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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 11, 2021 10:00am-11:00am GMT

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this is bbc news 7 these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. a surprise agreement between the us and china to tackle climate change gets a cautious welcome — but activists urge both nations to show greater commitment. and i'm in glasgow, with all the latest from the un climate change summit. it is, officially at least, the penultimate day of the climate summit. paramedics in the uk warn lives are at risk due to unacceptably long ambulance delays of up to nine hours for some patients. nhs waiting lists in england have reached a new record high. new figures show there were 5.83 million people waiting for treatment in september. britain and iran will hold rare face—to—face talks in london today to try to revive the agreement
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curbing its nuclear activities. the case of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe will also be on the agenda. the uk economy grew by 1.3% betweenjuly and september — but supply chain issues are hampering recovery from the pandemic. the duchess of sussex has apologised for misleading a court, about information given by her aides, to the authors of a biography. england captainjoe root has spoken out about the racism row at yorkshire county cricket club. he says racism is intolerable and everyone must work together to combat it. hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. the surprise declaration by the us
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and china at the cop 26 summit in glasgow, pledging to step up efforts to tackle climate change, in spite of their other differences — has been widely welcomed. the un secretary general, antonio guterres, said the crisis required international collaboration and solidarity, and this was an important step in the right direction. environmental groups have described it as a breakthrough. let's cross now to my colleague annita mcveigh in glasgow. another big day ahead of a busy few hours? welcome back to cop26, the un climate change summit in glasgow. it's officially the penultimate day — althought the timetable could stretch. we have heard different accounts of how long it could go on for. negotiators are working into the early hours, with the aim of keeping
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temperature increase below 1.5 celsius. that is the point where scientists say we will see even more dangerous impacts and consequences of climate change. today's theme is all about cities, regions and the built environment. there has been a cautious welcome to that big, unexpected announcement here in glasgow from the united states and china to cooperate on tackling global warming. the eu under the un described the move as an important step, and said both countries needed to show more commitment. our global science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. it's the final countdown in glasgow as the climate talks enter the last few days, and we see if enough can be done to stop dangerous climate change. last night, the prime minister boris johnson urged countries to pull out all the stops. but he also tried to manage expectations. the cop26 summit here in glasgow is not going to fix it in one go. we are not going to arrest climate change right here, right now,
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that is just impossible. and i think everybody has got to be realistic about that. but there is the possibility that we will come away from this with the first genuine road map for a solution to anthropogenic climate change. there are some signs of hope. china's top negotiator made a surprise announcement of a joint climate plan with the united states. the world's two biggest polluters agreed to move towards using clean energy. and they said they'd reduce methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas, in a positive sign of cooperation. the united states and china have no shortage of differences, but on climate, on climate, cooperation is the only way to get this job done. today, countries are also joining together to announce an ambitious initiative, a plan to phase out oil and gas led by costa rica and denmark. they want nations to join them
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in setting a date to end their use. coal, too, responsible for half of all greenhouse gases, will also be a focus. and whether plans to stop its use make it into the final agreement. there will be much wrangling in the coming days, and sleepless nights for negotiators trying to thrash out a deal. the process at the united nations means getting nearly 200 countries to agree, each with different economies, different problems and very different agendas. rebecca morelle, bbc news, glasgow. our science correspondent victoria gill is with me now. victoria, let's talk about the theme of today, cities, regions and the built environment. i guess what people say is what does cop26 mean for me, how does it impact the way i live and go about my daily business. this is all very relevant?— this is all very relevant? exactly, i think cities — this is all very relevant? exactly, i think cities lead _ this is all very relevant? exactly, i think cities lead the _ this is all very relevant? exactly, i think cities lead the way. - this is all very relevant? exactly, i think cities lead the way. it's i i think cities lead the way. it's quite useful, i think, as you put that, to try to zoom in on exactly
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how our lives are shifting. they are shifting already. he would have thought we would be talking about phasing out the internal combustion engine? but that is the stage we are at. we are talking about that in the next decade, setting those targets. when you look, specifically, cities, they kind of lead from the front in terms of technology, re—engineering how humans live. it sort of comes from two different perspectives, really. it's about how people's lives have to change, as we adapt. so think of something like your gas boiler, for example. that is something that will have to be phased out. we haven't quite got a plan for that yet. that is something thatis plan for that yet. that is something that is a gap in the uk strategy. but then there is quite a lot of positives to it as well. if you look at a city like leeds, going for quite an ambitious target, they are talking about investing in public transport, planting trees, greening the urban environment. you are talking about the net benefits of better air quality, a better way of
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getting around without your car. in october, something was published she adjusting that we could reduce our energy demand by 50% in the next decade, without impacting our quality of life. it is about balancing how we change. that quality of life. it is about balancing how we change. that is a hue balancing how we change. that is a huge amount _ balancing how we change. that is a huge amount. people _ balancing how we change. that is a huge amount. people want - balancing how we change. that is a huge amount. people want to - balancing how we change. that is a l huge amount. people want to know, what do i need to do, how much am i going to be inconvenienced by this? lots of people might want to change, but they don't want their lives to be hugely disrupted? absolutely, i think that was _ be hugely disrupted? absolutely, i think that was the _ be hugely disrupted? absolutely, i think that was the focus _ be hugely disrupted? absolutely, i think that was the focus of - be hugely disrupted? absolutely, i think that was the focus of the - think that was the focus of the report from the researchers in leeds, that our designers, our government business, going to have to make this easier for us to do. it is something that has been quite interesting at this cop. there is a lot more business presence here than at previous ones. i think that leads into the city theme for today. we will see how business, how consumption, how our lives have led
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from the front, in terms of what we want to do. the sustainable holidays we want to have, the food we want to eat, thejourneys we want to have, the food we want to eat, the journeys we want to make. it's going to be led by that theme of being sustainable and having lower carbon emissions. so, i think thatis lower carbon emissions. so, i think that is something that will really play out today, what we will be hearing. play out today, what we will be hearin. . ., . play out today, what we will be hearin. . i, i, ., ~ play out today, what we will be hearin. . ., i, ., ~ , hearing. victoria, thank you very much. in hearing. victoria, thank you very much- in a _ hearing. victoria, thank you very much. in a few— hearing. victoria, thank you very much. in a few minutes - hearing. victoria, thank you very much. in a few minutes i - hearing. victoria, thank you very much. in a few minutes i will. hearing. victoria, thank you very much. in a few minutes i will be | much. in a few minutes i will be talking to somebody that is in charge of climate energy and the circular economy strategy for the city of paris, they will be looking to see what they have been doing to deal with climate change. before that, kevin rudd is the former australian prime minister and now the president of the asia society, which has been working on global agreements on climate change. he gave the bbc his take on the agreement. the joint statement by the chinese and the americans, i think, is a significant step forward. it is not a game changer, as was the us—china agreement back in 2014, in the lead up to paris. but it is a big step forward, for two or three reasons.
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the current state of geopolitics between china and the united states, asjohn kerryjust inferred, is goddamn awful. the fact that you can extract this climate specific collaboration agreement between washington and beijing right now is an important piece of momentum. the second point is that it re—establishes a us—china climate working group, which had been frozen in the wilderness for many years now. it has now been formally re—established, with an explicit focus on bilateral actions between the two countries during the 2020s. that is the decade ahead. not in the never—never, 2050 or 2060, but in the decade ahead. so i regard this as a significantly positive development. i'm joined now by south african activist and director of earthlife africa, makoma lekalakala.
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you told the bbc earlier this year that the face of climate change should not be high—ranking politicians, it should be the people facing the burden, the people having their lives impacted by climate change already. do you think there has been enough of that at cop26? i don't think there has been enough of that. forthe don't think there has been enough of that. for the past days, just being at the cop, i think there is more than a dozen people that have lost their lives, being unable to breathe. and they have taken their last breath. after this cop we see more talking and no action. the pledges that come in, i wonder if they would be able to save people's lives as of now? we welcome all the pledges, but we would want to see action taking place. the ordinary people whose faces are not on the television screens, or billboards, these are the people that are bearing the brunt of nonaction. teili
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bearing the brunt of nonaction. tell us more about the impact of climate change in south africa? you talk about people dying because they can't breathe, because of this deadly combination of heat and humidity, that is something we heard about in a reportjust a few days ago, saying that this is going to become an even more severe problem in the future, if climate change is not curbed?— in the future, if climate change is not curbed? the southern african reion is not curbed? the southern african region is a _ not curbed? the southern african region is a drought _ not curbed? the southern african region is a drought stricken - not curbed? the southern african region is a drought stricken area. | region is a drought stricken area. as of now, we are contemplating that in the near future we might have another day zero. we have got a few years back in cape town.— years back in cape town. explain what ou years back in cape town. explain what you mean _ years back in cape town. explain what you mean by _ years back in cape town. explain what you mean by that? - years back in cape town. explain what you mean by that? when i years back in cape town. explain . what you mean by that? when there years back in cape town. explain - what you mean by that? when there is no water at all — what you mean by that? when there is no water at all in _ what you mean by that? when there is no water at all in a _ what you mean by that? when there is no water at all in a particular— no water at all in a particular area, people cannot access water. there is no waterfor any area, people cannot access water. there is no water for any business, for anything. that drought was a wake—up call to south africa, to say that it wake—up call to south africa, to say thatitis wake—up call to south africa, to say that it is important for us to accelerate measures to ensure that we don't direct much of our water to
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goessling energy projects, or energy in the country, for example, the coal—fired power stations in the country consume much more water than ordinary people and business. —— guzzling. without water, that means food insecurity becomes a real issue. people are going hungry because there is no water to water their gardens, and also farming becomes much more vulnerable because food cannot be produced at all. you are talking about absolutely fundamental requirements, water to drink, water to grow food. you mention food insecurity. in africa, some countries have already experienced 1.5 degrees of warming compared to 1990s levels. many
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african countries are already there. from what you have heard from cop26 so far, what you have seen of the draft agreement, is this enough? lots of activists are saying it isn't, and the language and strong enough. isn't, and the language and strong enouh. ., i, i, enough. the language and the narrative we _ enough. the language and the narrative we have _ enough. the language and the narrative we have been - enough. the language and the | narrative we have been getting enough. the language and the - narrative we have been getting from paris, around two celsius degrees, or 1.5, the target for temperatures, thatis or 1.5, the target for temperatures, that is not for africa. if you talk about 1.5 degrees, for us it is may be around four or six temperature rise. we really are experiencing the heat, where africa is on the brink of a full fire. this is what we cannot accept. 1.5 degrees, 2.0 degrees, that language and discussions, the targets that are going to be reached, it means nothing to africans. the continent is one of the hottest continents on
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earth. that would mean that we are already experiencing the impacts of temperature rises, for the mere fact that we have runaway fires, we have climate change induced and natural disasters that have happened in zimbabwe and mozambique in the past two morocco years. that says that the heat is too much, and climate change induced natural disasters are going to be the order of the day. already, people are experiencing the impacts, the negative impact of climate change.— impacts, the negative impact of climate change. impacts, the negative impact of climatechane. i, i, climate change. makoma, thank you ve much climate change. makoma, thank you very much for— climate change. makoma, thank you very much for talking _ climate change. makoma, thank you very much for talking to _ climate change. makoma, thank you very much for talking to us. - climate change. makoma, thank you | very much for talking to us. makoma lekalakala, director of earthlife lekala kala, director of ea rthlife africa. i'm joined now by yann francois, head of climate, energy and circular economy strategies, for the city of paris. tell me a bit about the paris climate action plan. i believe the first one was published in 2007?
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yes, you are entirely right. good morning. the first one was published in 2007, after maybe two morocco —— two years. it was to try to design a commitment by 2020, to decrease by 25%, emissions, and get an adaptation beginning on the territory. it was one of the first steps, and we did it. it was not so easy, but now we have 15 years of experiences and we are ready to choose the next, main step to become carbon neutral by 2050. and choose the next, main step to become carbon neutral by 2050.— carbon neutral by 2050. and you u date carbon neutral by 2050. and you update the _ carbon neutral by 2050. and you update the plan _ carbon neutral by 2050. and you update the plan every _ carbon neutral by 2050. and you update the plan every few- carbon neutral by 2050. and you update the plan every few years. carbon neutral by 2050. and you | update the plan every few years. i would love to hear more about what the challenges so far have been. on this day when we are looking at cities on the built environment, lots of people will be asking, what does this mean for where i live? how will my towel on my city have to adapt? what part will i have to play in that? , a, ,
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adapt? what part will i have to play in that? , i, , i, i, , in that? yes, that is totally right. the core issue _ in that? yes, that is totally right. the core issue is _ in that? yes, that is totally right. the core issue is to _ in that? yes, that is totally right. the core issue is to tackle - in that? yes, that is totally right. | the core issue is to tackle climate change. because we have to reduce our carbon footprint first, our mobility, housings, managing waste and so on, but also how to adapt the city for the future. because, as you said before, in south africa we are faced with more and more disaster, climate disasters, and so we have to protect the population together, to decrease, for example, the impact of the hot summer. we have to protect vulnerable people from that. we have to have cruel islands. we have a programme to reduce the impact and develop the solidarity between all peoples, to protect babies and the old. —— we have cool islands. we have to implement more and more
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things in this kind of issue. 50. things in this kind of issue. so, how much _ things in this kind of issue. so, how much retrofitting of buildings has been going on? for example, putting solar panels in. it has been going on? for example, putting solar panels in.— putting solar panels in. it will be a solution _ putting solar panels in. it will be a solution to _ putting solar panels in. it will be a solution to have _ putting solar panels in. it will be a solution to have more - putting solar panels in. it will be a solution to have more and - putting solar panels in. it will be l a solution to have more and more putting solar panels in. it will be - a solution to have more and more of that. the main issue for the historical cities is to retrofit the stock of the buildings on the flats. for the city of paris, we have to fit1 million you're units. it is for the winter, and also for the summer. by the way, to decrease energy poverty of the city of paris. that is a very important thing. currently, the price of gas and electricity increased a lot. so it is a social issue to tackle climate change and have equity for everyone. just finally, two questions in one. i'd love to know how all of this has
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been paid for, and, secondly, what do you think, from what you have heard of cop26 so far, does it help you in youraims? heard of cop26 so far, does it help you in your aims?— heard of cop26 so far, does it help you in your aims? well, there is two uestions you in your aims? well, there is two questions that _ you in your aims? well, there is two questions that you _ you in your aims? well, there is two questions that you have! _ you in your aims? well, there is two questions that you have! thank - you in your aims? well, there is two questions that you have! thank you. how to pay, how to fund, it is an investment for the future. there is a high cost of adaptation. so we have to implement solutions now. when you retrofit, you decrease energy poverty, so, when you retrofit, you decrease energy p°vefty, so, globally, when you retrofit, you decrease energy p°v9rty, so, globally, it when you retrofit, you decrease energy poverty, so, globally, it is a benefit, a positive benefit. energy poverty, so, globally, it is a benemi a positive benefit. at a benefit, a positive benefit. at cop26, we are in the last day, and for the city we hope to come back to the table. the city, there are 70% of the emissions, we are not clear on the text of the mechanisms. to achieve the paris agreement, we need to work together, to foster the
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paris agreement achievement. really interesting to — paris agreement achievement. really interesting to hear— paris agreement achievement. really interesting to hear what _ paris agreement achievement. really interesting to hear what you - paris agreement achievement. really interesting to hear what you have - interesting to hear what you have been doing in paris. that is the head of climate, energy and circular economy committee is for the city of paris. thank you for your time. in around an hour, we are expecting to hear more from the president of cop26, alok sharma. i understand thatis cop26, alok sharma. i understand that is more likely to be everything, ratherthan that is more likely to be everything, rather than a news conference. it sounds like it will be a status update, rather than any big announcements, and an update on how the negotiations are going on. adam fleming was tweeting much earlier today that those talks went on on a number of areas, including finance come into the early hours of the morning. we will wait to get an update and bring you the details of that as soon as we hear it. back to you in the studio. thanks very much indeed. breaking news from the world of
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football. it has been announced that aston villa is appointing steven gerrard as their new head coach. he leaves glasgow rangers after guiding them to the scottish premiership title last season. both teams, i have to say, clubs are glowing in their praise of steven gerrard, formerly of liverpool, of course. the rangers team saying that they wish him nothing but success for his next chapter and he and his staff are always welcome at ibrox. praising the unforgettable moments, as they put it, the delivery of the scottish premiership title back to ibrox last season, having not lost a match during the entire league campaign. aston villa have a statement saying that they are very excited that steven gerrard is going to leave them in the next phase of their ambitious plans. building on their ambitious plans. building on their current progress. i am sure there will be a lot of reaction to that appointment.
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next, to the other big story in the uk on the problems facing the health service. a survey of nhs leaders in england has found that staff shortages are putting patient care at risk — and pressure on the service is now at unsustainable levels. the survey was carried out by the nhs confederation, which represents the healthcare system. the warning comes as paramedics across the uk say lives are under threat because patients are facing unacceptably long waits for ambulances. whistleblowers have told bbc news that some ambulance services are at breaking point. here's our health correspondent, sophie hutchinson. across the length and the breadth of the uk, ambulances are queuing. unable to hand over the sick and injured patients they have on board because hospitals have no room. and ambulances stuck in queues aren't available to attend other emergencies, leaving patients in need, waiting at home. i called an ambulance at 11:50am. and they said that they were going to send help asap. just over two weeks ago,
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christina found her grandmother, who lives in cheltenham spa, slumped in a chair, having a stroke. it was a blue light emergency. the ambulance should have arrived in 18 minutes. but instead, it took nearly six hours. it then queued outside hospital for an another three. it was then that an ambulance lady, i asked her how long it was going to take for my nan to get a ct, because ijust needed to know whether or not it was a stroke. and she told me, well, your nan's event happened last night. so we would only administer the medication that would reverse any permanent damage within that three—hour window. how did you feel? ijust broke down in tears on the floor. whistle—blowers from inside the ambulance services have told the bbc the system is at breaking point. this 999 call handler said even patients whose hearts have stopped are facing delays.
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there was a call for a cardiac arrest, and there was an eta in excess of 50 minutes. the nearest available crew was 50 minutes away. and this guy was in arrest. and for every minute, they say 10% of your life expectancy will decrease. that's hard. we struggle massively with the long delays. this is life threatening. and we just don't have the crews to respond like we should do. and have you got the pain i in the chest at the moment? all 1a ambulance services in the uk have escalated to the highest level of alert, and some have even gone beyond. like here at south central, which recently declared a critical incident when managers said the service had become unsafe. stuart, a paramedic, was working that night. i had a conversation with the control room, you know, in the early hours, when they said how many jobs are outstanding. how many incidents are outstanding, and i was like, oh, my god. you just sit there thinking,
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we're never, ever going to get rid of that backlog for days. for the last three months, these handlers have answered an additional 21,000 999 calls, compared to two years ago. and just before the critical incident was declared here, instead of having an average of 20 patients waiting for an ambulance, they had 120 patients waiting. they are operating right at the edge of what they can manage in order to keep patients from harm. south central has now asked the government for military support. armed forces have helped ambulance services in other parts of england, wales and scotland, and have supported hospitals in northern ireland. governments in all parts of the uk say they are aware of the challenges and are doing their best to support services. but with winter coming, the pressure is likely only to get worse. sophie hutchinson, bbc news.
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hospital waiting lists in england have hit another record high, according to the latest figures from the nhs. there were 5.83 million people waiting for treatment in england in september. that's the highest figure on record, and up from 5.72 million the month before. the number of people waiting more than a year for treatment was also up slightly to just over 300,000 despite a small increase on the previous month, that figure is still below the peak of more than 400,000 in march of this year. before the pandemic began, the number of people waiting more than 52 weeks was around 1,600. our health correspondent katharine da costa is here. first, an ambulance wait times, these numbers coming out are really alarming? it these numbers coming out are really alarmin ? , . these numbers coming out are really alarmin? ,., , ,, , these numbers coming out are really alarmin? , ., , ,, , ., alarming? it is a depressing set of fiures for alarming? it is a depressing set of figures for england. _ alarming? it is a depressing set of figures for england. if— alarming? it is a depressing set of figures for england. if you - alarming? it is a depressing set of figures for england. if you look - alarming? it is a depressing set of figures for england. if you look at | figures for england. if you look at category one calls, life—threatening emergencies like cardiac arrest, the target time is to respond in seven
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minutes. the figures for october showed the average response time was nine minutes. that is the longest time since records began in 2017, when the definitions were changed. one in ten were waiting a quarter of an hour. remember, every minute counts in these emergencies and affects the outcomes for patients. if we look at category two, urgent emergencies, things like heart attacks, strokes, car accident, the target times to respond in 18 minutes. the figures for october showed the average response time was nearly 5a minutes. again, the worst on record. one in ten people waiting about two hours or more. we have seen the reports, you heard sophie's report talking about long waits outside emergency departments, ambulances queueing, where they can't off—load their patients, because there is not the staff or beds to see them in a&e. the figures for a&e, the target time is 95% of patients should be seen in four hours. the figures for last month
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show that 74% were seen. the worst on record since 2004, when the target was introduced. more than 7000 patients were waiting more than 12 hours to be admitted, so called trolley waiting, because there is pressure within hospitals themselves. they are talking about not enough beds because, quite often, there are patients that are well enough to go home, but there aren't the social care packages for them to be taken out into the community. again, this is all having an impact on the elective care. you mentioned 5.8 million people waiting for nonurgent operations, things like hip and knee replacements, cataract operations. that figure of waiting over a year, 300,000 waiting over a year, it has been coming down. the nhs is working really hard you try to bring down the really long waiting times. before the pandemic, the figure was 1600. so, there is huge challenges ahead. it is worth pointing out that the demand is high across the other uk nations as well. nhs england says
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this october with a record for the amount of pressure on the services, staff answered more than 1 million calls to 999, major a&es treated 1.4 million patients. still carrying out thousands of tests and checks. pressure remains incredibly high. matthew taylor of the nhs confederation, who did the report on the ambulances, he said that the one thing he would like to government to do, if they were going to do one thing, was to get more money to local authorities, so that they can pay to sort out the social care problem. there are huge staff shortages across social count nhs, and also visas to get more people in over the winter? you and also visas to get more people in over the winter?— over the winter? you are referring to the survey _ over the winter? you are referring to the survey with _ over the winter? you are referring to the survey with 450 _ over the winter? you are referring to the survey with 450 health - to the survey with 450 health leaders being asked, and nine out of ten said demand was unsustainable. they paint a picture across the board, pent up demand, people coming forward with more complex problems
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that they have put off, seeking treatment, so their condition deteriorated. you also have the problem of covid. although admissions have been falling, there are still thousands of people in hospital with covid and that affects the number of patients that can be treated and infection control measures. there's backlog of operations. in social care, as i was saying, if you don't have those packages, people can't leave to free up packages, people can't leave to free up the space. the priority is to get more people into that sector. today is the deadline for people to be double vaccinated and social care. thousands have left the service already. some have been given until christmas to prove whether they are medically exempt. there is already a crisis in social care and they need to attract more people in. we have already reached in november, and we haven't hit the peak winter months where things might get worse before they get better.
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in cricket — england test captain joe root says the racism scandal at his county side yorkshire has "fractured our game and torn lives apart". a report found former yorkshire player azeem rafiq was a victim of racial harassment and bullying but the club said they would not discipline anyone. ur sports presenter, mike bushill can bring us up to date. reading this statement from joe root, it is full of nice words, and positive sentiments, does it add up to very much? he positive sentiments, does it add up to very much?— positive sentiments, does it add up to very much? he wants to reach out to very much? he wants to reach out to the new — to very much? he wants to reach out to the new chairman _ to very much? he wants to reach out to the new chairman lord _ to very much? he wants to reach out to the new chairman lord patil. - to very much? he wants to reach out to the new chairman lord patil. it. to the new chairman lord patil. it is released on his behalf because he is released on his behalf because he is captain of england's test teach in australia, getting ready for the ashes at the start of the 8th december but he has been following vents back home at his club and it has hit him hard, in this statement, i can go through it. it is lengthy, you can look at it in full on the bbc sport website. he says he feels
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the compelled to address the situation that has consumed the sport, and his county yorkshire over the last couple of week, he says he wants the sport to be a place where everyone is enjoying it for the beautiful game it is and feels equal and safe. it has hurt him, it hurts knowing this has happened at yorkshire, so close to home, it is his club, he really cares passionately about it, and he has spent a lot time reflecting out there in australia, and he says there in australia, and he says there is no debate about racism, no one side or the other, it is simply intolerable, as you mentioned he said in strong words, the events have fractured the game, torn lives apart and it is time to recover and come back together as fans and players, media, he says and those who work within cricket. he thinks it is also an opportunity to make the sport he loves better for everyone, and he wants to see change and actions that will see yorkshire rise from this with a culture that harnesses a diverse environment, with trust across all communities
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that support cricket in the county, and he says we need to educate, unify and reset, and he will reach out tow the new chair of yorkshire, lord patil to offer support, however he is able to. as i say for the moment he is there in australia but he talks about the need for the sport to diversify and make sure that it celebrates diversity across the board. he said we are playing for england it is a multicultural society we live in and we have to represent that. find society we live in and we have to represent that.— represent that. and of course, en i land represent that. and of course, england and — represent that. and of course, england and test _ represent that. and of course, england and test cricket, - represent that. and of course, - england and test cricket, especially all forms of cricket are played round the world and it strikes me going to games with cricket obsessed children, just how honourable in a way the crowd behaves to both teams and therefore, to see this, this problem still ongoing is incredibly distressing isn't it.— distressing isn't it. absolutely, to be fair he says — distressing isn't it. absolutely, to be fair he says this _ distressing isn't it. absolutely, to be fair he says this is _ distressing isn't it. absolutely, to be fair he says this is in _ distressing isn't it. absolutely, to be fair he says this is in his - distressing isn't it. absolutely, to be fair he says this is in his view. be fair he says this is in his view a society issue that needs addressing, further afield than cricket but he comes back to the sport, saying as a sport we are to
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do more, how we can shape things differently moving forward positively within the sport of cricket because it's a worldwide game, celebrating all different cultures, you only have to look at t20 world cup reaching a conclusion in the middle east and the ashes series coming up. it is very important tojoe root series coming up. it is very important to joe root the fact he has been concentrating on this getting ready for the ashes down under. . ~' , ., getting ready for the ashes down under. . ~' ,, ~ ~' news coming in that fw de klerk has died. that has been reported by one agency news that he has died. think reuters are reporting that. we will confirm that of course, these are
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images i think from the possibly from the transition period, ah, from the peace prize, seen there with mandela of course. the last white president of south africa, fw de klerk has died, that is being reported at the moment. of course, he was in office under that hugely revolutionary change in south africa. we will bring you more on that as soon as we can. the hunger crisis in afghanistan is continuing to worsen, with the head of the un's world food programme urging world leaders to do everything they can to avert an impending catastrophe. millions of people there are facing starvation, with charities reporting that taliban restrictions, on women operating as aid workers, are worsening the humanitarian crisis in afghanistan. heather barr is associate director of the women's rights division at human rights.
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heather, we have been haring for a few days how difficult things are, what is your experience? 50. few days how difficult things are, what is your experience?- few days how difficult things are, what is your experience? so, as you have said. — what is your experience? so, as you have said. the _ what is your experience? so, as you have said, the taliban _ what is your experience? so, as you have said, the taliban are _ what is your experience? so, as you have said, the taliban are replacing| have said, the taliban are replacing restrictions on women aid workers which is marking it harderfor them to reach women and girls and women headed household, those are some of the most in need because women have been pushed out of paid employment by taliban restrictions, but i want to add the solution to afghanistan's humanitarian crisis is largely outside of afghanistan, with the us in particular, he needs to notjust provide humanitarian assistance but unlock all the barriers to the afghanistan economy functioning which are starving people to death. how much time is there before things become catastrophically worse? there is no time left. you may have seen
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stories are about afghan families selling their children to buy food, and those children, by the way are almost always girls, there are children staffering to death, we have seen footage from wards where one out of every five children admitted are dying. this crisis is under way, admitted are dying. this crisis is underway, —— admitted are dying. this crisis is under way, —— starving to death. every time a child is dying it is because of a political crisis not a natural disaster. so because of a political crisis not a natural disaster.— natural disaster. so what is happening _ natural disaster. so what is happening to _ natural disaster. so what is happening to the _ natural disaster. so what is happening to the women i natural disaster. so what is | happening to the women aid natural disaster. so what is - happening to the women aid workers who are trying to help? are they leaving afghanistan now? ha. i who are trying to help? are they leaving afghanistan now? no. i mean, obviousl , leaving afghanistan now? no. i mean, obviously. many _ leaving afghanistan now? no. i mean, obviously, many people _ leaving afghanistan now? no. i mean, obviously, many people left _ leaving afghanistan now? no. i mean, obviously, many people left during - obviously, many people left during the evacuation but that is a tiny percentage of afghanistan's percentage of afg hanistan's population, percentage of afghanistan's population, the reality for most women, including aid worker, women's right activists, women at polaris forensic the taliban, is they are stuck in afghanistan and there is no
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way out and so they are trying to survive the best they can. to talk more about the restrictions women aid workers are facing in 16 provinces the taliban has said that they can go to work but only if they are escorted by a male family member who is usually expected to stay with them, so that means that for you to do yourjob, you have to have your father, your brother or husband work full—time with you, unpaid, and that is just not feasible for women in addition to the incredibly infantalising and intrusive. so in -ractical infantalising and intrusive. so in practical term. _ infantalising and intrusive. so in practical term, what _ infantalising and intrusive. so in practical term, what proportion of those who might be able to help are not able to help, do you have any idea, as a proportion of them are women? i idea, as a proportion of them are women? ., �* ., idea, as a proportion of them are women? .,�* ., ,., , ., women? i don't have exact statistics on that, because _ women? i don't have exact statistics on that, because it _ women? i don't have exact statistics on that, because it is _ women? i don't have exact statistics on that, because it is across - women? i don't have exact statistics on that, because it is across many . on that, because it is across many different agencies and i don't think there is sort of centralised data on that, but we know from humanitarian
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crises all round the world, that without women aid workers you can't reach women and girls adequately and thatis reach women and girls adequately and that is even more the case in afghanistan, which is a society where there is deep gender segregation. where there is deep gender segregation-— where there is deep gender secureation. . , ., and just looking ahead slightly. a two minute silence will be held across the uk at 11 o'clock this morning , injust over half an hour's time, to mark armistice day. it's the first time the remembrance has been held since the uk and american troops pulled out of afghanistan. south africa's last white president f.w. de klerk has died. caroline hawley looks back at his life. today we have closed the book on apartheid and that chapter is finally closed.
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the force of history would have ended white supremacy in south africa eventually, but without fw de klerk the transformation to non—racial democracy could have been a lot more pain. . he saw his country had to change and he delivered. he knew very well what lay behind the chaos and violence in black townships, provoked by ridged racial segregation, for years as a minister, he had helped entrench apartheid. then, fw de klerk became president in 1989, replacing the last apartheid dinosaur and his approach was very different. the prohibition _ approach was very different. iia: prohibition of approach was very different. "iia: prohibition of the approach was very different. ii2 prohibition of the african approach was very different. i““i2 prohibition of the african national congress, the pan african congress, the south african communist party is being rescinded.
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within a year, peter mandelson finally walked to free —— nelson mandela walked to freedom. fw de klerk knew his own days in power were numbered. but it opened old wounds, there was terrible violence in the townships between the anc and its zulu rivals. violence that was actively to momented by the white security apparatus. and white extremists too were up in arms. upset at the prospect of a black government, deck clerk sensed the threat and outmanoeuvred them by offering a whites only referendum in 1992. he craved backing and he won it. now, change was unstoppable. the world acknowledged that. and in 1993, mr de klerk wasjointly awarded the nobel peace prize, along with the man who would replace him as president. although nelson
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mandela was sometimes infuriated by de klerk he called him a man of integrity. so de klerk he called him a man of interi . , ., de klerk he called him a man of - integrity._ president integrity. so help me god. president mandela's inauguration _ integrity. so help me god. president mandela's inauguration was - integrity. so help me god. president mandela's inauguration was parly . integrity. so help me god. president mandela's inauguration was parly a i mandela's inauguration was parly a tribute to mr de klerk�*s vision, some of his former colleagues claimed he had been opportunistic, merely seizing a moment but he did seize the moment.— merely seizing a moment but he did seize the moment. never again on one inch of the soil — seize the moment. never again on one inch of the soil of _ seize the moment. never again on one inch of the soil of the _ seize the moment. never again on one inch of the soil of the republic - seize the moment. never again on one inch of the soil of the republic of - inch of the soil of the republic of south africa will there ever be racial discrimination again. ihind south africa will there ever be racial discrimination again. and so for white south _ racial discrimination again. and so for white south africans, - racial discrimination again. and so for white south africans, de - racial discrimination again. and so for white south africans, de klerk| for white south africans, de klerk can stand tall in history. uk diplomats will urge iranian officials to release detained uk nationals, such as nazanin zaghari ratcliffe, in rare face—to—face talks today. it comes on the 19th day of her husband, richard's,
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hunger strike outside the foreign office in london. iran will also be urged to back a deal that would revive the international agreement regulating its nuclear programme. earlier, the former permanent under—secretary at the foreign and commonwealth office and head of the diplomatic service, lord simon mcdonald, explained why britain has not paid the debt to iran and why it will be impossible to put a time frame on nazanin's release. the saga is decades old, it goes back to the time of the shah when he ordered 1750 chieftain tanks and support vehicles. fortunately for the uk, he paid up front, unfortunately for iran, the tanks did not arrive before his fall, at the end of the �*70s, so ever since then there has been a dispute, the
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beginning the brits wouldn't pay because we weren't doing business with the revolutionary regime in iran, for many years this was very quiet, and i worked forjack straw at the beginning of the 2000s, and in the whole time he was foreign secretary this was not an issue between iran and the uk, but of course, it is a large sum of money, it came back and for several years now, the british government has acknowledgeded this is iranian money an we need to repay ate, but the international sanctions regime on iran has complicated that repayment. but the americans, i believe, the americans did pay, under obama, under a americans did pay, under obama, undera similar americans did pay, under obama, under a similar situation, i americans did pay, under obama, undera similarsituation, i mean, given a family at least one family, many more of course have been in these... why is britain not moving
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everything to sort this out now? you sa the everything to sort this out now? i'm. say the americans paid, but as you point out, it was crucial this happened under president obama, then we had president trump, who was very opposed to what his predecessor had done, and so we found it very difficult to negotiate with the us system to come to a similar deal, but we have had president biden for nine months so things should be more hopeful, there is an american precedent, i am sure, that british negotiators are using that precedent with the american administration. but the two cases are are of course separate. it sousse suits iran's negotiations yatesing team to link them but there is no link between nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe and the sale of chieftain tanks before she was even born, so we need to always bearin was even born, so we need to always bear in mind that they are separated, they need to be sol offed
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each on their own merits, and we must find way through. fire each on their own merits, and we must find way through.— must find way through. are you ho eful must find way through. are you hopeful that — must find way through. are you hopeful that today's _ must find way through. are you hopeful that today's face - must find way through. are you hopeful that today's face to - must find way through. are you | hopeful that today's face to face talks will yield an actual, you know, tangible push forward on this? these talks are part of a process, the main reason for the talks is not consular relations, it is to revive the jcpoa. consular relations, it is to revive thejcpoa. president consular relations, it is to revive the jcpoa. president trump consular relations, it is to revive thejcpoa. president trump took consular relations, it is to revive the jcpoa. president trump took the thejcpoa. president trump took the americans out of this international agreement, with iran, the agreement had mostly been negotiated withjohn kerry who is now back in the administration, so the americans are interested in returning to this agreement, and there are talks scheduled in serena at the end of this month —— vienna which should allow that. that. the iranian deputy foreign minister has been touring capitals in preparation for this meeting in vienna, so the main business is about nuclear, but i am
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sure, i know, that the british side will raise nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's case at the same time. zaghari-ratcliffe's case at the same time. �* , , .. , zaghari-ratcliffe's case at the same time. �* , , ., zaghari-ratcliffe's case at the same time. ~ , , ., ., zaghari-ratcliffe's case at the same time. , ., ., , time. and is it is case that iran is sa in if time. and is it is case that iran is saying if sanctions _ time. and is it is case that iran is saying if sanctions are _ time. and is it is case that iran is saying if sanctions are lifted - time. and is it is case that iran is saying if sanctions are lifted theyj saying if sanctions are lifted they will ratify the paris agreement? the cop summit is ongoing, john kerry is very closely involved in that too, so all these things are linked i presume. so all these things are linked i presume-— so all these things are linked i resume. ., , ., , ., presume. however separate they are, in negotiation. — presume. however separate they are, in negotiation, inevitably— presume. however separate they are, in negotiation, inevitably these - in negotiation, inevitably these things become linked. we will be making the case each on its own merits. . . r' making the case each on its own merits. . ., ,~' , ., making the case each on its own merits. . ., , ., ., ., merits. can i ask you again, returning — merits. can i ask you again, returning to _ merits. can i ask you again, returning to nazanin - returning to nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, it's a case we have followed for a long time. people will wonder, for every day that goes past, the family is being ripped apart. no—one pretends that foreign policy the ethical, it is pragmatic and about self—interest, biden has been in the white house for a while. why is this not been guaranteed it is going to happen by
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christmas? the guaranteed it is going to happen by christmas? , ., ., , , , christmas? the sum of money is very lare christmas? the sum of money is very [are one, christmas? the sum of money is very large one. it — christmas? the sum of money is very large one. it is _ christmas? the sum of money is very large one, it is disputed _ christmas? the sum of money is very large one, it is disputed because - large one, it is disputed because in the last 40 years interest needs to be paid, so there is a complicating negotiation round not only the size but how it is paid back. it will be very difficult, i think, for the brits and the americans to agree a cash payment, that the iranians could use for whatever they like, i am sure we would prefer payment in kind, medicines have been mentioned, of course the iranians will resist that, so this is something that has to be unpicked and solved. and just finally, do you it there be done by the end of this year or is it impossible to put a time frame on it. i it impossible to put a time frame on it. ., it impossible to put a time frame on it. . , ,.,, , , it impossible to put a time frame on it. i fear it is impossible to put a time frame _ it. i fear it is impossible to put a time frame but _ it. i fear it is impossible to put a time frame but i _ it. i fear it is impossible to put a time frame but i know— it. i fear it is impossible to put a time frame but i know that - it. i fear it is impossible to put a i time frame but i know that richard radcliffe in his hunger strike has achieved his short—term objective. everybody is thinking about his wife, this meeting today in the
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foreign office will be reported round the world and the picture with it will be of richard radcliffe on the 19th day of his hunger strike. the duchess of sussex has apologised for misleading a court about information given by her aides to the authors of a biography. meghan markle sued the publisher of the mail on sunday over five articles. in her witness statement, the duchess apologised and said that she did not intend to mislead the court about the role of her aide in providing information to the authors of the unauthorised biography. our news correspondent megan paterson explained the situation surrounding the latest updates from court. earlier this year the duchess of sussex won her legal battle against the publishers of the mail on sunday. they published a letter between meghan and her father. the court up held that was unlawful, but associated newspapers lawyers are trying to overturn this judgment, they say that there is perhaps part
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of the letter that was possibly meant for public consumption and thatis meant for public consumption and that is the really crucial bit here, the key point is that previously, we heard from spokesperson from the sussexes who said that the couple did not contribute in any way to a biography called finding freedom however, yesterday in evidence the couple's former communication director said the book was discussen a routine basis, discussed with the duchess e, in person and over e—mail. he said a planning meeting with the authors to provide background information had taken place, he said the duchess had given him briefing points so two different accounts there, an exchange of text messages which was read out in court. the duchess said obviously everything i have drafted is with the understanding that it could be leaked so i have been meticulous in my word choice, in a witness statement to the court, the duchess said she accepted her aide did have information, he did have meetings with the authors of that biography,
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she said she didn't have in—depth knowledge of the information that he passed over. as you say she has denied that she deliberately misled the court. she has apologised for forgetting to hand over that information. she says partly going none the background, a reason for not discovering the e—mails earlier was because at the stage of disclosure for litigation, it hadn't been reached in october last year when her lawyers applied to adjourn the trial date as she was pregnant. she also suffered a miscarriage. she was under intense pressure and stress, her medical team encouraged her to try and avoid that. that evidence coming from court, it will continue today but she has denied deliberately trying to mislead the court. figures for the three months to the end of september show that the economic recovery from the pandemic is continuing, but at a slower pace than in the previous quarter. the office for national statistics says gdp grew by 1.3%,
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that's down from 5.5% in the previous three months. the chancellor has told the bbc the government �*needs to do better�* in its efforts to tackle allegations of corruption and poor behaviour amongst mps. in an interview with our economics editor faisal islam, rishi sunak also defended his plans to boost economic growth we do have established independent parliamentary processes that govern all of these things, and it is absolutely right those are followed to the letter, but you know, reflecting on all of these things, over recent days, what i can say is for us as a government, we need to do better than we did last week, and we know that. and for you as chancellor, in charge of the nation's finances, one element of this was the notion that public money may have been used not to get to the neediest people in the country, but in order to buy the loyalty of mps. you as chancellor must be worried about that, do you know that didn't happen? it wouldn't right for me to comment on individual cases. there are rightly established independent parliamentary processes that look at these things.
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this idea of buying mps' votes. and i think — but it is right those processes are followed to the letter, and of course, people should be held to account for their actions. on the economy, these numbers, and perhaps more importantly the forecasts you look at, the bank of england and the obr, they show some concern about the economy, and in particular about living standards in the next couple of years, notjust not growing well but declining over the next couple of years. what you are seeing is an economy that is continuing to grow, and that is a good thing, we are on the right path, but of course there are global challenges ahead and that is why the budget set out a plan to build a stronger economy, with support for working families, at its heart. whether freezing fuel duty, cutting taxes for the lowest paid. that is the type of support we're trying to put in place. but the net result of that, say the bank of england, is two years of declining living standards after inflation, and after tax, so that includes
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all the measures you have mentioned. what it doesn't include is the spending on public services, and that does bring value to people's lives, so where is that money going in tax? it is going on investing in reducing the nhs backlog so people and their families are not waiting very long time to have elective treatments on the nhs. it goes on putting more police officers on the street. it goes in making sure our schools are well funded. i think that impacts people's quality of life. it is not right to say let us only look at this side, what we are paying, and not look at what we getting for the money. i think people would like to see waiting lists come to a more acceptable level. they want to see police officers on the street. they want to see investment in skills and young people. they want to see their communities feel like more enriching places to live as we level up. that is where all that money is going. we need to make sure it is well spent and delivers those outcomes, and i am confident we can do that and people will see their quality of life improve. you said there would be a prime minister's new economy of high wages and high productivity.
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that is not in the forecast of the bank of england and the obr that that is going to be delivered any time soon. if you look at wages, in real terms are higher than before the pandemic, and if you look at where we are targeting support to help people, the raising the national living wage, a thousand pound increase for those working full—time. we have cut taxes on those on the lowest incomes, by cutting the universal credit taper or rate, again a thousand pound benefit for those in work, rwarding their effort, letting them keep more of their money, but the best way to move to that new economy is to invest in people, to invest in skills and training and education, and the budget set out the most ambitious plans for a long time to do that, so people everywhere have the opportunity they need to get a great well paid job.
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anyone who works in a care home in england will have to be double—vaccinated against covid—19 from today, unless they are medically exempt. the health secretary sajid javid says the move is designed to make homes safer, but some in the sector have warned they could lose large numbers of employees, at a time when the industry is already struggling to recruit and retain staff. a new species of dinosaur with an unusually large nose has been discovered by a retired doctor. the remains of the brighstoneus simmondsi were found on the isle of wight in 1978 — they'd been in storage until drjeremy lockwood decided to reconstruct the skull of the animal and realised the bones belonged to an undiscovered species. we will bring you a two minute silence marked of course round the uk for armistice day, we are showing images of the cenotaph. we will be
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going right across the country as people stand and remember. this is bbc news. many of us it is fairly cloudy, any sunshine is at a premium but there are is some sunshine, in the far north, parts of southern scotland and northern england, further south, and northern england, further south, a fair bit of cloud with spots of rain and drizzle but that weather front produces moves, we will sheavier rain get in for southern scotland and also north—west england but it will be mild where ever you have. by the end of the afternoon, the wind will be strengthening out to the west and we will see heavy rain move across northern ireland and scotland. lighter rain moving across england and wales, but particularly windy with exposure in the west. gusting up to 40mph. 50mph
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in shetland. so another mild night to come. another wet start to the day tomorrow, especially in central and southern scotland and north—west england. the early rain clears southern england followed by showers and bright spells, brighter skies too in the far north and windy where ever you are. and we are at the national memorial arboretum as we await the moment when the nation will fall silence to remember our war dead. we are round the country. this is cardiff. and we are elsewhere round the country, we are also in edinburgh, we are at glasgow as well, at cop26, where alok sharma is waiting alongside other leaders to fall
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silent for two minutes, we are in belfast. and here the focus in london at the cenotaph. the duchess of cornwall is at the 93rd field of remembrance at westminster abbey. last post plays good morning and welcome to viewers on bbc one. soon, the country will fall silent for two minutes,
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at exactly 11 o'clock, as we remember those who have died in war. it marks the 11th hour, of the 11 day, of the 11th month, the time in 1918 when the guns finally fell silent along the western front and an armistice was declared. the allies and germany had signed a peace agreement in a railway carriage in france at 5am in the morning. six hours later, at 11am, the fighting ceased. the pandemic meant commmemorations had to be scaled back last year. but this year, the nation will be able to observe the two minute silence in the traditional way. in a moment we willjoin the silence around britain. we are with the duchess of cornwall at the 93rd field of remembrance at westminster abbey. a service at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. the edinburgh gardens of remembrance, belfast city hall and at the welsh national war memorial in cardiff.

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