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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 11, 2021 1:30pm-2:01pm GMT

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it had been dismissed as banter, it prompted protests, punishments and parliamentary scrutiny. azeem rafiq is not alone in making allegations and other investigations are being conducted. yorkshire's new chairman, lord kamlesh patel, is committed to taking action. after 158 years we are ready to change, we are ready to accept the past and we are ready to become a club which people can trust to do the right thing. jae become a club which people can trust to do the right thing.— to do the right thing. joe root said racism must _ to do the right thing. joe root said racism must be _ to do the right thing. joe root said racism must be called _ to do the right thing. joe root said racism must be called out - racism must be called out straightaway, but insisted he had never witnessed discrimination during his time at yorkshire. ijust wondered if this whole scandal engulfing yorkshire has affected your pride as a yorkshire player and perhaps may be consider your future there? it’s perhaps may be consider your future there? �*, ., _ perhaps may be consider your future there? _ there? it's obviously deeply hurtful that it's happened _ there? it's obviously deeply hurtful that it's happened at _ there? it's obviously deeply hurtful that it's happened at a _ there? it's obviously deeply hurtful that it's happened at a club - there? it's obviously deeply hurtful that it's happened at a club i'm - there? it's obviously deeply hurtful that it's happened at a club i'm sol that it's happened at a club i'm so close to end it means so much to me to go and play for yorkshire. in terms of my position, if you are not at the club how can you make any change? how can you help move things
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forward? the change? how can you help move things forward? , , ., , forward? the hype will now build towards the _ forward? the hype will now build towards the ashes _ forward? the hype will now build towards the ashes but _ forward? the hype will now build towards the ashes but joe - forward? the hype will now buildi towards the ashes but joe root's towards the ashes butjoe root's focus clearly split between matters of club and country is the ugly truths of cricket continue to require his attention. laura scott, bbc news. time for a look at the weather forecast, here's thomas and a picture of serenity. it's very quiet and mild and no change expected over the next few days. a dry, cloudy day for many others. tomorrow the winds will pick up others. tomorrow the winds will pick up and we'll notice that but he was the big picture across our neck of the big picture across our neck of the woods, and you can see a lot of mild air streaming the woods, and you can see a lot of mild airstreaming in the woods, and you can see a lot of mild air streaming in from the southern climes. this is the position of the jet stream, a reminder, it always denotes that transition between the mild air in the south and the cold air in the north so the jet stream is north of us right now, hence we are in the mild airstream. he us right now, hence we are in the mild air stream. he was the low pressure which is going to be right on top of us tomorrow, so tomorrow will be a blustery day, but ahead of
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it we've got that calm at the moment so the winds are relatively light but through the afternoon there will be picking about towards the west in advance of this cold front here and you can see how mild it is. mid teens across many parts of the country. just our friends in the far north, in lerwick, around 8 degrees. here comes the low pressure. it sweeps in off the atlantic, brings in spells of rain tonight and tomorrow. there will be a fair bit of cloud, rain and wind around tonight so temperatures won't drop. much around 11 degrees across many western towns and cities, may be single figures in the north. tomorrow, a slightly different day. again, the blustery wind will be very noticeable particularly around western coasts. up to gale force, 50 mile an hour gusts and places. pretty winding and land. you can see the rain across the uk. there will be some limits of sunshine around, not raining all day long. the rain will come and go. 15 in london, 12-13 will come and go. 15 in london, 12—13 across the north of the uk. a blustery end to the week. but this low pressure isn't going to hang
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around for too long. by the time we get to saturday morning it's moved out into the near continent and instead this little area of high pressure moves in, which means that things will settle down. the winds will die down on saturday is looking fine for most of us. not clear blue skies but there will be some sunny spells developing. i think overall a pleasant enough saturday on the way, with temperatures again above the average for the time of year, 1a in london. we'll probably match that in belfast and for remembrance sunday i think the weather is going to be fine as well. a lot of dry weather and this fine, settled weather is going to last through monday and tuesday. wednesday onwards i think the atlantic winds will pick up and bouts of rain sweeping in but that's not until towards the end of next week. that's all from the bbc news at one. it's goodbye from me. 0n bbc one we nowjoin the bbc�*s news teams where you are.
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good afternoon. now the latest from the bbc sport centre. aston villa have appointed steven gerrard as their new manager on a three—and—a—half year deal. the former liverpool captain leaves the scottish champions having guided them to a first league title in 10 years last season — he's been in charge at ibrox for three years. gerrard replaces dean smith, who was sacked on sunday after a run of five successive defeats. earlier, i asked our reporter alex howell how big a job gerrard has on his hands. it isa it is a massive job at a massive club, but villa have paid £4.5 million to get gerrard down to the club, and given him a 3.5 year deal, which shows commitment. he will want to go there, they have an established premier league squad, and they have funds, one of the wealthier clubs in the league. his
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first game will be bright and at home so people would say that is a game he could get off to a winning start with, but he will have to get them firing quickly. the game he will be looking forward to in four weeks' time is taking villa to liverpool. it is the allure of the premier league, money, the chance to get villa back into the top half of the table that i think has attracted him down there. england test captainjoe root says the racism scandal at his home club yorkshire has "fractured the game and torn lives apart".root had pledged to support the new chair of yorkshire, lord patel, as he brings about change at the club — four former players have spoken publicly about their experiences of discrimination. i think the most important thing that we have to look at right now is how we move forward as a sport, as a society as well. i think this is deeper than just cricket. i think what we need to do is address what has happened, and find ways of educating more, find ways of moving
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forward, and really looking at areas in which we, as a sport, and beyond that, as well, can, can really look to better society and better the game. meanwhile, ben stokes has been training with his england teammates, after a six—month lay—off from the game. stokes needed time to recover from mental—health issues, as well as a finger injury. he was a late addition to the ashes squad, but was right in the thick of it here on queensland's gold coast. the first test starts in brisbane on 8th december. dan evans has been knocked out of the stockholm 0pen at the quarter—final stage by francis tiafoe. evans started the match in brilliant form, taking the first set, 6—1, but that was a good as it got for the british number two, as tiafoe came roaring back, winning the match in three sets. andy murray will be in action later at the event against america's tommy paul. meanwhile, kyle edmund is set to play his first matches for over a year when england take on scotland at the battle of the
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brits in december. the 2018 australian open semi—finalist had an operation on his left knee in march. marcus smith will start at fly—half for england against australia on saturday, with captain 0wen farrell shifting to inside centre. it will be smith's third start in stest matches. there's a real surprise with the usual centre manu tuilagi moved to the wing despite only one start in that position in his previous 44 england caps. newcastle's adam radwan drops out of the squad to make way for tuilagi. you can get the full line—up on the bbc sport website. along with the rest of the sports news today, a t20 world cup semifinal between pakistan and australia are about to get under way shortly. new zealand already in the final. who willjoin them there? it is it from me, back to you.
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catherine, thank you very much. more now on fw de klerk, the last leader of apartheid south africa and a key figure in its transition to multi—racial democracy, who's died, aged 85. fw de klerk will be best remembered for freeing nelson mandela from prison in 1990. lord hain was a key anti—apartheid campaigner, before going on to become a labour minister. he also spent his early life in south africa, and he's been giving his reaction to today's news to my colleague, joanna gosling. at that point, and of course my childhood was in south africa, at that point in the autumn of 1989, nobody knew what was going to happen when fw de klerk became president of south africa. he had been for 20 years, as you have described, an apartheid cabinet minister, during the time when the state
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police was mercilessly apart had rules and smashing all opposition. and the rules were becoming increasingly restrictive in every area of life. that was his background and there was nothing in his background that could have given any hints to the crucial role he played in being the midwife to the transition from an old tyrannical and evil system of racial discrimination, the worlds worst in the history of the globe, to a new nonracial democracy. and he deserves credit for being the standard bearer of that transition. what do you think led him to that change? at that point, the business community was going to government ministers like him, and his predecessor wouldn't listen. going to government ministers like him, and saying the game is up. apartheid cannot survive.
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the black townships outside the cities were increasingly ungovernable. centres of resistance of uprisings and anger against the government, and the business community was saying, look, the economy cannot survive. growth had plummeted. unemployment and inflation were rising. 0n the one hand, there was pressure from the business community, which had profited apartheid for decades, and on the other hand... and then there was a decisive change in the unleashing of forces across central and eastern europe to ensure old soviet puppet regimes in east germany and poland and so on fall and be replaced as the cold war ended with mikhail gorbachev and his leadership. that was a crucial turning point, because the apartheid government had always framed the debate
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in their language as being, they positioned themselves as anti—communist. nelson mandela's african nationalist party as communists, which they weren't. they framed the debate in that way. when the cold war ended. between the us and the soviet union and the soviets in the west, that fell from underneath it. that was another motivation and change. and de klerk had the vision and the courage to make that change and do something, which was almost unprecedented or at least very unusual in history, when an elite enjoying the most power
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in the world, with black citizens serving it and gave up that power, gave up his domincance. instead of whites on the elections, there would be a new dispensation majority, universal franchise elections. it was quite a remarkable transition. and fw de klerk with nelson mandela was the midwife to that. in a personal sense, how will you remember him, and more widely how would you see his legacy now? his legacy is complicated, because during the four years between nelson mandela being released from prison, and that memorable moment when he walked to freedom, to when he became president, that's between february 1990 and april 1994 and he was elected president, there was mild violence there was more violence
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unleashed on nelson mandela's followers than at any time even under apartheid. in the decades of apartheid. that was because the old white power structure under de klerk was still trying to cling onto power. and so, his record is mixed in that sense, but what nobody can take away from him is his foresight. he seized the moment, he showed the courage, and he was the figure that saw the end of apartheid and those and nelson mandela elected as president and those heady days of the new rainbow democracy, sadly long passed, but that's another story in south africa today. a student from lancashire has been found guilty of murdering his step—grandmother, three years after an inquest ruled it had been an accident. preston crown court heard that 21—year—old tiernan darnton confessed to the killing during a game of truth or dare with his friends. 0ur north of england corrspondent
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fiona trott gave us this update a little earlier. for years, it was believed mary gregory's death was accidental, there was a fire at her home in lancashire, she was found crouched under a table in her bungalow and taken to hospital, and she died four days later. there was an investigation at the time and the fire service believed that the fire was caused by a discarded cigarette. an inquest ruled that the death was accidental, but then later, tiernan darnton, her step—grandson who was 17 at the time, was playing a game of truth or dare with his friends and he told them he had a dark secret. he said, i have a secret i haven't told anyone. i may have killed someone. and they pressed him on this, and he said that he started the fire, because he didn't want his stepgrandmother to suffer any longer from dementia. now, after that, the court also heard that he told a counsellor a year later that he also started the fire. but during this trial
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at preston crown court, tiernan darnton�*s lawyer said he made the confession to his friends because it was a misguided attempt to impress them, and he said the omission he made no the admission he made to the council was pure fiction. we also heard that tiernan darnton�*s stepfather, mrs gregory's own son, said the student had been suffering from depression for a number of years and was plagued by intrusive and disturbing thoughts. but today, the jury found him guilty of murder. he is due to be sentenced on friday. the headlines on bbc news... paramedics warn lives are at risk — due to �*unacceptably long' ambulance delays — with waits of up to nine hours for some patients. a surprise agreement between the us and china to tackle climate change gets a cautious welcome — but activists urge both nations to show greater commitment. and the former south african
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president fw de klerk — a key player in the country's transition to democracy — has died at the age of 85. and now — it's time for some of the stories that are making news across the uk. the issue of women's safety has been horribly highlighted by the murders of sarah everard and sabina nessa. a group of young women in newcastle decided they would do what they could to ensure other women could feel safe on the streets. women's streetwatch newcastle patrol the city centre at night helping anyone who's vulnerable — and they say they are helping hundreds every week. 0ur reporter alison freeman has been out on patrol with them. so are we ready to rumble? sweet,
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let's go. so are we ready to rumble? sweet, let's no. ~ ., so are we ready to rumble? sweet, let's io, ~ ., so are we ready to rumble? sweet, let's no. ~ ., ., ., let's go. women looking out for other women. _ let's go. women looking out for other women. women's - let's go. women looking out for- other women. women's streetwatch newcastle started its patrols three months ago in the wake of the murders of sarah everard and sabina nessa, the aim to help any female who may be vulnerable tonight, —— at night from the vulnerable and homeless to those who have had too much to drink. the group make sure everyone feels supported and say. it is not long into their shift when they spot someone in need of help. you're going to get hurt like this. don't come on the path and speak to us for a little bit. find don't come on the path and speak to us for a little bit.— us for a little bit. and 'ust outside central �* us for a little bit. and just outside central station, i us for a little bit. and just - outside central station, newcastle, and there _ outside central station, newcastle, and there is a member of the public was quite _ and there is a member of the public was quite distressed.— was quite distressed. there we go. this lady was _ was quite distressed. there we go. this lady was threatening - was quite distressed. there we go. this lady was threatening to - was quite distressed. there we go. this lady was threatening to take l this lady was threatening to take her own life. we are always going to intervene when we find women vulnerable like that on the street so we busily try to get some help. the police arrive and the patrol carries on. around the corner, the team spots a couple of young women, struggling to work out how to get home after a night out, sorting
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through their belongings on the floor. , ., , , , ., through their belongings on the floor. , ., , , , . . through their belongings on the floor. , ., _ , ., ., ., floor. obviously they have had a really good _ floor. obviously they have had a really good night _ floor. obviously they have had a really good night but _ floor. obviously they have had a really good night but i _ floor. obviously they have had a really good night but i think- floor. obviously they have had a | really good night but i think they were _ really good night but i think they were a _ really good night but i think they were a little _ really good night but i think they were a little bit _ really good night but i think they were a little bit embarrassed, i really good night but i think they were a little bit embarrassed, so they were — were a little bit embarrassed, so they were trying _ were a little bit embarrassed, so they were trying to _ were a little bit embarrassed, so they were trying to say— were a little bit embarrassed, so they were trying to say we - were a little bit embarrassed, so they were trying to say we don'tl they were trying to say we don't really _ they were trying to say we don't really need _ they were trying to say we don't really need any _ they were trying to say we don't really need any help, _ they were trying to say we don't really need any help, we're - they were trying to say we don't really need any help, we're all. really need any help, we're all right, — really need any help, we're all right, and _ really need any help, we're all right, and then, _ really need any help, we're all right, and then, after- really need any help, we're all right, and then, after a - really need any help, we're all right, and then, after a while,j really need any help, we're all- right, and then, after a while, they are kind _ right, and then, after a while, they are kind of— right, and then, after a while, they are kind of like, _ right, and then, after a while, they are kind of like, actually, - right, and then, after a while, they are kind of like, actually, we - right, and then, after a while, they are kind of like, actually, we could| are kind of like, actually, we could do with— are kind of like, actually, we could do with walked _ are kind of like, actually, we could do with walked to _ are kind of like, actually, we could do with walked to the _ are kind of like, actually, we could do with walked to the station. - are kind of like, actually, we could do with walked to the station. we i do with walked to the station. we walked _ do with walked to the station. we walked away— do with walked to the station. we walked away kind _ do with walked to the station. we walked away kind of _ do with walked to the station. we walked away kind of saying - do with walked to the station. we walked away kind of saying to - do with walked to the station. we i walked away kind of saying to each other— walked away kind of saying to each other we _ walked away kind of saying to each other we are — walked away kind of saying to each other we are glad _ walked away kind of saying to each other we are glad we _ walked away kind of saying to each other we are glad we helped - walked away kind of saying to each . other we are glad we helped because we got _ other we are glad we helped because we got them — other we are glad we helped because we got them safe _ other we are glad we helped because we got them safe and _ other we are glad we helped because we got them safe and on— other we are glad we helped because we got them safe and on a _ other we are glad we helped because we got them safe and on a taxi - other we are glad we helped because we got them safe and on a taxi and l we got them safe and on a taxi and on their— we got them safe and on a taxi and on their way— we got them safe and on a taxi and on their way home _ we got them safe and on a taxi and on their way home much _ we got them safe and on a taxi and on their way home much quicker. l we got them safe and on a taxi and . on their way home much quicker. the volunteers on their way home much quicker. volunteers mainly aim to help on their way home much quicker.- volunteers mainly aim to help women but they offer water and support to anyone who needs it, even providing anyone who needs it, even providing a human shield to a young woman caught short in the street. but sometimes it is just their presence that makes a difference. fin sometimes it isjust their presence that makes a difference.— that makes a difference. on friday niuht that makes a difference. on friday ni . ht we that makes a difference. on friday night we saw _ that makes a difference. on friday night we saw a _ that makes a difference. on friday night we saw a lady _ that makes a difference. on friday night we saw a lady coming - that makes a difference. on friday night we saw a lady coming down | that makes a difference. on friday i night we saw a lady coming down on clayton street with a man and as we kind of came across with each other, she just stopped on amongst us, and we were like, are you all right? she was like, i'm not sure. she didn't know the guy who was with her, she offices stopped, the guy carried on walking, and she kind of burst into tears, realise that she was kind of say.
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tears, realise that she was kind of sa . tears, realise that she was kind of sa , , ., ., , ., tears, realise that she was kind of sa . ., , ., ., ., say. the patrols are getting a lot of positive _ say. the patrols are getting a lot of positive feedback _ say. the patrols are getting a lot of positive feedback on - say. the patrols are getting a lot of positive feedback on the - say. the patrols are getting a lot| of positive feedback on the street from both men and women. i of positive feedback on the street from both men and women. i have been told over and — from both men and women. i have been told over and over _ from both men and women. i have been told over and over and _ from both men and women. i have been told over and over and over— from both men and women. i have been told over and over and over again - from both men and women. i have been told over and over and over again to - told over and over and over again to cover— told over and over and over again to cover nty— told over and over and over again to cover my drink but if someone is going _ cover my drink but if someone is going to — cover my drink but if someone is going to inject me with a drug, i can't _ going to inject me with a drug, i can't do — going to inject me with a drug, i can't do anything about it ultimately and i think it isjust, it is so— ultimately and i think it isjust, it is so important that people are out there — it is so important that people are out there basically watching out for us, because it isjust unsafe. they us, because it is 'ust unsafe. they are 'ust us, because it is 'ust unsafe. they just really — us, because it isjust unsafe. they are just really good _ us, because it isjust unsafe. they are just really good girls _ us, because it isjust unsafe. they are just really good girls looking after _ are just really good girls looking after good — are just really good girls looking after good girls, _ are just really good girls looking after good girls, and _ are just really good girls looking after good girls, and thankfullyl are just really good girls looking i after good girls, and thankfully the world _ after good girls, and thankfully the world needs — after good girls, and thankfully the world needs more _ after good girls, and thankfully the world needs more of— after good girls, and thankfully the world needs more of that- after good girls, and thankfully the world needs more of that —— - after good girls, and thankfully the i world needs more of that —— frankly the world _ world needs more of that —— frankly the world needs _ world needs more of that —— frankly the world needs more _ world needs more of that —— frankly the world needs more of— world needs more of that —— frankly the world needs more of that. - world needs more of that —— frankly the world needs more of that. it. world needs more of that —— frankly the world needs more of that. it is. the world needs more of that. it is so reassuring. _ the world needs more of that. it is so reassuring, it _ the world needs more of that. it is so reassuring, it is _ the world needs more of that. so reassuring, it is glad to know there _ so reassuring, it is glad to know there are — so reassuring, it is glad to know there are people looking up for us. you never— there are people looking up for us. you never know what will happen on a i'iili'it you never know what will happen on a night out _ you never know what will happen on a night out so _ you never know what will happen on a night out so it's nice to see people looking _ night out so it's nice to see people looking up— night out so it's nice to see people looking up you no matter what. and local looking up you no matter what. fific local businesses have looking up you no matter what. fific local businesses have backed them, offering toilet stops and drinks. so this is one of the pubs that have been nice to you? the this is one of the pubs that have been nice to you?— this is one of the pubs that have been nice to you? the ma'ority of the — been nice to you? the ma'ority of the venues across fi been nice to you? the majority of the venues across newcastle - been nice to you? the majority of| the venues across newcastle have been really receptive. they are really supportive of everything we do. it'sjust really supportive of everything we do. it's just fantastic. really supportive of everything we do. it'sjust fantastic. i5 really supportive of everything we do. it's just fantastic.— do. it's 'ust fantastic. is the bars stuck do. it'sjust fantastic. is the bars stuck to empty _ do. it'sjust fantastic. is the bars stuck to empty on _ do. it'sjust fantastic. is the bars stuck to empty on student - do. it'sjust fantastic. is the bars l stuck to empty on student nights, do. it'sjust fantastic. is the bars i stuck to empty on student nights, a few more who are the worse for wear need a helping hand. she
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few more who are the worse for wear need a helping hand.— need a helping hand. she was quite oorl but need a helping hand. she was quite poorly but was _ need a helping hand. she was quite poorly but was with _ need a helping hand. she was quite poorly but was with an _ need a helping hand. she was quite poorly but was with an absolutely i poorly but was with an absolutely lovely friend who was really supportive, helped wipe her sick of her shoes with wet wipes, and we managed to get her in a taxi and home. ., . , managed to get her in a taxi and home. ., .,, ., ., managed to get her in a taxi and home. ., ., ., ., i. home. how has the night gone for you then? it home. how has the night gone for you then? it has — home. how has the night gone for you then? it has been _ home. how has the night gone for you then? it has been intense, _ home. how has the night gone for you then? it has been intense, we - home. how has the night gone for you then? it has been intense, we have i then? it has been intense, we have had a few intense _ then? it has been intense, we have had a few intense incidences - then? it has been intense, we have had a few intense incidences to - then? it has been intense, we have| had a few intense incidences to deal with but— had a few intense incidences to deal with but it _ had a few intense incidences to deal with but it is part and parcel of being — with but it is part and parcel of being out— with but it is part and parcel of being out on the night with newcastle. an iconic motorcycle brand is returning to the west midlands after an absence of twenty years. norton was bought by indian firm tvs motor, after going into administration injanuary last year. the company is now opening a new factory in solihull. it's just a few miles from where the firm started in birmingham, 123 years ago. rob mayor has been to take a look. a new homejust a new home just a stone's throw from where it all began 123 years ago. norton supplied a quarter of all
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motorcycles to the british army during the second world war, and enjoyed success on the racetrack. in recent years, it fell on hard times, entering administration last year. after a break of almost 20 years, this famous motorcycle brand is speeding back into the west midlands under indian ownership. at full capacity, this factory will be building 8000 bikes every year. tvs motors bought the company for £16 million, and say they have already had more than 5000 customer enquiries. had more than 5000 customer enauiries. ., ., , had more than 5000 customer enquiries-— had more than 5000 customer enauiries. ., ., , ., ., had more than 5000 customer enauiries. ., ., ., ., enquiries. norton is for me one of the most exciting _ enquiries. norton is for me one of the most exciting motor— enquiries. norton is for me one of the most exciting motor brands i enquiries. norton is for me one of the most exciting motor brands inj the most exciting motor brands in the most exciting motor brands in the world. it is about the dna of racing, it is about innovation, it is about passion, it is about a very special product and there is a huge community outside the customer landscape you are very excited about norton. , .. ., ,
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landscape you are very excited about norton. , ., , .,, landscape you are very excited about norton. , .,y . ., ':::: norton. this factory has created 100 new “obs norton. this factory has created 100 new jobs and — norton. this factory has created 100 new jobs and staff _ norton. this factory has created 100 newjobs and staff on _ norton. this factory has created 100 new jobs and staff on the _ norton. this factory has created 100 new jobs and staff on the production newjobs and staff on the production line want to win back customers who may have been put off with problems made by backs under the old company from there it has changed massively, all the improvements, you can see the brand getting— all the improvements, you can see the brand getting bigger and bigger. ho efull we the brand getting bigger and bigger. hopefully we will _ the brand getting bigger and bigger. hopefully we will put _ the brand getting bigger and bigger. hopefully we will put bikes - the brand getting bigger and bigger. hopefully we will put bikes into - hopefully we will put bikes into production and make some happy customers. the production and make some happy customers-— production and make some happy customers. ., , , ., customers. the firm hopes to scale u . customers. the firm hopes to scale u- to customers. the firm hopes to scale up to 1000 — customers. the firm hopes to scale up to 1000 bikes _ customers. the firm hopes to scale up to 1000 bikes in _ customers. the firm hopes to scale up to 1000 bikes in production - customers. the firm hopes to scale up to 1000 bikes in production by. up to 1000 bikes in production by the end of next year. rob mair, bbc midlands today, solihull. as we mark armistice day — a man from christchurch is hoping to have a second book of first world war poems produced to raise money for the royal british legion. robert tate has written over a hundred poems reflecting on the great war. many of his poems are on display at the new forest airfields memorial. edward sault has been to holmsley to meet him. poppies grow again on the battleground, one for every soldier waiting to be found. poppies still
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grow, what brave men suffered, we will never know. poppies grow again on the battleground, one for every soldier waiting to be found. for robert tait, — soldier waiting to be found. for robert tait, poetry remembering the great war is his passion. iitrui’heh robert tait, poetry remembering the great war is his passion.— great war is his passion. when i go to bed at night. _ great war is his passion. when i go to bed at night, i _ great war is his passion. when i go to bed at night, i get _ great war is his passion. when i go to bed at night, i get this _ to bed at night, i get this inspiration to write, or to start one. where they come from, who is to know? ~ ., , one. where they come from, who is to know? a, , ., one. where they come from, who is to know? i. �*, one. where they come from, who is to know? �*, , one. where they come from, who is to know? �*, know? many of robert's poems are here on display _ know? many of robert's poems are here on display at _ know? many of robert's poems are here on display at the _ know? many of robert's poems are here on display at the new- know? many of robert's poems are here on display at the new forest l here on display at the new forest area fields memorial.— here on display at the new forest area fields memorial. there were 12 new forest — area fields memorial. there were 12 new forest airfields _ area fields memorial. there were 12 new forest airfields during - area fields memorial. there were 12 new forest airfields during world i new forest airfields during world war ii, _ new forest airfields during world war ii, and also in the first world war ii, and also in the first world wara— war ii, and also in the first world wara training ground war ii, and also in the first world war a training ground at east horder~ — war a training ground at east border. but this was to commemorate the 25,000 _ border. but this was to commemorate the 25,000 military personnel who served _ the 25,000 military personnel who served on— the 25,000 military personnel who served on the 12 airfields during world _ served on the 12 airfields during world war ii, and also the 10,000 civilians _ world war ii, and also the 10,000 civilians who supported them. it civilians who supported them.
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actually civilians who supported them. it actually sits on one of the original dispersal sites for the aircraft that would have used the airfield during the second world war, so this is a location where halifax and mosquitoes and typhoons and spitfires and marauders would have done their business, and where they have been serviced and maintained in between missions. the have been serviced and maintained in between missions.— have been serviced and maintained in between missions. the names, dave, john, between missions. the names, dave, john. philip. — between missions. the names, dave, john, philip, however, _ between missions. the names, dave, john, philip, however, they— between missions. the names, dave, john, philip, however, they went - between missions. the names, dave, john, philip, however, they went out| john, philip, however, they went out there. _ john, philip, however, they went out there. and _ john, philip, however, they went out there, and we are here today to enjoy_ there, and we are here today to enjoy the — there, and we are here today to enjoy the freedom that we have. please _ enjoy the freedom that we have. please remember the men who died side by— please remember the men who died side by side, just for a few days in novemhen — side by side, just for a few days in november. please wear the poppy with pride _ james reynolds is with you at tvm.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. hello. for the rest of the day for most of us there is actually not an awful lot of change in the weather. it is going to stay cloudy out there, mild, a little bit of dampness around too, some of that cloud is thick enough today to produce rain but the real story is just how mild it is, and it has been mild for quite some time now, this is not going to change in the next few days. we will keep seeing this mild, atlantic air arriving. this is the low pressure that will bring us the more blustery weather tomorrow, so the low pressure is just to the west of us right now. in fact, it is here. this is where the centre of the low is, this is where the gale force winds are, and ahead of it is a cold front moving across ireland eventually into northern ireland this evening ahead of it we have that increase in cloud and some of it thick enough to bring some rain. for example in south—western scotland and the lake district this afternoon. tonight, then, here comes
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the lower, barrels in, this is the cold front here, now often behind the cold front, the air is colder. that's why it's called a cold front. but actually, not necessarily, on this occasion. this is still quite mild, atlantic air, blustery weather moving in, so the temperatures are not going to drop tonight, 11 degrees first in the morning, across many western areas, so the low pressure moves across the uk, it brings outbreaks of rain but you can see the bits and pieces of rain being pushed quite swiftly by that wind and it will be strong around some western coasts, gusting to 15 mph in places. we will feel the strength of the wind in the land as well. mild, 15 in london, double figures further north too and then the forecast, friday night into saturday, the lower pulls away, in fact it sort of loses its impact, and in its place, briefly, high pressure builds in from the south. so that means that saturday is going to be much calmer. it is going to be a generally dry day, with some sunny spells. again, it is going to be mild, the mid—teens are quite possible across the south of the country. in the north, around 11 or 12. and i think sunday is going to be fairly similar too. again, generally dry weather, generally mild weather, and this calm, mild weather lasts through monday and tuesday,
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but from wednesday onwards i think the winds will pick up again and we will see bouts of rain coming off the atlantic later next week. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: two days to reach a deal — delegates enter the last 48 hours of the cop26 summit, to try and tackle climate change. the world is watching us and they are willing us to work together and reach consensus. and we know that we cannot afford to fail them. 0ptimism for a deal rises after last night's surprise agreement between the us and china to work together to tackle global warming. 0n climate, cooperation is the only way to get this job done. here — nhs under stress — paramedics tell the bbc lives are at risk because of growing waits for ambulances.
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three mps have been accused of "undermining respect for parliament" after they allegedly got drunk on a flight to visit uk

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