does have to _ those standing in the way. there does have to be _ those standing in the way. there does have to be a _ those standing in the way. there does have to be a bit _ those standing in the way. there does have to be a bit of - those standing in the way. there does have to be a bit of that. i those standing in the way. there | does have to be a bit of that. this financing is important. he rightly drew attention to it. $100 billion was promised to developing countries, it was promised in 2009 at the copenhagen summit, which i was at. it still hasn't been delivered. a lot of the developing countries are here and they are thinking, why haven't you delivered on this decade—long promise to us. every country has got to step up and do that because we know developing countries are at the sharpest end of climate change. it is going to affect all countries, including ours, but it does affect the vulnerable and developing countries. they are at the front line of this. it is important to deliver for them morally, but they are a voice that
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can put pressure on countries like china to say, you have got to step up. at the moment we are saying to the developed countries, step up, we need that pressure put on countries like china. the need that pressure put on countries like china. ,, . ., , , ., like china. the un secretary-general sa s that like china. the un secretary-general says that 1-5 — like china. the un secretary-general says that 1-5 is _ like china. the un secretary-general says that 1.5 is on _ like china. the un secretary-general says that 1.5 is on life _ like china. the un secretary-general says that 1.5 is on life support. - like china. the un secretary-general says that 1.5 is on life support. do . says that 1.5 is on life support. do you agree with greta thunberg and other activists, saying to the united nations, we need a level three emergency, this is the only way you will get the finance and organisation, someone to oversee the entire climate challenge and that is the only way we can do it? definitely, it is an emergency and we have got to declare that emergency. countries have got to take it more seriously. if we don't make the progress we need, there are things the uk government could have done, but there is a global picture and countries are struggling and dragging theirfeet in and countries are struggling and dragging their feet in taking the action that is necessary. in the end, we are in this together, it is a collective responsibility for
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countries to step up. no major country is doing enough. if we want to halve emissions by 2030, every country has got to do more. but these final hours are important. your viewers might be thinking, has this been a waste of time? it hasn't been a waste of time, but it is to put countries on the spot and say, you can either be the wrecker or come with us and move with us and thatis come with us and move with us and that is what we have got to do in these last hours of the summit. fire these last hours of the summit. are ou these last hours of the summit. are you playing — these last hours of the summit. are you playing some of that role? i - these last hours of the summit. are you playing some of that role? i am talkin: to you playing some of that role? i am talking to vulnerable _ you playing some of that role? i —n talking to vulnerable countries and some developed countries. i am trying to push for greater ambition in the text, by returning to meet the gap with 1.5 degrees. i want to be constructive in this. we want the uk government to succeed as best they can at this summit. we are not going to get where we wanted to be but we have got to salvage what we can. ed but we have got to salvage what we can. ~ ., ., ., but we have got to salvage what we can. ~ ., ., can. ed miliband, good of you to come along- _ come along. we know the african continent is
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already feeling the pressure of global warning. already feeling the pressure of globalwarning. ghana's already feeling the pressure of global warning. ghana's eastern coast has been subjected to tidal waves, flooding for the third time this year which experts say is down to climate change. this week alone around 3000 people have been displaced in the volta region. this is what remains of the devastating impact caused by sea level rise. homes and livelihoods are destroyed. this is how the entire area has transformed since 2016 and there is no sign of slowing down. hundreds of metres of land has been lost in the last 35 years, according to the institute for environmental and sanitation studies from the university of ghana. many communities have given up here and
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others are bracing themselves for more erosion. this school has been relocated three times and now it is completely shut down because of coastal erosion. the children have to take a boat ride across to the next village to access education. the people in this fishing community have been hit hard by the ever—changing coastline. i have been hit hard by the ever-changing coastline. i don't have any food — ever-changing coastline. i don't have any food to _ ever-changing coastline. i don't have any food to eat, _ ever-changing coastline. i don't have any food to eat, i - ever-changing coastline. i don't have any food to eat, i don't - ever-changing coastline. i don't i have any food to eat, i don't have ever-changing coastline. i don't - have any food to eat, i don't have a place to sleep and i don't have anyplace to do any structure. locai anyplace to do any structure. local community — anyplace to do any structure. local community leader _ anyplace to do any structure. local community leader showed - anyplace to do any structure. local community leader showed me round to show me the extent of damage. what show me the extent of damage. what is happening — show me the extent of damage. what is happening now. _ show me the extent of damage. what is happening now. i— show me the extent of damage. what is happening now, i haven't seen before _ is happening now, i haven't seen before it — is happening now, i haven't seen before it is _ is happening now, i haven't seen before. it is a nightmare. we wake up before. it is a nightmare. we wake up this_ before. it is a nightmare. we wake up this night and you realise your community— up this night and you realise your community has gone. just a day like this, it _ community has gone. just a day like this, it is _ community has gone. just a day like this, it is amazing. for community has gone. just a day like this, it is amazing.— this, it is amazing. for communities that have been _
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this, it is amazing. for communities that have been cut _ this, it is amazing. for communities that have been cut off _ this, it is amazing. for communities that have been cut off by _ this, it is amazing. for communities that have been cut off by coastal - that have been cut off by coastal erosion, narrow trenches like these have been cut through mangrove jungle is to be able to access them. ghana's coastline stretches over 500 kilometres but the government has only managed to build sea defences to protect a few villages. experts say it is not even sustainable. mi say it is not even sustainable. all we are say it is not even sustainable. rii we are trying to do is solve a problem at one location but transferred the problem down drift. sediment builds on the beaches so if you are trapping sediment you are depriving other areas of sediment. that will increase erosion there. what we suggest is if the area is critical, like we are seeing, they should be relocated. we need to understand the science behind what is going on. 50 understand the science behind what isuaoin on. , ., . is going on. so research. the villagers _ is going on. so research. the villagers here _ is going on. so research. the villagers here would - is going on. so research. the villagers here would like - is going on. so research. the villagers here would like to i is going on. so research. the l villagers here would like to see more action and less talking from their leaders. for now, they fight a
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losing battle against the advancing coastline. ghana, one of those countries that will need to adapt to the climate thatis will need to adapt to the climate that is already changing. let's speak to a representative. when i talk to representatives from ghana and other countries represented here on the front line of this, they are pretty disappointed by the way it is going? pretty disappointed by the way it is auoin ? . ~ pretty disappointed by the way it is oiiin? ., ~' pretty disappointed by the way it is iioin? ., , going? thank you, chris. unfortunately, _ going? thank you, chris. unfortunately, it - going? thank you, chris. unfortunately, it is - going? thank you, chris. unfortunately, it is true. | going? thank you, chris. - unfortunately, it is true. the developing countries came to cop26 with big ambitions on adaptation. i think there is a sense of frustration and the way they have been discussing. the important thing is to reduce emissions. we have to discuss at the cops, actions on the ground to move towards the 1.5. this is basic mitigation. but the feet on
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the shoes of countries that have very little emissions but they are suffering the consequences of climate change, they look at adaptation and they need the support to build their resilience. that is the ambition of the small states, the ambition of the small states, the african countries, the least developed countries. when they came to cops, they were expecting more. it's not that it is absent, but it is not there yet. yesterday the us china statement that came up made a very good statement regarding that they need to look at adaptation. we look at lots of this, agriculture, food systems, management of land offer both options. agriculture is very much a victim of climate change. maybe we are responsible in the sector by one third of the emissions, but we cannot be the only victim and cause. in emissions, but we cannot be the only victim and cause.— victim and cause. in many of these devel0ping — victim and cause. in many of these developing countries, _ victim and cause. in many of these developing countries, agriculture l victim and cause. in many of these | developing countries, agriculture is central to the economy and central to so many livelihoods. that is why
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they are desperate to talk about adaptation and why they are so frustrated with countries like the united states who only want to focus on mitigation. is it only about finance or is it about sharing new ways of farming and technology is that the developed world have and are not sharing with the worst affected countries? it is are not sharing with the worst affected countries? it is about a learnini affected countries? it is about a learning process. _ affected countries? it is about a learning process. you _ affected countries? it is about a learning process. you are - affected countries? it is about a learning process. you are right, j learning process. you are right, adaptation is a learning process because we know we have techniques to deal with drought, to deal with floods and building resilience, disaster risk reduction. but the way the climate is changing and the speed it is changing, it is exacerbated. as you said, agriculture is the backbone of the economy of most of these countries. agriculture is for adaptation my energy is for mitigation. you have to combine both. practice that will
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improve the carbon amount in the soils. you will increase fertility, increase productivity so you don't have to cut trees to produce the food you need. but you will store carbon when you avoid carbon that is in the soil to put in the atmosphere. three times more carbon in the soil than in the atmosphere, we wanted to be there. if in the soil than in the atmosphere, we wanted to be there.— in the soil than in the atmosphere, we wanted to be there. if you don't iut we wanted to be there. if you don't put adaptation _ we wanted to be there. if you don't put adaptation in _ we wanted to be there. if you don't put adaptation in place _ we wanted to be there. if you don't put adaptation in place for- we wanted to be there. if you don't put adaptation in place for the - put adaptation in place for the hardest—hit communities, they will move. and then you get a knock on effect, a migration crisis across already sensitive borders, particularly when you talk about africa and in the middle east. these are crucially important topics for national security?— are crucially important topics for national security? indeed. we have been doini national security? indeed. we have been doing studies. _ national security? indeed. we have been doing studies. and _ national security? indeed. we have been doing studies. and how - national security? indeed. we have been doing studies. and how much | national security? indeed. we have - been doing studies. and how much the climate migrants come from the
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agriculture sector, the food production sector. you are right, climate change is affecting the water cycle in the hope land. and the drought, when they occur they are 80% on food systems, food production and livestock. when communities who live on small, very fragile income and they lose their crops, they don't have another option. they are not voluntary migrants but they are forced climate migrants. unfortunately the number of people suffering from the climate change and from hunger is increasing. we produce food for everyone on the planet, so it is a question of having the right thing in the right place for us to avoid people having to move on voluntarily and produce the food, nutritious food they need. that and produce the food, nutritious food they need.— food they need. that is why this an ument food they need. that is why this argument today _ food they need. that is why this argument today is _ food they need. that is why this argument today is crucial - food they need. that is why this argument today is crucial at - food they need. that is why thisj argument today is crucial at this
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summit. thank you for coming. that is it for the moment from here in glasgow but we have plenty more to come and we are focusing on these negotiations. in a couple of hours, the closing ceremony in glasgow will get under way. the easy bits they have agreed, that will be announced from the stage. but the harder bits, that will go on through the night and into the morning and maybe even into the weekend. plenty more to talk about, but i will hand you back to the studio. we are looking at the figures for coronavirus. 42,1i08 new infections and 195 deaths. coronavirus. 42,1108 new infections and 195 deaths. cases have risen for four days in a row, but cases over the last seven days are down 12% compared to the previous seven.
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patients across the uk are facing unacceptably long waits for amublances, which is putting lives at risk — that's according to the college of paramedics. health concerns that went untreated in the pandemic, as well people requiring care for covid, are leading to more people needing urgent help as the nhs faces increasing winter pressures. the latest nhs figures show the average response time in england for the most serious incidents was nine minutes and 20 seconds — the longest since current records began in 2017. the average ambulance wait for people having heart attacks or strokes was more than 50 minutes, almost three times the target time of 18 minutes. but in some cases, people are waiting hours for help to arrive. 0ur health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. across the length and the breadth of the uk, ambulances are queueing, unable to hand over the sick and injured patients they have on board because hospitals have no room.
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and ambulances stuck in queues aren't available to attend other emergencies, leaving patients in need waiting at home. i called an ambulance at 11.50 and they said they were going to send help asap. just over two weeks ago, christina found her grandmother, who lives in cheltenham spa, slumped in a chair having a stroke. it was a blue—light emergency. the ambulance should have arrived in 18 minutes, but instead it took nearly six hours. it then queued outside hospital for another three. it was then that an ambulance lady, i asked her how long it was going to take for my nan to get a ct because ijust needed to know whether or not it was a stroke, and she told me, "0h, your nan's event happened last night, so we would only administer the medication that would have reversed any permanent damage within that three—hour window." how did you feel? ijust broke down in
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tears on the floor. whistle—blowers from inside the ambulance services have told the bbc the system is at breaking point. this 999 call handler said even patients whose hearts have stopped are facing delays. there was a call for a cardiac arrest, where the nearest available crew was 50 minutes away and this guy was in arrest, and for every minute they say 10% of your life expectancy will decrease. this is life threatening and we just don't have the crews to respond like we should do. and have you got the pain in the chest at the moment? all 1a ambulance services in the uk have escalated to the highest level of alert and some have even gone beyond, like here at south central, which recently declared a critical incident when managers said the service had become unsafe. stuart, a paramedic, was working that night. i had a conversation with the control room in the early
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hours and they said how manyjobs were outstanding, how many incidents were outstanding, and i was like, "oh, my god." you just sit there thinking you will never ever get rid of that backlog for days. for the last three months, these handlers have answered an additional 21,000 999 calls compared to two years ago. and just before the critical incident was declared here, instead of having an average of 20 patients waiting for an ambulance, they had 120 patients waiting. south central has now asked the government for military support. armed forces have helped ambulance services in other parts of england, wales and scotland, and have supported hospitals in northern ireland. governments in all parts of the uk say they are aware of the challenges and are doing their best to support services, but with winter coming, the pressure is likely only to get worse. sophie hutchinson, bbc news.
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joining me now is paul turner. he's a paramedic, and also the deputy branch secretary for the gmb union at the north west ambulance service. tell us about shortages where you are? ,, ., ., , tell us about shortages where you are? ,, ., ., are? shortages are across the country and — are? shortages are across the country and not _ are? shortages are across the country and notjust _ are? shortages are across the country and notjust in - are? shortages are across the country and notjust in the - country and notjust in the north—west. we have been seeing these for a number of years but this year has been more difficult and challenging than normal. the gmb did write to ministers and explained that we could have predicted this happening but we didn't get a response, which is very shocking because we are trying to help people, notjust the public but trying to demonstrate we are trying to work with the government as well. but we got no response with this case. d0 but we got no response with this case. y ., but we got no response with this case. ,, . but we got no response with this case. i. ., ., but we got no response with this case. ., ., , ., ., case. do you have a situation in which you _ case. do you have a situation in which you have _ case. do you have a situation in which you have parked - case. do you have a situation in . which you have parked ambulances case. do you have a situation in - which you have parked ambulances but not enough paramedics to go in them? there is not the case of parked
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ambulances with no one to attend but we have demand outstripping the resources and this is happening every year. the ambulance service as well as the nhs is paid in arrears. we are getting paid for the demand 12 months ago two years ago, rather than what we are experiencing now. the issue we have is if the government said, they did this a couple of months ago, gave the nhs millions of pounds to try and improve things, it is getting a little bit too late. we take three years to grow a paramedic in 12 months at least for a technician. we can't see any improvement any time soon. and that is the concerning bit. we see these delays now, i would like to see what they will be in april or march next year, especially on the back of the mandated vaccinations. that will create the next problem. nhs workers do believe that it should be
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mandated. we should be looking at them and talking to them. that mandated. we should be looking at them and talking to them.- them and talking to them. that is a se iarate them and talking to them. that is a separate subject — them and talking to them. that is a separate subject but _ them and talking to them. that is a separate subject but the _ them and talking to them. that is a separate subject but the first - them and talking to them. that is a separate subject but the first duty l separate subject but the first duty of anyone working in the nhs is to protect the lives of patients and the vaccines do that.— protect the lives of patients and the vaccines do that. there is no evidence to _ the vaccines do that. there is no evidence to say _ the vaccines do that. there is no evidence to say that _ the vaccines do that. there is no evidence to say that the - evidence to say that the vaccinations stop you from passing the cove it on or does it stop you passing it to and from your colleagues.— passing it to and from your colleagues. passing it to and from your colleaiues. , , , ., colleagues. there is plenty of evidence we _ colleagues. there is plenty of evidence we can _ colleagues. there is plenty of evidence we can show - colleagues. there is plenty of evidence we can show from . colleagues. there is plenty of - evidence we can show from scientists that show having the vaccine is the best way of protecting people, which is the first duty of notjust anyone, but of nhs staff in particular? i anyone, but of nhs staff in particular?— anyone, but of nhs staff in articular? ., ., ., ., ., , particular? i am not pro or against, neither are — particular? i am not pro or against, neither are the _ particular? i am not pro or against, neither are the gmb _ particular? i am not pro or against, neither are the gmb against - particular? i am not pro or against, neither are the gmb against the - neither are the gmb against the vaccination, but what we should be doing is educating and finding out why those individuals don't want the vaccination. if it was to do with health and safety the government could mandated across the board for every single person in the uk rather thanjust picking on
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every single person in the uk rather than just picking on the every single person in the uk rather thanjust picking on the nhs and every single person in the uk rather than just picking on the nhs and the care team as well. this is why if we just take that one step back, this is why we are struggling in the nhs. people don't want to work in care. that is causing backlogs within the a&e department and that is why we are queueing as ambulance clinicians, because the staff are paid a minimum wage to do a fantasticjob but the wage doesn't match what those individuals deserve. so if we have got backlogs, it is because we have an issue in social care as well. that comes because it is not properly funded, just like the nhs isn't. full tanner, thank— just like the nhs isn't. full tanner, thank you - just like the nhs isn't. full tanner, thank you so - just like the nhs isn't. full tanner, thank you so much for joining us. tanner, thank you so much for joining us— in response to those concerns about ambulance waiting times, an nhs spokesperson said they ve set out a 10—point action plan for this winter and have also asked trusts to tackle ambulance handover delays with immediate effect. well alongside those concerns about waiting times for ambulances across the uk,
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new nhs figures show hospital waiting lists in england have hit another record high. there were 5.8 million people waiting to start treatment in england at the end of september. that's the highest number since records began in 2007 and up from 5.7 million people waiting in august. the number of people waiting more than a year for treatment was also up slightly, tojust over 300,000. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. the weather is looking pretty quiet for the rest of the day. it has been mild and cloudy, damp for some others and here we go. this is the satellite picture, a lot of cloud across the uk but the sun is setting so we are no longer seeing the cloud. low pressure is approaching
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out towards the west so increasing winds and outbreaks of rain. certainly moving into many north—western parts of the uk. it will be a very mad night, temperatures no lower than 11 degrees in western towns and cities. tomorrow morning we wake up to blustery weather across the north—western portion of the uk and the wind will blow in some of that rain to other areas of the well. it won't be a wash—out tomorrow, it is going to stay mild on the thermometer. 15 in london, 12 to 13 in the north, but the winds will be stronger so it will not be as mild as some today. and then basically through the course of friday night into saturday, the wet weather moves into saturday, the wet weather moves into the north sea and the good news is that we can, it doesn't look too bad at all. not that sunny, but decent enough.
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hello this is bbc news with the headlines: the race to reach a deal — delegates enter the last 48 hours of the cop26 summit, to try to tackle climate change. the world is watching us. and they are willing us to work together and reach consensus. and we know that we cannot afford to fail them. the nhs under stress — paramedics in the uk tell the bbc lives are at risk because of growing waits for ambulances. president of south africa, and a key figure in the country's transition to democracy, has died at the age of 85
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the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe says his meeting with a foreign office minister was "depressing"and left him stuck in the "same status quo" . richard ratcliffe says his hunger strike outside the foreign office will continue communities across the uk come together for armistice day — a year after commemorations were disrupted by the pandemic. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, england manager gareth southgate sent his best wishes to steven gerrard as he makes to move from raiders to ask and data. the captain leaves the scottish champions after three years in charge having guided them to a first league title in ten years last evening and he replaces dean smith who was fired on sunday after a round of five successive
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defeats. southgate has been speaking to the media this afternoon and gave his thoughts on the move.— his thoughts on the move. stevens alwa s had his thoughts on the move. stevens always had fantastic _ his thoughts on the move. stevens always had fantastic leadership - always had fantastic leadership qualities. i live for the be a more senior_ qualities. i live for the be a more senior player. i been 30 when he first coming to the england squad and he _ first coming to the england squad and he was always a tidings but he always— and he was always a tidings but he always had — and he was always a tidings but he always had great drive. he had a fabulous — always had great drive. he had a fabulous start to his career and he leaves _ fabulous start to his career and he leaves one — fabulous start to his career and he leaves one massive football club to 'oin leaves one massive football club to join another. and i'm sure it's a challenge — join another. and i'm sure it's a challenge that he's looking forward to. challenge that he's looking forward to it's _ challenge that he's looking forward to it's a _ challenge that he's looking forward to. it's a great opportunity for him — to. it's a great opportunity for him. ., , ., , him. the former chelsea boss is amoni a him. the former chelsea boss is among a number— him. the former chelsea boss is among a number of— him. the former chelsea boss is among a number of candidates i him. the former chelsea boss is i among a number of candidates and talks with h about becoming a gaming manager. england test captainjoe root says the racism scandal at his home club yorkshire has "fractured the game and torn lives apart" — but he says he's never witnessed any such abuse during his time at the club. azeem rafiq — the former player who first spoke about his experience of racism at the club — said he feels "incredibly
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hurt" and disappointed to hear root claims — he said "uncomfortable truths are hard to accept". root spoke instead of the need for the sport to make changes: think the most important thing we have to do that right now is how we move forward as a squad and how we move forward as a squad and how we move forward as a squad and how we move forward as a society as well and i think what we need to do is address what is happening and find ways of educating more and find ways of moving forward and really looking at areas in which we as a sport and beyond that as well can really look to better society and better the game. at the t20 world cup — pakistan and australia are battling for the chance to take on new zealand in the final. australia won the toss and put pakistan into bat — an incredible innings saw them set a target of 177 to win...australia
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lost captain aaron finch to the first ball as they set out in reply — they're on ?? 57-2. it's 57—2. it's very tense stuff. england rugby union head coach eddiejones says he's written to emma raducanu to explain comments he made about her over the weekend. jones was accused of being "uninformed and sexist" after using the us open champion as an example when warning his players about dealing with distractions. he's said his words were not meant as criticism and have been taken out of context. it's just an example of what can happen. i don't know whether she is distracted or not because it's difficult for those young players and it's really difficult. i'm certainly aware of a treat this group of young players coming through that we want to make sure we minimize the distractions. we want them to enjoy what they can get. that's very important. at the same
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time they've got to be able to focus 100% on this sport. i don't have any misgivings about what i said. i was disappointed it was taken out of context and disappointed if emma was upset by it. dan evans has been knocked out of the stockholm open at the quarter—final stage by francis tiafoe. evans started the match in brilliant form, taking the first set 6—1, but that was a good as it got for the bristish number 2 and tiafoe came roaring back, and won the next two. andy murray will be in action later at the event against america's tommy paul. that's all the sport for now. the pace of the uk's economic recovery slowed in the three months to september, according to new figures from the office for national statistics. gdp grew by 1.3%, down from 5.5% in the previous three months, with supply issues contributing to slower growth. ramzan karmali reports. are the wheels of the
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economy slowing down? the latest official data shows the economy is still growing, but at a much more measured pace than earlier in the year. at this somerset toiletry company, the boss was confident enough to invest hundreds of thousands of pounds on a new soap making machine, as he's seen a big upturn in business, but he is still wary of some of the challenges ahead. i think we all expect some tailing off because the price of containers and shipping has gone through the roof, so we are expecting a drop off because the consumer will have to get used on the new retail prices that will start hitting the high street. some have already hit, some won't be hitting until the beginning of next year. like many businesses, he's also struggling to hire people as the economy has opened up, but the chancellor insists these are issues being faced all across the world. i think what you are seeing is an economy that is continuing to grow and that is a good thing. we are on the right path but there are global challenges
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ahead and that's why the budget set out a plan to build a stronger economy with support for working families at its heart. the economy is still growing, but that rebound between july and september is a lot less than many had predicted. if you look at this chart, it shows the losses we made during the pandemic still haven't been caught up. the service sector has now almost made up almost all of its losses, a sign the vaccine roll—out helped with the reopening, but the challenge for the government and other policymakers now is how to deal with an environment where taxes and energy bills are on the rise. last week the bank of england decided not to raise interest rates, but many economists expect them to go up from their historic lows before the end of the year. the risk is, obviously, if the bank of england start raising rates too quickly and that could depress demand quite significantly at a time when the economy is still vulnerable.
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the reason those rates may have to go up is to help combat the threat rising prices, so even though consumer spending rose as we emerged from lockdown, that demand may soften as businesses start to face much higher costs. ramzan karmali, bbc news. communities around the uk have come together to commemorate armistice day, after last year's ceremonies were disrupted by the pandemic. a two—minute silence was held to mark the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month, when fighting ceased in the first world war. the duchess of cornwall placed a cross amongst poppies outside westminster abbey, as people all over the country remembered those who died in conflict. sarah campbell reports. on the 11th hour of the 11th month in 1918 the guns of the first world war fell silent. more than a century later the nation paused to remember those who sacrificed so much in service to their country. today we remember places with names synonymous
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with places of conflict...
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today we remember places with names synonymous with places of conflict... last year the pandemic prevented many from coming together to remember. today we remember places with names synonymous so many lost lives to honour, given special mention at the cenotaph today, walter tull, britton's first black officer in the british army who died in 1918, invited to lay a wreath on his behalf his great—nephew. this is a fantastic event to come to the point where i'm able to lay a wreath on behalf of my grand uncle at the cenotaph, it's a great honour and a great honour to him. young and old ensuring sacrifices will never be forgotten. sarah campbell, bbc news. the duchess of sussex has apologised for misleading a court
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about information given by her aides to the authors of a biography. meghan sued the publisher of the mail on sunday over 5 articles. in her witness statement meghan apologised and said that she did not intend to mislead the court about the role of an aide in providing information to the authors of the unauthorised biography. three mps have been accused of "undermining respect for parliament" after they allegedly got drunk on a flight to visit uk troops in gibraltar. defence secretary ben wallace said the snp's drew hendry and david linden and labour's charlotte nichols had put their hosts "in a difficult position". our political correspondent chris mason gave us more detail about what happened with the mps. it was part of the scheme to ensure that mps have decent working knowledge of how the armed forces do their thing. this allegation corroborated by witnesses spoke to the bbc of these three mps, two from the bbc of these three mps, two from
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the snp and one from a neighbor drinking in the airport lounge prior to setting off continuing to drink on the plane out to gibraltar for the couple of hours at that flight takes from london and being drunk when the plane landed in gibraltar. now charlotte nichols, the shadow minister and neighbor and be for warrington north she was one of those mps she returned to the uk early in the delegation of the remaining mps is still out there. i understand she had a mental health episode and returned early and is on heavy medication. the two snp mps have responded pretty robustly to the allegation both of them saying they regard this as a tory smear operation because they say it's three mps trying to take attention away from the swell of allegations that have dominated the headlines in the last week or so following on pattison's resignation as an mp but as you mentioned ben wallace the
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defense secretary getting involved in all of this writing to labor and the snp saying this posed awkward questions as far as the military were concerned for the behavior of parliamentarians. so awkward headlines for three mps in the swell of all of these headlines at the moment about the conduct of mps more generally. a student from lancashire has been found guilty of murdering his step grandmother three years after an inquest ruled it had been an accident. preston crown court heard that 21 year old tiernan darnton confessed to the killing during a game of truth or dare with his friends. our north of england corrspondent fiona trott gave us this update a little earlier. that is what is remarkable about this court case, for years, it was believed mary gregory's death was accidental, there was a fire at her home in lancashire in 2018, she was found crouched under a table in her bungalow and taken to hospital, and she died four days later. there was an investigation at the time and the fire service believed that the fire was caused by a discarded cigarette. an inquest ruled that the death
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was accidental, but then later, tiernan darnton, her step—grandson who was 17 at the time, was playing a game of truth or dare with his friends and he told them he had a dark secret. he said, i have a secret i haven't told anyone. i may have killed someone. and they pressed him on this, and he said that he started the fire, because he didn't want his stepgrandmother to suffer any longer from dementia. now, after that, the court also heard that he told a counsellor a year later that he also started the fire. but during this trial at preston crown court, tiernan darnton's lawyer said he made the confession to his friends because it was a misguided attempt to impress them, and he said the omission he made no the admission he made to the council was pure fiction. we also heard that tiernan darnton's stepfather, mrs gregory's own son,
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said the student had been suffering from depression for a number of years and was plagued by intrusive and disturbing thoughts. but today, the jury found him guilty of murder. he is due to be sentenced on friday. the last president of the apartheid era south africa and the key figure in the transition to a multiracial democracy has died. he was 85. however that there is correspondent looks back on his life. today we have closed the book on apartheid and that chapter is finally closed. the force of history would have had ended white supremacy in south africa eventually. but without him the transformation to nonracial democracy could've been a lot more painful. he saw that his country had to change, and he delivered. mr de klerk knew very well
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what lay behind the chaos up and violence in black townships, provoked by rigid racial segregation. for years, as a minister in south africa's white minority government, he had helped entrench apartheid. then fw de klerk became president in 1989, replacing p w better, the last apartheid dinosaur. a president de klerk�*s approach was very different. the prohibition of the african national congress, the black african congress, the south african communist party and a number of subsidiary organisations has been rescinded. applause. order. within a year, nelson mandela finally walked to freedom. fw de klerk had ordered his release and unbanned the anc. acts he knew must number his own days in power. talks to end white minority rule opened old wounds in black politics. there was a terrible violence in the townships between anc
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and its zulu rivals. violence that was actively fomented by the white security apparatus. and white extremists too were up in arms. upset at the prospect of a black government. de klerk sensed the threat and outmanoeuvred them by offering a whites only referendum in 1992. he craved backing and he won it. now, change was unstoppable. the world acknowledge that. in 1993, mr de klerk wasjointly awarded the nobel peace prize along with a man who would replace him as president. although nelson mandela was sometimes infuriated by fw de klerk, he called him a man of integrity. president mandela's inauguration in1991i was partly a tribute to mr de klerk�*s vision. some of his former colleagues complained he's been opportunistic, merely seizing the moment.
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but he did seize the moment. never again on one inch of the soil of the republic of south africa will there ever be racial discrimination again. and so, for white south africans, fw de klerk and stand tall in history. some breaking news to bringing about cricket and yorkshire cricket club. there is a statement from the club and it says yorkshire county cricket club can confirm that its chief executive officer ? officer has resigned with immediate effect in the interim the statement says the board has appointed paul hudson finance director as acting ceo. the recruitment process for the appointment of a full—time chief executive will begin in due course and this of course comes admits that the aftermath of graces and scandella which has engulfed both the club and the widest point of
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cricket. as another piece of breaking news to bring you which comes from london. driver is on london's underground night cube are to stage a series of strikes from her later this month in the dispute of staffing and that is according to the rmt union. the husband of the jailed british iranian woman held in tehran, nazanin zagari ratcliffe says he is "stuck in the same status quo" after meeting officials at the foreign office. richard ratcliffe is on day 19 of a hunger strike camping outside the foreign office to protest his wife's continued detention in iran. he said the meeting had been quite depressing and he had not been given much hope for her release. nazanin was arrested during a holiday to the country in 2016. a study of a restored cultural ? coastal marsh showed the issue could have some benefits if managed
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correctly. digging into a changing environment. in an area that's surrounded by scotland's coal mining past and its industrial present, there's a transformation happening beneath our feet. just three years ago, this area was re—engineered to bring the coastal wetland back to its natural state. you breach the coastal defences and let the water back in. and at that point, we kind ofjust step back and let nature do its thing. and we're really seeing the wildlife respond. as well as a diverse wetland habitat this marsh has become a natural tool in our fight to reduce emissions of greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. marshland plants absorb one of those key planet warming gases, carbon dioxide, which then becomes buried in the mud. yay! that's the big one. this is some of the most organic rich soils we find in the uk compared to agricultural land, forestry land. the scientists studying this site say it's revealing a way to work with nature to manage one
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of the inevitable impacts of climate change — sea level rise. the threats of sea level rise are very serious. and i think where there are positive opportunities, particularly for nature, that we should be thinking about sea level rise as an opportunity for coastal wetland habitat creation. we can see a source of greenhouse gas emissions from here, from the fossil fuel industry. there's grangemouth refineryjust in the distance and we still need to slash emissions. but making space for natural stores of carbon, places like this, that suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere will help us rebalance that. allowing the sea to reclaim this stretch of land has provided a glimpse of how we can help nature to help us tackle the climate crisis. victoria gill, bbc news. a new species of dinosaur with an unusually large nose has been discovered by a retired doctor. the remains of the
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brighstoneus simmondsi, were found on the isle of wight in 1978. they'd been in storage until doctorjeremy lockwood decided to reconstruct the skull of the animal and realised the bones belonged to an undiscovered species. jeremy is now a phd student at the natural history museum and the university of portsmouth and he told me what happened. it was about a year ago sol it was about a year ago so i was going through i had this thought that maybe there was more diversity and there was of species of the type of data so that we were looking at which was a plant eating dinosaur and so i decided to go through all the bones and they were massive collections and also in tennis or museums on the isle of wight which had been gathered up in the last 200 years so it was a very tedious business of going through boxes of
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bones and measuring them and looking at them and learning the anatomy and during knockdown last year i suspect it was one of the highlights of my year last year and i was just altering a nasal bone and put it into a position i noticed there was a definite bulbous nose on this dinosaur which was completely different from the two main species that we knew existed on the island. and that bulbous nose then lead, you phoned people and said ok i have a new species here? what did you do at that point? we new species here? what did you do at that ioint? ~ , ., ., ., ~' new species here? what did you do at that ioint? . , ., ., that point? we started looking at the skeleton _ that point? we started looking at the skeleton and _ that point? we started looking at the skeleton and a _ that point? we started looking at the skeleton and a much - that point? we started looking at the skeleton and a much more i that point? we started looking at - the skeleton and a much more detail. ifound it had the skeleton and a much more detail. i found it had a the skeleton and a much more detail. ifound it had a lot the skeleton and a much more detail. i found it had a lot more teeth and then the other two main types of dinosaur that we found and as he started looking in more detail at the skeleton we found quite a few differences and it definitely proved this was a new species. i suspect
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when it was excavated it was lying next to a huge meat eating dinosaur and i think that was one of their great discoveries of its day back in 1978 so i think people get this overshadowed and it was put in a box and thought to be just another dinosaur but it turned out to be something quite different. mas dinosaur but it turned out to be something quite different. was it a herbivore? yes. _ something quite different. was it a herbivore? yes. it _ something quite different. was it a herbivore? yes. it was _ something quite different. was it a herbivore? yes. it was a _ something quite different. was it a herbivore? yes. it was a herbivore| herbivore? yes. it was a herbivore and it's got _ herbivore? yes. it was a herbivore and it's got teeth _ herbivore? yes. it was a herbivore and it's got teeth for _ herbivore? yes. it was a herbivore and it's got teeth for chewing. - herbivore? yes. it was a herbivore and it's got teeth for chewing. the diets of things there was no grass or flowering diets of things there was no grass orflowering plants back then diets of things there was no grass or flowering plants back then so diets of things there was no grass orflowering plants back then so it was pine needles and ferns and tough things so another herbivore and they are still wonderful animals. a french balloonist has broken the world record for standing on a hot—air balloon.
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here's 28 year old r mi ouvrard on top of the balloon over western france at an altitude of more than three and a half thousand metres. it was piloted by his father for a charity event. he told reporters he experienced a feeling of �*serenity�*during the flight. martine croxall�*s at the desk and ready to bring you the five o'clock news. before that, the weather with tomasz. the weather is quiets out at the moment. it's been a mild day for most of us. tomorrow is a different story. a story. most of us. tomorrow is a different story. a low pressure will temporarily visit us. it will bring us some blustery leather and some showers. not everyone will get rain tomorrow but we will notice the strength of the wind. it will stay mild and the low pressure is responsible for drying in that mild airfrom the responsible for drying in that mild air from the southern client sets over us right now. they not only
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bring bad weather but they also bring bad weather but they also bring mild weather from the southern crimes. and then cooler weather when the wind swings direction. the thing about this area of low pressure as it bows across the uk for the next 24 it bows across the uk for the next 2a hours, temperatures will not change much. right now temperatures are into the double figures pretty much across the board. and this low pressure is within a very mild air mass coming off the atlantic. that means temperatures wants change must do the night. the wind will strengthen and get can see rain spreading into northern and western areas with much rainfall in the south. temperatures will be what they are right now and is what they will be around five or seven o'clock in the morning tomorrow. tomorrow will not feel quite as mild as it did today because the wind will be stronger tomorrow. around a gale force western coasts of 50 mph. notice the weather is not too bad across some southern and central areas and the rainfall in the forecast 15 degrees. in the south
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their wrongdoings will feel cooler here in the north and the west. the low pressure is a one day wonder. it will not hang around for very long and it will go off by the time we get to saturday. and in the south will be an area of high pressure and it's called a rage because it billed from the south. the winds are light on saturday so after friday saturday is much calmer. they will be clouds in the sky but some sunshine and not much change in the temperature. it's that mild atlantic air that we have been around for for quite a few days. a bit of a change in the temperatures as we head towards next week. you can see a drop but generally speaking it is mild for the time of year and not much apart from tomorrow, not much change for tuesday. wednesday, thursday next week is going to let able to change and we look at blustery winds off the atlantic weather front but for
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now that's that.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the race to reach a deal — delegates enter the last 48 hours of the cop26 summit, to try to tackle climate change. the world is watching us, and they are willing us to work together and reach consensus. and we know that we cannot afford to fail them. the nhs under stress — paramedics tell the bbc lives are at risk because of growing waits for ambulances. we'll be speaking to the vice president of the college of paramedics, in 15 minutes' time. white mcmorris scandalise club ceo becomes the latest to be signed. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe says his meeting with a foreign office minister
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was "depressing"and left him stuck in the "same status quo".

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