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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 11, 2021 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines, i'm geeta guru—murthy. a surprise agreement between the us and china to tackle climate change gets a cautious welcome — but activists urge both nations to show greater commitment. and i'm at the un climate change summit in glasgow. it is officially the penultimate day. we will be here through the day with updates for you. paramedics warn lives are at riskdue to unacceptably long ambulance delays of up to nine hours britain and iran will hold rare face—to—face talks in london today to try to revive the agreement curbing its nuclear activities. the case of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe will also be on the agenda. the uk economy grew by 1.3%
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betweenjuly and september — but supply chain issues are hampering recovery from the pandemic. the duchess of sussex has apologised for misleading a court about information given by her aides to the authors of a biography. the surprise declaration by the us and china at the cop26 summit in glasgow — pledging to step up efforts to tackle climate change, in spite of their other differences — has been widely welcomed. lets get the latest from annita mcveigh. lets get the latest from annita mcveiuh. ., ~ ,, , . mcveigh. thank you very much. welcome back— mcveigh. thank you very much. welcome back to _ mcveigh. thank you very much. welcome back to cop26, -
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mcveigh. thank you very much. welcome back to cop26, the i mcveigh. thank you very much. | welcome back to cop26, the un climate change summit in glasgow. it is officially the penultimate day, although the timetable could stretch, with negotiators again working into the early hours with the aim of keeping global warming below 1.5 celsius. that is the point at which scientists say we will see even more dangerous consequences of climate change. well, there has been a cautious welcome to that unexpected announcement here in glasgow from the us and china to cooperate on tackling global warming. the eu under the united nations described the move as an important step, but said both countries need to show more commitment. it's the final countdown in glasgow as the climate talks enter the last few days, and we see if enough can be done to stop dangerous climate change. last night, the prime minister boris johnson urged countries to pull out all the stops. but he also tried to manage expectations. the cop26 summit here in glasgow is not going to fix it in one go.
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we are not going to arrest climate change right here, right now, that is just impossible. and i think everybody has got to be realistic about that. but there is the possibility that we will come away from this with the first genuine road map for a solution to anthropogenic climate change. there are some signs of hope. china's top negotiator made a surprise announcement of a joint climate plan with the united states. the world's two biggest polluters agreed to move towards using clean energy. and they said they'd reduce methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas, in a positive sign of cooperation. the united states and china have no shortage of differences, but on climate, on climate, cooperation is the only way to get this job done. today, countries are also joining together to announce an ambitious initiative, a plan to phase out oil and gas
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led by costa rica and denmark. they want nations to join them in setting a date to end their use. coal, too, responsible for half of all greenhouse gases, will also be a focus. and whether plans to stop its use make it into the final agreement. there will be much wrangling in the coming days, and sleepless nights for negotiators trying to thrash out a deal. the process at the united nations means getting nearly 200 countries to agree, each with different economies, different problems and very different agendas. rebecca morelle, bbc news, glasgow. our science correspondent victoria gill is with me now. you have been here right the way through cop26, almost two weeks at this stage. what is your sense of the mood right now? this is the penultimate day, as i mentioned in the introduction. it could stretch a bit, but we are getting into the hard yards?— bit, but we are getting into the hard yards? yes, that said, the sense now _ hard yards? yes, that said, the sense now is — hard yards? yes, that said, the sense now is that _ hard yards? yes, that said, the sense now is that we _ hard yards? yes, that said, the sense now is that we are - hard yards? yes, that said, the sense now is that we are really| sense now is that we are really looking at every single line of the
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agreement. the negotiators are getting down to the really hard task. it is the final straight. we did have one of our guests this morning he is a veteran cop watcher, putting theirfinger in morning he is a veteran cop watcher, putting their finger in the air and suggesting it will go into the weekend, probably more likely saturday afternoon. that is just the long process of getting to consensus. you know, the science of this is clear. it's been clear for some time. that is why we talked a lot, when we were talking about cop, the 1.5 target, when it comes to the global politics and getting 200 countries in the room to agree line by line on what the path forward is, this is what some kind of glasgow declaration is going to give us. it's not going to be a gavel moment and a treaty like in paris. we all agreed in paris, during the last cop six years ago, that we needed to do something, we needed to aim for 1.5 target. now it is all about figuring out what the to—do list actually is. lets talk about the 1.5 target. just
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bring us right back to basics, what this is about, what is at stake, what it means for people and where they live? it what it means for people and where the live? , they live? it is fundamentally makinu they live? it is fundamentally making this _ they live? it is fundamentally making this planet _ they live? it is fundamentally making this planet habitable | they live? it is fundamentally i making this planet habitable for they live? it is fundamentally - making this planet habitable for the coming century. it's about future generations. and really the impact on your own life as dependent on where you live. when we talk about 1.5, we are already living in a world that has heated up 1.1 degrees since post—industrial times. people all over the world are experiencing the impact of that. whether it is extreme heat, drought, extreme weather patterns and flooding. we saw that in europe over the summer. it is basically notching up the thermostat. as we have increased that, it has shifted the climatic patterns on earth. we can see that rolling out. we are not going to stop climate change. it is kind of about keeping the dial as steady as possible. if we can do that, we stabilise the climate. we do that by limiting the emissions of the greenhouse gases. so we know what we need to do, and this is all about
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figuring out the path forward to make sure that we can do that. lats make sure that we can do that. lots of talk from — make sure that we can do that. lots of talk from activists _ make sure that we can do that. lots of talk from activists here, and watching from elsewhere, but a credibility gap, the gap between what is being said and what scientists say needs to be done? exactly. i think, scientists say needs to be done? exactly. ithink, actually, the scientists say needs to be done? exactly. i think, actually, the us— china agreement will go some way to establishing a little bit more of that trust. the biggest emitters coming together to say, yes, we will set aside our differences and work together to really tackle this. hopefully that should really galvanise the agreement in the room. thank you very much. kevin rudd is the former australian prime minister and now the president of the asia society, which has been working on global agreements on climate change. thejoint statement by the joint statement by the chinese and the americans, i think, is a significant step forward. it is not a game changer, as was the us— china agreement back in 2014, in the lead up agreement back in 2014, in the lead up to paris. but it is a big step forward. for two are three reasons.
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the current state of geopolitics between china and the united states, asjohn between china and the united states, as john kerry between china and the united states, asjohn kerryjust inferred, is god damn awful. the fact that you can extract this climate specific collaboration agreement between washington and beijing right now is an important piece of momentum. the second point is that it re—establishes a us— china climate working group, which had been frozen in the wilderness for many years now. it has now been re—established, with an explicit focus on bilateral actions between the two countries during the 20 20s. that is the decade ahead. not in the never never, 2050 or 2060, but in the decade ahead. so i regard this as a significantly positive development. i'm joined now by nicolette bartlett, who's the chief impact officer at cdp, which supports companies and cities in managing climate change. lovely to have you with us, thank you forjoining us today. tell us a
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little bit more about what cdp does. thanks for having us. cdt as the global environmental disclosure platform. so we have over 13,000 companies, representing 65% of global market capitalisation, reporting through our system. that data goes to governments, to investors, big buyers, as their procurers, and then we have over 1000 cities reporting to the system as well, to states and regions, and them that data is put into a big portal and analysed, and used for bringing to these cops, and help the city is on a journey they need to go on. city is on a “ourney they need to go on. , , ., ,., on. does cdp, do you set targets for the companies. _ on. does cdp, do you set targets for the companies, cities _ on. does cdp, do you set targets for the companies, cities or— on. does cdp, do you set targets for the companies, cities or states? - the companies, cities or states? indeed, we have set up with three other ngos and set up an initiative which is a standard which allows companies and now also cities to be able to assess a target aligned with
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1.5 degrees. able to assess a target aligned with 1-5 degrees-— 1.5 degrees. what are the consequences _ 1.5 degrees. what are the consequences if - 1.5 degrees. what are the | consequences if somebody 1.5 degrees. what are the - consequences if somebody does 1.5 degrees. what are the _ consequences if somebody does not meet the target that has been set? are there any? fist meet the target that has been set? are there any?— are there any? at this point, what ha--ens are there any? at this point, what happens is — are there any? at this point, what happens is we _ are there any? at this point, what happens is we have _ are there any? at this point, what happens is we have a _ are there any? at this point, what| happens is we have a transparency mechanism. so, companies have to report against the annual emissions. the cities protocol will come in quite soon for that as well. and then we publish that transparently. what basically happens, we will have a protocol that means in about five years, when i have set their targets, if they don't meet them after five years they will no longer be listed as having that target. 50 be listed as having that target. so there are consequences and other companies and businesses can see how everyone else is doing. clearly there is a sense of pressure that you try to do as well, if not better, than anyone else. a better, than anyone else. exactly. a rave ard better, than anyone else. exactly. a graveyard of — better, than anyone else. exactly. a graveyard of promises _ better, than anyone else. exactly. a graveyard of promises is _ better, than anyone else. exactly. a graveyard of promises is how - better, than anyone else. exactly. a i graveyard of promises is how summary i was speaking to described plans in
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this specific case, deforestation. how can those involved in this cop, cop26, make sure that the promises and pledges are kept? that is very much what you are about, setting targets and trying to create a sense of accountability.— of accountability. exactly. so, this cop is very _ of accountability. exactly. so, this cop is very much _ of accountability. exactly. so, this cop is very much the _ of accountability. exactly. so, this cop is very much the legal - of accountability. exactly. so, this cop is very much the legal track, | cop is very much the legal track, one of the big items on the table as the global stock—take. it is all about how these countries are going to report against their targets. what we need to see, and we are very delighted to see the un secretary—general starting to work on the base, to set in place the accountability mechanisms which can both feed into that global stock—take, but also take account of what cities, states, companies and investors are doing. we need the two thing is to weave together so that we have a full stock—take of what is going on across the real economy and within the negotiations.— within the negotiations. really interesting _ within the negotiations. really interesting to _ within the negotiations. really interesting to hear— within the negotiations. really interesting to hear that. - within the negotiations. really interesting to hear that. thank within the negotiations. really - interesting to hear that. thank you very much. we are just hearing interesting to hear that. thank you very much. we arejust hearing in glasgow that in the next couple of
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hours we are going to get an update of some sort from the president of cop, alok sharma, and an initial draft has been published of the agreement, lots of activists and environmental groups say they are disappointed with the language are not in say the language is not nearly robust enough. let's see what the update, when it comes in a couple of hours' time, brings to the table and whether there are any significant update. now back to geeta in the studio. iam sure i am sure there will be more than one draft. annita on the team will be updating you on the coming hours. a survey of nhs leaders in england has found that staff shortages are putting patient care at risk — and pressure on the service is now at unsustainable levels. the survey was carried out by the nhs confederation, which represents the health care system.
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the warning comes as paramedics across the uk say lives are under threat because patients are facing unacceptably long waits for ambulances. whistle—blowers have told bbc news that some ambulance services are at breaking point. here's our health correspondent, sophie hutchinson. across the length and the breadth of the uk, ambulances are queuing. unable to hand over the sick and injured patients they have on board because hospitals have no room. and ambulances stuck in queues aren't available to attend other emergencies, leaving patients in need, waiting at home. i called an ambulance at 11:50am. and they said that they were going to send help asap. just over two weeks ago, christina found her grandmother, who lives in cheltenham spa, slumped in a chair, having a stroke. it was a blue light emergency. the ambulance should have arrived in 18 minutes. but instead, it took nearly six hours. it then queued outside hospital for an another three.
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it was then that an ambulance lady, i asked her how long it was going to take for my nan to get a ct, because ijust needed to know whether or not it was a stroke. and she told me, well, your nan's event happened last night. so we would only administer the medication that would reverse any permanent damage within that three—hour window. how did you feel? ijust broke down in tears on the floor. whistle—blowers from inside the ambulance services have told the bbc the system is at breaking point. this 999 call handler said even patients whose hearts have stopped are facing delays. there was a call for a cardiac arrest, and there was an eta in excess of 50 minutes. the nearest available crew was 50 minutes away. and this guy was in arrest. and for every minute, they say 10% of your life expectancy will decrease. that's hard.
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we struggle massively with the long delays. this is life threatening. and we just don't have the crews to respond like we should do. and have you got the pain i in the chest at the moment? all 14 ambulance services in the uk have escalated to the highest level of alert, and some have even gone beyond. like here at south central, which recently declared a critical incident when managers said the service had become unsafe. stuart, a paramedic, was working that night. i had a conversation with the control room, you know, in the early hours, when they said how many jobs are outstanding. how many incidents are outstanding, and i was like, oh, my god. you just sit there thinking, we're never, ever going to get rid of that backlog for days. for the last three months, these handlers have answered an additional 21,000 999 calls, compared to two years ago. and just before the critical incident was declared here,
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instead of having an average of 20 patients waiting for an ambulance, they had 120 patients waiting. they are operating right at the edge of what they can manage in order to keep patients from harm. south central has now asked the government for military support. armed forces have helped ambulance services in other parts of england, wales and scotland, and have supported hospitals in northern ireland. governments in all parts of the uk say they are aware of the challenges and are doing their best to support services. but with winter coming, the pressure is likely only to get worse. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. joining me now is shane clark who is the unison lead steward and emergency care assistant. thanks very much forjoining us. it's obviously very alarming to see this information coming out, even though it is 18 months or so since
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the pandemic first began. how worried are your members? fiur worried are your members? our members _ worried are your members? our members are — worried are your members? our members are very _ worried are your members? oi" members are very worried. none worried are your members? cl" members are very worried. none of us joined the ambulance service to see what is happening, on a daily and hourly basis, it is deeply upsetting, some of the stories that i have heard on your programme. they are very sad. my heartfelt condolences and apologies to everybody in behalf of my members. we mustn't forget that we are operating under extreme pressure at the moment. and we can't keep running the service in crisis mode. our managers running the service in crisis mode. 0ur managers are running the service in crisis mode. our managers are at the end of their tether, they really, really are. what i don't want this to be as a blame game. the hospitals, doctors, nurses, health care assistance, they are working under extreme pressure and patient care is absolutely exceptional. this is ten years of underfunding by the government. unfortunately it has caught up with us. �* ., .,. ., unfortunately it has caught up with us. �* ., ., , us. are their immediate action is the government _ us. are their immediate action is the government could _ us. are their immediate action is the government could do, - us. are their immediate action is the government could do, do - us. are their immediate action is| the government could do, do you think, that would help? i the government could do, do you think, that would help?— think, that would help? i don't think, that would help? i don't
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think there _ think, that would help? i don't think there is _ think, that would help? i don't think there is one _ think, that would help? i don't think there is one fast - think, that would help? i don't think there is one fast fix, - think, that would help? i don't think there is one fast fix, i. think there is one fast fix, i really don't. i'm really concerned as we move into mustn't forget we are in november at the moment and we're not seeing normal pressures of the line ambulance service, that the front line nhs would be seeing. if we have really, really cold weather, i think this is the calm before the storm. moving forward, is there a fast fix? i don't think there is. community hospital beds have decreased. as we have already heard on your programme, care in the community is extremely difficult to get. all of these are causing difficulties with hospital flow. these are causing difficulties with hospitalflow. that these are causing difficulties with hospital flow. that inevitably means that ambulances are waiting at hospitals. and sometimes if we have 15, 16, 17 ambulances waiting outside of an a&e department, that is 15, outside of an a&e department, that i515, 16, 17 outside of an a&e department, that is 15, 16, 17 ambulances that are not responding to 999, life threatening calls. inevitably, your viewers and relatives are waiting a long time for an ambulance. it is
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deeply, deeply sad, it really is. i experienced myself last year, calling an ambulance for my son, i was kept on hold for hours and eventually drove him to a hospital. not everybody can do that in every situation. would you even advise that? �* , situation. would you even advise that? �*, ' . situation. would you even advise that? h ' . .,~ that? it's difficult. taking somebody _ that? it's difficult. taking somebody to _ that? it's difficult. taking somebody to hospital- that? it's difficult. taking - somebody to hospital themselves, that speeds up the process a little bit. they will probably get seen quicker. at the hospitals are under unprecedented load. the ambulances are. the communities are under unprecedented demand. what we are seeing is the perfect storm as we move into winter pressures. it certainly helps if somebody can get to hospital, but it really depends how poorly that person is. what we don't want is everybody turning up at the front door of an a&e department. we only convey between 35 and 40% of the patients that we see, to the front door of an a&e
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department. the rest are kept at home. you know, the equipment and medicines that we use are in a front line ambulance. we don't take everybody to hospital. but we don't want everybody to arrive at the front door of a&e. that doesn't help anybody. front door of me. that doesn't help an bod . . ., front door of me. that doesn't help an bod. ., ,, front door of me. that doesn't help an bod. ., ~' , front door of me. that doesn't help anbod. .mg , . front door of me. that doesn't help anbod. .mg, , . the duchess of sussex has apologised for misleading a court about information given by her aides to the authors of a biography. meghan sued the publisher of the mail on sunday over five articles. in her witness statement, meghan apologised and said that she did not intend to mislead the court about the role of an aide in providing information to the authors of the unauthorised biography. our correspondent megan paterson is here. tell us more about this. we know the back round tell us more about this. we know the background to — tell us more about this. we know the background to this _ tell us more about this. we know the background to this is _ tell us more about this. we know the background to this is that _ tell us more about this. we know the background to this is that earlier - background to this is that earlier this year the duchess of sussex won her legal battle against the publishers of the mail on sunday. they published a letter between meghan and her father.
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they published a letter between meghan and herfather. the they published a letter between meghan and her father. the court upheld that letter was unlawful. but the lawyers of associated newspapers say that they are trying to overturn it, and part of the letter was possibly made for public consumption, that is the crucial bit. the key point is that previously we heard from spokespeople who said that the couple did not contribute in any way to a biography called finding freedom. however, yesterday, the couple's former medications director said the book was discussed on a routine basis, directly with the duchess multiple times, in person and over e—mail. he also said a planning meeting with the authors had taken place and that the duchess had taken place and that the duchess had given him briefing points to share with him. so, to different accounts. an exchange of text messages was read out in court. the duchess of sussex said, obviously everything i have drafted is with the understanding that it could be leaked, so i have been meticulous in my word choice. in a witness
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statement to the court, the duchess said she accepted that her aide did have information, that he did have meetings with the authors of that biography. she said he —— she didn't have detailed information about what he passed over. she denied she deliberately misled the court. she apologised for forgetting to hand over the information. she said partly, going on in the background, the reason for not discovering those exchanges earlier was because of the stage of disclosure for mitigation it had not been reached, in october last year, when her lawyers applied to adjourn the trial date as she was pregnant. she had also suffered a miscarriage. she was under intense pressure, intense stress, and her medical team encouraged her to avoid all of that. so, that evidence yesterday, coming from court, and it will continue today. she has denied deliberately trying to mislead the court. . , deliberately trying to mislead the court. ., , . uk diplomats will urge iranian officials to release detained uk nationals, such as nazanin zaghari ratcliffe, in rare face—to—face talks today.
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it comes on the 19th day of her husband, richard's, hunger strike outside the foreign office in london. iran will also be urged to back a deal that would revive the international agreement regulating its nuclear programme. joining me now is former permanent under—secretary at the foreign and commonwealth office and head of the diplomatic service until september 2020 lord simon. thanks so much forjoining us. why has britain not paid the £400 million debt to around? it says it is crucial to unlocking the case. the tank saga is decades old. it goes back to the time of the shah, in 1971 he ordered 1750 chieftain tanks and support vehicles. fortunately for the uk he paid
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upfront. unfortunately for iran, the tanks did not arrive before his fall at the end of the 70s. so, ever since then there has been a dispute. in the beginning, the brits would not paid, because we were not doing business with the revolutionary regime in iran. for many years it was very quiet. i worked forjack straw, at the beginning of the 20005, straw, at the beginning of the 2000s, the whole time he was foreign secretary, this was not an issue between iran and the uk. but, of course, it is a large sum of money. it came back. for several years now, the british government has acknowledged that this is a rainy and money, and we need to repay it. —— iranian money. but the international sanctions regime on iran has complicated but international sanctions regime on iran has complicated— iran has complicated but the americans — iran has complicated but the americans did _ iran has complicated but the americans did pay _ iran has complicated but the americans did pay under - iran has complicated but the - americans did pay under obama, iran has complicated but the _ americans did pay under obama, under a similar situation? given that there is at least one family, many
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more of course have been caught up in these difficult politics, know of one family here, one little girl who is missing her mother. why is britain not moving everything to sort this out now? you britain not moving everything to sort this out now?— sort this out now? you say the americans _ sort this out now? you say the americans paid, _ sort this out now? you say the americans paid, but _ sort this out now? you say the americans paid, but as - sort this out now? you say the americans paid, but as you - sort this out now? you say the i americans paid, but as you point sort this out now? you say the - americans paid, but as you point out it was crucial that has happened under president obama. then we had president trump, he was very opposed to what his predecessor had done. and so we found it very difficult to negotiate with the us system to come to a similar deal. but we have had president biden now for nine months. so, things should be more hopeful. there is an american precedent, and i am sure that the british are using that with the american administration. it suits iran's negotiating team to link them as closely as possible. but there is
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absolutely no link between nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe and the sale of chieftain tanks before she was even born. so, we need to always bear in mind that they are separate, they need to be solved each on their own merits, and we must find a way through. merits, and we must find a way throu~h. ., ,., merits, and we must find a way throu~h. ., y., , merits, and we must find a way throu~h. ., ,, , ., through. so, are you hopefulthat toda 's through. so, are you hopefulthat today's face-to-face _ through. so, are you hopefulthat today's face-to-face talks - through. so, are you hopefulthat today's face-to-face talks will. today's face—to—face talks will yield an actual... you know, tangible push forward on this? these talks are part — tangible push forward on this? these talks are part of— tangible push forward on this? these talks are part of a _ tangible push forward on this? these talks are part of a process. _ tangible push forward on this? these talks are part of a process. the - talks are part of a process. the main reason for the talks is not consumer relations, it is to revive thejcp consumer relations, it is to revive the jcp 08. consumer relations, it is to revive thejcp 08. president obama took the americans out of the negotiations with iran. it had mostly been negotiated with john with iran. it had mostly been negotiated withjohn kerry, who is now back in the government. there are talks in vienna at the end of
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the month that should allow that. the iranian foreign minister has been touring european capitals, berlin, paris and london, in preparation for the meeting in vienna. the main business about nuclear. but i know that the british side will raise nazanin's case at the same time. is side will raise nazanin's case at the same time.— side will raise nazanin's case at the same time. is at the case that iran is the same time. is at the case that iran is saying _ the same time. is at the case that iran is saying if — the same time. is at the case that iran is saying if sanctions - the same time. is at the case that iran is saying if sanctions are - iran is saying if sanctions are lifted, they will ratify the paris agreement? obviously the cop is ongoing, john kerry is very closely involved in that. all of these things are linked, i presume? however separate they are, yes, in the negotiation, inevitably these things become linked. we will be making the case, each on its own merits. . , making the case, each on its own merits. ., , ., ,~ making the case, each on its own merits. .. , ., , ., ., ., merits. can i 'ust ask you again, 'ust merits. can i 'ust ask you again, just finauy. — merits. can ijust ask you again, just finally, returning _ merits. can ijust ask you again, just finally, returning to - merits. can ijust ask you again, | just finally, returning to nazanin, because it is a case we have all followed for a long time, people willjust wonder, for every day followed for a long time, people will just wonder, for every day that goes past, one family of many that are being ripped apart by this, no
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one pretends any more that foreign policy is purely ethical, its pragmatic and self interests. biden has been in the white house for a while. why is this notjust being guaranteed that it is going to happen by christmas? the guaranteed that it is going to happen by christmas? the sum of mone is happen by christmas? the sum of money is a _ happen by christmas? the sum of money is a very — happen by christmas? the sum of money is a very large _ happen by christmas? the sum of money is a very large one. - happen by christmas? the sum of money is a very large one. it - happen by christmas? the sum of money is a very large one. it is i money is a very large one. it is disputed, because, of course, it includes 40 years of interest that needs to be paid. so, there is a complicated negotiation around not only the size, but how it is paid back. it would be very difficult, i think, for brits and the americans to agree a cash payment that the iranians could use for whatever they liked. i am sure we would prefer payment in kind, medicines have been mentioned. the iranians will resist that. they will say this is something that has to be unpicked and solved. . , something that has to be unpicked and solved. .. , ., something that has to be unpicked and solved-— and solved. finally, do you think this will be _ and solved. finally, do you think this will be done _ and solved. finally, do you think this will be done by _ and solved. finally, do you think this will be done by the - and solved. finally, do you think this will be done by the end - and solved. finally, do you think this will be done by the end of l and solved. finally, do you think. this will be done by the end of the year? or is it impossible to put a
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timeframe on it? i year? or is it impossible to put a timeframe on it?— timeframe on it? i think it is impossible _ timeframe on it? i think it is impossible to _ timeframe on it? i think it is impossible to put _ timeframe on it? i think it is impossible to put on - timeframe on it? i think it is impossible to put on a - timeframe on it? i think it is - impossible to put on a timeframe, but i know that richard ratcliffe has achieved his short—term objective. everybody is thinking about his wife. this meeting will be reported around the world, the picture accompanying it will be of richard ratcliffe on the 19th day of his hunger strike.— richard ratcliffe on the 19th day of his hunger strike. simon mcdonald, former head — his hunger strike. simon mcdonald, former head of _ his hunger strike. simon mcdonald, former head of the _ his hunger strike. simon mcdonald, former head of the diplomatic- former head of the diplomatic service, many thanks. much appreciated. let's have a quick look at the weather with carol. is it getting colder? not really. sunday will be cooler, but still mild for the time of the year. quite a bit of cloud, mist and fog. a bright start across northern england, northern ireland and parts of scotland as well. however, as we go through the day, some rain will move northwards, getting into
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north—west england and also south—west scotland. temperatures today are 8—15, mild, as we were mentioning, for the time of year. identity afternoon the wind will be starting to pick up, out towards the west. as we go through the night, some heavy rain will move across northern ireland and also scotland. gusty wind with exposure in the west, gusting as much as 40 miles an hour, 50 mph gusts are possible in shetland. once again, it's going to be mild. patchy rain crossing england and wales, that will push into the new continent first thing into the new continent first thing in the morning. bright skies and some sunshine. we will also see some more rain coming in across central, southern scotland and northern england, and wherever you are it will be mild and windy. hello this is bbc news. the headlines. a surprise agreement between the us and china to tackle climate change gets a cautious welcome — but activists urge both nations to show greater commitment.
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paramedics warn lives are at risk due to unacceptably long ambulance delays of up to nine hours for some patients. britain and iran will hold rare face—to—face talks in london today to try to revive the agreement curbing its nuclear activities. the case of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe will also be on the agenda. the uk economy grew by 1.3% betweenjuly and september but supply chain issues are hampering recovery from the pandemic. the duchess of sussex has apologised for misleading a court about information given by her aides to the authors of a biography. some news of a school bus overturning near lincoln, apparently no serious injuries have been reported. it was near lincoln according to lincolnshire police.
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the police also said they were on the scene at north meadow lane. there are no serious injuries reported, do not attend the scene. saint chris terse's school is the rendezvous point for anyone worry id, alarming to hear about that but let us hope that is correct, no—one seriously injured there. we will update you of course more on that as soon as we get it. sport, and for a full round up from the bbc sport centre, here's mike. good morning. it's back to test cricket and the ashes tour next for england's cricketers, after the t20 team, were reminded of how quickly the tables can turn, in the shortest format of the sport, as they had their place in sunday�*s as they had their place in sunday's world cup final snatched away from them, by new zealand. england had looked on course, to keep alive their hopes of adding,
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the t20 title, to the 50 over trophy they hold, and after making 166 for 4, they had new zealand on the ropes. but needing an unlikely, 57 runs off the last 24 ballsjimmy neesham channelled all the hurt he felt, from when his team lost to england in the 50 overfinal at lords, two years ago, and in just one over, smashed his team back into it. we are devastated to be on the wrong side of a close game, which is not easy to take. i thought we fought unbelievably well on a wicket that didn't necessarily suit our batting but we managed to post around a par score and we were brilliant with the ball. it sounds weird, but i never felt it was out of our grasp, with the small side boundary on the one side we knew there would be matchups that would suit us at the end and we knew if we kept itjust within certain numbers we felt comfortable with, we always had a chance and i thought
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the way neesham came out and dominated that one over, sitting, i take my cap off to him because it was a hell of a knock. so disappointment for england in the t20 world cup, but here's a sight that will cheers the fans up. ben stokes has been training with his team—mates after a six month lay off from the game. stokes needed time to recover from mental—health issues, as well as a finger injury. he was a late addition to the ashes squad, but was right in the thick of it here on queensland's gold coast. the first test starts in brisbane on 8th december. relief for arsenal's women, who got a much—needed win in the women's champions league. steph catley steadied the nerves, with first, a perfect free kick as, they beat danish side kurg, 5—1 last night, to keep up the pressure on group leaders barcelona.....there were four more the pressure on group leaders barcelona. there were four more goals in the second—half. jordan nobbs rounding things off.
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the new newcastle manager, eddie howe, says his team do have the ability to stay in the premier league. howe was speaking to the media for the first time afterjoining with the club, next to bottom in the league. he refused to be drawn on the controversial saudi—backed ownership of the club, and insisted he took the job for football reasons only and has benefited from, over a year out of the game. once covid rules allowed, i've been here and there are everywhere and i sit here a better manager than i was. people will say i've been out of the game and question that but for me i'm more relevant and in touch than i've ever been in terms of what is going on at the top level. and talking of new managers, aston villa are stepping up moves to appoint rangers manager steven gerrard, and significant developments are expected in the next 48 hours. onto tennis, and andy murray is buzzing, and says beating the top seed, at the stockholm open is probably his best win of the season. he brushed asidejannik sinner, who's also now number ten in the world, to reach the quarter finals in sweden. murray says he's hoping he can
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improve further and faces american tommy paul next. british number two dan evans has also reached the last eight in stockholm. finally, how about this. it's been described by comedian adam hills as the best try he's ever seen in wheelchair rugby. from one end of the court to the other, a fantastic move. nathan collins was the man who finally scored. in the end a really plucky effort from england. they eventually went on to lose 49 — 24 but captain tom halliwell backed his side to bounce back when the teams meet again in kent on saturday. that's all the sport for now. anyone who works in a care home in england will have to be double—vaccinated against covid—19 from today, unless they are medically exempt. the health secretary, sajid javid, says the move is designed to make homes safer, but some in the sector have warned
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they could lose large numbers of employees, at a time when the industry is already struggling to recruit and retain staff. joining me now is louise akester. it is hardest thing i had to do. saying goodbye to everybody, all the people that i've cared for for so long, the people i've worked with, there's been, it's been so emotional, this is so unfair. i can't believe all the (bleep) government is doing to us, ijust don't get it. they don't understand. louise, shejoins us now, former
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care home—worker, you were very emotional there, and sad to leave, how do you feel this morning? it still feelsjust as raw, you know. today of all days when we're supposed to be celebrating our freedom. it feels like mine has been torn away. freedom. it feels like mine has been torn awa . ., freedom. it feels like mine has been torn awa. ., ., g ., freedom. it feels like mine has been torn awa . ., ., , , ., ., torn away. you obviously have done an incredibly _ torn away. you obviously have done an incredibly valuable _ torn away. you obviously have done an incredibly valuable job _ torn away. you obviously have done an incredibly valuable job that - an incredibly valuable job that meant a lot to you, why have you been so opposed to getting vaccinated? i been so opposed to getting vaccinated?— been so opposed to getting vaccinated? ., �* , , vaccinated? i don't trust it yet. you know. _ vaccinated? i don't trust it yet. you know, still— vaccinated? i don't trust it yet. you know, still in _ vaccinated? i don't trust it yet. you know, still in trials - vaccinated? i don't trust it yet. you know, still in trials till - vaccinated? i don't trust it yet. | you know, still in trials till 2023 i would rather wait until we have more long—term data. none of us know anything about the long—term side effects of the vaccine, and we should be able to make these choices for ourselves. we should be able to make these choices for ourselves-— for ourselves. we all can, but there are consequences, _ for ourselves. we all can, but there are consequences, which _ for ourselves. we all can, but there are consequences, which you - for ourselves. we all can, but there are consequences, which you are i for ourselves. we all can, but there l are consequences, which you are now experiencing and do you not think at the end of the day with millions of people being vaccinated round the world, and you know, a lot of
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governments and private groups tracking the safety that ultimately, it's something that is for your benefit, as well as everybody else, the people you are working with? ida. the people you are working with? no, because the people you are working with? iifr, because you know, the way i see it, is that you can still catch and spread covid even if you are vaccinated, i actually have already had covid, i got that last christmas, and i actually caught that from work, from caring for these elderly people, and i've since done an anti—test, i still have them in my system, why aren't they allowing people to that —— test that. allowing people to that -- test that. �* .., , , allowing people to that -- test that. . , ,, that. because, is it because the vaccine massive _ that. because, is it because the vaccine massive less _ that. because, is it because the vaccine massive less reduces i that. because, is it because the i vaccine massive less reduces your chances of getting it and spreading it. i am sure you must understand because you are dealing with relatives that people it wants someone caring for i their family who are not as safe as can be. itruiith
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who are not as safe as can be. with we were safe _ who are not as safe as can be. with we were safe enough _ who are not as safe as can be. tn we were safe enough and good who are not as safe as can be. try we were safe enough and good enough before the vaccine got rolled out. we was the ones there dealing with this, face to face, everybody was at home locked up safe with their families while i'm having to kiss my crying son goodbye, he's begging me not go to work because he was so worried that, you know,'d die and wouldn't come home because none of us knew what we were up against. we didn't have the vaccines then, there was shortages of pp pavement and shortages of testing —— ppe and we were good enough then, we were the ones holding the fort working hard, having to cover really long shifts, it was mentally and physically exhausting. we put ourselves out throughout so much. i am exhausting. we put ourselves out throughout so much.— throughout so much. i am sure everybody _ throughout so much. i am sure everybody completely - throughout so much. i am sure i everybody completely absolutely listens to you and says thank you for what you did and admiring of you and others who do that incredibly hard work, still, but when there is a much safer way forward, and if
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there is any risk, it has to be very minimal and there are risks to everything, people will again perhaps be watching and saying surely it is safer for you to get the jab and you can continue this amazing work. i the jab and you can continue this amazing work-— amazing work. i don't feel it is safe. i don't _ amazing work. i don't feel it is safe. i don't understand - amazing work. i don't feel it is safe. i don't understand how l amazing work. i don't feel it is - safe. i don't understand how people with see it as being safer. there has been so many adverse reactions recorded, you know, so many deaths and more and more each day, this data is changing, and... d0. and more and more each day, this data is changing, and...— and more and more each day, this data is changing, and... do, but are ou data is changing, and... do, but are you getting — data is changing, and... do, but are you getting your— data is changing, and... do, but are you getting your data _ data is changing, and... do, but are you getting your data from - data is changing, and... do, but are you getting your data from reliable l you getting your data from reliable fact checked sources? i am you getting your data from reliable fact checked sources?— fact checked sources? i am getting m data fact checked sources? i am getting my data from _ fact checked sources? i am getting my data from the _ fact checked sources? i am getting my data from the government's i fact checked sources? i am getting i my data from the government's very own website. there will always be side effects of anything, anything that... �* , , side effects of anything, anything that... �* . , ., , that... and the numbers are very very small _ that... and the numbers are very very small compared _ that... and the numbers are very very small compared with - that... and the numbers are very very small compared with the i that... and the numbers are very i very small compared with the risks to you of getting covid, the side effects of getting involved for you of long covid are huge, potentially? i don't think so. i trust my own natural immunity, i wish the
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government, they say this has been costing them so much for the roll out of the vaccine, well, maybe a way to save a bit of money is to start to test people for antibodies, and maybe you won't need all of these vaccine, why isn't that being given as an option. can these vaccine, why isn't that being given as an option.— given as an option. can i ask you ruickl , given as an option. can i ask you quickly. what — given as an option. can i ask you quickly, what are _ given as an option. can i ask you quickly, what are you _ given as an option. can i ask you quickly, what are you landing i given as an option. can i ask you quickly, what are you landing to | given as an option. can i ask you i quickly, what are you landing to do now, are you planning to get back in to the workforce, you know, get anotherjob somewhere else? i to the workforce, you know, get anotherjob somewhere else? another 'ob somewhere else? i would love, i anotherjob somewhere else? i would love. i would — anotherjob somewhere else? i would love, i would love _ anotherjob somewhere else? i would love, i would love to _ anotherjob somewhere else? i would love, i would love to get _ anotherjob somewhere else? i would love, i would love to get my - anotherjob somewhere else? i would love, i would love to get my old i anotherjob somewhere else? i would love, i would love to get my old job i love, i would love to get my old job back, i really do miss them, i really do. back, i really do miss them, i really do-_ back, i really do miss them, i reall do. �* ., ., , ., really do. but you have no plan, you know ou really do. but you have no plan, you know you have _ really do. but you have no plan, you know you have no _ really do. but you have no plan, you know you have no plans _ really do. but you have no plan, you know you have no plans to _ really do. but you have no plan, you know you have no plans to work- know you have no plans to work elsewhere?— know you have no plans to work elsewhere? ~ ., , , , , �* elsewhere? well, obviously, yes, i'm not auoin elsewhere? well, obviously, yes, i'm not going to — elsewhere? well, obviously, yes, i'm not going to stay _ elsewhere? well, obviously, yes, i'm not going to stay unemployed, i elsewhere? well, obviously, yes, i'm not going to stay unemployed, my i not going to stay unemployed, my first intention was to go working backin first intention was to go working back in the community, doing caring that way, but, now there is plans to go ahead with making you know, mandatory to are the vaccines in that area, i don't want to put myself in this situation again a few months down the line, you know, i
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have to look after myself as well, and my mental health and that of my family. and i think i'm going to look, i will have to look for something else if it is not possible for me to return to the work i have done for so many years. bier? done for so many years. very interesting — done for so many years. very interesting to _ done for so many years. very interesting to speak - done for so many years. very interesting to speak to i done for so many years. very interesting to speak to you, i done for so many years. very interesting to speak to you, thank you very much for your time. thank ou. figures for the three months to the end of september show that the economic recovery from the pandemic is continuing, but at a slower pace than in the previous quarter. the office for national statistics says gdp grew by 1.3%, that's down from 5.5% in the previous three months. the chancellor has told the bbc the government needs to do better in its efforts to tackle allegations of corruption and poor behaviour amongst mps. in an interview with our economics editor faisal islam, rishi sunak also defended his plans to boost economic growth and living standards. we do have established independent
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parliamentary processes that govern all of these things and it is absolutely right those are followed to the letter, but you know, reflecting on all of these things, over recent days, what i can say is for us as a government, we need to do better than we did last week, and we know that. and for you as chancellor, in charge of the nation's finances one element o this was the notion that public money may have been used not to get to the neediest people in the country, but in order to buy the loyalty of mps. you as chancellor must be worried about that, do you know if that didn't happen? it about that, do you know if that didn't happen?— about that, do you know if that didn't happen? about that, do you know if that didn't ha en? ., �* ., didn't happen? it wouldn't right for me to comment _ didn't happen? it wouldn't right for me to comment on _ didn't happen? it wouldn't right for me to comment on individual- didn't happen? it wouldn't right for. me to comment on individual cases, there are rightly established independent parliamentary processes that look at the things. band independent parliamentary processes that look at the things.— that look at the things. and i, but it is riaht that look at the things. and i, but it is right those _ that look at the things. and i, but it is right those processes - that look at the things. and i, but it is right those processes are i it is right those processes are followed to the letter, and of course, people should be held to account for their actions. course, people should be held to account fortheiractions. on course, people should be held to account for their actions. on the economy, these numbers, and perhaps more importantly the forecasts you look at. the bank of england and the
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obr, they show some concern about the economy and in particular about living standards in the next couple of years, notjust not growing well but declining over the next couple of years. but declining over the next couple of ears. ~ ., ,., but declining over the next couple of ears. ~ ., ., , , of years. what you are seeing is economy that — of years. what you are seeing is economy that is _ of years. what you are seeing is economy that is continuing i of years. what you are seeing is economy that is continuing to i of years. what you are seeing is i economy that is continuing to grow, and that is a good thing, we are on the right path but of course there are global challenges ahead and that is why the budget set out a plan to build a stronger economy, with support for working families, at its heart. whetherfreezing support for working families, at its heart. whether freezing fuel duty, cutting taxes for the lowest paid. that is the type of spurt. but cutting taxes for the lowest paid. that is the type of spurt.- that is the type of spurt. but the net result say — that is the type of spurt. but the net result say the _ that is the type of spurt. but the net result say the bank- that is the type of spurt. but the net result say the bank of i net result say the bank of england is two years of declining living standards after inflation, and after tax, so that includes all the measures you have mentioned. what tax, so that includes all the measures you have mentioned. what it doesnt measures you have mentioned. what it doesn't include — measures you have mentioned. what it doesn't include is _ measures you have mentioned. what it doesn't include is the _ measures you have mentioned. what it doesn't include is the spending - measures you have mentioned. what it doesn't include is the spending on i doesn't include is the spending on public services and that does bring value to people's lives so where is that money going in tax? it is going on investing in reducing the backlog so people and their families are not waiting very long time to have elective treatments on the nhs. it goes on putting more police officers on the street. it goes in making
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sure our schools are well funded. i think that impacts people's quality of life. it is not right to say let us only look at this side, what we are paying and not look at what we getting for the money. i think people would like to sigh waiting lists come to a more acceptable level. they want to see police officers on the street. see investment in skills and young people. they want to see their communities feel like more enriching places to live, that is where all that money is going, we need to make sure it is well spent and delivering those outcomes and i am confident we can do that and people will see their quality of life improve. you said there _ their quality of life improve. you said there would _ their quality of life improve. you said there would be a prime minister's new economy of high wages and high productivity that is not in the forecast of the bank of england and the obr that is going to be delivered. ii and the obr that is going to be delivered. , ., ., ., ~' and the obr that is going to be delivered. , ., ., ., ~ ., and the obr that is going to be delivered. , ., ., ., , delivered. if you look at wages, in real terms — delivered. if you look at wages, in real terms they _ delivered. if you look at wages, in real terms they were _ delivered. if you look at wages, in real terms they were higher i delivered. if you look at wages, in real terms they were higher than l real terms they were higher than before the pandemic and if you look at where we are targeting support to help people, the raising the
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national living wage, a thousand pound increase for those working full—time. we have cut taxes on those on the lowest incomes, by cutting thor rate, again a thousand pound benefit for those in work, reregarding —— rewarding their effort, letting them keep more of their money but the best way to move to that new economy is to invest in people, to invest in skills and training and education and the budget set out the most ambitious plans for a long time do that so people everywhere have the opportunity they need to get a great well paid job. the opportunity they need to get a great well paid job-— well paid “0b. the chancellor s-ueakin well paid job. the chancellor speaking to _ well paid job. the chancellor speaking to faisal— well paid job. the chancellor speaking to faisal islam. i let's speak to our business correspondent, victoria fritz. so, the numbers released today relate to what is going on with the economy, and what is already happening, so they are backwards looking they are looking at the last quarter of growth. they are showing,
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that, yes, the chancellor is right. the economy is growing but it is growing slowly, it is growing more slowly than expected. the bounce backin slowly than expected. the bounce back in september was not enough to off set you know, pretty poor months in july and off set you know, pretty poor months injuly and august, and yes, you know, yes we have had a budget, a supportive budget, for working families but there is no doubt about it, there are challenges ahead and rishi sunak is aware of that, we have global head winds, we have trade issue, semi conductor microcrepe shortages, construction is still down, manufacturing is down, and lots of things like that. then you have local issues, things that are more specific to the uk economy. so in terms of living standards, which is obviously a sort of a forward looking measure or indication, the expectation at the moment is there are going to be two years of falling living standards and that will be felt in food, food
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price, inflation, it will be felt potentially at the pumps, it is going to be felt in terms of all sorts of other things as well, and so, you are seeing price rise, energy bills rising, etc, so is it going to be enough? rishi sunak says that yes, it will be enough. the increase in public spend willing be off no off set the decreases in living standards, other people not so sure, the other thing to throw—in to the mix of all of this is interest rates as well. so the bank of england at the moment has not raised rates. it will be looking carefully at some of the data that has come through, today, about the economy. the economy is still not at prepandemic level, it is not still where it was in february 2020. other countries are, china has already managed it. it bigger than it once was, the us has managed it too. we are growing more slowly, and there are growing more slowly, and there are significant head winds ahead. victoria, thank you.
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wa nt to want to bring you the latest nhs numbers on waiting lists which have been published, and, the number of people waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high, a total of 5.8 million people waiting to start treatment at the end of september 2021 according to figures from nhs england. that is the highest since records began in august 2007, and the number of people having to wait more than 32 weeks 300 —— 3566. that is more than double waiting a year earlier o356,000. let us get more on the problems facing the health service at the moment. matthew taylor is chief executive of the nhs confederation, which represents health service organisations and carried out that survey of health leaders.
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matthew, i don't know if you have had a chance to see the latest waiting figures which have literally come out, sorry to spring that on you, obviously you have done a report on the whole delays to the ambulance service, do you have any response to the waiting time increase here we response to the waiting time increase here— response to the waiting time increase here ~ .. , . , increase here we have three pieces of information _ increase here we have three pieces of information that _ increase here we have three pieces of information that go _ increase here we have three pieces of information that go together i increase here we have three pieces of information that go together to i of information that go together to form a picture of a service that is finding it almost impossible to cope with the levels of demand we face weed has information from the ambulance service about response times, which are increasing, both for the most urgent call—outs, but also for call—outs where there is a bit more time allowed but actually those times have slipped enormously so we are exes experiencing long waits for people who have had heart attacks or strokes and people are waiting in hospital car parks to get
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into emergency departments. our work as a survey from acute, from mental health, community service, primary care and nine out of ten of them are saying the situation is now unsustainable. and what is more, they are saying the priority now is not more spending on the health service but on social care, because in some hospitals one in five patients could be out of hospital but there is no social care provision for them. we have enormous number of shortages so people who get one visit have not getting it, that maybe why they are trying to see their gp or having to call to an ambulance, and now we have, the latest official statistics from the nhs, which show that despite the fact that the nhs is working flat out and is undertaking high levels of activity we have unprecedented levels of demand, the number of people calling 999 is the highest ever recorded. so the nhs is doing everything it can, but the
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combination of the fact we still have thousands of people in hospital with covid, that rate is declining, thatis with covid, that rate is declining, that is a good thing but there are still thousands of patients in hospital. the fact it is winter and the nhs is always under pressure in winter and then the pent up demand that has build up as people have not been able to use the health service because of covid, those three things come together have put news a very difficult situation. bud come together have put news a very difficult situation.— difficult situation. and matthew, obviousl , difficult situation. and matthew, obviously, looking _ difficult situation. and matthew, obviously, looking across i difficult situation. and matthew, obviously, looking across the - difficult situation. and matthew, - obviously, looking across the board, it is incredibly complex, is there anything that the government could do to try and ease these pressures, for example, should they be looking at easing the visa restrictions? is the compulsory covid jab something that might risk driving people out of the workforce? so that might risk driving people out of the workforce?— that might risk driving people out of the workforce? so to be fair the government _ of the workforce? so to be fair the government has _ of the workforce? so to be fair the government has put _ of the workforce? so to be fair the government has put in _ of the workforce? so to be fair the government has put in extra - of the workforce? so to be fair the | government has put in extra money for the winter, and, government has put in extra money forthe winter, and, i government has put in extra money for the winter, and, i think however extraordinary times require extraordinary times require extraordinary measure, so i think we need to look at anything with can do to get us through the next few months, i want to emphasise if we
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can get through the winter, the medium term for the nhs i am sure we can make progress on the backlog o hopefully with numbers dick lining and now an effective treatment for covid we can see the light at the end of the tunnel, so if question get through the winter things will look up a but we have to get through the next few months and the government should do anything in its power and if i had to choose one thing i would say give money to local government now, to increase salaries for social care assistants to possibly pay signing on fees for people who come into social care, or retention bonuses, if we could just deal with the under, the workforce gaps in social care, so more people can get out of hospital, and more people can be supported at home, thatis people can be supported at home, that is probably one of the few things we can do in the immediate term, that would make an impact. but we still know there is a massive staff shortage, should visas be
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increased, extended immediately to get more people to be able to come and work in all these sectors? i certainly if if we can bring extra people in all our social care, absolutely we should do. we have to pull out all the stops, over these next few months because problem is this, it is notjust that, we have theissue this, it is notjust that, we have the issue of people waiting a long time for ambulances to arrive, waiting in hospital car parks, issues of safety of patients right now, but also because of these pressure, we are not able to do anything about that backlog so the reason that is rising is in part because hospitals that would like to doing this about elective care are only able to cope with the people coming in through emergency departments, the government needs to pull out the stops, the nhs is doing everything it can to respond, but there is a role for the public, you know. i urge people to do what you can, to minimise the risk that you
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will government or pass it on, to use the health service in a responsible way, if you feel unwell, there is brilliant nhs website. there is 111. the nhs app. try to use the services that are there available to you. if you are offered available to you. if you are offered a digital consultation f the doctor feels you need to be seen face to face that is what will happen. use the nhs in a responsible way, and understand the kinds of pressure that staff are under.— that staff are under. finally matthew. _ that staff are under. finally matthew, very _ that staff are under. finally matthew, very quickly - that staff are under. finally matthew, very quickly how| that staff are under. finally - matthew, very quickly how worried are you about the next few weeks? i am very worried are about the winter, you know. nhs leaders are not given to hyperbole and when nine out of ten say it is unsustainable we are in unchartered territory. we have to treat this as an extraordinary set of circumstances that require an extraordinary response, if we do everything we can, then we can get through this winter but we have to understand the scale of it. government needs to acknowledge and recognise it and give the public a clear message
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about how tough the next few months will be. thank you. a quick loot a the weather. carol, still pretty unpredictable for november? it is fairly mild. and we have a bit of cloud, a bit of rain, we have also got mist and some fog as well. but the common denominator is it is my lord. some of us started off on a chilly note but temperatures are picking up nicely. we have two weak weather fronts, an area of low pressure coming in and it will be bring in rain and you can see by looking at the isobars that it is going to be pretty windy. what we have at the moment is a lot of low cloud. mist, murk, spots of rain, and also some clear skies, we had clear skies throughout the day in the highlands, through the day you will find more cloud will march northward and we will see rain return into the south—west, some of that rain getting into northern
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ireland, and also north—west england, but as we head towards the south, although there will be areas of cloud thick enough for drizzle it should generally tend to brighten up. these are the temperature, eight to 15 degrees with light winds but as we go through the latter part of the day the wind will strengthen to the day the wind will strengthen to the west, heralding the arrival of that area of low pressure. and it is going to be bringing in some rain across northern ireland, and also scotland. that is where it will be heaviest. the rain coming in across england and wales, won't be as heavy as it continues to push eastwards. gusty winds, especially with exposure in the west and the far north. once again, a mild night in prospect. so tomorrow, we have got the weak band of rain for pushing across the south—east, clearing, and then more rain comes in across central and southern scotland and this is going to be heavier, quite a bit of cloud with one or two brighter breaks here and there, and once again, windy, but as the centre of the low pressure moves across central scotland the wind for you
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will tend to ease. temperatures 10-15 will tend to ease. temperatures io—is grow, the average at this time of year is roughly nine to ii io—is grow, the average at this time of year is roughly nine to 11 north to south. as we head into saturday we will have brisk winds to start the day, in the east, a bit of rain first thing, both 06 these will ease, a ridge of high pressure builds in and things settle down. on saturday it is going to be fairly cloudy. it will be mild. temperatures io—ili cloudy. it will be mild. temperatures 10—14 degrees and there will be a bit of sunshine, you can see by the end of the day the next front waiting in the ings withes. that looks like it will come in to the north—west as we go through sunday but sunday again largely dry, a fair bit of cloud. a bit of sunshine, light winds, with highs between 11 and 14. health secretarist health secretary
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this is bbc news ? these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. a surprise agreement between the us and china to tackle climate change gets a cautious welcome — but activists urge both nations to show greater commitment. and i'm in glasgow, with all the latest from the un climate change summit. it is, officially at least, the penultimate day of the climate summit. paramedics in the uk warn lives are at risk due to unacceptably long ambulance delays of up to nine hours for some patients. nhs waiting lists in england have reached a new record high. new figures show there were 5.83 million people waiting for treatment in september. britain and iran will hold rare face—to—face talks in london today to try to revive the agreement curbing its nuclear activities.

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