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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 11, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. lives at risk because of unacceptably long ambulance delays of up to nine hours. a warning from paramedics as new figures on waiting times are due out this morning. the usa and china unexpectedly agree to co—operate over global warming, as the cop 26 climate change summit enters its final days. but can acting locally help globally? i am but can acting locally help globally? iam in but can acting locally help globally? i am in hull, but can acting locally help globally? iam in hull, one but can acting locally help globally? i am in hull, one of the city is hoping to go carbon neutral ahead of the national target. it's heavily reliant on scientists working with academics. i will look
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at how that is working here. from the swimming pool to the strictly ballroom, it's been quite a year for adam peaty. the olympic champion will be here to tell us how he wants to inspire people to achieve the impossible. the world cup dream is over for england's cricketers. they had looked on course for the t—20 final on sunday, until a dramatic fightback by new zealand in abu dhabi crushed england's hopes in a whirlwind finale. good morning. for many of us this morning, it is going to be mostly cloudy, there is some rain in the forecast and limited sunshine but once again it is going to be mild. the wind strengthened in the west heralding the arrival of some heavy rain. all the details later. it's thursday 11th november. our main story. unacceptably long waits for ambulances across the uk, are putting lives at risk. that's according to the college of paramedics. in some cases, people thought to have had strokes or heart attacks are waiting hours for help to arrive.
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the latest figures for england are due out later this morning. here's more from our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. across the length and the breadth of the uk, ambulances are queuing. unable to hand over the sick and injured patients they have on board because hospitals have no room. and ambulances stuck in queues aren't available to attend other emergencies, leaving patients in need, waiting at home. i called an ambulance at 11:50am. and they said that they were going to send help asap. just over two weeks ago, christina found her grandmother, who lives in cheltenham spa, slumped in a chair, having a stroke. it was a blue light emergency. the ambulance should have arrived in 18 minutes. but instead, it took nearly six hours. it then queued outside hospital for an another three. it was then that an ambulance lady, i asked her how long it was going to take for my nan
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to get a ct, because ijust needed to know whether or not it was a stroke. and she told me, well, your nan�*s event happened last night. so we would only administer the medication that would reverse any permanent damage within that three—hour window. how did you feel? ijust broke down in tears on the floor. whistle—blowers from inside the ambulance services have told the bbc the system is at breaking point. this 999 call handler said even patients whose hearts have stopped are facing delays. there was a call for a cardiac arrest, and there was an eta in excess of 50 minutes. the nearest available crew was 50 minutes away. and this guy was in arrest. and for every minute, they say 10% of your life expectancy will decrease. that's hard. we struggle massively with a lot of delays. this is life threatening. and we just don't have the crews
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to respond like we should do. all 1a ambulance services in the uk have escalated to the highest level of alert, and some have even gone beyond. like here at south central, which recently declared a critical incident when managers said the service had become unsafe. stuart, a paramedic, was working that night. i had a conversation with the control room, you know, in the early hours, when they said how many jobs are outstanding. how many incidents are outstanding, and i was like, oh, my god. you just sit there thinking, we're never, ever going to get rid of that backlog for days. for the last three months, these handlers have answered an additional 21,000 999 calls, compared to two years ago. and just before the critical incident was declared here, instead of having an average of 20 patients waiting for an ambulance, they had 120 patients waiting.
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they are operating right at the edge of what they can manage in order to keep patients from harm. south central has now asked the government for military support. armed forces have helped ambulance services in other parts of england, wales and scotland, and have supported hospitals in northern ireland. governments in all parts of the uk say they are aware of the challenges and are doing their best to support services. but with winter coming, the pressure is likely only to get worse. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. an update for you on the case discussed at the start of that report, christina's grandmother is now recovering in a stroke rehabilitation centre and is hoping to go home soon. we will be discussing those ambulance waiting times more throughout the programme this morning. the united states and china have agreed to closer co—operation to tackle climate change, in a surprise declaration at the cop26 climate summit.
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they issued a joint statement in glasgow pledging to achieve the 1.5 celsius temperature goal set out in the 2015 paris agreement. our global science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. it's the final countdown in glasgow as the climate talks enter the last few days, and we see if enough can be done to stop dangerous climate change. last night, the prime minister boris johnson urged countries to pull out all the stops. but he also tried to manage expectations. the cop26 summit here in glasgow is not going to fix it in one go. we are not going to arrest climate change right here, right now, that is just impossible. and i think everybody has got to be realistic about that. but there is the possibility that we will come away from this with the first genuine road map for a solution to anthropogenic climate change. there are some signs of hope. china's top negotiator made a surprise announcement of a joint
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climate plan with the united states. the world's two biggest polluters agreed to move towards using clean energy. and they said they'd reduce methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas, in a positive sign of cooperation. the united states and china have no shortage differences, shortage of differences, but on climate, on climate, cooperation is the only way to get this job done. today, countries are also joining together to announce an ambitious initiative, a plan to phase out oil and gas led by costa rica and denmark. they want nations to join them in setting a date to end their use. coal, too, responsible for half of all greenhouse gases, will also be a focus. and whether plans to stop its use make it into the final agreement. there will be much wrangling in the coming days, and sleepless nights for negotiators trying to thrash out a deal. the process at the united nations means getting nearly 200 countries to agree, each with different economies,
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different problems and very different agendas. rebecca morelle, bbc news, glasgow. 0ur chief political correspondent adam fleming is in glasgow this morning. good morning, adam. so, we know that everyone is urging all countries to pull out all the stops. this is a change of heart, between the us and china, after basically trading insults earlier in the week? goad insults earlier in the week? good mornin: , insults earlier in the week? good morning. naga- _ insults earlier in the week? good morning, naga. yes, _ insults earlier in the week? good morning, naga. yes, it's- insults earlier in the week? good morning, naga. yes, it's not- insults earlier in the week? good morning, naga. yes, it's not a i morning, naga. yes, it's not a surprise that china and the us have done something big. because everyone says that at previous conferences, thatis says that at previous conferences, that is always the moment when things shift, when china and the us either agree or disagree on something. having said that, the thing they came out last night and the point at which they came out with it was a bit of a surprise. at the moment it is just a very powerful symbol of two people who are not necessarily friends all the time coming together to work on
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climate change in the future. what will obviously matter is whether it makes a difference, and it could makes a difference, and it could make a difference in the short—term here in glasgow because it could put pressure on other countries to come together and sign the deal. it looks like the us and china are on the same page on lots of issues that other people have disagreements about. then in the medium term, it will matter if it means that china and the us come forward with even more ambitious climate change targets next year all the year after the after that, because the scientists say that is required. and if china and the us do that and accelerate their ambition, it would encourage other countries to do that as well. we got a bit of a much needed reality check from boris johnson, the prime minister, he was here in glasgow for a day trip. he reminded everyone that this conference will not and was never going to be able to stop climate change or reverse itjust in this two weeks. glasgow is part of the bid process that will continue in
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other cities, in other years in times to come. and i wasjust other cities, in other years in times to come. and i was just really struck, it's one of those moments when you look up from your laptop and stop taking notes, he said, the uk is not a corrupt country. he obviously feels that all of these headlines about members of parliament and their second jobs might be having an effect on the uk's reputation while it is hosting a big international event with lots of other countries attending. anyone who works in a care home in england will have to be double—vaccinated against covid—19 from today, unless they are medically exempt. the health secretary sajid javid says the move is designed to make homes safer, but some in the sector have warned they could lose large numbers of employees, at a time when the industry is already struggling to recruit and retain staff. iran will be urged to release detained uk nationals, such as nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, when rare face—to—face talks will take place between british and iranian diplomats in london today. it comes on the 19th day of her husband, richard's, hunger strike outside the foreign office. 0ur correspondent, tim muffett,
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is there for us this morning. good morning. we can see some of the tents behind you. this is deeply personal, of course, for richard ratcliffe. tell us a little bit more about these face—to—face talks. yes. about these face-to-face talks. yes, as ou about these face-to-face talks. yes, as you say. — about these face-to-face talks. yes, as you say. it — about these face-to-face talks. yes, as you say. it is _ about these face-to-face talks. yes, as you say, it is date _ about these face-to-face talks. yes, as you say, it is date 19 _ about these face-to-face talks. yes, as you say, it is date 19 of _ about these face—to—face talks. 1a: as you say, it is date 19 of richard ratcliffe's hunger strikes, he is still asleep in one of the tents behind me but we will speak to him later. the idea is to raise awareness of the plight of his wife nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe who has been held in custody in iran since 2016. today delegates from iran are expected to meet with officials from the foreign office to discuss a range of issues and the british governance it will be pressing firmly for the immediate release of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe and many other people. she has been held captive since 2016, in the country
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with her daughter visiting relatives when she was arrested at the airport and accused of plotting to overthrow the iranian government. she has always denied any wrongdoing. she was held captive injail in iran for four years, for one year she was under house arrest but earlier this year she lost an appeal is that she could be sent back to prison at any time. richard ratcliffe says he welcomes the fact that officials will be talking but there have been many false dawns before so he is realistic about the chances for any breakthrough, he says he isn't holding his breath but he is glad that talks will be taking place. thank you very much. the defence secretary, ben wallace, will write to the labour and snp leaders to express disappointment about claims mps were drunk on a parliamentary trip to gibraltar this week. the snp have said the allegations are false and have accused the conservatives of trying to divert attention from the contoversy about politicians having second jobs. the duchess of sussex has apologised for misleading a court about information given by her aides, to the authors of a biography.
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meghan sued the publisher of the mail on sunday over five articles. in her witness statement, published yesterday, meghan apologised and said that she did not intend to mislead the court about the role of an aide in providing information to the authors of the unauthorised biography. a french balloonist has broken the world record for standing on a hot—air balloon. these amazing pictures show 28—year—old remi 0uvrard on top of the balloon over western france at an altitude of more than 3,500m. there is extraordinary pictures! the it was piloted by his father for a charity event. a lot of trust there! he told reporters he experienced "a feeling of "zenitude" whilst in the sky. i haven't heard that word before. a
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form of zen tranquillity embraced by people who follow the biggest religion. can you weave the word zenitude into your broadcast? i don't think i would have that if i was stood on top of the balloon! we have a lot of cloud around, not much zenitude in this forecast at all! we have rain in the wet, clearer skies in parts of southern scotland, northern england and northern ireland. that has allowed the temperature to fall away. at the moment it is 4 degrees in newcastle. low cloud and mist and fog in central and southern england and wales, spots of rain, which will migrate north through the day. as will the showers across western
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scotland. starting with some sunshine, in northern scotland, then it would cloud over through the day. and we start off with cloud and spot of rain in southern england and wales. that rain is moving north through the day so we should see some sunshine in southern areas. the rain will strengthen in the west heralding the arrival of low pressure bringing some rain, but mild across the board. the rain will push across scotland, northern ireland and northern england, some will be heavy. the tail end is wrapped around the low pressure moving towards towards the east, lighter and more patchy in nature, and still windy. exposure in the west, gusts of up to 50 miles an hourin west, gusts of up to 50 miles an hour in shetland but it will not be a cold night. tomorrow we have the rain heavy across southern and central scotland and northern england, then the patchy rain get into the south—east, followed by some showers. still quite windy,
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especially in eastern areas through tomorrow. gusts around a0 miles an hour. and still on the mild side. thank you very much. events will be taking place across the uk today to commemorate those who've died in conflict. remembrance day can be particularly hard for children who have lost a parent who served in the armed forces. 0ur reporterjohn maguire has been meeting some of those who've been helped by a charity set up to support bereaved children and young people dealing with the death of a parent in the military. when sergeant major gary o'donnell, a highly decorated bomb disposal expert, was killed in afghanistan in 2008, his sons, aidan and ben, were aged eight and just nine weeks old. well, i think he was just, well, my hero. i think he was kind, generous, you know, he had such an amazing job and was so good at it. i have really fond memories
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with him, and, yeah, ithink, what would he do in situations in my life? i really looked up to him, i want to be like him. both boys are supported by the charity scotty's little soldiers. we are just with people who know what we're going through, and obviously, we understand them as well so we can help them. it's really good that we get to have those fun times with the people who understand everything that's happened to us and relate to us. scotty's organises everything from christmas parties to bereavement support. its main strength is the shared experience of those it helps. families of servicemen and women who have died. knowing there are other people out there makes it better, makes itjust, you can relax a bit, knowing there's other people out there that have gone
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through the same thing as you, and you can ask advice and give advice and cry with them and laugh with them and they understand you. you just understand each other, it's brilliant. the charity was set up by nicky scott in 2010, after her husband lee, a corporal in the royal tank regiment, was killed in action the year before. he left two young children. kai was five at the time and brooke was just seven months old. when i had to tell kai, i suddenly realised that he'd never experienced the death of anyone before in the family. he really withdrew into himself, but he'd also have horrific nightmares, real trouble sleeping, very clingy. difficulties at school. and we were in a military garrison, so he's just really confused with, why is everyone else's daddies coming home from afghan from afghan and mine didn't? and the questions were starting to come and come. so i wanted to reach out and get him the best support. on sunday, a group of scotty's families, resplendent
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in their distinctive striped scarves, willjoin the national remembrance parade at the cenotaph in london. it's the one time of year when the whole country shows that they haven't forgotten. and i wouldn't want it any other way, it's really special, very proud time. but it is up there with the anniversary of lee's death for me personally, it's a really difficult time. but i've finally got children and young people, bereaved children and young people, who experienced the death of a parent on that parade. and that is a very special feeling, when you walk through that parade with those children and you see the crowd just pay respect. two years ago, the first time children had attended the ceremony, ben carried a wreath in his father's memory and this weekend, the boys will return. it's about remembering those who have given the ultimate sacrifice. even if it's something little like visiting my dad's plaque, just to show remembrance. but i think it is a tough time, all the memories flood back and we are looking back to not
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just my dad but all the soldiers that gave their lives. and that does bring back some not so nice memories. many of us will bow our heads on sunday in honour and remembrance of those who died whilst serving their country. some we never met, some we knew. but wearing the black and yellow scarves, the young people whose lives were changed forever. families who support each other and who share a bond forged in the toughest of times. john maguire, bbc news. that really makes you think. listening to what nikki was saying about her sons, you think about remembrance day, everyone has different thoughts on that day, for her children, she said it was very special, very proud today, but very difficult as well. because of the
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memory. difficult as well. because of the memo . ~ , ., ~ ., memory. we will be talking to her little later- _ memory. we will be talking to her little later. it's _ memory. we will be talking to her little later. it's an _ memory. we will be talking to her little later. it's an interesting - little later. it's an interesting way to look at remembrance. it is 20 minutes past six. let's have a look at the papers. several of the front pages feature further claims about the earnings of sir geoffrey cox, as the debate about mps second jobs continues. the i newspaper says conservative chief whip mark spencer is "in peril" after giving his approval to sir geoffrey working in the caribbean instead of attending parliament. the daily telegraph's front page reports that the duchess of sussex admitted misleading a court over whether she had authorised aides to brief the authors of a biography the times' lead story reports on "fraudulent or mistaken" claims on the government's furlough scheme during the pandemic. the paper says hundreds of companies were only established after the scheme was announced. and the last minute climate deal between the us and china is on the front page of the guardian today. yesterday the two countries
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announced a surprise deal to work together to cut greenhouse gas emissions. plenty more from glasgow to the programme this morning. watching cop26 and listening _ programme this morning. watching cop26 and listening to _ programme this morning. watching cop26 and listening to all- programme this morning. watching cop26 and listening to all the - cop26 and listening to all the conversations around climate change, people thinking they need to do something, a little something which makes a difference. and of course it is quite a way away, christmas, we are not there yet. 0ne is quite a way away, christmas, we are not there yet. one of the things being looked at is, you know you have these houses, often this house here, helen and john here, people decorating their houses. this is a charity, this is raising money and they get people around to see the light and i put a lot of effort into all of this. but it is the energy going into this. so campaigners are saying, we absolutely get what you
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are doing, but perhaps they could be using led lights because they only use 10% of the power of conventional strings of christmas lights. i5 use 10% of the power of conventional strings of christmas lights.— strings of christmas lights. is that from the previous _ strings of christmas lights. is that from the previous year? _ strings of christmas lights. is that from the previous year? yes. - strings of christmas lights. is that from the previous year? yes. but| from the previous year? yes. but the are from the previous year? yes. but they are talking _ from the previous year? yes. but they are talking about, _ from the previous year? yes. but they are talking about, this - from the previous year? yes. but i they are talking about, this monthly bill for this house when the lights go bill for this house when the lights 9° up bill for this house when the lights go up to hundreds of pounds, and we have been talking about energy bills and people are struggling. the energy saving trust says the uk could fill 15.5 thousand hot air balloon to the carbon dioxide —— with the carbon dioxide from our christmas lights every year. fin a christmas lights every year. on a sliuhtl christmas lights every year. on a slightly different _ christmas lights every year. on a slightly different note, _ christmas lights every year. on a slightly different note, there have been some important discussions all over the place about a very important things. not given quite so much attention is the negotiations over the world scotch pie championships. you might not be aware but yesterday was the judging day. aware but yesterday was the 'udging da . ~ . , aware but yesterday was the 'udging da . . ., , ., aware but yesterday was the 'udging da. ., ., aware but yesterday was the 'udging
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aware but yesterday was the judging day. what is in a scotch pie? so, they have _ day. what is in a scotch pie? so, they have 11 _ day. what is in a scotch pie? so, they have 11 categories _ day. what is in a scotch pie? so, they have 11 categories in - day. what is in a scotch pie? so, they have 11 categories in all. - they have 11 categories in all. these are two judges looking at or through the pies or pretending to. 11 categories... did through the pies or pretending to. 11 categories. . ._ 11 categories... did they eat all of the ies? 11 categories... did they eat all of the pies? the _ 11 categories... did they eat all of the pies? the awards _ 11 categories... did they eat all of the pies? the awards are - 11 categories... did they eat all of the pies? the awards are in - 11 categories... did they eat all of i the pies? the awards are in january. yes, of the pies? the awards are in january. yes. of course _ the pies? the awards are in january. yes, of course they _ the pies? the awards are in january. yes, of course they eat _ the pies? the awards are in january. yes, of course they eat them - the pies? the awards are in january. | yes, of course they eat them because they are checking which one is the best buy because it is an award. [30 best buy because it is an award. do ou best buy because it is an award. drr you like pi? best buy because it is an award. do you like pi? i— best buy because it is an award. do you like pi? i have _ best buy because it is an award. do you like pi? i have gone _ best buy because it is an award. do you like pi? i have gone to - best buy because it is an award. do you like pi? i have gone to the - you like pi? i have gone to the trouble of _ you like pi? i have gone to the trouble of looking _ you like pi? i have gone to the trouble of looking at _ you like pi? i have gone to the trouble of looking at what - you like pi? i have gone to the trouble of looking at what the | trouble of looking at what the categories were of pie. scotch pie, i think that is just a pie. football pie and savoury, macaroni pie? i have seen that, like macaroni cheese inside a pie. have seen that, like macaroni cheese inside a pie-— inside a pie. steak pie, sausage roll, the classic _ inside a pie. steak pie, sausage roll, the classic one. _ inside a pie. steak pie, sausage roll, the classic one. that - inside a pie. steak pie, sausage roll, the classic one. that is - inside a pie. steak pie, sausage roll, the classic one. that is a l roll, the classic one. that is a ie? is roll, the classic one. that is a pie? is a _ roll, the classic one. that is a pie? is a sausage _ roll, the classic one. that is a pie? is a sausage roll- roll, the classic one. that is a pie? is a sausage roll apply? | roll, the classic one. that is a - pie? is a sausage roll apply? these are all of the _ pie? is a sausage roll apply? these are all of the categories _ pie? is a sausage roll apply? these are all of the categories they - pie? is a sausage roll apply? these are all of the categories they are i are all of the categories they are judging within the awards. sausage
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roll, cold savoury pie, hot savary... hold on. savary. .. hold on. vegetarian savoury. _ savary. .. hold on. vegetarian savoury. haggis _ savary. .. hold on. vegetarian savoury, haggis savoury. - savary. .. hold on. vegetarian savoury, haggis savoury. you| savary. .. hold on. vegetarian - savoury, haggis savoury. you cannot just sit here and read a list and not discuss it.— not discuss it. bridie and apple ie. i not discuss it. bridie and apple pie- i can _ not discuss it. bridie and apple pie- i can tell— not discuss it. bridie and apple pie. i can tell you _ not discuss it. bridie and apple pie. i can tell you now, - not discuss it. bridie and apple pie. i can tell you now, if- not discuss it. bridie and apple pie. i can tell you now, if you l pie. i can tell you now, if you think along the lines of a pasty, it is sausage meat with vaulted over pastry, —— folded pastry, it is similar to a pasty, a bridie. pastry, —— folded pastry, it is similarto a pasty, a bridie. a pasty is very different. 50 similar to a pasty, a bridie. a pasty is very different. so what is the difference _ pasty is very different. so what is the difference between _ pasty is very different. so what is the difference between that - pasty is very different. so what is the difference between that and i pasty is very different. so what is | the difference between that and a sausage roll? sausage meat and pastry? it sausage roll? sausage meat and ast ? , , . pastry? it is entirely enclosed. if ou are pastry? it is entirely enclosed. if you are familiar— pastry? it is entirely enclosed. if you are familiar with _ pastry? it is entirely enclosed. if you are familiar with a _ pastry? it is entirely enclosed. if you are familiar with a sausage l you are familiar with a sausage roll, at either end it is open. so it is more like a piece of piping with sausage in the middle. [30 it is more like a piece of piping with sausage in the middle. do you en'o with sausage in the middle. do you enjoy eating _ with sausage in the middle. do you enjoy eating pie. — with sausage in the middle. do you enjoy eating pie, what _ with sausage in the middle. do you enjoy eating pie, what is _ with sausage in the middle. do you enjoy eating pie, what is your- with sausage in the middle. do you enjoy eating pie, what is your pie l enjoy eating pie, what is your pie of choice? ., ., ., enjoy eating pie, what is your pie of choice?— enjoy eating pie, what is your pie of choice? ., ., ., ., of choice? you cannot go wrong with that number — of choice? you cannot go wrong with that number of _ of choice? you cannot go wrong with that number of awards. _ of choice? you cannot go wrong with that number of awards. the - of choice? you cannot go wrong with that number of awards. the judging | that number of awards. the judging is being done, you find out in january what has one. if is being done, you find out in january what has one.- is being done, you find out in january what has one. if you own a
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cat, i am january what has one. if you own a cat. i am very _ january what has one. if you own a cat, i am very confused _ january what has one. if you own a cat, i am very confused by - january what has one. if you own a cat, i am very confused by this - cat, i am very confused by this article. i have tried to figure it out. basically some scientists have done some experiments, pitting cats into a room, then they hear their owners voices and it confuses them. the reason this interesting is because cats their owners as if they are prey, almost. 0r because cats their owners as if they are prey, almost. or a source of food, which obviously owners are. so they always know where we are when it comes to being in the house or the garden if you are fortunate enough to have a garden. so they did these experiments, and cats always know where you are. so you can surprise a cat but if you surprise them... ., . , , surprise a cat but if you surprise them... ., ., , , ., ., surprise a cat but if you surprise them... ., ., , , .,, ., ., ., them... how many people have got a room in them. .. how many people have got a room in their— them... how many people have got a room in their house _ them... how many people have got a room in their house that _ them... how many people have got a room in their house that they - them... how many people have got a room in their house that they do - them... how many people have got a room in their house that they do not | room in their house that they do not go in? room in their house that they do not no in? ~ i room in their house that they do not go in?- i don't— room in their house that they do not go in?- i don't think - room in their house that they do not go in?- i don't think many i go in? well... i don't think many --eole go in? well... i don't think many people have _ go in? well... i don't think many people have a — go in? well... i don't think many people have a room _ go in? well... i don't think many people have a room in _ go in? well. .. i don't think many people have a room in their- go in? well... i don't think many. people have a room in their house which you don't go in. i think most people use the rims that they have got. i people use the rims that they have not. ., �* ,
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people use the rims that they have lot. ~ �* , ., , people use the rims that they have not. ~' �*, got. i think it's most about the cats. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. i'm sonja jessup. nhs figures suggest bromley could lose 170 care home workers who are yet to have a second covid jab. under government rules, from today, all care home staff must be double vaccinated. figures suggest more than a00 carers in south east london are yet to have theirjabs. leyton 0rient�*s become the first football club to commemorate its fallen from the first world war with their own memorial. the club ? then known as clapton 0rient ? were the first to sign up en masse to fight in 191a. the memorial was unveiled by former players peter kitchen and dean smith at a ceremony at the national memorial arboreetum in staffordshire. the first world war and the second world war and the history of it all means a lot to my family,
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so we are here today and living the life that we live for those who have gave theirs up. from today uber�*s putting its prices in london up by 10 per cent — and even more for some airport trips — to try and attract more drivers. the company says demand's risen by 20 per cent since we came out of lockdown, leading to longer waiting times, and it needs 20,000 more drivers to help get service back to normal. transport bosses say westminster bridge will have fully segregated cycle lanes and permanent protective barriers by the end of january. temporary barriers were installed there and on seven other crossings in central london following the 2017 attack, where a terrorist drove a car into pedestrians. work�*s due to start next week. the metropolitan line having problms yet again as there aren't enough trains running— minor delays between moor park and amersham and watford. and there's been a signal failure affecting tfl rail— minor delays between hayes &
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harlington and paddington. and you can get travel updates on your bbc local radio station and all the latest information throughout the morning 0nto the weather now with elizbeth rizzini. good morning. yesterday was a very grey and murky day with a few outbreaks of light, patchy rain and drizzle at times, courtesy of a weather front that is still with us today. so it's another very grey start to the morning, plenty of cloud around and temperatures are in double figures. it's a very mild start. we will keep those layers of cloud as we head through the day and most of us stood stay dry but i wouldn't rule out the possibility of a few spots of drizzle falling from the thickness of the cloud at times, particularly over the higher ground. but there should be some breaks in the cloud developing as we head through the afternoon, especially towards south—eastern areas of the capital as we start to see the weather front push northwards again. the southwesterly wind stays light and top temperatures peak at 13 or 1a celsius. the wind starts to strengthen overnight tonight and again it
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should stay mostly dry, a lot of cloud and a mild start to the day tomorrow. we could see early brightness tomorrow morning in eastern areas for a time but then showery outbreaks of rain and a strengthening south—westerly wind. quite a blustery day but there will be brighter spells on friday through the afternoon and it's a mostly dry weekend to follow, just feeling slightly cooler. there's more from me in half an hour, now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the road to success — after a remarkable year, adam peaty tells us about the 'gladiator�* mindset that led to his third olympic gold and how it can inspire others. a treasure trove of comedy. we'll hear about the newly discovered sketches, written by victoria wood, that never made it to our screens.
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and after nine this morning, we'll speak to the retired gp whose love of bones has lead him to discover a new species of dinosaur. all care home staff must be double jabbed against covid—19 or face losing theirjobs, as a new government rule comes into force from today. the health secretary says it will make care homes safer, but for those working in an industry already under pressure from staff shortages, it's not been easy to say goodbye. we've been running homes for a3 years. this is the most severe thing we have ever had to endure, losing staffjust because of the vaccination. it's been very hard losing some of our lovely staff here at the home. there's been many tears from us all. it's been a very trying time, to lose people we've known and grown
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to love and are part of our family. i mean, there's so many reasons why i don't want to have the vaccine. - part of it is, i think it's| a choice of the person. i'm working in the kitchen - and i don't like have a very direct contact with the residents. i think you will be alli right if you use masks and everything, protection. i don't like getting rid of any member of staff but to get rid of a member of staffjust because they've not been vaccinated is probably one of the hardest things i've had to do. i will so miss you. those were some of the goodbyes with people leaving theirjobs because of what has happened. we're joined now by the chief executive of the national care forum, vic rayner. i suppose most importantly, today is for you to explain and give us a picture of how this is practically affecting care homes, and how many are without staff who would
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otherwise have been there. thank ou. otherwise have been there. thank you- today. _ otherwise have been there. thank you- today. as — otherwise have been there. thank you- today. as you _ otherwise have been there. thank you. today, as you say, _ otherwise have been there. thank you. today, as you say, is - otherwise have been there. thank you. today, as you say, is the - otherwise have been there. thank you. today, as you say, is the day the regulations come into force for care homes across the country, that is all care homes whether they are working with older people or working age adults, so what that means in reality these members we have worked with think on average they are about to lose around 8% of their staff, some of whom will have already gone because they took the decision to leave the sector early on when the policy was first outlined, others who are leaving sadly as was shown yesterday and in recent days and some who might leave towards the end of the year because they have gone through a process of medical self exemption. it's really challenging for organisations across the country and i think there is a human cost to this policy which really needs to be
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understood. that is the cost for people leaving and those who work in the sector and the same people who spent the last 18 months talking about how fantastic they are, very human cost of the people who had been supported by them and often a long—standing supportive relationships born within organisations and of course the cost of the breach in trust and their employers and the manager is talking about the hard situation they faced in asking staff to leave under that, so there is a real cost associated with this and what it is from the care home sector is that they have been the guinea pigs around the implementation and roll—out of this policy and the industry has sat back and said you might lose seven or 8% of your staff group and it might cost you 100 million or more, but you are individual employers and you get on with it, and i don't think that's an acceptable approach for
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any industry to take and any industry wanting to accept it. particularly an industry where the need for staff to be there for people is so essential and we are seeing the impact of that happening across the country with hospitals unable to take him new people and unable to take him new people and unable to take him new people and unable to discharge and people with unpaid carers and families who are struggling because they are not able to access the care they need, so it's a very human cost policy. fist it's a very human cost policy. at the beginning of your answer you used the word challenging, word often used in the circumstances and then he went on to say that there are probably 80% of staff no longer injobs they were are probably 80% of staff no longer in jobs they were in. does that necessarily mean that the care available, that can be given to people is less today than it was yesterday, a week ago, two weeks ago as these people left. is that an inevitable consequence?-
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as these people left. is that an inevitable consequence? there are two thin . s inevitable consequence? there are two things happening. _ inevitable consequence? there are two things happening. one - inevitable consequence? there are two things happening. one is - two things happening. one is organisations are making very sure that they are able to offer the people they are working with continues to be of high quality and i think that's really important, that people should understand that those who are in receipt of care, organisations are doing everything possible. organisations are doing everything ossible. ~ . �* , ., possible. what i'm trying to get ou, ifi possible. what i'm trying to get you. if i can _ possible. what i'm trying to get you. if i can be _ possible. what i'm trying to get you, if! can be clear, _ possible. what i'm trying to get you, if! can be clear, is- possible. what i'm trying to get you, if! can be clear, is we - you, if i can be clear, is we understand that the people working will try to do their best and the care they will offer will be the best they can possibly do but if it is a fact that 8%, there are 8% fewer people working in those places, and as we know there is a staff shortage in terms of recruitment, it seems inevitable that something has to give. i don't understand how that works. absolutely. what is giving is that people who need care who are not currently in receipt of it are unable to get it so we are hearing lots of things, lots of
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organisations across the country who are saying they are unable to take him people who need care within homes or indeed to provide domiciliary home care for people who need to leave hospital with additional help at home. i think the biggest impact is happening for those people who need to get care now but are not currently receiving it, so that's where i think the pressure is being felt most acutely. you are also seeing organisations who say, unfortunately, they are no longer able to provide the care for the people they have been doing, particularly in the home care environment, so it's got an immediate impact but people have known that this deadline is coming so what you won't see today is something dramatically change because people have been planning for this but their planning has been that they've had to take some of that they've had to take some of that capacity and ability to flex up in order to meet peoples new and emerging care needs out of the system. system is a horrible world
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but what it means ultimately is people who need care cannot get it and that's not an acceptable position and not one that anybody in the care sector wants to have and we desperately have been talking to government about doing some of the things it needs to do to take action to ensure we have a retention bonus for staff who continue to work in the sector and more pay for people to be recognised for the skills and expertise they have.— to be recognised for the skills and expertise they have. thank you for our time expertise they have. thank you for your time this _ expertise they have. thank you for your time this morning. _ expertise they have. thank you for your time this morning. she - expertise they have. thank you for your time this morning. she could | your time this morning. she could executive of the national care forum. let's talk to my confined about what is happening in the sport. ? let's talk to mike about what is happening in the sport. revenge is a powerful motivator in sport and this is quite a story. jimmy neesham was heartbroken in the famous final in 2019 as new zealand lost in the super over in dramatic fashion. yesterday, that must have been on
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his mind as he led the new zealand fight back in the semifinals of the shorter format to break england's hearts. it really was a story of redemption and a dramatic turnaround in what drama we saw. and it means there will be no world cup double for england as they were aiming to add the t20 trophy to the 50 over trophy they hold but they were left heartbroken by new zealand's dramatic fightback in england had the cash built a decent platform as moeen ali helped england to 166—a and new zealand looked in trouble in their reply and they needed 57 runs off the last 2a balls, a tall order, except if you arejimmy neesham, driven on by the hurt of two years ago, he smashed three sixes and turned the match on its head and in the end new zealand won with an over to spare. england were left licking their wounds. we are devastated to be on the wrong side of a close game, which is not easy to take. i thought we fought unbelievably well on a wicket that didn't necessarily suit our batting but we managed to post around a par
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score and we were brilliant with the ball. but its new zealand who will now face australia or pakistan in sunday's final they play today. now to football and france and a remarkable story from paris saint germain. where one of the club's female players — aminata diallo — has been arrested by french police as part of an investigation, into an attack on her team—mates, earlier this month. reports in france suggest that one of the assaulted players was kheira hamraoui, who was allegedly dragged out of her car by two masked individuals who beat her legs. well, paris saint germain said in a statement that they "condemn in the strongest possible terms the violence committed. 0n the pitch, arsenal got a much—needed win in the women's champions league. they beat danish side kurg, 5—1 last night, to keep up
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the pressure on group leaders barcelona. it was tight and tense in denmark, until steph catley broke the deadlock with this brilliant free—kick. and then the confidence flowed through arsenal, with four goals in the second—half. jordan nobbs rounding things off with arsenal's fifth. andy murray says beating the top seed at the stockholm 0pen is probably his best win of the season. he brushed asidejannik sinner, who's also now number 10 in the world, to reach the quarter finals in sweden. murray says he's hoping he can improve further and faces american tommy paul next. british number two dan evans has also reached the last eight in stockholm. premiership rugby side exeter chiefs have been told that their native american—style branding uses a "dehumanising stereotype". the national congress of american indians has written to the rugby club asking it to stop using native american imagery. more than 3,700 chiefs fans have previously signed a petition calling on the club
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to rethink its name and branding. and finally, history has been made in women's skiing after the first double cork 1aao by a female athlete. definitely a champagne moment, for the, chinese—american freestyle skier, eileen gu, at normal speed it's a blur, a bamboozling, series, of twists and turns in the air, but slow it down and we see what a double cork 1aao what is the iaao? what is the 1440? i will have to look it up- _ what is the 1440? i will have to look it up- it — what is the 1440? i will have to look it up. it is _ what is the 1440? i will have to look it up. it is a _ what is the 1440? i will have to look it up. it is a technical - what is the 1440? | will have to | look it up. it is a technical term. maybe it is the number of twists. maybe it is the number of twists. maybe it is the number of twists. maybe it was the time she carried out the _ maybe it was the time she carried out the drum. not maybe it was the time she carried out the drum-— maybe it was the time she carried out the drum. ., , ., ,., ., out the drum. not sure about that. ? carried out — out the drum. not sure about that. ? carried out the _ out the drum. not sure about that. ? carried out the jump. _ out the drum. not sure about that. ? carried out the jump. i _ out the drum. not sure about that. ? carried out the jump. i am _ out the drum. not sure about that. ? carried out the jump. i am doing - carried out the 'ump. i am doing some maths. — carried out the jump. i am doing some maths. shall— carried out the jump. i am doing some maths. shall we _ carried out the jump. i am doing some maths. shall we see - carried out the jump. i am doing some maths. shall we see it - carried out the jump. i am doing i some maths. shall we see it again? it bodes well. the winter olympics
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in february. it bodes well. the winter olympics in february-— it bodes well. the winter olympics infebrua. ., ., in february. you have played so many of these brilliant _ in february. you have played so many of these brilliant clips. _ in february. you have played so many of these brilliant clips. you _ in february. you have played so many of these brilliant clips. you can't - of these brilliant clips. you can't see it at normal _ of these brilliant clips. you can't see it at normal speed. - of these brilliant clips. you can't see it at normal speed. what. of these brilliant clips. you can't see it at normal speed. what is | of these brilliant clips. you can't| see it at normal speed. what is it 360 times for? there it is. yes, it does look like a cork coming out the bottle. very good. we does look like a cork coming out the bottle. very good.— bottle. very good. we get there in the end, bottle. very good. we get there in the end. don't _ bottle. very good. we get there in the end, don't we? _ here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. what is it looking like out there?— like out there? good morning everyone- _ like out there? good morning everyone- it's _ like out there? good morning everyone. it's looking - like out there? good morning everyone. it's looking fairly . like out there? good morning - everyone. it's looking fairly cloudy and for most of us that is the case and for most of us that is the case and it will continue to be so through the course of the day. some sunshine around but also some rain as well and the rain not particularly heavy and we currently have two week weather fronts heading north and there are splashes of rain on them and then we have this deeper area of low pressure coming in from
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the atlantic and one look at the isobars tells you it will be windy as it comes in and the wind is coming from a mild direction, namely the south—west, so for the next few days it is going to remain mild for the time of year. we have some clear skies across southern scotland, northern england and northern ireland and this is where the temperature is lowest and we are currently looking at sunshine across the north of scotland. both weather fronts move northwards and we will see heavier rain building and across northern england and southern scotland. the black circles represent the strength of the gusts of wind, so you can see through the afternoon it starts to pick up towards the west ahead of the weather front attached to the low pressure coming our way, and that is coming our way pressure coming our way, and that is coming ourway and pressure coming our way, and that is coming our way and is going to bring in some rain. temperatures today between eight and 1a, north to south and the average at this time of year is between nine and 11, north to south. as we head through the
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evening and overnight, in comes the rain, heavy across northern ireland and scotland, gusty winds with exposure in the west, costing as much as a0 or 50 miles an hour as it moves across shetland and we have the tail end of the weather front and it is here, wrapped, if you can imagine it, around this area of low pressure and the tail end is bringing light rain across england and wales. temperatures tonight not particularly low, between seven and 12 degrees. as we head through tomorrow, here is the low pressure and as it moves across scotland, the centre of it means there will not be much wind, so that will ease down, but for the rest of us a windy day and you can see the tail end of the weather front producing patchy rain and pushing to the south—east and behind it we are looking at bright spells and showers and the heaviest rain through central and southern scotland and also across northern england but to the north of it there will be showers, but equally bright spells and even sunshine. temperatures between ten and 15
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degrees, north to south, so fairly mild for the time of year. as we head into the weekend, the low pressure pushes away and we have a ridge of high pressure building that will settle things down and a weather front not too far away from the north—west, so basically still windy in the east during the course of saturday first thing that they will ease down and for the outlook it's going to be mainly dry. there will be a lot of cloud around at times and sunshine will be at a premium but if you look at the temperatures it still as mild for the time of year. world leaders are still thrashing out a deal at the cop climate conference in glasgow to reduce global carbon dioxide levels. nina is in hull for us this morning.
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it's interesting, because there is the big it's interesting, because there is the big picture it's interesting, because there is the big picture between it's interesting, because there is the big picture between countries and the things you do at home inside your own home and then there is what your own home and then there is what you might hope for from your immediate environment. yes, and all ofthat immediate environment. yes, and all of that is reliant _ immediate environment. yes, and all of that is reliant on _ immediate environment. yes, and all of that is reliant on science _ immediate environment. yes, and all of that is reliant on science and - of that is reliant on science and innovation. we may have our own personal ambitions but we are reliant on innovation to make it happen. yes, welcome to the aura innovation centre in hull. you might have a business that wants to reduce emissions and you don't know how and you have scientists with great ideas but you need practical experience on the two components to come together. this is a 3d printer and what it is doing it is creating fake coral that you might find in a reef, and what they do is they test the way water flows around it and do is they test the way water flows around itand in do is they test the way water flows around it and in doing so they can improve the way flood defences work. isn't that clever? come and have a look out here because i will be speaking to andrew later and he runs
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a business that creates plastic and right next to him are a team of scientists helping create the component parts that are more carbon friendly to get us off the plastic we are hooked on that is so bad for the environment. let me tell you why they are leading the way in hull because the plan is to be carbon neutral, 12 years ahead of the target and they are using things like hydrogen for heating and waste to generate energy and capturing carbon from the air. there's also an of course to hornsey project at the worlds largest offshore wind farm thatis worlds largest offshore wind farm that is generating enough energy for 1 million homes, and one person keeping a close eye on what is happening here in hull is the former deputy prime ministerjohn prescott. do you remember him? he was the mp for east hull forfour do you remember him? he was the mp for east hull for four decades and was part of the team that secured the kyoto agreement in 1997 and is a huge advocate of what is happening here.
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if you want to seejohn prescott get passionate, get him to talk about the humber estuary. we can develop new estuaries with new technology. think about the power, the growth, the energy. he had a stroke two years ago. his words get jumbled. he struggles at times to follow a conversation. but, he has not lost his pride in the city he represented as an mp for 37 years. and he's not lost his use of blunt language. it's the only bloody answer. as deputy prime minister, john prescott was perhaps better known as a gas guzzler than an environmentalist. his love ofjaguar cars earned him the nickname two jags. and he once justified using a car 200 yards by saying his wife pauline didn't like having her hair blown about. but, he was also responsible for the government's climate change policy and he was the european union's lead negotiator at the kyoto climate change conference in 1997.
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lord prescott, you were the mp here for four decades. this is an incredibly important part of the world for you. what does it mean to you to see the transformation here at the estuary? the estuary is critical. i've always argued for it. i was a seaman and sailed on the ships. but now you don't see the fish trawlers in, now the new industry is at the estuary. the humber estuary is a place of great change. whilst it's still very polluted, its heavy industry is responsible for 5% of all uk carbon emissions, it's cleaning up its act. just off the coast is the world's biggest offshore wind farm and they are investing in pioneering green technology. it's about a future built on the estuary. you begin to tell yourself it's the only major one in the country. it's future, future, its future. round the estuary, and by god, they are well on their way. lord prescott wants the world's
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estuaries to follow humber�*s lead and he will be making that argument at the cop26 climate change conference in glasgow this week. i think it's reallyjust unfinished business after kyoto in 1997, then going on to paris and now we are into glasgow as well. a lot of the things that he wanted to achieve, which they only managed 40 odd countries in kyoto, now you've got over 200 countries and i think he wants to show us the humber, and its estuary, and estuaries are some of the most polluted regions in the world could actually be the answer to climate change if we can decarbonise. it's driven him for years, even if it was before he had the stroke. it's something that drives him still. he wants to be there and make the case. at papa's fish and chips, john prescott might as well be back on the campaign trail, smiling for the cameras. perfect portion of chips. he's here to learn about how papa's,
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the biggest fish and chip shop in the world, has been cutting its carbon emissions. and we are reusing everything we can to make it the most i efficient process possible. the company says it has halved its gas bill by using an 80% more energy efficient fryer. whilst the fat they use is turned into biodiesel, and the potatoes come from just a few miles away. there you go. looks ready, beautiful bit of fish. in here, john. there we go. john prescott promises that from now on all his fish and chips will be low carbon. but he's also made an even bigger announcement this week. he's sold his jaguar. so, time to call him zero jags. professor dan parsons will be escorting lord prescott to the cop26 conference, just as hejoined him at a climate summit three years ago. what's it like to be in the room with him? he is just so connected with everybody. he knows everyone. you are walking down the corridor in cop2a in poland, walking down the corridor,
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everybody�*s there and you say, "who is that, john?" and he says, "that's the leader of the chinese delegation, i've known him for years." and then the leader of the swedish delegation. he knows everybody and is so well connected. probably when you ask most people what they think aboutjohn prescott, they will say two jags. it sounds like you think that is a bit of a shame. it is a big shame, because his role in climate change, bringing climate science that i work on and bringing that to policy, he's been instrumental in that and in securing these kind of international agreements. john prescott may be a little unsteady on his feet, butjust look at his sense of wonder as he explores the conference hall. his family knows how much it means to him to be in glasgow, which is why his wife pauline doesn't mind too much that he's missing their 60th wedding anniversary. zoe conway, bbc news.
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ifjohn prescott can give up his jaguars, you can do your bit. have a look at these beads, because they are plastic beads, but not as we know them. andrew, tell us why these are special. know them. andrew, tell us why these are secial. ~ . , know them. andrew, tell us why these are secial. . ., , ,, .., know them. andrew, tell us why these are secial. ~ . , ,, .., ., are special. what is special about this plastic _ are special. what is special about this plastic is _ are special. what is special about this plastic is that _ are special. what is special about this plastic is that it _ are special. what is special about this plastic is that it is _ are special. what is special about this plastic is that it is made - are special. what is special about| this plastic is that it is made from plants, _ this plastic is that it is made from plants, not— this plastic is that it is made from plants, not oil and that means it has a _ plants, not oil and that means it has a far— plants, not oil and that means it has a far lower carbon footprint, up to seven _ has a far lower carbon footprint, up to seven times lower than competing plastics _ to seven times lower than competing lastics. �* �* , ., ., ., plastics. and it's not reliant on fossil fuel. _ plastics. and it's not reliant on fossil fuel. it's _ plastics. and it's not reliant on fossil fuel. it's not _ plastics. and it's not reliant on fossil fuel. it's not made - plastics. and it's not reliant on fossil fuel. it's not made from| fossil fuel. it's not made from fossil fuel. it's not made from fossil fuels, _ fossil fuel. it's not made from fossil fuels, its _ fossil fuel. it's not made from fossil fuels, its renewable - fossil fuels, its renewable resources and the plants grow back every _ resources and the plants grow back every year — resources and the plants grow back every year and we can use them for generations — every year and we can use them for generations to come. how every year and we can use them for generations to come.— every year and we can use them for generations to come. how does having it all under one — generations to come. how does having it all under one roof— generations to come. how does having it all under one roof like _ generations to come. how does having it all under one roof like this _ generations to come. how does having it all under one roof like this make - it all under one roof like this make a difference quest market is one thing creating it, but you have to sell it on the market for it to work quest but with the scale of the climate crisis it's not something we can do individually. haste climate crisis it's not something we can do individually.— can do individually. we need to collaborate _ can do individually. we need to collaborate and _ can do individually. we need to collaborate and work _ can do individually. we need to collaborate and work together. can do individually. we need to i collaborate and work together so being _ collaborate and work together so being here in the centre of low
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carbon— being here in the centre of low carbon innovation and we have all the facilities we need for testing, prototyping, to make the product real and — prototyping, to make the product real and we have access to companies and we _ real and we have access to companies and we have _ real and we have access to companies and we have others to collaborate with _ and we have others to collaborate with. ~ ., ., ., ~ .,, with. we look ahead to cop26 as it wra -s u- with. we look ahead to cop26 as it wraps up this _ with. we look ahead to cop26 as it wraps up this weekend. _ with. we look ahead to cop26 as it wraps up this weekend. are - with. we look ahead to cop26 as it wraps up this weekend. are we - wraps up this weekend. are we chasing unicorns thinking we can hit the 1.5 target? it’s chasing unicorns thinking we can hit the 1-5 target?— the 1.5 target? it's not a question of if we can _ the 1.5 target? it's not a question of if we can hit _ the 1.5 target? it's not a question of if we can hit it, _ the 1.5 target? it's not a question of if we can hit it, we _ the 1.5 target? it's not a question of if we can hit it, we have - the 1.5 target? it's not a question of if we can hit it, we have to - the 1.5 target? it's not a question of if we can hit it, we have to hitl of if we can hit it, we have to hit it and _ of if we can hit it, we have to hit it and everybody can do their bit, whether— it and everybody can do their bit, whether in— it and everybody can do their bit, whether in using the right materials or renewable energy, big organisations and consumers in the street— organisations and consumers in the street can — organisations and consumers in the street can all make a difference. thank— street can all make a difference. thank you — street can all make a difference. thank you very much. and that is the thing we will hear is the weekend wraps up, questions around how successful c0 p26 wraps up, questions around how successful cop26 has been, and the truth is we won't know for some time how the success will be judged but as andrew and everyone else he argues, it's not an option not to try and that's exactly what they are doing in hull, putting a big effort and investment to make sure that they are carbon neutral 20 years ahead of the national target. hind. ahead of the national target. nina, thank ou ahead of the national target. nina, thank you for— ahead of the national target. nina,
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thank you for showing _ ahead of the national target. nina, thank you for showing us _ ahead of the national target. nina, thank you for showing us around and we will be back later on with you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. nhs figures suggest bromley could lose 170 care home workers who are yet to have a second covid jab. under government rules from today, all care home staff must be double vaccinated. figures suggest more than a00 carers in south east london are yet to have theirjabs. leyton 0rient�*s become the first football club to commemorate its fallen from the first world war with their own memorial. the club, then known as clapton 0rient, were the first to sign up en masse to fight in 191a. the memorial was unveiled by former players peter kitchen and dean smith at a ceremony at the national memorial arboreetum in staffordshire. the first world war and the second world war and the history of it all means a lot to my family,
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so we are here today and living the life that we live for those who have gave theirs up. from today ubers putting its prices in london up by 10%, and even more for some airport trips, to try and attract more drivers. the company says demand's risen by 20% since we came out of lockdown, leading to longer waiting times, and it needs 20,000 more drivers to help get service back to normal. transport bosses say westminster bridge will have fully segregated cycle lanes and permanent protective barriers by the end of january. temporary barriers were installed there and on seven other crossings in central london following the 2017 attack, where a terrorist drove a car into pedestrians. work�*s due to start next week. let's take a look at how the tube is running this morning. the metropolitan line having problms yet again as there aren't enough trains running. minor delays between moor park and amersham and watford. and there's been a signal failure affecting tfl rail. minor delays between hayes and harlington and paddington.
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and you can get travel updates on your bbc local radio station. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. yesterday was a very grey and murky day with a few outbreaks of light, patchy rain and drizzle at times, courtesy of a weather front that is still with us today. so it's another very grey start to the morning, plenty of cloud around and temperatures are in double figures. it's a very mild start. we will keep those layers of cloud as we head through the day and most of us stood stay dry but i wouldn't rule out the possibility spots of drizzle falling from the thickness of the cloud at times, particularly over the higher ground. but there should be some breaks in the cloud developing as we head through the afternoon, especially towards south—eastern areas of the capital as we start to see the weather front push northwards again. the southwesterly wind stays light and top temperatures peak at 13 or 1a celsius. the wind starts to strengthen overnight tonight and again it should stay mostly dry, a lot of cloud and a mild start to the day tomorrow.
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we could see early brightness tomorrow morning in eastern areas for a time but then showery outbreaks of rain and a strengthening south—westerly wind. quite a blustery day but there will be brighter spells on friday through the afternoon and it's a mostly dry weekend to follow, just feeling slightly cooler. lots more over on our website including the commuter who is windsurfing — well, sort of — in protest over the ulez charge. do take a look. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt
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and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today. a surprise agreement between the usa and china to co—operate over global warming gets a cautious welcome, but activists urge both countries to show greater commitment. lives at risk because of unacceptably long ambulance delays of up to nine hours. a warning from paramedics. new figures on waiting times due out this morning. from the swimming pool to the strictly ballroom, it's been quite a year for adam peaty. the olympic champion will be here to tell us how he wants to inspire people to achieve the impossible. the world cup dream is over for england's cricketers. their hopes of playing in sunday's t—20 final were blown away by a dramatic fightback from new zealand in abu dhabi. good morning. for many of us today, it is going to be fairly cloudy with some spots of rain and drizzle in the forecast. limited sunshine and
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later the wind will strengthen and heavier rain will come in from the west. all of the details coming up. it's thursday 11th november. an unexpected agreement between the us and china to co—operate on tackling global warming has received a cautious welcome. the eu and un described the move as encouraging and an important step, but greenpeace said both countries needed to show more commitment. our global science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. it's the final countdown in glasgow as the climate talks enter the last few days, and we see if enough can be done to stop dangerous climate change. last night, the prime minister boris johnson urged countries to pull out all the stops. but he also tried to manage expectations. the cop26 summit here in glasgow is not going to fix it in one go. we are not going to arrest climate change right here, right now, that is just impossible. and i think everybody has got to be realistic about that.
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but there is the possibility that we will come away from this with the first genuine road map for a solution to anthropogenic climate change. there are some signs of hope. china's top negotiator made a surprise announcement of a joint climate plan with the united states. the world's two biggest polluters agreed to move towards using clean energy. and they said they'd reduce methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas, in a positive sign of cooperation. the united states and china have no shortage of differences, but on climate, on climate, cooperation is the only way to get this job done. today, countries are also joining together to announce an ambitious initiative, a plan to phase out oil and gas led by costa rica and denmark. they want nations to join them in setting a date to end their use. coal, too, responsible for half of all greenhouse gases,
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will also be a focus. and whether plans to stop its use make it into the final agreement. there will be much wrangling in the coming days, and sleepless nights for negotiators trying to thrash out a deal. the process at the united nations means getting nearly 200 countries to agree, each with different economies, different problems and very different agendas. rebecca morelle, bbc news, glasgow. 0ur chief political correspondent adam fleming is in glasgow this morning. lovely to see you. the headlines come out, don't they, of cop, and this is obviously a big and significant one. butjust because people say things or country say things doesn't necessarily mean it's going to happen and not be scrutinised.— going to happen and not be scrutinised. . �* , . , scrutinised. that's a very good lesson for _ scrutinised. that's a very good lesson for basically _ scrutinised. that's a very good lesson for basically anything i scrutinised. that's a very good l lesson for basically anything you hear coming out of this climate change conference. what we had yesterday from the us and china it was quite a surprise, we weren't expecting it, although people always say there is a big move by china and
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the us at that point in this conference and this was it. it has been broadly welcomed by analysts who say it's good, it means the difference is that china and the us have on other things are not going to get in the way of what they do on climate change. but what will really matter is not the words that were said by the two countries yesterday but the difference that was made in the next few days. they galvanise the next few days. they galvanise the 195 other countries who are here, to get behind the glasgow deal? because there were quite a few divisions, does this us and china action help to paper over those cracks and g people up a little bit as well? in the medium term, the two countries talk about enhanced action on climate change. does that mean that next year, or the year after, they will come back with more ambitious pledges to reduce the amount of greenhouse gases they put into the atmosphere, which is what scientists are calling for? and does that encourage other countries to go
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even further and even faster? so that will be the proof of whether this us china agreement actually makes a difference in the real world. �* . ., makes a difference in the real world. �* . . , makes a difference in the real world. . ., , . world. adam, thanks very much, we will seak world. adam, thanks very much, we will speak to — world. adam, thanks very much, we will speak to you _ world. adam, thanks very much, we will speak to you later. _ iran will be urged to release detained uk nationals, such as nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, when rare face—to—face talks take place between british and iranian diplomats in london today. it comes on the 19th day of her husband richard's hunger strike outside the foreign office. our correspondent, tim muffett, is there for us this morning. we can see the tents behind you. tell us a bit more about the protest and the significance of these talks. good morning. as you say, it is day 19 of richard rackliff�*s hunger strike, he is still asleep in one of the tents behind me, we hope to be speaking to him later on. the idea of the hunger strike is to raise awareness over the plight of his wife nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe who
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has been held in custody in iran since 2016. today, delegates from iran will be meeting with officials from the foreign office to discuss a range of issues, including this one, and the uk government says it will be pressing firmly for her release and the release of other people it says are being unfairly held in iran. to briefly recap, she was rearrested in 2016, while visiting family members with her daughter, and accused of plotting to overthrow the iranian government. she has always denied any wrongdoing. she was held for custody in four years in a jail in iran and she has been in a jail in iran and she has been in home arrest fora in a jail in iran and she has been in home arrest for a year. earlier this year she lost an appeal meeting that she could be sent back to jail at any point. this isn't the first hunger strike that richard rackliff has undertaken, both he and his wife went without food in for 50 days in 2019 to raise awareness in her
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situation. —— 15 days. richard says he is realistic about the prospect of a breakthrough, there have been many false dawns before but he is glad that the talks are at least happening. glad that the talks are at least happening-— glad that the talks are at least haueninu. . , . the defence secretary, ben wallace, will write to the labour and snp leaders to express disappointment at the alleged behaviour of mps who were accused of being drunk on a parliamentary trip to gibraltar this week. the two snp mps and one labour were part of a group of 15 visiting troops on the island. the snp has said the allegations are false and has accused the conservatives of trying to divert attention from the controversy about politicians having second jobs. the duchess of sussex has apologised to a court for forgetting she asked a senior aide to brief the authors of a biography about her. she denied intentionally misleading the high court after an appeal heard herformer spokesman provided information to the authors of the book. we can get more on this
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with megan paterson. good morning. what is the background all of this? $5 good morning. what is the background all of this? �* , good morning. what is the background all ofthis? �* , ~' ., good morning. what is the background all ofthis? �* , ,, ., ., all of this? as we know, earlier this ear all of this? as we know, earlier this year the — all of this? as we know, earlier this year the duchess _ all of this? as we know, earlier this year the duchess of - all of this? as we know, earlier| this year the duchess of sussex all of this? as we know, earlier- this year the duchess of sussex was successful in her legal case against the mail on sunday newspaper after it published letters between the duchess and her father. it published letters between the duchess and herfather. that publication was ruled to be unlawful. but the publishers, the associated newspapers, are seeking to overturn that, saying they believe parts of the letters were intended possibly for public consumption. this is where the evidence that we had yesterday becomes particularly significant. the duchess of sussex has denied that she intentionally misled the high court, she has college eyes and says she is sorry that she forgot she asked a senior aide to brief the authors of a biography about her. this is significant because previously, the sussex is spokesperson had said that the couple did not contribute to that
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biography, finding freedom. yesterday, in evidence from the former communications secretary from the couple, we heard that the book was discussed directly with the duchess multiple times in person and over e—mail. it was all said there had been planning meetings with the authors and points had been passed on from the duchess to this aide who gave them to the author. so a contrast to the accounts. in a witness statement to the duchess says she accepted that the aid provided information but she said she was not fully aware of the exact content of the information. she said, i had absolutely no wish to mislead the defendant or the court. latest figures out this morning show the uk economy is continuing to rebound, but is still below pre—pandemic levels. nina's in hull with more details. just give us the picture that is emerging this morning, nina. goad emerging this morning, nina. good
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morninu. emerging this morning, nina. good morning. growth _ emerging this morning, nina. (limp. morning. growth betweenjuly, august and september of the economy overall, everything we make and do was up 1.3%. slightly lower than expected, but think about that period, we were coming at a social distancing measures and going back to festivals, eating out again. and there is a specific growth in area like culture, the arts and recreation, joining sports clubs for example. so a bit of growth, not massive compared to the 5.5% we saw in the three months beforehand, but that was because we were coming out of that very dark long lockdown over the last winter. the big question as you alluded to there is where that puts as compared to pre—pandemic levels. in the second quarter of 22, the overall —— of 2020, the overall economy contracted by 20% so we are still making baby steps. we are 2.1% lower than the growth we saw before the pandemic. it's all about what
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happens now when it comes to the bounce back, whether the economy will continue to grow or be hampered by the supply chain issues we are seeing in the lead up to christmas which traditionally is a golden time of year when it comes to spending and growth. overall 1.3% growth for the quarter, slightly disappointing for some but certainly moving in the right direction.— right direction. thank you very much. we will keep you up—to—date with that news as it comes through, the impact of it. you need to know what is happening with the weather, so carroll has the news. a gorgeous picture behind you. i think it is quite mild at the moment. absolutely right, yes, it is mild. there's guys across parts of northern england, central and southern ireland, —— there are clear skies across parts. but the cloud will be thick enough in southern england and wales for some spots of rain and some drizzle, and we have a weather front moving north across
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scotland, fairly weak but also taking its cloud and drizzle, eradicating the bright start in the far north. by the end of the day, heavier rain coming in across the northern england and southern scotland, with the rain strengthening towards the west. temperatures, eight to 15 degrees. at this time of year, the average would be known it to 11 north to south. —— nine to 11 north to south. the heavy rain will be moving out accompanied by gusty winds, as much as a0 miles an hour, and the rain moving across southern england and wales will be lighter and more patchy. eventually it will clear through the course of tomorrow, leaving brighter skies and some showers bind it. still some heavy rain to come across parts of central and southern scotland and northern england and it will be a windy day tomorrow once again. temperature —wise, still above average, ten in the to 15 in the south.
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thank you. it is 12 minutes past seven. unacceptably long waits for ambulances across the uk are putting lives at risk. that's according to the college of paramedics. in some cases, people thought to have had strokes or heart attacks are waiting hours for help to arrive. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. across the length and the breadth of the uk, ambulances are queuing. unable to hand over the sick and injured patients they have on board because hospitals have no room. and ambulances stuck in queues aren't available to attend other emergencies, leaving patients in need, waiting at home. i called an ambulance at 11:50am. and they said that they were going to send help asap. just over two weeks ago, christina found her grandmother, who lives in cheltenham spa, slumped in a chair, having a stroke. it was a blue light emergency. the ambulance should have arrived in 18 minutes. but instead, it took nearly six hours.
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it then queued outside hospital for an another three. it was then that an ambulance lady, i asked her how long it was going to take for my nan to get a ct, because ijust needed to know whether or not it was a stroke. and she told me, well, your nan's event happened last night. so we would only administer the medication that would reverse any permanent damage within that three—hour window. how did you feel? ijust broke down in tears on the floor. whistle—blowers from inside the ambulance services have told the bbc the system is at breaking point. this 999 call handler said even patients whose hearts have stopped are facing delays. there was a call for a cardiac arrest, and there was an eta in excess of 50 minutes. the nearest available crew was 50 minutes away. and this guy was in arrest. and for every minute, they say 10% of your life
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expectancy will decrease. that's hard. we struggle massively with the long delays. this is life threatening. and we just don't have the crews to respond like we should do. and have you got the pain i in the chest at the moment? all 1a ambulance services in the uk have escalated to the highest level of alert, and some have even gone beyond. like here at south central, which recently declared a critical incident when managers said the service had become unsafe. stuart, a paramedic, was working that night. i had a conversation with the control room, you know, in the early hours, when they said how many jobs are outstanding. how many incidents are outstanding, and i was like, oh, my god. you just sit there thinking, we're never, ever going to get rid of that backlog for days. for the last three months, these handlers have answered an additional 21,000 999 calls, compared to two years ago.
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and just before the critical incident was declared here, instead of having an average of 20 patients waiting for an ambulance, they had 120 patients waiting. they are operating right at the edge of what they can manage in order to keep patients from harm. south central has now asked the government for military support. armed forces have helped ambulance services in other parts of england, wales and scotland, and have supported hospitals in northern ireland. governments in all parts of the uk say they are aware of the challenges and are doing their best to support services. but with winter coming, the pressure is likely only to get worse. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. an update for you on the case discuseed at the start of that an update for you on the case discussed at the start of that report, christina's grandmother is now recovering in a stroke
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rehabilitation centre and is hoping to come home soon. it is important we keep you updated, because you do wonder and we do wish her well. we arejoined now byjason killens who is chief executive of the welsh ambulance service and steve tonks, whose mother waited nine hours for paramedics. you can tell us, what happened to your mother rita? mr; you can tell us, what happened to your mother rita?— you can tell us, what happened to your mother rita? my mum is 87, she is a widower. — your mother rita? my mum is 87, she is a widower, she _ your mother rita? my mum is 87, she is a widower, she lives _ your mother rita? my mum is 87, she is a widower, she lives on _ your mother rita? my mum is 87, she is a widower, she lives on her- your mother rita? my mum is 87, she is a widower, she lives on her own. i is a widower, she lives on her own. and she has been waiting 19 months for replacement knee surgery. a few weeks ago, she was walking from her house to her garage, fell over, unfortunately the right knee which needed replacement gave way. and she hurt her hip. so she was crying for help, one of the neighbours contacted the family, we went down to see her, and we realised
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straightaway she was in distress. she was in a lot of pain, and we called the ambulance straightaway. at that time, we were hopeful that the ambulance was going to be on standby fairly quickly, but we didn't realise, 30 to a5 minutes later, we called for an update, and we were told that they couldn't give us an update unfortunately, the hospital, the ambulance was very busy. and as a result, they couldn't give us any potential arrival time. so during that period, we tried to keep my mother warm and comfortable. it was a really stressful, anxious environment. we it was a really stressful, anxious environment.— it was a really stressful, anxious environment. ~ . , , . , environment. we are seeing pictures, i'm environment. we are seeing pictures, i'm assuming — environment. we are seeing pictures, i'm assuming this _ environment. we are seeing pictures, i'm assuming this is... _ environment. we are seeing pictures, i'm assuming this is... that _ environment. we are seeing pictures, i'm assuming this is... that is - environment. we are seeing pictures, i'm assuming this is... that is very i i'm assuming this is... that is very upsetting, and i can see that upsets
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you. at this moment in time, you are trying to keep her warm, you had umbrellas over her, it was raining. exactly, she was open to the elements. we had the garden umbrella, golf umbrellas, whatever we could do to keep her warm and comfortable but at that time, we just didn't realise she was going to be sitting and lying there for nine hours. so be sitting and lying there for nine hours. ,., .., be sitting and lying there for nine hours. ~ , ., . hours. so you called the ambulance service again _ hours. so you called the ambulance service again for _ hours. so you called the ambulance service again for an _ hours. so you called the ambulance service again for an update - hours. so you called the ambulance service again for an update and - hours. so you called the ambulance service again for an update and you | service again for an update and you were told they were very busy. and over that period of time, what updates were you given? irate over that period of time, what updates were you given? we called twice, updates were you given? we called twice. further— updates were you given? we called twice, further times, _ updates were you given? we called twice, further times, and _ updates were you given? we called twice, further times, and each - updates were you given? we called | twice, further times, and each time we were told, they are really busy, they are aware that she is waiting for an ambulance. and they will get to her as soon as possible. so all we could do is reallyjust wait and keep her as comfortable as possible. so this happened, that is an agonising length of time and your mum presumably was quite distressed as time was going on. since that
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event, what have you learned by way of exploration, if there is any? == of exploration, if there is any? -- b wa of exploration, if there is any? -- by way of — of exploration, if there is any? -- by way of explanation? we have an apology through the media from west midlands ambulance service. we understand that the primary reason was the long handover times from the ambulance into the hospitals. at that time, it was taking over four our. 50 that time, it was taking over four our. , , , ., that time, it was taking over four our. , , y., ., ., our. so this is where you have an ambulance _ our. so this is where you have an ambulance trying _ our. so this is where you have an ambulance trying to _ our. so this is where you have an ambulance trying to get - our. so this is where you have an ambulance trying to get patients| ambulance trying to get patients into hospital, but there is no room into hospital, but there is no room in the hospital so they are literally sitting outside and waiting? literally sitting outside and waitin: ? ~ . , , literally sitting outside and waitina? ~ . , , ., waiting? which ties up more ambulances _ waiting? which ties up more ambulances which _ waiting? which ties up more ambulances which means i waiting? which ties up more | ambulances which means the ambulances which means the ambulances can no longer go and serve the community. haifa ambulances can no longer go and serve the community.— ambulances can no longer go and serve the community. how is your mum now? two days — serve the community. how is your mum now? two days after _ serve the community. how is your mum now? two days after she _ serve the community. how is your mum now? two days after she was _ now? two days after she was admitted. — now? two days after she was admitted, she _ now? two days after she was admitted, she had _ now? two days after she was admitted, she had a - now? two days after she was - admitted, she had a replacement hip operation, she's doing well. slow progress, but well so far. 50 operation, she's doing well. slow progress, but well so far.- progress, but well so far. so you alluded to _ progress, but well so far. so you alluded to one _ progress, but well so far. so you alluded to one of _ progress, but well so far. so you alluded to one of the _ progress, but well so far. so you alluded to one of the issues - progress, but well so far. so you l alluded to one of the issues there, let's hear directly from jason
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killens. chief executive of the welsh ambulance service. good morning. it's fair to say all four nations are struggling in terms of similar issues. you heard what was happening there with rita, steve's mum. can you explain what the pressures are being faced by paramedics, and what's causing these delays? and it may be in these cases, they are extreme but it's certainly one that we have heard about before. i’m certainly one that we have heard about before.— certainly one that we have heard about before. i'm glad that she is recovering. _ about before. i'm glad that she is recovering, i'm _ about before. i'm glad that she is recovering, i'm sorry _ about before. i'm glad that she is recovering, i'm sorry to _ about before. i'm glad that she is recovering, i'm sorry to hear - about before. i'm glad that she is| recovering, i'm sorry to hear that. there _ recovering, i'm sorry to hear that. there are — recovering, i'm sorry to hear that. there are things happening across the uk, _ there are things happening across the uk, we — there are things happening across the uk, we have pressure on our workforce, — the uk, we have pressure on our workforce, high community prevalence of covid _ workforce, high community prevalence of covid means we have higher sickness — of covid means we have higher sickness and absence in our workforce _ sickness and absence in our workforce than we would normally see. workforce than we would normally see we _ workforce than we would normally see. we have much more work than we would _ see. we have much more work than we would normally see, so we are busier than we _ would normally see, so we are busier than we have — would normally see, so we are busier than we have ever been, and indeed we have _ than we have ever been, and indeed we have been seeing winter plus levels _ we have been seeing winter plus levels of — we have been seeing winter plus levels of activity for many months now, _ levels of activity for many months now. since —
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levels of activity for many months now, since the summer certainly. here _ now, since the summer certainly. here in _ now, since the summer certainly. here in wales, we receive 30% more calls than— here in wales, we receive 30% more calls than we would expect this time of year~ _ calls than we would expect this time of year. and thirdly, pressure across— of year. and thirdly, pressure across urgent and emergency care is resulting _ across urgent and emergency care is resulting in _ across urgent and emergency care is resulting in hand over delays for ambulance crews right across the uk, meaning _ ambulance crews right across the uk, meaning we _ ambulance crews right across the uk, meaning we have less capacity to respond — meaning we have less capacity to respond to patients in the community, regrettably, as a result of all— community, regrettably, as a result of all of— community, regrettably, as a result of all of those things coming together. so patients are waiting longer~ _ together. so patients are waiting loner. �* , ., ., ., , longer. i'm sure a lot of people listenin: longer. i'm sure a lot of people listening to _ longer. i'm sure a lot of people listening to what _ longer. i'm sure a lot of people listening to what you _ longer. i'm sure a lot of people listening to what you are - longer. i'm sure a lot of people listening to what you are say, l listening to what you are say, everyone will have a lot of respect for paramedics and the work they do and the pressures they are working under. so i think that is given in this situation. correct me if i'm wrong, a red call is the most severe call, if that is life threatening? that's right, yes.— call, if that is life threatening? that's right, yes. so, if today or yesterday. _ that's right, yes. so, if today or yesterday. i _ that's right, yes. so, if today or yesterday, i don't _ that's right, yes. so, if today or yesterday, i don't know- that's right, yes. so, if today or yesterday, i don't know how - that's right, yes. so, if today orj yesterday, i don't know how you collate your figures, yesterday, i don't know how you collate yourfigures, if yesterday, i don't know how you collate your figures, if a red yesterday, i don't know how you collate yourfigures, if a red call comes into your ambulance service, what is the response time people can expect? in wales, we have a slightly
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different regime in terms of the targets that exist in england. for a red call, it should _ targets that exist in england. for a red call, it should be _ targets that exist in england. for a red call, it should be arriving - red call, it should be arriving within— red call, it should be arriving within eight minutes in 65% of the occasions — within eight minutes in 65% of the occasions. so within eight minutes in 6596 of the occasions. ., , , �* ., occasions. so inevitably, i'm going to ask you. — occasions. so inevitably, i'm going to ask you. so _ occasions. so inevitably, i'm going to ask you, so that _ occasions. so inevitably, i'm going to ask you, so that is _ occasions. so inevitably, i'm going to ask you, so that is it _ occasions. so inevitably, i'm going to ask you, so that is it six - occasions. so inevitably, i'm going to ask you, so that is it six out - occasions. so inevitably, i'm going to ask you, so that is it six out of. to ask you, so that is it six out of ten cases, what about the four that are not within that time?— are not within that time? that's ri . ht, are not within that time? that's riaht, but are not within that time? that's right. but we — are not within that time? that's right, but we do _ are not within that time? that's right, but we do strive - are not within that time? that's right, but we do strive to - are not within that time? that's right, but we do strive to get i are not within that time? that's right, but we do strive to get toj right, but we do strive to get to every— right, but we do strive to get to every call— right, but we do strive to get to every call as quickly as we can. services — every call as quickly as we can. services across the uk have been doing _ services across the uk have been doing everything possible to get more _ doing everything possible to get more ambulances onto the streets to respond _ more ambulances onto the streets to respond to— more ambulances onto the streets to respond to as many patients as quickly— respond to as many patients as quickly as— respond to as many patients as quickly as we can. in your package, you mentioned military assistance and that— you mentioned military assistance and that is— you mentioned military assistance and that is very much the case here in wales, _ and that is very much the case here in wales, you have the army here for the third _ in wales, you have the army here for the third time to the pandemic now back with _ the third time to the pandemic now back with this for a couple of weeks helping _ back with this for a couple of weeks helping us — back with this for a couple of weeks helping us to get two more patients more _ helping us to get two more patients more quickly. it's also right to recognise _ more quickly. it's also right to recognise that our people are working — recognise that our people are working extremely hard to do the very best — working extremely hard to do the very best they can, not just our paramedics and emergency medical technicians on the streets, but also
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our control— technicians on the streets, but also our control room staff. we have a particularly — our control room staff. we have a particularly difficult job when we are under— particularly difficult job when we are under pressure managing to get their work— are under pressure managing to get their work coming are under pressure managing to get theirwork coming in are under pressure managing to get their work coming in and also give updates— their work coming in and also give updates to — their work coming in and also give updates to people waiting for us to arrive _ updates to people waiting for us to arrive we — updates to people waiting for us to arrive. ~ . ., updates to people waiting for us to arrive. . . ., . ., ., arrive. we have made clear the great resect we arrive. we have made clear the great respect we have _ arrive. we have made clear the great respect we have for _ arrive. we have made clear the great respect we have for the _ arrive. we have made clear the great respect we have for the staff, - arrive. we have made clear the great respect we have for the staff, the - respect we have for the staff, the question isn't about how hard you are trying. what people want to know is, when will this system stop being so broken? i think it is fair to say it is broken. in september, more than 600 patients waiting more than 12 hours for an ambulance, that isn't what you want to deal with all your staff want to deal with. we have spoken about the crunch points, when will they be fixed? this have spoken about the crunch points, when will they be fixed?— when will they be fixed? this is a com - lex when will they be fixed? this is a complex issue, _ when will they be fixed? this is a complex issue, the _ when will they be fixed? this is a complex issue, the delay - when will they be fixed? this is a complex issue, the delay is - complex issue, the delay is occurring _ complex issue, the delay is occurring at the emergency department for example are a result of a number of challenges which ewist— of a number of challenges which exist right to health and into social— exist right to health and into social care as well with patients that are — social care as well with patients that are ready to go back into the community— that are ready to go back into the community that hospitals cannot discharge. there are a number of
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issues _ discharge. there are a number of issues which need to be sorted out. for the _ issues which need to be sorted out. for the next— issues which need to be sorted out. for the next few months, we are focused — for the next few months, we are focused on — for the next few months, we are focused on getting as much capacity on the _ focused on getting as much capacity on the street as we can to respond to patients — on the street as we can to respond to patients as quickly as possible. in to patients as quickly as possible. in the _ to patients as quickly as possible. in the future, certainly in wales, we are _ in the future, certainly in wales, we are very— in the future, certainly in wales, we are very clear that we need to change _ we are very clear that we need to change the — we are very clear that we need to change the way we deliver our ambulance service, increasingly seek to close _ ambulance service, increasingly seek to close episodes of care in the community and in the patient's home with them _ community and in the patient's home with them using advanced practice and different clinicians and only conveying the patience to the emergency department when it is necessary — emergency department when it is necessa . . ~' emergency department when it is necessa . ., , . necessary. thank you very much, jason. necessary. thank you very much, jason- i'm _ necessary. thank you very much, jason. i'm keen _ necessary. thank you very much, jason. i'm keen to _ necessary. thank you very much, jason. i'm keen to point- necessary. thank you very much, jason. i'm keen to point out, - necessary. thank you very much, jason. i'm keen to point out, youj jason. i'm keen to point out, you are not the bad guy, you are fronting up and talking about a problem you are facing. ijust wonder, steve, do you have a question? jason is the boss of an ambulance service, not directly involved in your case but do you have a care ? a question about how the system works and what you would like to see as someone who has been at the sharp end of something that has gone wrong? the at the sharp end of something that has gone wrong?— has gone wrong? the fundamental ruestion has gone wrong? the fundamental question is. _ has gone wrong? the fundamental question is. if— has gone wrong? the fundamental question is, if you _ has gone wrong? the fundamental question is, if you have _ has gone wrong? the fundamental question is, if you have targets - question is, if you have targets then targets need to be met, and
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even though they have not been met, as naga has pointed out, when are they going to get fixed? because people's lives at risk here. itrefoil. they going to get fixed? because people's lives at risk here. well, i mean, in response _ people's lives at risk here. well, i mean, in response to _ people's lives at risk here. well, i mean, in response to that, - people's lives at risk here. well, i mean, in response to that, i- people's lives at risk here. well, i mean, in response to that, i can i mean, in response to that, i can talk— mean, in response to that, i can talk for— mean, in response to that, i can talk for wales, we are recruiting as many— talk for wales, we are recruiting as many people as you can to grow our service _ many people as you can to grow our service we — many people as you can to grow our service, we have had record recruitment and investment over the last two— recruitment and investment over the last two years and we are deploying people _ last two years and we are deploying people as _ last two years and we are deploying people as quickly as we can on the streets _ people as quickly as we can on the streets i— people as quickly as we can on the streets. i can't answer the question particularly — streets. i can't answer the question particularly about when we expect those _ particularly about when we expect those targets to be met and exceeded, but what i can say is that we are _ exceeded, but what i can say is that we are doing everything we can to -et we are doing everything we can to get to— we are doing everything we can to get to patients. we are doing everything we can to get to patients-— get to patients. jason, this be so frustrating _ get to patients. jason, this be so frustrating for _ get to patients. jason, this be so frustrating for you _ get to patients. jason, this be so frustrating for you for _ get to patients. jason, this be so frustrating for you for you - get to patients. jason, this be so. frustrating for you for you because you just want to get on with the job. you 'ust want to get on with the 'ob. . �* , ., you 'ust want to get on with the 'ob. . �*, ., ., ., job. that's right, our paramedics and all of our _ job. that's right, our paramedics and all of our staff _ job. that's right, our paramedics and all of our staff come - job. that's right, our paramedics and all of our staff come in - job. that's right, our paramedics and all of our staff come in the l and all of our staff come in the control— and all of our staff come in the control rooms across the street to 'oin control rooms across the street to join ambulance services to provide great _ join ambulance services to provide great care — join ambulance services to provide great care to patients and that is what _ great care to patients and that is what we — great care to patients and that is what we come to work to do. we are all frustrated we cannot do that at the moment but what we are focused on is doing _ the moment but what we are focused on is doing the best we can in the
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circumstances that we face, and get into as _ circumstances that we face, and get into as many patients as quickly as possible _ into as many patients as quickly as ossible. ~ , , ., possible. well, i wish you well comeau you — possible. well, i wish you well comeau you and _ possible. well, i wish you well comeau you and all _ possible. well, i wish you well comeau you and all of - possible. well, i wish you well comeau you and all of your. possible. well, i wish you well. comeau you and all of your team well. let's hope the situation does improve so we can talk about it in a more positive light. thank you, jason killens, chief executive of the welsh ambulance services. steve tonks, son of rita, thank you for coming in. i know it was distressing seeing those pictures but i'm so glad that her health is improving and hopefully she will have a lovely better in a couple of weeks. yes. better in a couple of weeks. yes, she will be _ better in a couple of weeks. yes, she will be 88. _ better in a couple of weeks. yes, she will be 88. wish _ better in a couple of weeks. yes, she will be 88. wish her - better in a couple of weeks. yes, she will be 88. wish her well - better in a couple of weeks. yes, | she will be 88. wish her well from us and everyone _ she will be 88. wish her well from us and everyone viewing. - she will be 88. wish her well from us and everyone viewing. oh, - she will be 88. wish her well from i us and everyone viewing. oh, there she is! lovely mum! hopefully she will be watching. she she is! lovely mum! hopefully she will be watching.— will be watching. she looks like a very cheerful _ will be watching. she looks like a very cheerful soul. _ will be watching. she looks like a very cheerful soul. she _ will be watching. she looks like a very cheerful soul. she is. - will be watching. she looks like a very cheerful soul. she is. is- will be watching. she looks like a very cheerful soul. she is. is that our very cheerful soul. she is. is that your granddaughter? _ very cheerful soul. she is. is that your granddaughter? yes, - very cheerful soul. she is. is that your granddaughter? yes, it - very cheerful soul. she is. is that your granddaughter? yes, it is. l very cheerful soul. she is. is that i your granddaughter? yes, it is. was that ou at your granddaughter? yes, it is. was that you at the _ your granddaughter? yes, it is. was that you at the end _ your granddaughter? yes, it is. was that you at the end there _ your granddaughter? yes, it is. was that you at the end there in - your granddaughter? yes, it is. was that you at the end there in the - that you at the end there in the bowtie 's that was at my sons
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wedding. very kindly to share those pictures. thank you for sharing your story. pictures. thank you for sharing your sto . . ., pictures. thank you for sharing your sto . ., ,, , ., pictures. thank you for sharing your sto . . ~' , ., , pictures. thank you for sharing your sto. .mg , . time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. i'm sonja jessup. london will fall silent today in remembrance of those who've lost their lives in war. the duchess of cornwall, will attend westmister abbey later to pay her respects. earlier this week, she visited the poppy factory in richmond upon thames. one wreath — which has already been carried around the uk— will travel up the thames before being taken onboard hms belfast, and on to the tower of london. meanwhile, leyton orient�*s become the first football club to commemorate its fallen from the first world war with their own memorial. the club ? then known as clapton orient ? were the first to sign up en masse to fight in 191a. the memorial was unveiled by former players peter kitchen and dean smith at a ceremony at the national
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memorial arboreetum in staffordshire. the first world war and the second world war and the history of it all means a lot to my family, so we are here today and living the life that we live for those who have gave theirs up. nhs figures suggest bromley could lose 170 care home workers who are yet to have a second covid jab. under government rules, from today, all care home staff must be double vaccinated. figures suggest more than a00 carers in south east london are yet to have theirjabs. from today, uber�*s putting its prices in london up by 10 per cent — and even more for some airport trips — to try and attract more drivers. the company says demand's risen by 20 per cent since we came out of lockdown, leading to longer waiting times, and it needs 20,000 more drivers to help get service back to normal. well, let's take alook at how the tube is running this morning.
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the problems on the metropolitan line have now cleaerd, but there's been a signal failure affecting tfl rail. minor delays between hayes & harlington and paddington. and you can get travel updates on your bbc local radio station time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. yesterday was a very grey and murky day with a few outbreaks of light, patchy rain and drizzle at times, courtesy of a weather front that is still with us today. so it's another very grey start to the morning, plenty of cloud around and temperatures are in double figures. it's a very mild start. we will keep those layers of cloud as we head through the day and most of us stood stay dry but i wouldn't rule out the possibility spots of drizzle falling from the thickness of the cloud at times, particularly over the higher ground. but there should be some breaks in the cloud developing as we head through the afternoon, especially towards south—eastern areas of the capital as we start to see the weather front push northwards again. the southwesterly wind stays light and top temperatures peak at 13 or 1a celsius.
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the wind starts to strengthen overnight tonight and again it should stay mostly dry, a lot of cloud and a mild start to the day tomorrow. we could see early brightness tomorrow morning in eastern areas for a time but then showery outbreaks of rain and a strengthening south—westerly wind. quite a blustery day but there will be brighter spells on friday through the afternoon and it's a mostly dry weekend to follow, just feeling slightly cooler. there's more from me in an hour, and lots more stories on our website too. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's the last few days for deals to be made at the cop26 climate summit, and making a surprise agreement yesterday evening, the united states and china pledged to work together to tackle climate change. our chief political correspondent adam fleming joins us from glasgow.
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so, this deal, it is being couched, and it's great that these two countries have finally found some place agreement but still, what can they actually do?— they actually do? yes, people are lovin: the they actually do? yes, people are loving the symbolism _ they actually do? yes, people are loving the symbolism of- they actually do? yes, people are loving the symbolism of the - they actually do? yes, people are loving the symbolism of the two i loving the symbolism of the two biggest emitters coming together to make a powerful statement right at the end out the dramatic moment of the end out the dramatic moment of the climate change summit but like everything at cop26 the devil is in the details, so what impact does it have on the negotiations and the other countries in the negotiations in the short term and what does it mean for those countries pledges to reduce greenhouse gases in the medium to long term and we can discuss all of that with guess we have here because the great thing about cop26 is full of super nerds, if i can put it like that and we have a couple now. we have mark
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maslin from ucl and jennifer allen from university of cardiff. thanks forjoining us. i hope you did not mind me calling you a super nerd. i am happy to be and uber geek. mind me calling you a super nerd. i i am happy to be and uber geek. were ou am happy to be and uber geek. were you surprised — am happy to be and uber geek. were you surprised when _ am happy to be and uber geek. -- you surprised when we saw am happy to be and uber geek. -- you surprised when we sanohn kerry and his chinese counterpart doing a deal? it and his chinese counterpart doing a deal? . , . and his chinese counterpart doing a deal? ., , ., , , , and his chinese counterpart doing a deal? . , ., , , , ., ., , deal? it was a surprise and it was ureat deal? it was a surprise and it was treat to deal? it was a surprise and it was great to see _ deal? it was a surprise and it was great to see because _ deal? it was a surprise and it was great to see because the - deal? it was a surprise and it was great to see because the last - deal? it was a surprise and it was| great to see because the last time these _ great to see because the last time these countries _ great to see because the last time these countries work _ great to see because the last time these countries work together- great to see because the last time these countries work together on. great to see because the last time | these countries work together on a claimant _ these countries work together on a claimant statement _ these countries work together on a claimant statement it _ these countries work together on a claimant statement it help - these countries work together on a claimant statement it help pave i these countries work together on a i claimant statement it help pave the way for _ claimant statement it help pave the way for the — claimant statement it help pave the way for the paris _ claimant statement it help pave the way for the paris agreement - claimant statement it help pave the way for the paris agreement and . way for the paris agreement and hopefully— way for the paris agreement and hopefully pay— way for the paris agreement and hopefully pay the _ way for the paris agreement and hopefully pay the way— way for the paris agreement and hopefully pay the way for - way for the paris agreement and hopefully pay the way for some i way for the paris agreement and i hopefully pay the way for some of the tricky — hopefully pay the way for some of the tricky issues _ hopefully pay the way for some of the tricky issues we _ hopefully pay the way for some of the tricky issues we face - hopefully pay the way for some of the tricky issues we face here. - the tricky issues we face here. reading — the tricky issues we face here. reading between _ the tricky issues we face here. reading between the - the tricky issues we face here. reading between the lines, i the tricky issues we face here. i reading between the lines, what the tricky issues we face here. - reading between the lines, what did they commit to? iloathed reading between the lines, what did they commit to?— they commit to? what they have committed _ they commit to? what they have committed to — they commit to? what they have committed to is _ they commit to? what they have committed to is to _ they commit to? what they have committed to is to work - they commit to? what they have | committed to is to work together they commit to? what they have i committed to is to work together so they are _ committed to is to work together so they are looking at this decade as a decade _ they are looking at this decade as a decade where they will pull their resources — decade where they will pull their resources to work out how they can decarbonise — resources to work out how they can decarbonise and president biden said they would halve their emissions in america _ they would halve their emissions in america over the next ten years and that is— america over the next ten years and that is huge — america over the next ten years and that is huge. china has said they will slow— that is huge. china has said they will slow their expansion and hopefully pique emissions by 2030 and then— hopefully pique emissions by 2030 and then both will hit the net zero.
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america _ and then both will hit the net zero. america by— and then both will hit the net zero. america by 2050 and then china by 2060. _ america by 2050 and then china by 2060. so _ america by 2050 and then china by 2060. so if— america by 2050 and then china by 2060, so if they can work together and pull— 2060, so if they can work together and pull it— 2060, so if they can work together and pull it more towards the present day we _ and pull it more towards the present day we are _ and pull it more towards the present day we are on a way to decarbonising the globe _ day we are on a way to decarbonising the lobe. , ., ,, day we are on a way to decarbonising the lobe. , . ,, ., day we are on a way to decarbonising the lobe. , ., ~' ., ., the globe. they talk about methane, areenhouse the globe. they talk about methane, greenhouse gas _ the globe. they talk about methane, greenhouse gas we _ the globe. they talk about methane, greenhouse gas we don't _ the globe. they talk about methane, greenhouse gas we don't talk - the globe. they talk about methane, greenhouse gas we don't talk much i greenhouse gas we don't talk much about our co2 book could be almost more important. it’s about our c02 book could be almost more important-— more important. it's really potent, so a more — more important. it's really potent, so a more potent _ more important. it's really potent, so a more potent greenhouse - more important. it's really potent, so a more potent greenhouse gasl more important. it's really potent, i so a more potent greenhouse gas and does more _ so a more potent greenhouse gas and does more damage _ so a more potent greenhouse gas and does more damage per— so a more potent greenhouse gas and does more damage per molecule - so a more potent greenhouse gas andj does more damage per molecule than c02, does more damage per molecule than (102, so— does more damage per molecule than c02, so cooperating _ does more damage per molecule than c02, so cooperating on _ does more damage per molecule than c02, so cooperating on that _ does more damage per molecule than c02, so cooperating on that can - does more damage per molecule than c02, so cooperating on that can havel c02, so cooperating on that can have a multiplayer— c02, so cooperating on that can have a multiplayer type _ c02, so cooperating on that can have a multiplayer type effect _ c02, so cooperating on that can have a multiplayer type effect on - c02, so cooperating on that can have a multiplayer type effect on the - a multiplayer type effect on the ability— a multiplayer type effect on the ability to— a multiplayer type effect on the ability to help _ a multiplayer type effect on the ability to help the _ a multiplayer type effect on the ability to help the climate. - a multiplayer type effect on the ability to help the climate. that is the us and _ ability to help the climate. that is the us and china _ ability to help the climate. that is the us and china but _ ability to help the climate. that is the us and china but lets - ability to help the climate. that is the us and china but lets talk - ability to help the climate. that is l the us and china but lets talk about the us and china but lets talk about the negotiations of the 195 other countries here, and we can break it down into various bits. the word i keep on hearing from people is ambition, more ambition, less ambition. when they talk about ambitions are they actually talking about, mark? the ambitions are they actually talking about. mark?— about, mark? the most important thin is about, mark? the most important thing is that _ about, mark? the most important thing is that this _ about, mark? the most important thing is that this is _ about, mark? the most important thing is that this is a _ about, mark? the most important thing is that this is a practical - thing is that this is a practical c0pd~ — thing is that this is a practical c0pd~ i— thing is that this is a practical copd. i know there will not be a
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huge _ copd. i know there will not be a huge big — copd. i know there will not be a huge, big announcement, that is paris _ huge, big announcement, that is paris but— huge, big announcement, that is paris. but it is us trying to work out as— paris. but it is us trying to work out as a — paris. but it is us trying to work out as a global group, how do you do this? _ out as a global group, how do you do this? how— out as a global group, how do you do this? how do— out as a global group, how do you do this? how do you decarbonise and 80% of the _ this? how do you decarbonise and 80% of the world _ this? how do you decarbonise and 80% of the world energy is now fossil fuels _ of the world energy is now fossil fuels and — of the world energy is now fossil fuels and we want that to be zero in 2050 _ fuels and we want that to be zero in 2050 so— fuels and we want that to be zero in 2050 so it's — fuels and we want that to be zero in 2050 so it's the practical things. how do — 2050 so it's the practical things. how do we — 2050 so it's the practical things. how do we phase out coal? there is a small— how do we phase out coal? there is a small agreement about that. how do we make _ small agreement about that. how do we make sure coal is not funded internationally question that there is a small— internationally question that there is a small agreement about that. how do we _ is a small agreement about that. how do we avoid _ is a small agreement about that. how do we avoid deforestation? so it's lots of— do we avoid deforestation? so it's lots of little agreements. however, what we _ lots of little agreements. however, what we are worried about is the overarching ambition which is the end a _ overarching ambition which is the end a statement of cop26, because at the moment it is quite weak, despite having _ the moment it is quite weak, despite having the _ the moment it is quite weak, despite having the us and china coming together— having the us and china coming together in a love match, we are still wanting something stronger to come _ still wanting something stronger to come out _ still wanting something stronger to come out of this to infuse other countries — come out of this to infuse other countries to actually make that big effort _ countries to actually make that big effort. �* . �* , . countries to actually make that big effort. �* . �*, ., ., ., effort. and that's all about what the individual _
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effort. and that's all about what the individual pledges _ effort. and that's all about what the individual pledges are - effort. and that's all about what the individual pledges are to - effort. and that's all about what - the individual pledges are to reduce greenhouse gases and whether it gets us on course for limiting global temperatures or down to 1.5 degrees. that is the headline stuff about those pledges. jennifer, loads of technical stuff happening in other rooms and i'd like you to explain some of that to me. there is a real piece ofjargon i keep hearing, article six. what is article six and why is it so important?— article six. what is article six and why is it so important? thanks for that, first thing _ why is it so important? thanks for that, first thing in _ why is it so important? thanks for that, first thing in the _ why is it so important? thanks for that, first thing in the morning. i that, first thing in the morning. article — that, first thing in the morning. article six— that, first thing in the morning. article six is— that, first thing in the morning. article six is carbon _ that, first thing in the morning. article six is carbon markets . that, first thing in the morning. | article six is carbon markets and also _ article six is carbon markets and also a _ article six is carbon markets and also a bit — article six is carbon markets and also a bit about _ article six is carbon markets and also a bit about non—markets, i article six is carbon markets and| also a bit about non—markets, so article six is carbon markets and - also a bit about non—markets, so how we are _ also a bit about non—markets, so how we are going — also a bit about non—markets, so how we are going to, — also a bit about non—markets, so how we are going to, if— also a bit about non—markets, so how we are going to, if one _ also a bit about non—markets, so how we are going to, if one country- we are going to, if one country reduces— we are going to, if one country reduces emissions— we are going to, if one country reduces emissions and - we are going to, if one country reduces emissions and maybe i we are going to, if one country- reduces emissions and maybe they have reduced — reduces emissions and maybe they have reduced more _ reduces emissions and maybe they have reduced more emissions - reduces emissions and maybe they have reduced more emissions than they thought. _ have reduced more emissions than they thought, maybe _ have reduced more emissions than they thought, maybe they - have reduced more emissions than they thought, maybe they can - have reduced more emissions than they thought, maybe they can sell| have reduced more emissions than. they thought, maybe they can sell it to a country— they thought, maybe they can sell it to a country having _ they thought, maybe they can sell it to a country having trouble - they thought, maybe they can sell it to a country having trouble and - they thought, maybe they can sell it to a country having trouble and that| to a country having trouble and that country _ to a country having trouble and that country can — to a country having trouble and that country can say _ to a country having trouble and that country can say, hey, _ to a country having trouble and that country can say, hey, we _ to a country having trouble and that country can say, hey, we bought. to a country having trouble and thati country can say, hey, we bought this credit— country can say, hey, we bought this credit and _ country can say, hey, we bought this credit and we — country can say, hey, we bought this credit and we will— country can say, hey, we bought this credit and we will put _ country can say, hey, we bought this credit and we will put that _ country can say, hey, we bought this credit and we will put that against i credit and we will put that against the paris — credit and we will put that against the paris agreement _ credit and we will put that against the paris agreement pledge. - credit and we will put that against the paris agreement pledge. it. the paris agreement pledge. it sounds — the paris agreement pledge. it sounds simple _ the paris agreement pledge. it sounds simple but _ the paris agreement pledge. it sounds simple but it's- the paris agreement pledge. it sounds simple but it's usuallyi sounds simple but it's usually complicated _ sounds simple but it's usually complicated when— sounds simple but it's usually complicated when you - sounds simple but it's usually complicated when you think. sounds simple but it's usually- complicated when you think about all the different— complicated when you think about all the different ways _ complicated when you think about all the different ways of _ complicated when you think about all the different ways of reducing - the different ways of reducing emissions _ the different ways of reducing emissions and _ the different ways of reducing emissions and the _ the different ways of reducing emissions and the different i the different ways of reducing - emissions and the different types of pledges _ emissions and the different types of pledges we — emissions and the different types of pledges we have _ emissions and the different types of pledges we have and _ emissions and the different types of pledges we have and the _ emissions and the different types of pledges we have and the countries i pledges we have and the countries involved. — pledges we have and the countries involved. so— pledges we have and the countries involved. so it _ pledges we have and the countries involved, so it is _ pledges we have and the countries involved, so it is an— pledges we have and the countries involved, so it is an accountants i involved, so it is an accountants nightmare — involved, so it is an accountants nightmare how— involved, so it is an accountants nightmare how to _ involved, so it is an accountants
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nightmare how to figure - involved, so it is an accountants nightmare how to figure this - involved, so it is an accountantsj nightmare how to figure this out involved, so it is an accountants - nightmare how to figure this out and we have _ nightmare how to figure this out and we have 197— nightmare how to figure this out and we have 197 countries _ nightmare how to figure this out and we have 197 countries trying - nightmare how to figure this out and we have 197 countries trying to - we have 197 countries trying to figure — we have197 countries trying to figure out— we have 197 countries trying to figure out the _ we have 197 countries trying to figure out the accounting - we have 197 countries trying to figure out the accounting on i we have 197 countries trying toj figure out the accounting on it. we have 197 countries trying to - figure out the accounting on it. you mention figure out the accounting on it. mention accounting which makes figure out the accounting on it.“ mention accounting which makes me think of money. money is a theme that runs through all of this and you hear all sorts of numbers, $100 billion, $130 trillion. give us a useful way of thinking to help us follow the money? you useful way of thinking to help us follow the money?— useful way of thinking to help us follow the money? you need to put the money — follow the money? you need to put the money in _ follow the money? you need to put the money in perspective _ follow the money? you need to put the money in perspective because i follow the money? you need to put i the money in perspective because the world governments have just spent $14 trillion lifting the economy out of covid, _ $14 trillion lifting the economy out of covid, so the numbers here are actually— of covid, so the numbers here are actually quite small, so when the developed world is talking about $100 billion to help the least developed countries in those countries that rely heavily on petrochemical for their economy, to help them _ petrochemical for their economy, to help them decarbonise, it's a really small— help them decarbonise, it's a really small amount of money. the most important — small amount of money. the most important thing about that 100 billion— important thing about that 100 billion is— important thing about that 100 billion is it is a promise, and it shows— billion is it is a promise, and it shows good faith and for ten years we have _ shows good faith and for ten years we have not produced it, and this is
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ridiculous — we have not produced it, and this is ridiculous if— we have not produced it, and this is ridiculous. if the world is going to work— ridiculous. if the world is going to work together and there's going to be trust _ work together and there's going to be trust and solidarity, we need the 100 billion — be trust and solidarity, we need the 100 billionjust as be trust and solidarity, we need the 100 billion just as a leap be trust and solidarity, we need the 100 billionjust as a leap of be trust and solidarity, we need the 100 billion just as a leap of faith to say, — 100 billion just as a leap of faith to say, yes, here it is, we promised it, to say, yes, here it is, we promised it. it's _ to say, yes, here it is, we promised it. it's ten _ to say, yes, here it is, we promised it, it's ten years late, but here it is. it, it's ten years late, but here it is but— it, it's ten years late, but here it is but there _ it, it's ten years late, but here it is. but there are negotiations to go and which — is. but there are negotiations to go and which is — is. but there are negotiations to go and which is not only to have the 100 billion — and which is not only to have the 100 billion but also 100 billion per year because lifting those countries out of _ year because lifting those countries out of energy poverty and moving them _ out of energy poverty and moving them away from fossil fuels is good for that— them away from fossil fuels is good for that country, good for the climate — for that country, good for the climate and good for the global economy. climate and good for the global econom . ~ ., ., ., , economy. what i love about this -rocess economy. what i love about this process is _ economy. what i love about this process is that _ economy. what i love about this process is that you _ economy. what i love about this process is that you have - economy. what i love about this process is that you have a - economy. what i love about this| process is that you have a target economy. what i love about this i process is that you have a target to spend $100 billion mistake few years ago but they are talking about what the new target should be from 2025 even though they haven't done the old one. this is my first ever cop, so does it get dramatic? do people run around and people stay up all night? run around and people stay up all niuht? , , ., night? yes, we will be here all niuht. night? yes, we will be here all night. there's _ night? yes, we will be here all night. there's a _ night? yes, we will be here all night. there's a of _ night? yes, we will be here all night. there's a of up - night? yes, we will be here all night. there's a of up and - night? yes, we will be here all| night. there's a of up and wait, everyone — night. there's a of up and wait, everyone will— night. there's a of up and wait, everyone will rush _ night. there's a of up and wait, everyone will rush in, - night. there's a of up and wait, everyone will rush in, plenary. night. there's a of up and wait, i everyone will rush in, plenary will convene _ everyone will rush in, plenary will convene and _ everyone will rush in, plenary will convene and they— everyone will rush in, plenary will convene and they will— everyone will rush in, plenary will convene and they will adopt -
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convene and they will adopt decisions _ convene and they will adopt decisions and _ convene and they will adopt decisions and i— convene and they will adopt decisions and i would - convene and they will adopt decisions and i would say i convene and they will adopt i decisions and i would say we convene and they will adopt - decisions and i would say we will see you — decisions and i would say we will see you soon _ decisions and i would say we will see you soon and _ decisions and i would say we will see you soon and soon _ decisions and i would say we will see you soon and soon could - decisions and i would say we will see you soon and soon could bel decisions and i would say we will - see you soon and soon could be eight hours _ see you soon and soon could be eight hours later, _ see you soon and soon could be eight hours later, so— see you soon and soon could be eight hours later, so some _ see you soon and soon could be eight hours later, so some of us _ see you soon and soon could be eight hours later, so some of us might- hours later, so some of us might have _ hours later, so some of us might have a _ hours later, so some of us might have a betting _ hours later, so some of us might have a betting pool— hours later, so some of us might have a betting pool about - hours later, so some of us might have a betting pool about when i hours later, so some of us might. have a betting pool about when this might— have a betting pool about when this mightend _ have a betting pool about when this mightend and _ have a betting pool about when this might end and i'm _ have a betting pool about when this might end and i'm thinking - have a betting pool about when this| might end and i'm thinking saturday afternoon _ might end and i'm thinking saturday afternoon -ish _ might end and i'm thinking saturday afternoon —ish. [— might end and i'm thinking saturday afternoon -ish._ might end and i'm thinking saturday afternoon -ish. i will check when my train is booked. _ afternoon -ish. i will check when my train is booked. we _ afternoon -ish. i will check when my train is booked. we have _ afternoon -ish. i will check when my train is booked. we have to - afternoon -ish. i will check when my train is booked. we have to get - afternoon -ish. i will check when my| train is booked. we have to get used to the idea that this is a meeting that will lead to more meetings. it's not a eureka moment. that's really important. _ it's not a eureka moment. that's really important. we _ it's not a eureka moment. that's really important. we won't - it's not a eureka moment. that's really important. we won't have | it's not a eureka moment. that's| really important. we won't have a simple _ really important. we won't have a simple solution. climate change is incredibly— simple solution. climate change is incredibly complicated and that is what we — incredibly complicated and that is what we have to understand. we are changing _ what we have to understand. we are changing the whole economic system of the _ changing the whole economic system of the world and we are going to do it in 30 _ of the world and we are going to do it in 30 years and all of the signs from _ it in 30 years and all of the signs from these — it in 30 years and all of the signs from these meetings are really positive — from these meetings are really positive but it is huge. 80% of the energy— positive but it is huge. 80% of the energy is— positive but it is huge. 80% of the energy is produced by fossil fuels and that— energy is produced by fossil fuels and that has to disappear in less than _ and that has to disappear in less than 30 — and that has to disappear in less than 30 years. and that has to disappear in less than 30 years-— than 30 years. well, i hope that conversation _ than 30 years. well, i hope that conversation wasn't _ than 30 years. well, i hope that conversation wasn't too - than 30 years. well, i hope that conversation wasn't too scary i than 30 years. well, i hope thatl conversation wasn't too scary but than 30 years. well, i hope that i conversation wasn't too scary but it is a good insight into what is being discussed. one of the other things i've realised talking to people here, when you talk to academics and
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scientists and people from think tanks, they are often very ambitions and when you talk to politicians and civil servants who have to think about voters and how much money they have gotten all of the other that governments have to do, they are quite often a little less ambitious and sometimes a lot less. adam, thank ou and sometimes a lot less. adam, thank you so _ much at cop26. mike is here on the sofa with us talking cricket. the drama of the semifinals of the world cup, but how quickly things can change in the sport. and the format is so short you have no time to recover. and at the heart of this a play on the wrong end of an england victory in the famous final at lord's in the 50 over game, jimmy neesham and he was so upset by losing to england in the final and he tweeted at the time, kids, don't take up sport, take up baking. good job he didn't for new zealand because he was the hero in the
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semifinal. he channelled all of those thoughts. england were reminded of how quickly the tables can turn in t20 cricket, as they had their place in sunday's world cup final snatched away from them, by new zealand. england had looked on course, to keep alive their hopes of adding the t—20 title to the 50 over trophy they hold, and after making 166 for a...they needing an unlikely 57 of the last 2a balls, jimmy neesham channelling the upset from two years ago when his team lost in the final at lord's, smashing his team back into it with three sixes and finishing thejob as it with three sixes and finishing the job as daryl mitchell made an unbeaten 72 as they broke english hearts. it sounds weird but i never felt it was out of our grasp, with the small side boundary on the one side we knew there would be matchup that would suit us at the end and we knew if we kept itjust would suit us at the end and we knew if we kept it just within would suit us at the end and we knew if we kept itjust within certain numbers we felt comfortable with, we always had a chance and i thought
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the way neesham came out and dominated that one over, sitting, i take my cap off to him because it was a hell of a knock. but its new zealand who will now face australia or pakistan in sunday�*s final. they play today. next to a remarkable story in football, from paris saint germain, where one of the club's female players, aminata diallo, has been arrested by french police, as part of an investigation, into an attack on her team—mates, earlier this month. reports in france suggest that one of the assaulted players was kheira hamraoui, who was allegedly dragged out of her car by two masked individuals who beat her legs. well, paris saint germain said in a statement... on the pitch, relief for arsenal's women who got a much—needed win
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in the women's champions league. steph catley steadied the nerves with first a perfect free kick as they beat danish side kurg, 5—1 last night to keep up the pressure on group leaders barcelona. there were four more goals in the second—half. jordan nobbs rounding things off. the new newcastle manager eddie howe, says his team do have the ability to stay in the premier league. howe was speaking to the media for the first time after joining with the club next to bottom in the league. he refused to be drawn on the controversial saudi—backed ownership of the club, and insisted he took the job for football reasons only and has benefited from over a year out of the game. once covid rules allowed it, i've been here and there are everywhere and i sit here a better manager than i was. people will say i've been out of the game and question that but for me i more relevant and in touch than i've ever been in terms of what is going on at the top level. stand is going on at the top level. and aston villa _ is going on at the top level. and aston villa are _ is going on at the top level. and aston villa are stepping up moves to
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a rangers manager stephen gerard and significant developments are expected in the next a8 hours. onto tennis, and andy murray is buzzing and says beating the top seed at the stockholm open is probably his best win of the season. he brushed asidejannik sinner, who's also now number 10 in the world, to reach the quarter finals in sweden. murray says he's hoping he can improve further and faces american tommy paul next. british number two dan evans has also reached the last eight in stockholm. and finally, history has been made in women's skiing after the first double cork 1aao by a female athlete. definitely a champagne moment for the chinese—american freestyle skier, eileen gu. at normal speed it's a blur, a bamboozling, series of twists and turns in the air. but slow it down and we see what a double cork 1aao looks like.
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1aao refers to 360 multiplied by four. how you land and are not dizzy, i don't know. she's only 18 and was in disbelief as she celebrated after landing. there would have been a time in that sport where they would have said it was simply not possible which makes me think of a guest coming up later, adam peaty who will be with us on the sofa, because people said at certain times in swimming could not be done. it can't be done and then somebody goes and does it. and what he achieved a strictly was fantastic. he will be with us in a few minutes. let's go to another high achiever. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. i thought somebody else had walked into the studio. i i thought somebody else had walked into the studio.— into the studio. i wasn't referring to ou. into the studio. i wasn't referring to you- they _ into the studio. i wasn't referring to you. they had. _ into the studio. i wasn't referring to you. they had. good - into the studio. i wasn't referring to you. they had. good morning | to you. they had. good morning everybody- _ to you. they had. good morning everybody- it's _ to you. they had. good morning everybody. it's mixed _ to you. they had. good morning everybody. it's mixed fortunes i to you. they had. good morning i everybody. it's mixed fortunes with the weather today. as you can see
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from two of the weather watchers pictures, it is quite foggy in wolverhampton and a lot of cloud around and mist and fog and drizzle but we also have clear skies as well and as you can see from the weather watchers picture, taken in hampshire. what we are starting weather across much of england and wales is a lot of low cloud, some missed, some fog and some rain. bright skies across northern and southern scotland and northern england to start with but through the day we will see more rain sweep up the day we will see more rain sweep up into northern england and south—west scotland and the cloud continues to push north across northern scotland and temperatures today between eight and 15 degrees. by today between eight and 15 degrees. by the time you get to the afternoon the wind will be strengthening towards the west heralding the arrival of low pressure with its fronts, and it will come overnight bringing heavy rain across northern ireland and scotland, lighter rain across the rest of england and also wales and wherever you are again, it
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will be windy, but especially out towards the west and across shetland but it will be a mild night so i'll start to the day tomorrow with light rain moving across england and clearing but heavy rain coming in across central and southern scotland and northern england. brighter skies in the far north and a windy day but also a mild one for the time of year. these are our values, between ten and 15, average at this time of the is roughly nine to 11. see you later on. i was listening to carol but i was also looking at adam peaty�*s book. teh carol but i was also looking at adam peaty's book-— rising sea levels are one of the most significant consequences of climate change — causing irreparable damage. however, a study of a restored coastal marsh in scotland has shown there could some benefits — if rising water is managed properly. our science correspondent victoria gill has more.
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digging into a changing environment. in an area that is surrounded by scotland's coal mining past and its industrial present, there is a transformation happening beneath our feet. just three years ago, this area was re—engineered to bring the coastal wetland back to its natural state. you breach the course of the fences and let the water back in, but within two or three years we were seeing salt marsh plants reappear and we are now three years down the line, and you know, it is all salt marsh. and at that point we kind of stepped back and let nature do its thing and we are seeing the wildlife respond, so birds are using it at high tide, seeing lots of deer, hares in the spring. as well as a diverse wetland habitat, this marsh has become a natural tool in the fight to reduce emissions of greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. marsh land plants absorb one
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of those key planet warming gases, carbon dioxide, which then becomes buried in the mud. yes. that's a big one. this is some of the most organic rich soil you can find in the uk compared to agricultural land, forestry land. so we will wrap this up in clingfilm, just so it holds its shape and we take it back to the university of st andrews and we have a laboratory there and we will perform a couple of experiments using a couple of different machines, different equipment, just to kind of measure the different levels of carbon within the layers of the core here. the scientists studying this site say it's revealing a way to work with nature to manage one of the inevitable impacts of climate change, sea—level rise. i think the threats of sea level rise are very serious and we need to be reimagining our coastlines where we can. and i think where there are positive opportunities, particularly for nature, we should be thinking
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about sea rise as an opportunity for coastal wetland habitat creation. we can see a source of greenhouse gas emissions here from the fossil fuel industry. there is grangemouth refineryjust in the distance and we still need to slash emissions but making space for natural stores of carbon, places like this that suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, will help us rebalance that. allowing the sea to reclaim this stretch of land has provided a glimpse of how we can help nature to help us tackle the climate crisis. victoria gill, bbc news. it 5 just a few days since he waltzed off the strictly dancefloor, but there's no rest for sporting superstar adam peaty just yet. he's launching a new book,
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drawing on his experiences as one of britain's greatest olympians. why don't you stop and take a break? i want to, but my mind works in funny ways. i wish i could have a rest but i want to inspire people. not from strictly, hopefully from the early picks. not from strictly, hopefully from the early picks-— not from strictly, hopefully from the early picks. there is no doubt that ou the early picks. there is no doubt that you do _ the early picks. there is no doubt that you do because _ the early picks. there is no doubt that you do because we _ the early picks. there is no doubt that you do because we can't - the early picks. there is no doubt| that you do because we can't have you on and not show you are. here. adam peaty is the double olympic champion! a legacy is something that you can't almost create. it creates itself. ijust want to be the best, it's as simple as that. it's 365, 24/7, so the amount of pressure firstly, but also the self talk. we are literally 30 seconds from the new house, and it's very exciting.
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hiya! owning your own home and providing and having your family around, i don't think any thing can compare to that. like a reverse triangle. big arms. yes! applause it's only appropriate, and i saw you chuckling a bit. was there a contented smile as you saw pictures of yourself on strictly? yes. contented smile as you saw pictures of yourself on strictly?— of yourself on strictly? yes, it's such a fun _ of yourself on strictly? yes, it's such a fun experience. - of yourself on strictly? yes, it's such a fun experience. one - of yourself on strictly? yes, it's such a fun experience. one of. of yourself on strictly? yes, it's l such a fun experience. one of the hardest things i've done, literally and people say you've trained your whole life as an olympian but it's one of the most amazing things i've done because working with catchier and working with someone us, because i'm a lone wolf and that's what i do when i'm on my own, so relying on neesham and her relying on these
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different so it was a contented smile, definitely. flan different so it was a contented smile, definitely.— different so it was a contented smile, definitely. can i ask one ruestion smile, definitely. can i ask one question to _ smile, definitely. can i ask one question to get _ smile, definitely. can i ask one question to get out _ smile, definitely. can i ask one question to get out of - smile, definitely. can i ask one question to get out of the - smile, definitely. can i ask one question to get out of the way. j smile, definitely. can i ask one - question to get out of the way. mum must always massively support their children and i'm sure your mum, all the way through everything you've done has supported you and she said some things about your exit from strictly so it's only right you should get the chance, and she said it was a fix and think she should stay be there. i it was a fix and think she should stay be there.— it was a fix and think she should sta be there. . , ., ., stay be there. i agree with you that mums will away — stay be there. i agree with you that mums will away support _ stay be there. i agree with you that mums will away support their - stay be there. i agree with you that mums will away support their own i stay be there. i agree with you that i mums will away support their own and she wanted to see me every saturday night, bless her and she loves me to bits but i think she wants to do a paso doble. for me, if anyone can lose well, it's me and everybody in that competition, they are all incredible people and i don't deserve to be there because some of the dancers has myjaw dropping and thatis the dancers has myjaw dropping and that is incredible and i'm normally on my own i would say, you are not
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beating today, but this is different.— beating today, but this is different. ., �* ., , ., , different. you've answered that very diplomatically- _ different. you've answered that very diplomatically. have _ different. you've answered that very diplomatically. have you _ different. you've answered that very diplomatically. have you had - different. you've answered that very diplomatically. have you had words| diplomatically. have you had words with your mother?— diplomatically. have you had words with your mother? well, yes. but it is the way it — with your mother? well, yes. but it is the way it is- _ with your mother? well, yes. but it is the way it is. i _ with your mother? well, yes. but it is the way it is. i don't _ with your mother? well, yes. but it is the way it is. i don't want - with your mother? well, yes. but it is the way it is. i don't want to - is the way it is. i don't want to censor anyone or say anything to anyone, she's got her thoughts, i've got mine, and my thought is the most important one to me. i had the most incredible time and everyone on that show deserves to be there and i don't, and that's just the way it is. don't, and that's 'ust the way it is. ~ . , don't, and that's 'ust the way it is. . ., , ., ., is. was it harder training with ka a or is. was it harder training with katya or harder— is. was it harder training with katya or harder training - is. was it harder training with katya or harder training to i is. was it harder training with katya or harder training to bej is. was it harder training with i katya or harder training to be an olympian? katya or harder training to be an ol mian? katya or harder training to be an olympian?— katya or harder training to be an olmian? ., ~ , ., olympian? oh, god. a bit of both. ka a is olympian? oh, god. a bit of both. katya is an — olympian? oh, god. a bit of both. katya is an incredible _ olympian? oh, god. a bit of both. katya is an incredible person. - olympian? oh, god. a bit of both. | katya is an incredible person. until you know her in person she is one of the most amazing people and so inspirational from the most amazing people and so inspirationalfrom my side the most amazing people and so inspirational from my side of things. aouchiche is also very kind. very kind, sometimes calm, but i enjoyed working with her but the olympics is five years. you don't train five years for a dance, and this is my dance ear and i trained
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12 years for this moment, and if i mess up here, it's a waste, bit by mess up here, it's a waste, bit by mess up here, it's a waste, bit by mess up in the dancing, it's only a been a week. so a little bit different but this is myjob and i'm looking forward to getting back to it. i looking forward to getting back to it. , ., looking forward to getting back to it. , . _ _ looking forward to getting back to it. i started by saying when are you auoin to it. i started by saying when are you going to stop. _ it. i started by saying when are you going to stop. and _ it. i started by saying when are you going to stop, and you _ it. i started by saying when are you going to stop, and you had - it. i started by saying when are you going to stop, and you had spoken| going to stop, and you had spoken about taking time off because you've been busy and we will talk about the bookin been busy and we will talk about the book in a moment but she spoke about taking time off to look after you. do you still have that in mind? are you going to do that?— do you still have that in mind? are you going to do that? from january the 1st i you going to do that? from january the 1st i will — you going to do that? from january the 1st | will start _ you going to do that? from january the 1st i will start picking _ you going to do that? from january the 1st i will start picking it - you going to do that? from january the 1st i will start picking it up, - the 1st i will start picking it up, from now until then, i'm taking a step back, emotionally, physically and i'm just ticking over, really. i think longevity and athletes, we don't speak about it because we think about the next championship or dominating the next championship but how can you do that if you don't look after you. if you don't put number one first, you will burn out and burn—out is something we are looking across corporations as people and we are getting more in tune with. why should we get to the point with people saying, i am done now rather than taking care of
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yourself up to that point. you had a sore shoulder, you would take care of it, and it's the same with your mind, and i'm taking care of myself no because i will need that killer instinct in may. 50 no because i will need that killer instinct in may.— no because i will need that killer instinct in may. so in some ways, havin: instinct in may. so in some ways, having read _ instinct in may. so in some ways, having read the _ instinct in may. so in some ways, having read the book, _ instinct in may. so in some ways, having read the book, you - instinct in may. so in some ways, having read the book, you would| instinct in may. so in some ways, l having read the book, you would be on both sides of this equation because you have obviously been at points in your training where somebody might have been saying, enough now, you've done enough and you are the one saying, i'm going to do more and i will push harder all the time. is that a slight mindset change you have gone through now, looking after yourself? i change you have gone through now, looking after yourself?— looking after yourself? i think so but don't get _ looking after yourself? i think so but don't get it _ looking after yourself? i think so but don't get it twisted, - looking after yourself? i think so but don't get it twisted, i - looking after yourself? i think so but don't get it twisted, i will. but don't get it twisted, i will push harder than anyone else when i am in the pool but its taken care of myself between those moments and at the end of the session it was like do three more, and i will do four, and that's why i've won for so long because i would always go to the nth degree and make sure i'd done enough to win. ~ , ., degree and make sure i'd done enough towin. ~ degree and make sure i'd done enough towin. ~ ~' to win. when you say something like
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that, do you — to win. when you say something like that, do you think— to win. when you say something like that, do you think it _ to win. when you say something like that, do you think it slightly - that, do you think it slightly disrespectful to those who think that they are also working as hard and doing their best? i that they are also working as hard and doing their best?— and doing their best? i think so, but it's not. _ and doing their best? i think so, but it's not, because _ and doing their best? i think so, but it's not, because that - and doing their best? i think so, but it's not, because that is - and doing their best? i think so, | but it's not, because that is sport comments ruthless. i'm not going to sugar coat it. so comments ruthless. i'm not going to sugar coat it— sugar coat it. so you work harder than everyone — sugar coat it. so you work harder than everyone else. _ sugar coat it. so you work harder than everyone else. i _ sugar coat it. so you work harder than everyone else. i work- sugar coat it. so you work harder i than everyone else. i work smarter, and i than everyone else. i work smarter, and i work — than everyone else. i work smarter, and i work harder, _ than everyone else. i work smarter, and i work harder, that _ than everyone else. i work smarter, and i work harder, that is _ than everyone else. i work smarter, and i work harder, that is sport. - and i work harder, that is sport. that's made me successful for seven years. you can't go, but they might have worked hard on that, because that's not the truth. i wish i could sit here and tell you that but i know in my heart that when i get behind that block i look at everyone and i'm going, you have not worked as hard as me and that has got to be the champion mindset or the gladiator mindset. you have to own the arena with your brain and heart and your soul and you've got to believe that. its and your soul and you've got to believe that.— and your soul and you've got to believe that. its expiring hearing ou sa believe that. its expiring hearing you say that _ believe that. its expiring hearing you say that and _ believe that. its expiring hearing you say that and it _ believe that. its expiring hearing you say that and it feels - believe that. its expiring hearing you say that and it feels true. i believe that. its expiring hearing | you say that and it feels true. it's like you got into a different mindset. ., like you got into a different mindset-— like you got into a different mindset. ., ., , , , mindset. you got me pumped up. you -h sicall mindset. you got me pumped up. you physically change- _ mindset. you got me pumped up. you physically change. you _ mindset. you got me pumped up. you physically change. you could - mindset. you got me pumped up. you physically change. you could feel- physically change. you could feel the level rising in the room a bit. but it is connected, and you talk a
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lot in the book about negative mindsets and more importantly positive mindsets, and again it feels like you have been on both sides of the equation and made an active, deliberate decision to go less of the negative. what is the tip? how do you get to that point? it doesn't matter if you are an olympian or somebody doing a more regular line of work. everybody has moments. . , ., moments. that is the book for me, it's not to teach _ moments. that is the book for me, it's not to teach athletes _ moments. that is the book for me, it's not to teach athletes to - moments. that is the book for me, it's not to teach athletes to be - it's not to teach athletes to be better it's to teach everyone to be better it's to teach everyone to be better or hopefully i can. i'm 26 years old and i got so much to learn that this is just my little diary and what has made me who i am today. negativity is one of those things, because it's like a drain and it sucks your mood and in here, i mentioned about that the five people you spend the most time with, are they positive or negative? for me, i'd rather choose positive because it lifts you up and it's like a radiator, you radiate energy and i believe 110% in energy and the
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reciprocation of energy so the energy i'm giving you now, hopefully you are feeling it back, just little things like that, and positivity, i got up this morning and thought i am tired today and i got to go on bbc breakfast and i love it but i am tired, but that's ok. we try to cover that and we are not as honest as we can be with ourselves and i say to myself now, i'm honest with myself, but hopefully, millions of people will hear me and talk about this and hopefully i will inspire people and that is worth so much more to me and i'd rather be tired every day and inspire people than do nothing at all and stay in that mediocre zone for myself. i have this certain level of level for myself and i know that is so important in the next seven years of my swimming career. [30 important in the next seven years of my swimming career.— my swimming career. do you know what? i my swimming career. do you know what? i enjoyed — my swimming career. do you know what? i enjoyed flicking _ my swimming career. do you know what? i enjoyed flicking through i my swimming career. do you knowl what? i enjoyed flicking through the book, but i think you've let us into a secret. you know that moment when you see swimmers come out and they walk out and they have their headphones in and you are always thinking, what are you listening to?
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you've given away your secrets. what is it? top tunes for getting plugged into range and then calming down again. are you getting plugged into again. are you getting plugged into a rage when you are walking on? those songs. it’s a rage when you are walking on? those songs-— a rage when you are walking on? those songs. it's in the book. give us one? i— those songs. it's in the book. give us one? i love _ those songs. it's in the book. give us one? i love grime _ those songs. it's in the book. give us one? i love grime and - those songs. it's in the book. give us one? i love grime and hip-hopl those songs. it's in the book. give i us one? i love grime and hip-hop and dance music. — us one? i love grime and hip-hop and dance music, but _ us one? i love grime and hip-hop and dance music, but it's— us one? i love grime and hip-hop and dance music, but it's about _ us one? i love grime and hip-hop and dance music, but it's about the - dance music, but it's about the balance and understanding myself on the day, becausejust balance and understanding myself on the day, because just like anything else, we are not going to deliver the same performance every day. our mind will be in a different way, we might have more fatigue and anxiety, so how do i adapt quest what i have two playlist, one that puts me into rage and one that puts me into chill sometimes i think i need to calm down so i put on the chill playlist but sometimes i wake up and i need to get it more and tune into myself more and i put on the rage playlist but that is being an athlete. you will not deliver the same goods for seven years. you will be like this
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and understanding it is important. having you on the sofa has been brilliant and there is brilliant energy coming from you but i've had a first of this morning. i've never known charlie to ask a guest where his outfit is from and try to imagine himself in it. because the s lish imagine himself in it. because the stylish tracksuit _ imagine himself in it. because the stylish tracksuit thing _ imagine himself in it. because the stylish tracksuit thing is _ imagine himself in it. because the stylish tracksuit thing is going - imagine himself in it. because the stylish tracksuit thing is going on. | stylish tracksuit thing is going on. we will send you one. it's a hybrid. it's a suit, but i can go to the gym with it. i it's a suit, but i can go to the gym with it. ., ~ with it. i said i did not think! would carry _ with it. i said i did not think! would carry it _ with it. i said i did not think! would carry it off— with it. i said i did not think! would carry it off well- with it. i said i did not think! would carry it off well at - with it. i said i did not think! would carry it off well at all. | would carry it off well at all. there is quite a buzz in the room for adam. there is quite a buzz in the room foradam. ifeel there is quite a buzz in the room for adam. ifeel i could go in the pool and do a record time. it is ener: . pool and do a record time. it is energy- give — pool and do a record time. it 3 energy. give people your energy and hopefully they will give it back. mike is nodding. he is getting pumped up already. it’s mike is nodding. he is getting pumped up already.— mike is nodding. he is getting pumped up already. it's been a 'oy havin: pumped up already. it's been a 'oy having you — pumped up already. it's been a 'oy having you on fl pumped up already. it's been a 'oy having you on the d pumped up already. it's been a 'oy having you on the sofa i pumped up already. it's been a 'oy having you on the sofa and i pumped up already. it's been a joy having you on the sofa and enjoy l having you on the sofa and enjoy your time to yourself and chilling as well and good luck when it begins in january. we as well and good luck when it begins injanuary. we have the headlines coming up in a moment.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. a surprise agreement between the usa and china to co—operate over global warming gets a cautious welcome, but activists urge both countries to show greater commitment.
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good morning. can science like this generated locally help change things globally? i'm in hull, a city hoping to be carbon neutral by 2030. we will be asking how scientists and businesses working together and helping that to happen. lives at risk because of unacceptably long ambulance delays of up to nine hours. a warning from paramedics. new figures on waiting times are due out this morning. delegates from the iranian government will be meeting british government will be meeting british government officials here at the foreign office today, and amongst the topics up for discussion, the plight of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, held captive in iran since 2016. it is the 19th day of her husband's hunger strike, we will be talking to richard in half an hour. england's cricketers suffer world cup heartbreak. their hopes of playing in sunday's t—20 final were blown
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away after a dramatic fightback from new zealand in abu dhabi. a fairly cloudy start to the day for many of us, some mist and fog, rain and drizzle around, sunshine is utter privy —— premium today. that will herald the arrival for some heavier rain coming later. although the details later. it's thursday 11th november. our main story. an unexpected agreement between the us and china to co—operate on tackling global warming has received a cautious welcome. the eu and un described the move as encouraging and an important step, but greenpeace said both countries needed to show more commitment. our chief political correspondent adam fleming is in glasgow this morning. you have been following everything that has been going on at cop26. so with cautious brackets around it,
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which is, this announcement is good, the? —— the question is how it might work in practice. the? -- the question is how it might work in practice.— work in practice. yes, that is a very good _ work in practice. yes, that is a very good summary _ work in practice. yes, that is a very good summary of - work in practice. yes, that is a | very good summary of basically work in practice. yes, that is a - very good summary of basically all of the announcements you get at this climate conference. they can sound very good and ambitious but you have to read the small print and then come to a judgment which might be a long way down the line. this agreement between the us and china came as a surprise because people were not expecting it, but at the same time it isn't a surprise because often these events turn on an agreement or a lack of agreement between the world's an agreement or a lack of agreement between the worlds to biggest economies and the two biggest emitters of greenhouse gases. what will matter is what effect this deal has, will it galvanise countries and bring them together in the short term to agree a final deal? and does it marginalise the countries who are opposing the current agreement? and then in the longer term, does this mean that china and the us come
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forward with more ambitious pledges to reduce greenhouse gas emissions? maybe next year or the year after, which is what a lot of campaigners are calling for an scientists say is necessary to limit the in global temperatures —— increase in global temperatures —— increase in global temperatures to 1.5 degrees by the end of the century. that's something we will find out in the next few days and few years. and we also got a bit of a reality check yesterday from borisjohnson the prime minister when he was here for a few hours. he said, this conference cannot and was never going to be able to stop climate change or reverse it, just in two weeks. glasgow is a staging post on the way to other cities in other years, which means this conference might not end with a big bang, let's be honest. �* . ., ~ not end with a big bang, let's be honest. �* . ., ,, , ., , not end with a big bang, let's be honest. �* . . ~' , ., , . unacceptably long waits for ambulances are putting lives at risk. that's according to the college of paramedics. in some cases, people thought to have had strokes
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or heart attacks are waiting hours for help to arrive. the latest figures for england will be published later today but services across the uk are under pressure. the delays that are occurring at the emergency department, for example, are a result of a number of challenges which exist right through health and into social care as well with patients that are ready to go back into the community that hospitals cannot discharge. so there's a number of issues that need to be sorted out. for the next few months, we are focused on getting as much capacity on the street as we can to respond to patients as quickly as possible. the duchess of sussex has apologised to a court for forgetting that she asked a senior aide to brief the authors of a biography about her. she denied intentionally misleading the high court after an appeal heard herformer spokesman provided information to the authors of the book. we can get more on this with megan paterson. good morning. so, what do we know?
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perhaps not surprisingly, this is a story which is filling up social media timelines and across the front pages of many newspaper this morning. the background to this is a earlier this year, the duchess of sussex had a victory against the mail on sunday newspaper, they published a letter between meghan markle and her father and the court ruled it was unlawfully published. the newspaper's lawyers say that should be overturned and part of that letter were possibly intended for public consumption. that's where we are at. the key piece of information which has come into focus today is that previously, the sussex have said they did not brief the authors of a biography called finding freedom, but yesterday we heard evidence from the former communications secretary of the couple who said that the book was directly discussed with the duchess multiple times in person and over
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e—mail so a contrast in the two accounts. the staff member also said that planning meetings had been held with the authors to provide background information, that the duchess had given briefing points to share with them. the duchess has denied that she intentionally misled the high court, she has apologised for forgetting, the high court, she has apologised forforgetting, she the high court, she has apologised for forgetting, she says, the high court, she has apologised forforgetting, she says, that the high court, she has apologised for forgetting, she says, that she had asked a senior aide to brief the authors of a biography, she said she was not clear on what information was not clear on what information was shared. she said she has absolutely no wish or intention to mislead the defendant or the court. this is the latest twist in a long—running and complicated story which does not like it is going to get any more simple or straightforward. official figures show the uk economy grew by 1.3% betweenjuly and september. it's a slowdown compared to the second quarter, when many covid restrictions were lifted. the gdp figures, published by the office for national statistics, show economic output remains weaker than before the pandemic.
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some brilliant pictures to show you now. a french balloonist has broken the world record for standing on a hot—air balloon. i'm not sure he is a balloonist, because he is on top of the balloon, he isn't flying it. the father of the man is flying the balloon. he has broken the world record for standing on a hot—air balloon. i’m standing on a hot-air balloon. i'm very curious _ standing on a hot-air balloon. i'm very curious as — standing on a hot—air balloon. in very curious as to how he got on top of the balloon. i very curious as to how he got on top of the balloon.— of the balloon. i think there was a ro -e of the balloon. i think there was a rope ladder— of the balloon. i think there was a rope ladder involved. _ 28—year—old r mi ouvrard was on top of the balloon over western france at an altitude of more than 3,500 metres. it was piloted by his father for a charity event. he told reporters he experienced a feeling of "zenitude" whilst in the sky. iimagine it i imagine it is like being an astronaut. 3500 metres, altitude, can you be that that attitude? it
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looks like he was wearing a full astronaut suit —— can you breathe at that altitude? bhd astronaut suit -- can you breathe at that altitude?— that altitude? and i think i know who would _ that altitude? and i think i know who would look _ that altitude? and i think i know who would look brilliant - that altitude? and i think i know who would look brilliant doing i that altitude? and i think i know i who would look brilliant doing that. just look this way. that's never going to happen! do you know what, that's never going to happen! do you know what. you _ that's never going to happen! do you know what, you said _ that's never going to happen! do you know what, you said that _ that's never going to happen! do you know what, you said that once - that's never going to happen! do you know what, you said that once when i know what, you said that once when it came to singing, do you remember, singing from a tower? it is it came to singing, do you remember, singing from a tower?— singing from a tower? it is a chari , singing from a tower? it is a charity, carol! _ singing from a tower? it is a charity, carol! oh, - singing from a tower? it is a charity, carol! oh, the - singing from a tower? it is a | charity, carol! oh, the time, singing from a tower? it is a - charity, carol! oh, the time, time to net on charity, carol! oh, the time, time to get on with _ charity, carol! oh, the time, time to get on with the _ charity, carol! oh, the time, time to get on with the weather! - charity, carol! oh, the time, time to get on with the weather! this i to get on with the weather! this morning it is cloudy wherever you are, low cloud, mist and fog. a couple of exceptions where we have some sunshine, but we also have some rain especially later on in the west. starting up across england and wales, a lot of cloud, summerfog, mist and drizzle and patchy rain. northern england, northern ireland and southern scotland is a bit brighter to start with, as is northern scotland. through the day, the weather front producing the rain
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in the south moves northwards, taking it back into northern england and southern scotland. it will cheer up and southern scotland. it will cheer up in the south with some brightness coming through. temperatures today, eight to 15 degrees. the average at the moment is 927 zero —— nine to 11, north to south. tonight, rain coming in, heavy across northern ireland and scotland. the wind is gusting towards the west and shetlands. light arena will cross england and wales through the night, leaving us with a mild night —— lighter rain. that will clear the south—east tomorrow morning, but more heavy rain to come in central and southern scotland and northern england. it is a windy day wherever you are but the winds are easing across central scotland through the day. the brightness is developing in the north, a bit of brightness in the north, a bit of brightness in the south. still mild wherever you are. i am going to lead it out of the studio before you have any more
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wild ideas! it’s the studio before you have any more wild ideas! �* , . ., wild ideas! it's ok, we have the dad ready come — wild ideas! it's ok, we have the dad ready come is _ wild ideas! it's ok, we have the dad ready come is waiting _ wild ideas! it's ok, we have the dad ready come is waiting outside - wild ideas! it's ok, we have the dad ready come is waiting outside the i ready come is waiting outside the studio, he will have a word with you, you are in safe hands, don't worry. i you, you are in safe hands, don't wor . ., ., ., worry. i have nothing to say! exce t, worry. i have nothing to say! except. i'm _ worry. i have nothing to say! except, i'm off, _ worry. i have nothing to say! except, i'm off, i— worry. i have nothing to say! except, i'm off, iwill- worry. i have nothing to say! except, i'm off, i will see i worry. i have nothing to say! | except, i'm off, i will see you worry. i have nothing to say! i except, i'm off, i will see you in half an hour. we will have the sport later on after england got a bit of a drubbing in the cricket, and carol will be back with the weather later on as well. 13 minutes past eight. events will be taking place across the uk today to commemorate those who've died in conflict. remembrance day can be particularly hard for children who have lost a parent who served in the armed forces. our reporterjohn maguire has been meeting some of those who've been helped by a charity set up to support bereaved children and young people dealing with the death of a parent in the military. when sergeant major gary o'donnell, a highly decorated bomb disposal expert, was killed in afghanistan in 2008, his sons, aidan and ben, were aged eight and just nine weeks old.
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well, i think he was just, well, my hero. i think he was kind, generous, you know, he had such an amazing job and was so good at it. i have really fond memories with him, and, yeah, ithink, what would he do in situations in my life? i really looked up to him, i want to be like him. both boys are supported by the charity scotty's little soldiers. we are just with people who know what we're going through, and obviously, we understand them as well so we can help them. it's really good that we get to have those fun times with the people who understand everything that's happened to us and relate to us. scotty's organises everything from christmas parties to bereavement support.
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its main strength is the shared experience of those it helps. families of servicemen and women who have died. knowing there are other people out there makes it better, makes itjust, you can relax a bit, knowing there's other people out there that have gone through the same thing as you, and you can ask advice and give advice and cry with them and laugh with them and they understand you. you just understand each other, it's brilliant. the charity was set up by nikki scott in 2010, after her husband lee, a corporal in the royal tank regiment, was killed in action the year before. he left two young children. kai was five at the time and brooke was just seven months old. when i had to tell kai, i suddenly realised that he'd never experienced the death of anyone before in the family. he really withdrew into himself, but he'd also have horrific nightmares, real trouble sleeping, very clingy. difficulties at school.
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and we were in a military garrison, so he's just really confused with, why is everyone else's daddies coming home from afghan and mine didn't? and the questions were starting to come and come. so i wanted to reach out and get him the best support. on sunday, a group of scotty's families, resplendent in their distinctive striped scarves, willjoin the national remembrance parade at the cenotaph in london. it's the one time of year when the whole country shows that they haven't forgotten. and i wouldn't want it any other way, it's really special, very proud time. but it is up there with the anniversary of lee's death for me personally, it's a really difficult time. but i've finally got children and young people, bereaved children and young people, who experienced the death of a parent on that parade. and that is a very special feeling, when you walk through that parade with those children and you see the crowd just pay respect. two years ago, the first time children had attended the ceremony, ben carried a wreath in his father's memory and this weekend, the boys will return.
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it's about remembering those who have given the ultimate sacrifice. even if it's something little like visiting my dad's plaque, just to show remembrance. but i think it is a tough time, all the memories flood back and we are looking back to not just my dad but all the soldiers that gave their lives. and that does bring back some not so nice memories. many of us will bow our heads on sunday in honour and remembrance of those who died whilst serving their country. some we never met, some we knew. but wearing the black and yellow scarves, the young people whose lives were changed forever. families who support each other and who share a bond forged in the toughest of times. john maguire, bbc news. we're joined now by nikki scott, who set up the charity
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scotty's little soldiers. good morning. good morning. i will sa this good morning. good morning. i will say this very — good morning. good morning. i will say this very openly. _ good morning. good morning. i will say this very openly, i _ good morning. good morning. i will say this very openly, i am _ good morning. good morning. iwill say this very openly, i am in all of what you have done, it really is amazing. life dealt you are really difficult blow and as you say it so clearly, your children, that blow. and though you have responded to it and the mother you have been in the work you're doing for other people, i think it's quite remarkable. did you know you had that strength in you know you had that strength in you to do it that way round? iflat you know you had that strength in you to do it that way round? not at all, you to do it that way round? not at all. people — you to do it that way round? not at all. people always _ you to do it that way round? not at all, people always say, _ you to do it that way round? not at all, people always say, i _ you to do it that way round? not at all, people always say, i would - you to do it that way round? not at all, people always say, i would not| all, people always say, i would not have had the strength to do it. until you are in the situation, you don't know what is going to happen and it is a massive thing, i don't do it on my own, my families and friends at the early stages were incredible with me. i think they thought, here we go, she is clearly grieving, going to set up a charity. people have begun to realise we are doing some important work and it is
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growing. doing some important work and it is ttrowin. . ., , doing some important work and it is ttrowin. .,~ , ., doing some important work and it is i rowint . ., ~' , ., ., growing. take us through the moment when ou growing. take us through the moment when you did — growing. take us through the moment when you did realise _ growing. take us through the moment when you did realise that _ growing. take us through the moment when you did realise that you - growing. take us through the moment when you did realise that you did - when you did realise that you did have this strength in you. your husband lee was taken in afghanistan in 2009. he was killed. what was he like? he looks like a fun guy. exactly like that, always very happy, cheeky, sometimes quite annoying, you know, if he was in the room, you knew he was in the room. just so positive but when he was killed he was 26 and that was one of the things which really got to me. he had so much more to give. i was always the parent that was a serious one, saying, we can't do that, he was like, yes we can! when he died, for a long time it was a very dark but after that i started to think, maybe i should take a leaf out of his book and be, we can do things. he mentioned families, and i think
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it was your cousin who got you to engender that spirit again? she got you out on holiday and it was you seeing your son smile and laugh at you had not seen for a long time, which made you realise, i'm grieving, we are as a family grieving, we are as a family grieving, but children are being affected in so many ways which i hadn't realised before. definitely, completely- _ hadn't realised before. definitely, completely- it _ hadn't realised before. definitely, completely. it was _ hadn't realised before. definitely, completely. it was always - hadn't realised before. definitely, completely. it was always in - hadn't realised before. definitely, completely. it was always in my l hadn't realised before. definitely, - completely. it was always in my mind from the moment i had to tell kai, he was five, brooke was only seven months old, back then my focus was on kai because he was five. na vely, i thought, brooke is a family, she doesn't understand, but i have since learned that no matter how old you are used know something is going on and it will affect your life. kai was my focus and i had a bit of a wake—up call on that holiday, i didn't want to go and i was dreading it but now it was the best thing i could have done. it sounds cheesy but i had that moment where i thought, how many bereaved children
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who suffered the death of the parent are being supported? i saw a glimpse of the old kai on that holiday laughing with his cousins and ijust realised how badly he had been coping over the last few months. you know the ebb — coping over the last few months. you know the ebb and flow of grief more than anyone else and you mentioned a moment ago, not knowing when it is going to strike them. and kids are remarkable in some ways in the way they deal with things and then there will be times with things when out of the blue, something will occur which can take them right back, it could be at any age. i know you work with older youngsters, 18 plus now. because they can appear ok and then... what have you seen which has made you realise that? i then. .. what have you seen which has made you realise that?— made you realise that? i have learned so — made you realise that? i have learned so much _ made you realise that? i have learned so much on _ made you realise that? i have learned so much on this - made you realise that? i have i learned so much on this journey, made you realise that? i have - learned so much on this journey, i call it myjourney. from my own children's experience but meeting the other children and young people, just how it doesn't matter how old you are when your parent dies, or how long it has been, there will be
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times in a child and young person's life when it affects you. that's the amazing thing about the charity, we are always there and rebuild that trust. when the tough times come, it's easy to get in touch with a semi can do the emotional and specialist support. we —— get in touch with us and we can do the emotional and says specialist support. it even 18—year—olds who are going up and starting their own families, it can even affect them. the work that you do, sometimes those children will be close to the age when their parents died, which can be significant in itself. massively, yes. every child is different, and they grieve differently, and bereavement like you say will hit them at different stages. ijust think it's acknowledging that it doesn't matter when you grieve. you are in this on your own journey, when you grieve. you are in this on your ownjourney, there is no right or wrong and i think that's really
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important. i remember kai, we were having a normal day shopping in tesco and he saw the yoghurt is that dad used to eat and that would start him off. and you are like, i'm in the middle of tesco, are we going to do this right here? but i think, if you want to talk about this now, we will talk about that now. good you want to talk about this now, we will talk about that now.— will talk about that now. good on ou. will talk about that now. good on you- what _ will talk about that now. good on you- what is _ will talk about that now. good on you. what is remembrance - will talk about that now. good on you. what is remembrance day, | will talk about that now. good on - you. what is remembrance day, this period of time, it's so significant... all morning i have been watching that film, you are part of that, and reading what happened to you, it's an area that we just don't happened to you, it's an area that wejust don't think happened to you, it's an area that we just don't think about in general. how do you as a family cope around now? who do you get your children and other children to talk to? �* , ., , , children and other children to talk to? �*, , to? it's massive, remembrance is hue. to? it's massive, remembrance is huge- for— to? it's massive, remembrance is huge. for bereaved _ to? it's massive, remembrance is huge. for bereaved forces - to? it's massive, remembrance is. huge. for bereaved forces families, this is the time of year when we remember, we remember every day, but this is the time and the whole country stops to pay respects and that means more than i can put into
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words. 50 that means more than i can put into words. " ,, ., that means more than i can put into words. ., ,, that means more than i can put into words. " ., ,, ., words. so 11 o'clock on sunday, what will that mean? _ words. so 11 o'clock on sunday, what will that mean? everything, - words. so 11 o'clock on sunday, what will that mean? everything, really, i will that mean? everything, really, to see people _ will that mean? everything, really, to see people stop _ will that mean? everything, really, to see people stop and _ will that mean? everything, really, to see people stop and remember. j to see people stop and remember. when you speak to the children, i spoke to a few of our 12—year—old on a podcast recently and they were incredible, and they say that just seeing someone take that two minutes means they have not been forgotten. they are remembering everyone who made those sacrifices. i think the key for us is, as amazing as it is and it is so important to world war i and to, and the people that lost their lives there, and history are so important, but also remembering that it still young children today and that is key. —— it still impacts young people today. isafe and that is key. -- it still impacts young people today-— and that is key. -- it still impacts young people today. we are seeing those scarves. _ young people today. we are seeing those scarves, that _ young people today. we are seeing those scarves, that such _ young people today. we are seeing those scarves, that such a - young people today. we are seeing those scarves, that such a good i young people today. we are seeing. those scarves, that such a good idea because it is a visual sign of what you are doing and it's solidarity. such a great idea, people will see those at events today and know what it means. , . , , , it means. yes, and it brings us toaether it means. yes, and it brings us together as — it means. yes, and it brings us together as a _ it means. yes, and it brings us together as a community - it means. yes, and it brings us together as a community and i it means. yes, and it brings us - together as a community and that's really important in the military
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because you lose that. so be able to bring them back together and be that military community is important. didn't you say that lots of children are drawing them now, feeling that solidarity? are drawing them now, feeling that solidari ? , , ., , solidarity? they seem to be quite iconic. solidarity? they seem to be quite iconic- i'm _ solidarity? they seem to be quite iconic. i'm sure _ solidarity? they seem to be quite iconic. i'm sure it _ solidarity? they seem to be quite iconic. i'm sure it is _ solidarity? they seem to be quite iconic. i'm sure it is not... - solidarity? they seem to be quite iconic. i'm sure it is not... that i iconic. i'm sure it is not... that the veil iconic. i'm sure it is not. .. that the veil of— iconic. i'm sure it is not... that the veil of death _ iconic. i'm sure it is not... that the veil of death and _ iconic. i'm sure it is not... that the veil of death and grief - iconic. i'm sure it is not... that the veil of death and grief can i iconic. i'm sure it is not... that i the veil of death and grief can be so isolating. when you have got something who, you can see someone else is going through the, nothing to be ashamed about, because i'm sad and i missed my loved one but someone else is going to it as well, that helps. as much as adults talk to you, you need to know that someone else get it who you can talk to who is your age.— to who is your age. exactly. sometimes _ to who is your age. exactly. sometimes through - to who is your age. exactly. sometimes through no - to who is your age. exactly. | sometimes through no fault to who is your age. exactly. i sometimes through no fault of to who is your age. exactly. - sometimes through no fault of their own, young children get forgotten. that is why the parade on sunday is such an amazing thing, to be able to give them the opportunity to march in honour of their parent, and for the country to see them. ijust think it's incredible, it's overwhelming, and needs emotional time —— it is an emotional time but
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such a proud time. if people can do the two—minute silence today and sunday, that means so much to bereaved forces children and young people. bereaved forces children and young --eole. ~ , , ., bereaved forces children and young heole.. , people. where is your scarf? i thou~ht people. where is your scarf? i thought you — people. where is your scarf? i thought you might _ people. where is your scarf? i thought you might have - people. where is your scarf? i thought you might have it - people. where is your scarf? i thought you might have it on. | people. where is your scarf? i | thought you might have it on. i nearly did, i thought i would save it for sunday when i am with all the children and young people. goad it for sunday when i am with all the children and young people. good for ou! thank children and young people. good for you! thank you _ children and young people. good for you! thank you very _ children and young people. good for you! thank you very much. - time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. london will fall silent today in remembrance of those who've lost their lives in war. the duchess of cornwall, will attend westmister abbey later to pay her respects. earlier this week she visited the poppy factory in richmond upon thames. one wreath, which has already been carried around the uk, will travel up the thames before being taken onboard hms belfast and on to the tower of london. meanwhile leyton orient�*s become the first football club to commemorate its fallen from the first world war with their own memorial. the club, then known as clapton orient,
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were the first to sign up en masse to fight in 191a. the memorial was unveiled by former players peter kitchen and dean smith at a ceremony at the national memorial arboreetum in staffordshire. the first world war and the second world war and the history of it all means a lot to my family, so we are here today and living the life that we live for those who have gave theirs up. nhs figures suggest bromley could lose 170 care home workers who are yet to have a second covid jab. under government rules, from today all care home staff must be double vaccinated. figures suggest more than a00 carers in south east london are yet to have theirjabs. uber�*s putting up its prices by 10 per cent in london from today — and even more for some airport trips — to try and attract more drivers. the company says demand's risen by 20 per cent since we came out of lockdown, leading to longer waiting times, and it needs 20,000 more drivers to help get
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service back to normal. let's take a look at how the tube is running this morning. there's been a signal failure affecting tfl rail and there are currently severe delays between hayes & harlington and paddington. and you can get travel updates on your bbc local radio station with all the latest information throughout the morning. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. yesterday was a very grey and murky day with a few outbreaks of light, patchy rain and drizzle at times, courtesy of a weather front that is still with us today. so it's another very grey start to the morning, plenty of cloud around and temperatures are in double figures. it's a very mild start. we will keep those layers of cloud as we head through the day and most of us should stay dry but i wouldn't rule out the possibility of spots of drizzle falling from the thickness of the cloud at times, particularly over the higher ground. but there should be some breaks in the cloud developing as we head through the afternoon, especially towards south—eastern
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areas of the capital as we start to see the weather front push northwards again. the southwesterly wind stays light and top temperatures peak at 13 or 1a celsius. the wind starts to strengthen overnight tonight and again it should stay mostly dry, a lot of cloud and a mild start to the day tomorrow. we could see early brightness tomorrow morning in eastern areas for a time but then showery outbreaks of rain and a strengthening south—westerly wind. quite a blustery day but there will be brighter spells on friday through the afternoon and it's a mostly dry weekend to follow, just feeling slightly cooler. there's more from me in half an hour and lots more stories on our website too. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 'morning live' follows us on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's in store
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with kimberly and gethin. coming up on morning live, as we've been hearing on breakfast it's armistice day and we're paying tribute to our fallen heroes by meeting the people helping to keep their memory alive by giving precious war photos a new lease of life using ground—breaking technology. it's rather like the legend has come to life _ it's rather like the legend has come to life. ~ , , it's rather like the legend has come to life. ~ , ., to life. absolutely remarkable technology- — we'll see how the amazing process works and why it means so much to their families. we'll also hear the incredible war memories of two extraordinary sisters who served their country during world war two by taking on top—secret code—breaking missions. also today, it impacts half of men over 50 and millions of women too. dr xand's breaking the taboo of talking about hair loss. that's right. reports claim we are in a silent — that's right. reports claim we are in a silent hair loss crisis. i will tell you — in a silent hair loss crisis. i will tell you why— in a silent hair loss crisis. i will tell you why stress and even covid could _ tell you why stress and even covid could be _ tell you why stress and even covid could be to — tell you why stress and even covid could be to blame in hair loss for both— could be to blame in hair loss for both men— could be to blame in hair loss for both men and women and explaining what you _
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both men and women and explaining what you can do to treat it. plus, mark lane shows us how you can takejust one plant and clone it over and over again forfree — it's really easy to do — costs nothing and can make great gifts for your friends and family too. and she's topped the music charts, and now her cookbook — full of her family's favourite recipes — has become a best—seller! rochelle humes shares her secret to cooking the perfect roast potato. we need to know that. especially for breakfast. we'll see you at 9.15. i have no arguments with that at all. thanks, guys. carroll will bring us up to date with the weather in 15 minutes. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, who's been held in iran since 2016, after being accused of spying, is on the 19th day of his hunger strike. richard ratcliffe is hoping the british government will push for his wife's release when diplomats meet iranian officials later today. tim muffett has this recap of the story so far. in 2016, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was about to board a plane with her
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one—year—old daughter when she was stopped and arrested at the airport. she had been visiting family in iran but authorities there accused of plotting to overthrow the government. she has always denied the allegations, but was sentenced to five years in prison. two years ago, under then foreign secretary jeremy hunt, she was given diplomatic protection making her case a formal legal dispute between the uk and in iran. last year, during the pandemic, she was allowed to stay with her parents in iran but her movements were severely restricted. her sentence ended in march, butjust one month later, she was given an additional one—year jail term, accused of spreading propaganda. she lost an appeal last month and could be sent back to jail at any time. it's now been two years since she has seen her daughter, gabriella. her husband, richard, has devoted himself to securing her freedom. in 2019, hejoined nazanin
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on a 15—day hunger strike. now he's doing it again, and this time he's already on day 19. our correspondent, tim muffett, is with richard outside the foreign office this morning. yes, good morning to you, and richard, it's nice to speak to you. first question, the 19th day of your hunger strike. first question, the 19th day of your hunger strike-— first question, the 19th day of your hunger strike. how are you? feeling ok. hunger strike. how are you? feeling 0k- definitely _ hunger strike. how are you? feeling ok. definitely weaker. _ hunger strike. how are you? feeling ok. definitely weaker. i'm _ hunger strike. how are you? feeling ok. definitely weaker. i'm not- hunger strike. how are you? feeling ok. definitely weaker. i'm not up. 0k. definitely weaker. i'm not up much _ 0k. definitely weaker. i'm not up much on — ok. definitely weaker. i'm not up much on my— 0k. definitely weaker. i'm not up much on my feet, mostly sitting down and the _ much on my feet, mostly sitting down and the weather is a bit milder, so not feeling — and the weather is a bit milder, so not feeling cold so much. i'm definitely— not feeling cold so much. i'm definitely in the last two days at this point— definitely in the last two days at this point but still going on. today. _ this point but still going on. today, delegates from the iranian government will be meeting british government will be meeting british government officials. what, realistically, are you hoping for? i guess i'm hoping for substantive movement on two points. one, we hope to hear— movement on two points. one, we hope to hear what— movement on two points. one, we hope to hear what has happened where
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nazanin _ to hear what has happened where nazanin is — to hear what has happened where nazanin is being held and have the british— nazanin is being held and have the british comic reached agreement with the iranians? just british comic reached agreement with the iranians?— the iranians? just to clarify this is money owed _ the iranians? just to clarify this is money owed to _ the iranians? just to clarify this is money owed to iran - the iranians? just to clarify this is money owed to iran from - the iranians? just to clarify thisj is money owed to iran from the 19705. it is money owed to iran from the 19705. , ., ., , , 19705. it is a long-running dispute that predates _ 19705. it is a long-running dispute that predates us _ 19705. it is a long-running dispute that predates us by _ 19705. it is a long-running dispute that predates us by a _ 19705. it is a long-running dispute that predates us by a long - 19705. it is a long-running dispute that predates us by a long way - 19705. it is a long-running dispute j that predates us by a long way and that predates us by a long way and that is— that predates us by a long way and that is why— that predates us by a long way and that is why nazanin was picked up and was _ that is why nazanin was picked up and was told bluntly by interrogators that that is why she is being _ interrogators that that is why she is being held and the prime minister promised _ is being held and the prime minister promised to pay it when he was foreign— promised to pay it when he was foreign secretary. the second thing is to hear— foreign secretary. the second thing is to hear that the government is trying _ is to hear that the government is trying to— is to hear that the government is trying to bring british citizens home — trying to bring british citizens home and not link us to the americans and it'sjust home and not link us to the americans and it's just a simple process— americans and it's just a simple process to — americans and it's just a simple process to get a same scene. americans and it'sjust a simple process to get a same scene. you've soken process to get a same scene. you've spoken about — process to get a same scene. you've spoken about the _ process to get a same scene. you've spoken about the many _ process to get a same scene. you've spoken about the many false - process to get a same scene. you've spoken about the many false dawns| spoken about the many false dawns you've been through in this arduous process. are you realistically hope for there could be good news today? i am cautious. we've had so many ups and downs _ i am cautious. we've had so many ups and downs. the reason we are camping here is— and downs. the reason we are camping here is because we are on the precipice _ here is because we are on the precipice of her being a new sentence _ precipice of her being a new sentence and she could be back in
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prison— sentence and she could be back in prison and — sentence and she could be back in prison and i'm not hopeful but it's good _ prison and i'm not hopeful but it's good news — prison and i'm not hopeful but it's good news that the iranian deputy foreign— good news that the iranian deputy foreign minister is here and it's good _ foreign minister is here and it's good that— foreign minister is here and it's good that he is meeting ministers and let's— good that he is meeting ministers and let's hope there is a breakthrough.— and let's hope there is a breakthrou:h. . ,., , and let's hope there is a breakthrou:h. . ., breakthrough. have you spoken to our wife breakthrough. have you spoken to your wife recently, _ breakthrough. have you spoken to your wife recently, and _ breakthrough. have you spoken to your wife recently, and how - breakthrough. have you spoken to your wife recently, and how is - breakthrough. have you spoken to| your wife recently, and how is she? i spoke to her yesterday evening. i am nervous, — i spoke to her yesterday evening. i am nervous, worried as much about being _ am nervous, worried as much about being on— am nervous, worried as much about being on hunger strike as she is about— being on hunger strike as she is about being in prison. she can follow— about being in prison. she can follow on _ about being in prison. she can follow on social media all of the care and — follow on social media all of the care and support she has had from around _ care and support she has had from around the — care and support she has had from around the country, so we are deeply appreciative — around the country, so we are deeply appreciative of all that care and strength— appreciative of all that care and strength but these are worrying times — strength but these are worrying times. ., ., , , times. you mentioned the support, and a lot of— times. you mentioned the support, and a lot of people _ times. you mentioned the support, and a lot of people have _ times. you mentioned the support, and a lot of people have come - times. you mentioned the support, and a lot of people have come up i times. you mentioned the support, | and a lot of people have come up to you in the last week or so here will stop how important has the support been for you?— stop how important has the support been for ou? , , ., been for you? hugely. the number of lovely people — been for you? hugely. the number of lovely people we _ been for you? hugely. the number of lovely people i've met _ been for you? hugely. the number of lovely people i've met who _ been for you? hugely. the number of lovely people i've met who have - been for you? hugely. the number of| lovely people i've met who have come and people _ lovely people i've met who have come and people who wanted to just come down _ and people who wanted to just come down they— and people who wanted to just come down they were thinking of you. and i've down they were thinking of you. and we had _ down they were thinking of you. and i've had people come and pray with us, and _ i've had people come and pray with us, and the — i've had people come and pray with us, and the high and mighty from the house _ us, and the high and mighty from the house of— us, and the high and mighty from the house of lords and lots of mps, but
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'ust house of lords and lots of mps, but just lots— house of lords and lots of mps, but just lots of— house of lords and lots of mps, but just lots of lovely people from all walks _ just lots of lovely people from all walks of — just lots of lovely people from all walks of life, and that level of support — walks of life, and that level of support and care, just knowing you are not— support and care, just knowing you are not alone, it'sjust support and care, just knowing you are not alone, it's just amazing. this— are not alone, it's just amazing. this is— are not alone, it's just amazing. this is not— are not alone, it's just amazing. this is not your first hunger strike. you went 15 days without food two years ago. i cannot begin to imagine how hard it is. is this a tougher process you have gone through this time? this tougher process you have gone through this time?— through this time? this is definitely _ through this time? this is definitely a _ through this time? this is definitely a tougher- through this time? this is l definitely a tougher process through this time? this is - definitely a tougher process partly because _ definitely a tougher process partly because the weather is much colder and i_ because the weather is much colder and i can— because the weather is much colder and i can feel the cold on hunger strike _ and i can feel the cold on hunger strike i— and i can feel the cold on hunger strike. i don't think i am planning on being — strike. i don't think i am planning on being a — strike. i don't think i am planning on being a serial hunger striker. this— on being a serial hunger striker. this will— on being a serial hunger striker. this will be _ on being a serial hunger striker. this will be the last one i will do but hopefully it gets over the message. but hopefully it gets over the messate. ~ . but hopefully it gets over the message-— but hopefully it gets over the messate.~ . , ., message. what is your message to the british government _ message. what is your message to the british government officials _ message. what is your message to the british government officials today - british government officials today who will be speaking to the iranian delegates? i who will be speaking to the iranian dele . ates? , who will be speaking to the iranian deleaates? , ., , who will be speaking to the iranian deleaates? , ~' , ., delegates? i 'ust think they need to be reall delegates? i just think they need to be really clear. _ delegates? i just think they need to be really clear. it's _ delegates? i just think they need to be really clear. it's really _ delegates? i just think they need to be really clear. it's really simple i be really clear. it's really simple at this— be really clear. it's really simple at this point what the issues are in the case _ at this point what the issues are in the case of— at this point what the issues are in the case of nazanin and i would like them _ the case of nazanin and i would like them to— the case of nazanin and i would like them to be — the case of nazanin and i would like them to be frank and straight with them to be frank and straight with the iranian— them to be frank and straight with the iranian authorities and get a breakthrough.— the iranian authorities and get a breakthrough. the iranian authorities and get a breakthrou:h. . . . ~' ., breakthrough. richard, thank you for talkin: us breakthrough. richard, thank you for talking us ? — breakthrough. richard, thank you for talking us ? to _ breakthrough. richard, thank you for talking us ? to us _ breakthrough. richard, thank you for talking us ? to us today _ breakthrough. richard, thank you for talking us ? to us today and - breakthrough. richard, thank you for talking us ? to us today and best - breakthrough. richard, thank you for talking us ? to us today and best of i talking us ? to us today and best of
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luck. so a message from richard that is clear to the british government, he wants there to be specific clarity as to what it is that he wants them to say and there is hope that there will be good news but as richard mentioned there have been false dawns before, so a sense of realism. we've been talking lots about how countries around the world will tackle climate change — but individuals cities and regions in the uk, will also have their part to play. we've seen the commitment between the us and china with that surprise announcement.— the us and china with that surprise announcement. ~ �* , ., announcement. we've been examining that as well- — announcement. we've been examining that as well. one _ announcement. we've been examining that as well. one of _ announcement. we've been examining that as well. one of the _ announcement. we've been examining that as well. one of the things - that as well. one of the things people have been conjuring a lot with during cop26 is how there are very big decision is made between countries and we've heard some of those between the us and china but we also had the decisions made in
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your home which are the micro elements and then there are issues around the cities, the environment you live in. if you've been watching this morning, nina has been in hull for us, and the idea is that lots of cities are being told how they can contribute to climate change and bringing down emissions. one of the cities that has been in the focus is hull and someone who is a big character isjohn prescott. angie would have heard that he had the nickname, and he has changed, so he's been talking to zoe conway about how and why and to what end. if you want to seejohn prescott get passionate, get him to talk about the humber estuary. we can develop new estuaries with new technology. think about the power, the growth, the energy. he had a stroke two years ago. his words get jumbled. he struggles at times to follow a conversation. but, he has not lost his pride in the city he represented
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as an mp for 37 years. and he's not lost his use of blunt language. it's the only bloody answer. as deputy prime minister, john prescott was perhaps better known as a gas guzzler than an environmentalist. his love ofjaguar cars earned him the nickname two jags. and he once justified using a car 200 yards by saying his wife pauline didn't like having her hair blown about. but, he was also responsible for the government's climate change policy and he was the european union's lead negotiator at the kyoto climate change conference in 1997. lord prescott, you were the mp here for four decades. this is an incredibly important part of the world for you. what does it mean to you to see the transformation here at the estuary? the estuary is critical. i've always argued for it. i was a seaman and sailed on the ships. but now you don't see
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the fish trawlers in, now the new industry is at the estuary. the humber estuary is a place of great change. whilst it's still very polluted, its heavy industry is responsible for 5% of all uk carbon emissions, it's cleaning up its act. just off the coast is the world's biggest offshore wind farm and they are investing in pioneering green technology. it's about a future built on the estuary. you begin to tell yourself it's the only major one in the country. it's future, its future, its future. round the estuary, and by god, they are well on their way. lord prescott wants the world's estuaries to follow humber�*s lead and he will be making that argument at the cop26 climate change conference in glasgow this week. i think it's reallyjust unfinished business after kyoto in 1997, then going on to paris and now we are into glasgow as well. a lot of the things that he wanted
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to achieve, which they only managed 40 odd countries in kyoto, now you've got over 200 countries and i think he wants to show us the humber, and its estuary, and estuaries are some of the most polluted regions in the world could actually be the answer to climate change if we can decarbonise. it's driven him for years, even if it was before he had the stroke. it's something that drives him still. he wants to be there and make the case. at papa's fish and chips, john prescott might as well be back on the campaign trail, smiling for the cameras. perfect portion of chips. he's here to learn about how papa's, the biggest fish and chip shop in the world, has been cutting its carbon emissions. and we are reusing everything we can to make it the most i efficient process possible. the company says it has halved its gas bill by using an 80% more energy efficient fryer. whilst the fat they use is turned into biodiesel, and the potatoes come from just a few miles away. there you go.
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looks ready, beautiful bit of fish. pop it in here, john. there we go. john prescott promises that from now on all his fish and chips will be low carbon. but he's also made an even bigger announcement this week. he's sold his jaguar. so, time to call him zero jags. professor dan parsons will be escorting lord prescott to the cop26 conference, just as hejoined him at a climate summit three years ago. what's it like to be in the room with him? he is just so connected with everybody. he knows everyone. you are walking down the corridor in cop2a in poland, walking down the corridor, everybody�*s there and you say, "who is that, john?" and he says, "that's the leader of the chinese delegation, i've known him for years." and then the leader of the swedish delegation. he just knows everybody and is so well connected. probably when you ask most people what they think aboutjohn prescott, they will say two jags. it sounds like you think
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that is a bit of a shame. it is a big shame, because his role in climate change, bringing climate science that i work on and bringing that to policy, he's been instrumental in that and in securing these kind of international agreements. john prescott may be a little unsteady on his feet, butjust look at his sense of wonder as he explores the conference hall. his family knows how much it means to him to be in glasgow, which is why his wife pauline doesn't mind too much that he's missing their 60th wedding anniversary. zoe conway, bbc news. for excuses to miss an anniversary, it is one. interesting to see his journey, going right back. we are talking about hull and that is where nina is this morning. lovely to see you. i've seen so many creative things there, things are being made
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in glass boxes and i'm amazed they have let you touch whatever that bit of equipment is as well. irla have let you touch whatever that bit of equipment is as well.— of equipment is as well. no one is more surprised _ of equipment is as well. no one is more surprised than _ of equipment is as well. no one is more surprised than i _ of equipment is as well. no one is more surprised than i am - of equipment is as well. no one is more surprised than i am that - of equipment is as well. no one is more surprised than i am that i'vej more surprised than i am that i've been trusted with this, but have a look. this is what they are doing in hull and east riding. they are trying to be carbon neutral as well as they can, so under this roof we have scientists working closely with businesses because it's no good having having a great idea without having having a great idea without having a business to help it on and there's no point businesses being ambition without the idea behind them, so these electronic boards, you have one in your mobile phone, and your car, your vacuum cleaner and your car, your vacuum cleaner and instead of importing them from asia, they make them in—house. no carbon footprint so all of the gadgets used in our made in house and we can make brian ? meet brian. explain what you are doing. can you lift it out so we can have a look. the important thing about that is question that we can do it here, locally and cheaper and more
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sustainably. because hull is aiming high. they are hoping that by 2030, 20 years ahead of the national target, they will be carbon neutral. they are using hydrogen for heating, for example and processing waste to create energy and they have started ideas around carbon capture which is the future of neutralising the air. of course there is the hornsey project you might have heard of, the worlds largest offshore wind farm and it will generate enough energy for1 million homes, isn't that amazing? and businesses are already doing their bit and hull and the humber, a quarter already say they are acting to reduce emissions but this place is completely unique in bringing together businesses with scientists and in here you will have a look at the microscopes, because on the left you have a tea bag and next week the tea leaves, and it shows you the power of microscopes and lewies will tell us why they are
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so useful. ., ., ., , so useful. you might, for example imort so useful. you might, for example import some _ so useful. you might, for example import some bolts _ so useful. you might, for example import some bolts and _ so useful. you might, for example import some bolts and you - so useful. you might, for example import some bolts and you need i so useful. you might, for example| import some bolts and you need to check— import some bolts and you need to check their— import some bolts and you need to check their integrity, so you can put them — check their integrity, so you can put them under this very powerful microscope and check there aren't any faults— microscope and check there aren't any faults in the metal. and microscope and check there aren't any faults in the metal.— microscope and check there aren't any faults in the metal. and you can swa out any faults in the metal. and you can swap out non-biodegradable - any faults in the metal. and you can | swap out non-biodegradable matter. swap out non—biodegradable matter. some of these machines here, one of the scientists are working on them, and you _ the scientists are working on them, and you can — the scientists are working on them, and you can understand the composition and maybe some of the compositions are not biodegradable, so you _ compositions are not biodegradable, so you could look at replacing them with plastics made from plants which is what _ with plastics made from plants which is what my— with plastics made from plants which is what my colleague is working on. one of— is what my colleague is working on. one of the — is what my colleague is working on. one of the things that might get in the way for business and i know you spoken with more than 600 of them, is that we want to do better but we don't know how.— is that we want to do better but we don't know how. what are you saying to them? lyu — don't know how. what are you saying to them? lyu there _ don't know how. what are you saying to them? lyu there are _ don't know how. what are you saying to them? lyu there are a _ don't know how. what are you saying to them? lyu there are a lot - don't know how. what are you saying to them? lyu there are a lot of- to them? lyu there are a lot of businesses who have ten or fewer people and they don't have spare capacity to be thinking thoughts about what i'm going to do. there are small things they can do and they can talk to us about that but we can put them together with some
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of the companies that are doing innovative stuff like this company, and innovation creates innovation, so bringing them together in this space here helps with that and moving forward and making steps into the net zero journey, moving forward and making steps into the net zerojourney, because moving forward and making steps into the net zero journey, because we have to do something. absolutely, louise, and the big sticking point for small and medium—sized businesses is making the initial investment, the outlay that might seem expensive in the first place but pays off long term. financially, as well as in terms of your carbon footprint, so lots of people looking to cop26 wrapping up and asking what is tangible and what good will come. the truth is we won't know for a generation or so but as everybody here has been saying, we have to try our bit. wejust here has been saying, we have to try our bit. we just have to say a quick good morning to pauline prescott who is watching this morning and said to husband, off you go to cop26 and i will allow you to miss our wedding anniversary. all in, you are far
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more generous than i. isafe anniversary. all in, you are far more generous than i.- anniversary. all in, you are far more generous than i. we did notice that from that _ more generous than i. we did notice that from that report _ more generous than i. we did notice that from that report earlier. - that from that report earlier. certain things are important. it’s certain things are important. it's been his certain things are important. it�*s been his lifelong passion as you heard about, part of securing the kyoto deal and he is making his face and voice heard at the moment. ii’klile. and voice heard at the moment. nina, lad and voice heard at the moment. nina, alad ou and voice heard at the moment. nina, glad you didn't — and voice heard at the moment. nina, glad you didn't break _ and voice heard at the moment. nina, glad you didn't break anything. see you soon. my kizzire with the sport. have you still got ? mike is here with the sport. he have you still got ? mike is here with the sport.— have you still got ? mike is here with the sport. have you still got ? mike is here with the sort. ., , with the sport. he was reminding me to do the new _ with the sport. he was reminding me to do the new yorker, _ with the sport. he was reminding me to do the new yorker, a _ with the sport. he was reminding me to do the new yorker, a move - with the sport. he was reminding me to do the new yorker, a move and i with the sport. he was reminding me j to do the new yorker, a move and he remembers the fingers. it is very rare to find an athlete still at the peak of their form with a chance to win more medals going into something like strictly and being so honest and open about the pain he went through, which was really surprising although he did do the best lifts
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i've ever seen.— although he did do the best lifts i've ever seen. how quickly things can change _ i've ever seen. how quickly things can change in _ i've ever seen. how quickly things can change in the _ i've ever seen. how quickly things can change in the t20 _ i've ever seen. how quickly things can change in the t20 cricket, - i've ever seen. how quickly things can change in the t20 cricket, thej can change in the t20 cricket, the shortest format of the game, and i suppose england fans, hence the sad face and england fans will look at the old traditional test format, the ashes, and in the test version you can have a bad over and recover the next day you can make up free and sleep on it in the t20 cricket, one over cost england the semifinal. england were reminded of how quickly the tables can turn in t20 cricket as their place on sundays world cup final was snatched away dramatically by new zealand because england had looked on course to keep alive the hopes of adding the t20 title to the 50 over trophy and they made 166—a, not bad and had new zealand on the ropes and their reply but needing an unlikely 57 runs off the last 2a
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balls, jimmy neesham channelled all of the hurt he felt from when his team lost to england in the 50 over final and smashed his team back into it. three sixes and finishing the job was daryl mitchell who made an unbeaten 72 as they broke england hearts. igrate unbeaten 72 as they broke england hearts. ~ . ., , ., unbeaten 72 as they broke england hearts. . ., ., , ., ., unbeaten 72 as they broke england hearts. ~ . ., , ., ., , unbeaten 72 as they broke england hearts. ~ . ., ., , ., hearts. we are devastated to be on the mom hearts. we are devastated to be on the wrong side _ hearts. we are devastated to be on the wrong side of _ hearts. we are devastated to be on the wrong side of a _ hearts. we are devastated to be on the wrong side of a close _ hearts. we are devastated to be on the wrong side of a close game - hearts. we are devastated to be on l the wrong side of a close game which is not easy to take. i thought we fought unbelievably well today on a wicket that didn't necessarily suit our batting, but we managed to post a par score and we were brilliant with the ball. next to a remarkable story, in football, from paris saint germain. where one of the club's female players, aminata diallo, has been arrested by french police, as part of an investigation, into an attack on her team—mates, earlier this month. reports in france suggest that one
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of the assaulted players, well paris saint germain said in a statement: andy murray back in action after doing so well in stockholm and into the quarterfinals, and watch this space at aston villa as they are stepping up their attempts to lure steven gerrard to aston villa. mada; steven gerrard to aston villa. away from rangers- _ steven gerrard to aston villa. away from rangers. could _ steven gerrard to aston villa. away from rangers. could developments in the next 2a hours. i promised we would have more of carroll before the end of the programme and we can deliver. good morning. some of us starting with sunshine this morning and there is this beautiful weather watchers picture taken, but some of us are under a lot of cloud, there are some mist and fog around and as you can see from this weather watchers picture taken in lincolnshire. the forecast
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is mostly cloudy but for all of us, if you started on a chilly note, it's going to be a mild day. what is happening is we have two week weather fronts and pressure coming in from the atlantic with rain coming in and one look at the isobars tells you with the rain, the wind will strengthen. a lot of cloud across parts of england and wales with spots of rain, some drizzle, bright skies across the north of scotland which will be eradicated by cloud pushing north and through the afternoon, more rain arrives across northern ireland, southern scotland and also north west england. coming south, after a cloudy start, we see one or two brighter breaks, maybe some sunshine in the far south and also into the channel islands. temperatures today are above average for the time of year and we are looking between eight and 15 degrees, and the averages roughly,
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north to south, between nine and 11. so this evening and overnight the winds strengthen and then in comes the rain, heavy across northern ireland and scotland and you can see the tail end moving across england and wales but that will be lighter but it will be windy, especially with the exposure in the west and also across shetland. temperatures tonight falling away between six and 11, so the most another mild night. tomorrow we pick up the light rain, moving east, clearing the south—east and then behind that we are back to brighter skies, and then behind that we are back to brighterskies, but and then behind that we are back to brighter skies, but further heavy rain across central and southern scotland and also northern england and it will be another windy day, but as the centre of the low pressure pushes across central scotland, the wind will ease. temperatures, ten in the north down to 15 in the south. into saturday, brisk winds along the east to start and they will ease through the day but we can still see spots of rain in the far south—east but a ridge of
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high pressure builds in and it will settle things down. as you can see there will be a lot of cloud around and any sunshine will be at a premium but it will still be mild with temperatures between 11 and 15 degrees. later it looks on sunday that we might see rain coming in across the north—west but on sunday, for most, it will be dry and a fair bit of cloud, a little bit of sunshine here and there, but mild foremost for the time of year, 11 to 13 although temperatures slipping a bit compared to the next couple of days. walter tull was not only one of the first black footballers in england, but one of the first black officers to command white soldiers in battle. he lost his life in 1918 on the battlefields of flanders. today, he will be remembered through a poem reading by former eastenders actor nicholas bailey at the cenotaph just after 11 o'clock.
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nickjoins us now. nick joins nickjoins us now, good morning and thanks for talking to us on breakfast. just talk to us about walter tull, breakfast. just talk to us about waltertull, because breakfast. just talk to us about walter tull, because he was someone you found out about quite a while ago and it's a story you refused to let go of. ago and it's a story you refused to let at) of. , , ago and it's a story you refused to letaoof. ,, , let go of. this is true. everybody, many people _ let go of. this is true. everybody, many people know _ let go of. this is true. everybody, many people know about - let go of. this is true. everybody, many people know about walter i let go of. this is true. everybody, - many people know about walter today but when i first discovered his story in 1998, hardly anyone had heard of him. i was reading a newspaper and there was a memorial football match at tottenham hotspur, so i reached out to walter's primary historian and biographer, and from then on we spent four years researching his life together and we thought it might make a great film script, but ever since, walter has become a centralfigure, a real figure of distinction in general
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british history, notjust around the war, but over diversity, inclusion and triumph over adversity. he was orphaned before the age of ten and became the first black outfield footballer to play for tottenham hotspur. he played for clapton, northampton town and was the first sportsperson to enlist in the british expeditionary force in 191a and black people were not allowed to be in the war, it was illegal in terms of military law for black people to serve, but he became a second lieutenant. he was commissioned in 1917 and was decorated and lost his life in the second battle of the somme. he was an exceptional human being but a great man, in any era and he deserves to be remembered, so it's great now to be speaking his name at the cenotaph as a guest of the western front association. i am so privileged to be here. has western front association. i am so privileged to be here.— privileged to be here. as you were talkina privileged to be here. as you were talking there. _ privileged to be here. as you were talking there, you _ privileged to be here. as you were talking there, you won't _ privileged to be here. as you were talking there, you won't have - privileged to be here. as you were | talking there, you won't have seen it where you are, but we were
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showing pictures of him in his footballing career and also in uniform as well. tell us a little bit about the events today, because i know you will be reading a poem. yes, i will be reading a famous poem, in a flanders field, which was the poem that speaks of poppies and in the 1920s the poppy appeal began, largely due to this poem and in 1915, he was a canadian officer who lost a friend and sat down and wrote this poem and then it was taken up and it took off and it's an incredible opportunity to be here today to speak a few words about walter and all of the forgotten voices, all of the voices of the first world war that have been forgotten and for groups that are not normally celebrated, walter is a figurehead for that so it's a tremendous honour and privilege to speak his name at the cenotaph today. i
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speak his name at the cenotaph toda . ., �* ~' ., speak his name at the cenotaph toda. ~ ., , today. i don't know if you've been today. i don't know if you've been to the cenotaph _ today. i don't know if you've been to the cenotaph before, - today. i don't know if you've been to the cenotaph before, before i today. i don't know if you've been i to the cenotaph before, before this occasion, but i'm just seeing behind you, people walking past and it's a very special place in those with only seen it on television, which is what most people do, can you give us a sense of what it is like for you being there now and looking ahead to the events? it is being there now and looking ahead to the events? , ., , the events? it is tremendous. i feel a real sense — the events? it is tremendous. i feel a real sense of _ the events? it is tremendous. i feel a real sense of presence, _ the events? it is tremendous. i feel a real sense of presence, if - the events? it is tremendous. i feel a real sense of presence, if i'm - a real sense of presence, if i'm honest. it is something i have seen on tv every year and i actually interviewed some veterans challenged by sto interviewed some veterans challenged by ptsd a few years ago, so every year! by ptsd a few years ago, so every year i tune in and every november the 11th, i observe the two—minute silence. it's really important that is not only remembrance sunday but also armistice day as well, the actual 11th of november, and the western front association and other people, the volunteers, the enthusiast, the educational charities that speak of this, it's a
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tremendous honour to be here, it really is, and i'm deputising today. it's tremendous, and a real sense of occasion and i can feel it now and a real sense of pride and ijust have to hold together long enough to get the poem out. i’m to hold together long enough to get the poem out-— the poem out. i'm sure you will nicholas- _ the poem out. i'm sure you will nicholas. enjoy _ the poem out. i'm sure you will nicholas. enjoy your _ the poem out. i'm sure you will nicholas. enjoy your day. - the poem out. i'm sure you will| nicholas. enjoy your day. mixed emotions for a lot of people but have a wonderful day and i'm glad to see the weather is good. nick will be reading in a flanders field immediately after the silence at 11 o'clock this morning.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines, i'm geeta guru—murthy. a surprise agreement between the us and china to tackle climate change gets a cautious welcome — but activists urge both nations to show greater commitment. and i'm at the un climate change summit in glasgow. it is officially the penultimate day. we will be here through the day with updates for you. paramedics warn lives are at riskdue to unacceptably long ambulance delays of up to nine hours britain and iran will hold rare face—to—face talks in london today to try to revive the agreement curbing its nuclear activities. the case of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe will also be on the agenda. the uk economy grew by 1.3%
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betweenjuly and september — but supply chain issues are hampering recovery

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