Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 10, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

9:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm james reynolds. the glasgow climate summit enters its final phase, and tonight, a surprisejoint pledge from the world's top two polluters. the us and china commit to ramping up their climate ambitions, but what can we glean from the lofty promises? the conservative mp sir geoffrey cox denies any wrongdoing over his second job. the british prime minister says if ministers break the rules, they must be punished. thousands of migrants remain stranded in freezing conditions along poland's border with belarus at the centre of an escalating international row. plus, the fizzy orange drink that's making glasgow's international visitors fizz with excitement — scotland's unofficial national drink.
9:01 pm
hello. the uk prime minister, borisjohnson, is calling on world leaders to stop sitting on their hands and make a collective push to get a deal on limiting climate change over the line. time is running out for an agreement, as there are just 48 hours left on the clock before the cop26 climate change summit in glasgow ends. mrjohnson says that a deal is in sight, but that there's still much more work to be done. with more, here's our science editor, david shukman. can the world agree to slow down the release of the gases heating the planet? can it do what it takes to reduce the melting of the polar ice? and will this be enough to limit the rise of the sea? with the conference now entering its final days, delegates are trying to find common ground,
9:02 pm
and the uk as hosts has come up with a draft of a possible agreement. seven pages of text, welcomed as a first step by some but criticised by many. the words are almost meek and mild in many places, and the world is on fire. we've seen the australian wildfires, koala bears being burnt alive. we have to make sure that we've got power and proactive commitments on the table. any document like this is bound to be a compromise, so the calls for the first time for coal to be phased out, but it doesn't give a date. it pushes for 1.5 celsius to be the limit of global warming, but currently, no one is on course to achieve that, and it urges countries to update their climate plan if not in 2025, but far sooner — in fact, next year — but there is no obligation. it needs to be clear. there's no room for ambiguity and fudges.
9:03 pm
i see in this latest text, there's a lot of urging and calling for, that kind of soft language, and it will need to be sharpened up. otherwise, it will be very difficult to claim that this summit has succeeded. the prime minister has stepped in briefly, but, faced with an uphill struggle, he is now trying to manage expectations. the cop26 summit here in glasgow i is not going to fix it in one go. i we're not going to arrest climate change right here, right now. - it'sjust impossible, _ and i think everybody has got to be realistic about that, - but there is the possibility that we will come away from this with the first genuine _ road map for a solution to end climate change. | to try to keep a sense of momentum, there's a government initiative for electric cars for a global deadline to phase out petrol and diesel engines by 2040
9:04 pm
at the latest, but some of the most important countries have not signed up. on any objective analysis, this doesn't go far enough, quick enough, to get to net zero by 2050, so progress, but lots of gaps. in this last phase of the talks, distant perspectives are colliding — industrial giants like china that don't want to see their businesses restrained, and countries like madagascar, victims of climate change, are desperate for this conference to get them help. where does this leave us? myles allen is a professor of geosystem science at the university of oxford and director of the oxford net zero intitative. he joins me from the cop26 conference in glasgow. professor, conference in glasgow. thanks so much for joining professor, thanks so much for joining us. what counts for us success? �* , .,
9:05 pm
joining us. what counts for us success? �*, ., ., , success? it's important for people to realise that _ success? it's important for people to realise that this _ success? it's important for people to realise that this is _ success? it's important for people to realise that this is part - success? it's important for people to realise that this is part of - success? it's important for people to realise that this is part of a - to realise that this is part of a process that's been going on for almost 30 years —— you as success. borisjohnson, this particular boris johnson, this particular meeting borisjohnson, this particular meeting will not stop climate change, but it is very important to acknowledge the progress that has been made. back in 2005, i published a paper that said if we managed to limit the total amount of carbon we dumped into the atmosphere to i dumped into the atmosphere to 1 trillion tonnes, we'd limit global warning to below two degrees. at the time, that was the target. now, 16 years on, it looks like with the latest pledges that have come in to the glasco meeting, we may actually manage to do that, to save the trillionths done. i didn't think i'd ever say that. so, trillionths done. i didn't think i'd eversay that. so, in trillionths done. i didn't think i'd ever say that. so, in the big long—term picture, the progress is in the right direction and people acknowledge what needs to be done.
9:06 pm
but, and it's a massive but, we've also realised in that 15 years, just how bad climate change is both for us and the rest of the world. the goal is no longer two degrees. the goal is no longer two degrees. the goal is no longer two degrees. the goal is 1.5 degrees, and that's where the pledges that are coming into the summit have fallen short. professor, you mentioned some of the world's two biggest countries responsible have been getting together. another of today's announcements was between china and the us — that the two superpowers had agreed an enhanced climate action plan for the 2020s. take a listen to what beijing's climate envoy said. the challenge of climate change is x extensional and severe. we need to work actively to address climate change — work actively to address climate change as— work actively to address climate change as the two major powers in the world — change as the two major powers in the world need to take our do
9:07 pm
responsibilities, work together and work with— responsibilities, work together and work with other powers of. so china has made some _ work with other powers of. so china has made some pledge _ work with other powers of. so china has made some pledge there, - work with other powers of. so china has made some pledge there, but l work with other powers of. so china - has made some pledge there, but from what we understand, it has not signed up to the global methane pledge. what do you make of that statement?— pledge. what do you make of that statement? ~ . ., , �* , ., statement? well, clearly, it's great news that these _ statement? well, clearly, it's great news that these countries - statement? well, clearly, it's great news that these countries are - news that these countries are agreeing to work together and climate and crucially, in the language of their declaration, they made it clear that they were aiming to limit global warming 1.5 degrees. not 1.5 x to limit global warming 1.5 degrees. not1.5x 2100, to limit global warming 1.5 degrees. not 1.5 x 2100, meaning we could shoot past that and then come back down, they want to limit warming to 1.5 degrees. they're sticking with a pledge made in paris. the detail that they're agreeing to talk on the very important measures that we need to take in order to make that a reality, but it's light on the detail. but it's good news they're working together because they need to work together.—
9:08 pm
to work together. plenty of people watchin: to work together. plenty of people watching what's _ to work together. plenty of people watching what's happening. - to work together. plenty of people watching what's happening. we i to work together. plenty of people l watching what's happening. we have to work together. plenty of people - watching what's happening. we have a chart which shows how public opinion has been changing over the years. if you have a look at this, it hovered at about 10%, i know it has crept up to about 40% with the start of that summit. that is a significant change in public opinion in recent years. how do you harness that was yellow it is, and that is a huge different i'm saying. i don't go to cops very often. the first when i went to was 2003. there were like the book of mormon. americans telling us climate change was fake. people are taking this seriously and getting behind in taking action, and i think everybody involved in this process, from the
9:09 pm
school strikers to the demonstrators, to the negotiators who will be up all night for the next couple nights, can take some credit. it's important to recognise the positives and the impact that that public acknowledgement of the seriousness of the issue is having to give our politicians the space to take the action they need to deal with the problem.— take the action they need to deal with the problem. professor myles allen, thank— with the problem. professor myles allen, thank you _ with the problem. professor myles allen, thank you so _ with the problem. professor myles allen, thank you so much. - the british prime minister says mps who break the rules must be punished, but he defended the system of politicians having second jobs, saying he did not believe that the uk was a corrupt country. it comes after the conservative mp sir geoffrey cox said he hasn't breached the rules governing mps' behaviour after he was filmed apparently using his mp's office to carry out paid work advising the government of the british virgin islands. let's get the latest from our political correspondent iain watson. first of all, let's rewind a bit
9:10 pm
because the story has been going a great pace. what kind of second jobs are mps actually allowed to have? they're are mps actually allowed to have? they�* re allowed to are mps actually allowed to have? they're allowed to have a whole range of second jobs, but there are restrictions on some of the activities which they can carry out. for example, mps can be consultants to private companies, but they cannot lobby a government minister or agency on their behalf, and that's what apparently happened in the case of the former mp 0wen patterson. there are restrictions on what they can do. for example, sir geoffrey cox, the former law officer who spent part of this year in the caribbean, advocating for the british virgin islands, he has not broken any rules by doing that. he's had a well of criticism, but that is within the rules. there are some difficulties, and this is not that second job, this is about
9:11 pm
restrictions on mps' activities. if you carry out private business, that's one thing, but you shouldn't carry out private business from public premises. from the houses of parliament where the taxpayer pays for these facilities. because the opposition say, and he hasn't denied that he took part in a meeting. directly from his own office, he says he's done nothing wrong. he said if there is any investigation, he will cooperate fully with that, but it has stoked up a new focus on notjust but it has stoked up a new focus on not just where some but it has stoked up a new focus on notjust where some mps are breaking rules, but whether the rules governing second jobs are actually tight enough. imilli governing second 'obs are actually tight enough.— tight enough. will those rules chan . e? tight enough. will those rules change? boris _ tight enough. will those rules change? boris johnson - tight enough. will those rules change? boris johnson was i tight enough. will those rules - change? boris johnson was asked this toda , and change? boris johnson was asked this today. and what _ change? boris johnson was asked this today, and what was _ change? boris johnson was asked this today, and what was interesting - change? boris johnson was asked this today, and what was interesting was l today, and what was interesting was that he was speaking at cop26, but a lot of the questions were about the
9:12 pm
political climate here. he had to fend off questions of some of his own mps, but he defended the current system. there was a bit of carrot and stick. he's assaying for hundreds of years, people have had these outside jobs that help bring experience into parliament, but if they do not want those to change, they do not want those to change, they have to stick by the existing rules. those who lobby, they will face sanctions. it was a tough message, but it wasn't a willingness to change the rules in the way the labour opposition is calling for, which would ban some second jobs. not all, but those from private gain. not all, but those from private aain. . not all, but those from private iain. ., ~ ., not all, but those from private iain. ., ~., ., not all, but those from private a usjudge in washington has rejected former president donald trump's effort to block a congressional committee from accessing white house documents, as lawmakers continue their investigation into the january 6th deadly attack on the capitol. trump had claimed executive privilege, which has now been struck
9:13 pm
down by the federal court. i'm joined now by anthony zurcher in washington. hi, anthony. executive privilege, it didn't work very well for richard nixon. it didn't stop tapes being released. it doesn't appear to be helping mr nixon's late in life friend donald trump. what's your assessment? the friend donald trump. what's your assessment?— friend donald trump. what's your assessment? the challenge is he's t in: to assessment? the challenge is he's trying to play _ assessment? the challenge is he's trying to play and _ assessment? the challenge is he's trying to play and all— assessment? the challenge is he's trying to play and all executive - trying to play and all executive privilege which is this right for presidents to keep certain information away from the public�*s i because the president, in their view, deserves candour and should be able to get that. when you're not president any more, the strength of one's executive privilege claim rest in the current president, and joe biden has already said these documents that the committee is requesting should be handed over by
9:14 pm
the executive agencies thatjoe biden is in charge of. donald trump is trying to assert that privilege, even though he's out of office now. he is assuming in order to get a judge to try to agree with them, and at least in the first step, the district courtjudge ruled in favour of the congressional inquiry. but this won't be the end. it's already being appealed to and depending on the outcome, it could reach the supreme court. we the outcome, it could reach the supreme court.— the outcome, it could reach the supreme court. we are waiting for president biden _ supreme court. we are waiting for president biden to _ supreme court. we are waiting for president biden to appear- supreme court. we are waiting for president biden to appear in - president biden to appear in baltimore. he will talk about the infrastructure bill. a question about the current president, how has about the current president, how has a president whojust about the current president, how has a president who just passed a major spending bill, who faces no scandal that we know of, who faces no more draining from wars, how come he is still stuck in the dungeons of public opinion? i still stuck in the dungeons of public opinion?— still stuck in the dungeons of ublic oinion? ~ i. ., ., ~' public opinion? i think if you look at when joe _ public opinion? i think if you look at when joe biden's _ public opinion? i think if you look at when joe biden's pulling - public opinion? i think if you look l at when joe biden's pulling starting at whenjoe biden's pulling starting to drop, it was around the time that
9:15 pm
the delta variant of coronavirus began taking off. people were less optimistic that the united states would be able to smoothly move out of the pandemic. there was also the problem with the us withdrawal in afghanistan, the view that the administration didn't handle that well, that kind of laid on him. something i think you'll hearjoe biden talk about in his speech is that inflation has been going up. we found out inflation went up by over 6%, which is the largest year on year increase since 1990. i think a lot of people are feeling that in their pocket books, and when people are worried about the economy, they start looking for people to blame, and joe biden is one in charge right now. the democrats are the ones in charge right now, and so they are getting some of the blame for the troubles that people are facing. anthony zurcher, thank you so much. let's take you to baltimore, maryland now,
9:16 pm
where president biden is about to deliver a speech on his new trillion dollar infrastructure deal. he might be on the right of the shot. as anthony was saying, it is a hugely important bill. as president biden shakes hands with people and fluorescent, this is a bill which is $1.2 billion. it is the second major bill that mr biden has passed since taking office onjanuary the 20th. it is a bill that was also passed with bipartisan support. there were republicans in both houses of congress. let's listen to the introduction. good afternoon. my name is tony trouble senior. i'v e i've been at the port of baltimore since 1986. my my father is retired. i currently have two sons involved in the
9:17 pm
memberships. 0ne have two sons involved in the memberships. one is a crane operator, one is at the marine terminal. for my family and many other hard—working families, for centuries, the current leadership, the union employers, local government and continuing investments towards infrastructure will ensure hard—working union members are able to continue to provide for theirfamilies members are able to continue to provide for their families and keep the hope moving. let's move forward. if you work on the waterfront, you know what that means. you'll understand greatly. the infrastructure investment will benefit the port of barnum or. his infrastructure investment will benefit the port of barnum or. as we wait for the — benefit the port of barnum or. as we wait for the president _ benefit the port of barnum or. as we wait for the president to _ benefit the port of barnum or. as we wait for the president to be - wait for the president to be introduced, let's go back to anthony zurcher. 0ne are the stakes for the president at the moment now that this bill... never mind here comes
9:18 pm
mr biden. we this bill... never mind here comes mr biden. ~ ., ., , ,, ., mr biden. we have an expression when i served in the — mr biden. we have an expression when i served in the senate. _ mr biden. we have an expression when i served in the senate. when _ mr biden. we have an expression when i served in the senate. when i - mr biden. we have an expression when i served in the senate. when i want - i served in the senate. when i want to make _ i served in the senate. when i want to make some statement was personal, appoint— to make some statement was personal, appoint a _ to make some statement was personal, appoint a personal privilege. you're talking _ appoint a personal privilege. you're talking about working on the water, my family's vision from baltimore, and the _ my family's vision from baltimore, and the entire biden family worked in the _ and the entire biden family worked in the water until probably 1906, seven— in the water until probably 1906, seven or— in the water until probably 1906, seven or eight. and my father... although — seven or eight. and my father... although they never worked with the ports. _ although they never worked with the ports, they did work on the bay. this— ports, they did work on the bay. this has— ports, they did work on the bay. this has been, this is one of the oldest _ this has been, this is one of the oldest ports in the country, continuously running and one of the best ports —
9:19 pm
continuously running and one of the best ports. tony, thanks for that introduction, and mayor scott, thank you for— introduction, and mayor scott, thank you for the _ introduction, and mayor scott, thank you for the passport. i want to thank— you for the passport. i want to thank governor hogan for being here. i thank governor hogan for being here. i want _ thank governor hogan for being here. i want to— thank governor hogan for being here. i want to start off with one of my best buddies, and i think one of the most _ best buddies, and i think one of the most offensive people in the united states— most offensive people in the united states and its, chris van holland. if states and its, chris van holland. if you _ states and its, chris van holland. if you knew — states and its, chris van holland. if you knew something, go to him. he knows _ if you knew something, go to him. he knows how— if you knew something, go to him. he knows how to get it done. also, the luy knows how to get it done. also, the guy who _ knows how to get it done. also, the guy who i _ knows how to get it done. also, the guy who i knew when he was a kid. i'm guy who i knew when he was a kid. in getting — guy who i knew when he was a kid. i'm getting so old. i knew his dad. you have — i'm getting so old. i knew his dad. you have a — i'm getting so old. i knew his dad. you have a first rate delegation, so i you have a first rate delegation, so i want _ you have a first rate delegation, so i want to— you have a first rate delegation, so i want to thank him for being here today— i want to thank him for being here today and — i want to thank him for being here today and thank him for all the help in getting _ today and thank him for all the help in getting the members of the house and getting the legislation passed. it's a and getting the legislation passed. its a trig _ and getting the legislation passed. it's a big deal. it's going to make a trig _ it's a big deal. it's going to make a big difference. that's the reason
9:20 pm
i a big difference. that's the reason i started _ a big difference. that's the reason i started calling it build back better _ i started calling it build back better. we underestimate our self. we're _ better. we underestimate our self. we're the _ better. we underestimate our self. we're the only country in the world as a ntatter— we're the only country in the world as a matter of history that every crisis _ as a matter of history that every crisis we — as a matter of history that every crisis we face, we've come out iletter— crisis we face, we've come out better on— crisis we face, we've come out better on the other side. we not only treat— better on the other side. we not only beat it. not a joke, think about— only beat it. not a joke, think about it _ only beat it. not a joke, think about it. we've come out better than we were _ about it. we've come out better than we were before. and the economic and political, _ we were before. and the economic and political, as— we were before. and the economic and political, as well as health crisis we found — political, as well as health crisis we found with covid, i was the chairman— we found with covid, i was the chairman when we got elected. the world _ chairman when we got elected. the worid was— chairman when we got elected. the world was changing so rapidly, so rapidly _ world was changing so rapidly, so rapidly. we've got to keep up. we're in competition to determine whether or not— in competition to determine whether or not we _ in competition to determine whether or not we can still remain the most powerful— or not we can still remain the most powerful economic force in the world — powerful economic force in the world in _ powerful economic force in the world. i'm here to talk about one of the most _ world. i'm here to talk about one of the most pressing economic concerns of the _ the most pressing economic concerns of the american people, and it's reat~ _ of the american people, and it's reat~ and — of the american people, and it's real. and that is getting prices down, — real. and that is getting prices down, numberone, numbertwo, making sure our— down, numberone, numbertwo, making sure our stores— down, numberone, numbertwo, making sure our stores are fully stocked, and numberthree, getting a
9:21 pm
sure our stores are fully stocked, and number three, getting a lot of people _ and number three, getting a lot of people back to work while tracking and tackling these two above challenges. today's report showed unemployment continued to fall, but prices _ unemployment continued to fall, but prices remain too high. the american peopiem _ prices remain too high. the american people... they're still looking out there _ people... they're still looking out there a_ people... they're still looking out there. a loaf of bread cost more, a gallon— there. a loaf of bread cost more, a gallon of— there. a loaf of bread cost more, a gallon of gas cost more. we still face the — gallon of gas cost more. we still face the challenges we have to tackle — face the challenges we have to tackle head on. on a good side, we see the _ tackle head on. on a good side, we see the highest growth rate in decades _ see the highest growth rate in decades. the fact fastest decrease in unemployment since 1950. jobs are up, in unemployment since 1950. jobs are up. savings _ in unemployment since 1950. jobs are up, savings are up, but we've got problems. — up, savings are up, but we've got problems, too. many people remain unsettied _ problems, too. many people remain unsettled about the economy, and we all know _ unsettled about the economy, and we all know why. they see higher prices — all know why. they see higher prices. they go to the store online and they— prices. they go to the store online and they can't... they can't find what _ and they can't... they can't find what they— and they can't... they can't find what they always want. and when they
9:22 pm
want it _ what they always want. and when they want it and _ what they always want. and when they want it. and we're tracking these issues _ want it. and we're tracking these issues and — want it. and we're tracking these issues and trying to figure out how to tackle _ issues and trying to figure out how to tackle them head on. my administration will help the folks on nty— administration will help the folks on my left over here, has a plan to finish _ on my left over here, has a plan to finish a _ on my left over here, has a plan to finish a plan — on my left over here, has a plan to finish a plan of getting us back to normal— finish a plan of getting us back to normal and having a stronger economy _ normal and having a stronger economy. let me explain the part that _ economy. let me explain the part that it — economy. let me explain the part that... it starts with a piece of good — that... it starts with a piece of good news _ that... it starts with a piece of good news. infrastructure week has finally _ good news. infrastructure week has finally arrived.— finally arrived. applause how many _ finally arrived. applause how many times - finally arrived. applause how many times have - finally arrived. applause | how many times have you finally arrived. applause - how many times have you heard of that in— how many times have you heard of that in the — how many times have you heard of that in the last five years? yeah! anyway, — that in the last five years? yeah! anyway, last week, we took a monumental step forward as a nation, and we _ monumental step forward as a nation, and we did _ monumental step forward as a nation, and we did something long overdue and we did something long overdue and long _ and we did something long overdue and long talked about. but almost never _ and long talked about. but almost never actually done. the house of representatives passed my infrastructure bill. this bill is going — infrastructure bill. this bill is going to _ infrastructure bill. this bill is going to reduce the cost of goods to
9:23 pm
consumers. — going to reduce the cost of goods to consumers, businesses and get people back to _ consumers, businesses and get people back to work. helping us build an economy— back to work. helping us build an economy from the bottom up where everybody _ economy from the bottom up where everybody is better off. i'm tired of this— everybody is better off. i'm tired of this trickle—down economy stuff. i of this trickle—down economy stuff. i come _ of this trickle—down economy stuff. i come from — of this trickle—down economy stuff. i come from delaware just across the line, i come from delaware just across the line. and _ i come from delaware just across the line. and we — i come from delaware just across the line, and we have more corporations in delaware — line, and we have more corporations in delaware than any other nation combined — in delaware than any other nation combined. i understand bigbee exist. as combined. ! understand bigbee exist. as families— combined. i understand bigbee exist. as families start paying their fair share. _ as families start paying their fair share. you — as families start paying their fair share, you have 55 corporations last year that _ share, you have 55 corporations last year that made $40 billion and didn't— year that made $40 billion and didn't pay a single penny in taxes —— i understand big business. nobody is going _ —— i understand big business. nobody is going to _ —— i understand big business. nobody is going to pay. you're not going to pay anything more than taxes at all, period _ pay anything more than taxes at all, eriod. ,, , period. studio: president - period. studio: president biden| period. studio: - president biden speaking period. studio: _ president biden speaking in baltimore. it's important to say is being overshadowed by rising prices in the united states. he said in that speech you need to get prices
9:24 pm
down. still with me as anthony zurcher and washington. i remember the ronald raisin mine —— ronald reagan line. is it harderfor you to buy things at the store than it was four years ago? we got a chart that shows how much 1980 matters in this particular debate. as you can see there, inflation was high. that was when reagan defeated carter. now inflation is rising again. i when reagan defeated carter. now inflation is rising again.— inflation is rising again. i think ou can inflation is rising again. i think you can tell— inflation is rising again. i think you can tell from _ inflation is rising again. i think you can tell from that - inflation is rising again. i think you can tell from that speech | inflation is rising again. i think . you can tell from that speech that they're taking it very seriously. this was supposed to be a celebratory speech, touting the benefits of infrastructure spending, the legislative winjoe biden god. here he wasn't starting the speech off with inflation —— joe here he wasn't starting the speech off with inflation ——joe biden got. we're going back to 1980, which helped ronald reagan defeat incumbent presidents, but in 1980,
9:25 pm
the economy was struggling. there was a stagnant economy while inflation was growing. at least here, it seems like the economy is picking up, so i think the hope among this administration is that eventually, this inflation will received. in the economy will keep growing. by the time next year, by the time the reelection comes in 2024, he'll be on better political footing. he 2024, he'll be on better political footinu. . ~ 2024, he'll be on better political footin.. ., ,, ., 2024, he'll be on better political footinu. ., ~ ., , footing. he talked about being harder to buy _ footing. he talked about being harder to buy things. - footing. he talked about being harder to buy things. let's - footing. he talked about being | harder to buy things. let's look footing. he talked about being i harder to buy things. let's look at how hard it is to buy petrol. that's what it was, that's what it is now, considerable changes to the price. yeah, that is something that americans not only feel in their pocketbook every day, but they see because gas prices are put on signs on the roads around the city. they can see how much that's going up. the economy was getting stronger, that's not enough to convince people. that's not enough to convince --eole. �* ., , .
9:26 pm
that's not enough to convince --eole. . ., , . ., ,, that's not enough to convince --eole. �* ., , . ., people. anthony zurcher, thank you so much. people. anthony zurcher, thank you so much- do — people. anthony zurcher, thank you so much. do stay _ people. anthony zurcher, thank you so much. do stay with _ people. anthony zurcher, thank you so much. do stay with bbc - people. anthony zurcher, thank you so much. do stay with bbc news. i good evening. there's been quite a lot of cloud across england and wales today. it's been mild, but at times, the cloud thick enough for some light rain and drizzle. you can see rather threatening looking skies from this beautiful weather watcher picture sent in from sheffield. different story into the northeast of scotland, starting the morning cold and frosty, but that's where the best of the sunshine has been today. beautiful afternoon for many. there's some cloud and rain pushing into scotland overnight tonight. at the same time, our weather front that's brought quite a lot of cloud will stubbornly sit across much of england and wales. some regions between the two will have some clearer skies and low single figures here, but the rain will gradually sink its way south across scotland, and at the same time, through england and wales with that low cloud, that drizzle, a lot of mist and murk first
9:27 pm
thing in the morning. in fact, fog may well be an issue across central and southern england. some of it dense in places, some of it slow to lift. so, do tune into bbc local radio station first thing in the morning for travel and traffic updates. so, yes, it's a cloudy, murky start. there will be outbreaks of drizzle as well at times, particularly along west facing coasts. as we go through the afternoon, more rain pushing into northwest england and western scotland. there's an area of low pressure starting to push in from the west. temperatures still just slightly above where they should be for this time of year, though, despite the cloud and the rain moving in. now, as we head towards friday, it's going to turn increasingly wet and windy with this area of low pressure. the strongest of the winds to the southern flanks, so gale force gusts of wind are quite likely here. again, a relatively mild start, widely double digits to greet us on friday morning. a dry start across much of south—east england. we'll see one band of showery rain easing away, some wet and windy weather pushing in from the west. but then, it may well stay dry through the afternoon across east anglia and
9:28 pm
the southeast, and again, those temperatures just above where they should be for the time of year at 10—15 celsius, once again the high. now, as we move out of friday into saturday, high pressure is going to build in from the west. that will actually quieten things down quite nicely for the weekend, but that weather front to the south to ease first thing on saturday morning. but generally, the weekend will be largely dry. there is a question mark as to just how much cloud we're going to see, but nevertheless, pleasant enough for many.
9:29 pm
9:30 pm
this is bbc news with me, james reynolds. the two biggest emitters of greenhouse gases, china and the us, have issued a surprise joint statement. in it, they set out their plans to tackle global warming, with both countries saying cooperation was the only way forward. as the murder trial of ahmaud arbery, the unarmed black man killed while outjogging, enters its second week, we speak to human rights advocate martin luther king iii. new research suggests conspiracy theories promoting climate change scepticism increased ahead of the glasgow conference. plus, we'll speak live to the teacher who's just won $1 million in a unesco—backed prize.
9:31 pm
today, there are two important, separate trials taking place in the us this week with the theme of race. the first is that of kyle rittenhouse, the teenager charged with killing two people and the wounding of a third during racialjustice protests in wisconsin last year. he has pleaded not guilty, and today he testified in his own defence. the other case is that of the three men on trial for killing ahmaud arbery, a 25—year—old black man who was out jogging in suburban georgia when he was shot dead. today, thejury has been hearing evidence of how one of the defendents told a police officer they had ahmand arbery "trapped" before he was fatally shot. let's bring in the human rights advocate martin luther king iii. thank advocate martin luther king iii. you so much forjo the thank you so much forjoining me. in the ahmaud arbery case, what does justice look like to you? well. justice look like to you? well, 'ustice justice look like to you? well, justice looks _ justice look like to you? well, justice looks like _ justice look like to you? well, justice looks like a _ justice look like to you? well,
9:32 pm
justice looks like a full - justice look like to you? well, i justice looks like a full conviction of really hunting down and murdering a human being. it seems pretty clear. note cases are open and shut, although they seem like it sometimes, but it seems very, very clear from the evidence that has been presented so far that this was really a group of citizens who came together and decided they wanted to trap this man like an animal and kill him. and the fact of the matter is even once he was shot, as the officer was driving up to the scene, he asked a question of the assailants and one of them said, you know, i'm not doing so good, ijust shot someone, but yet there was no aid offered to the man came up ahmaud arbery, who was there dying. there was no emergency services. it was just... there was no emergency services. it wasjust... the there was no emergency services. it was just... the whole there was no emergency services. it wasjust... the whole process, not just the ones who actually pulled
9:33 pm
the trigger, but the fact that the police did not call for help, try to get assistance for this man who was laying there dying in the streets. more widely, where do you think the black lives matter movement stands now a year and a half after the start of that movement and 60 years after the movement started by your father. i after the movement started by your father. ~ �* . . ~ after the movement started by your father. ~' �* ., . ,, , father. i think the black lives matter issues _ father. i think the black lives matter issues that _ father. i think the black lives matter issues that need - father. i think the black lives matter issues that need to i father. i think the black lives| matter issues that need to be addressed unfortunately really there has not been much movement really since the tragic killing of george floyd last year. that sentiment is not going anywhere. this country is going to have to address elements of police brutality and misconduct as it relates to black people. that is one of the primary issues of black lives matter and others in this country, getting legislation, the george floyd bill passed in congress and i wantjust a totally congress
9:34 pm
but certainly the house has passed a bill but the senate refuses still to do that. so what it means is we have got to figure out how do we double down in a nonviolent way, constructive way to get legislation, and then we can begin to see movement. we need a lot of changes still in some levels of policing. part of the challenge is crime is coming up, and that makes people look and redirect what should be done. but it does not mean that there still does not need to be some serious restructuring of some police organisations. serious restructuring of some police organisations-— organisations. what kind of conversations _ organisations. what kind of conversations do _ organisations. what kind of conversations do you - organisations. what kind of conversations do you have l organisations. what kind of- conversations do you have with the police? conversations do you have with the olice? .., ,., ., , conversations do you have with the olice? .., ., , ., police? the conversations that i have talked _ police? the conversations that i have talked about _ police? the conversations that i have talked about what - police? the conversations that i have talked about what i - police? the conversations that i have talked about what i have i police? the conversations that i - have talked about what i have talked to police organisations revolve around it's good that there are now cameras that are being introduced so that the police person now has to record the things that they are doing. but i think about diversity, sensitivity, human relations
9:35 pm
training, i thought about civilian review boards because civilians come in the community must be involved. when the community is involved when something goes awry, and the community helps to resolve it by determining the fate of those particular officers. those are some of the things i thought about. community policing is another. martin luther king the third, thank you so much forjoining us.- you so much for 'oining us. thank ou. germany's chancellor, angela merkel, has told president putin of russia that he must stop what she called the "inhumane" exploitation of the migrant crisis at the border between poland and belarus. thousands of people have massed in the area, wanting to cross into poland and enter the eu. poland's prime minister has accused belarus of "state terrorism" over the crisis. nick beake sent this report from the border. for those who hoped to find a new life safe in the european union, there's a grim realisation
9:36 pm
that this could now be home. trapped between belarus and poland. the bbc was sent these pictures as journalists and crucially aid agencies are being kept away. we managed to contact a man who was a scientist in iraq. he wants eu member poland to let them through. my message is we should get across the border to poland. why should poland open the border to you? one day, two day, three day, people will die. poland has been accused of pushing back migrants illegally. but it wants to highlight this, troops from belarus appearing to force migrants along the border, and it has accused belarus of terrorism masterminded by russia. the european union says this is a man—made political crisis.
9:37 pm
this is a challenge to the whole of the european union. and this is not a migration crisis. this is the attempt of an authoritarian regime to try to destabilise its democratic neighbours. but russia has hit back, saying the eu was provoking belarus. moscow released footage of two bombers being sent to patrol its ally�*s airspace in a demonstration of solidarity and strength amid a growing international crisis. this huge forest is one of europe's oldest woodlands, but it's now the epicentre of the continent's newest migrant crisis. thousands have been trying to make their way from belarus through these trees to here in poland. and many more are set to follow, determined to take their chances in this wilderness if it means
9:38 pm
reaching eu soil. because in belarus' capital, minsk, more families were preparing to head to the border after being welcomed by president lukashenko's regime. they're apparently undeterred by the spiralling misery that awaits them. nick beake, bbc news, on the poland—belarus border. 0nline misinformation knows no bounds. for nearly two years, the internet has been awash with false claims about coronavirus and the vaccines that prevent its spread. now we have another to add to the list, climate change denial. researchers at tech firm blackbird.ai discovered a large quantity of climate—change denial content began to spread rapidly injune, amplified by bots and influencers alike. the company scanned millions of posts across big social networks like twitter and telegram and identified four major trends. here to tell us what they are is blackbird.ai's ceo, wasim khaled.
9:39 pm
thank you so much forjoining us. what are the trends? 1 thank you so much for 'oining us. what are the trends?_ what are the trends? i would say that really into _ what are the trends? i would say that really into date's _ what are the trends? i would say that really into date's rapidly - that really into date's rapidly shifting information ecosystem we are all being manipulative. in this report we found there is a constant stream of narratives that are really building momentum to shift people's perception against climate science. right and these threats are typically hard to detect. 0ne right and these threats are typically hard to detect. one of the big things we found here is that much of the climate denial content use mechanisms that were very effective and edifying the same mechanisms using covid—19 is a ration and vaccine hesitancy and transferring the frustration around those narratives to climate change denial. and severally mimicking those to spread them across multiple platforms very quickly, so for example one of these was that climate change lock are coming. essentially what we saw were bad
9:40 pm
actors seating audiences that congregate on twitter and other platforms to protest covid—19 lockdowns being pulled into these conspiracies that world governments are using it to let people down in a climate change lockdowns were the next people would see. is it next people would see. is it ossible next people would see. is it possible to _ next people would see. is it possible to work _ next people would see. is it possible to work out - next people would see. is it possible to work out who started this disinformation? brute possible to work out who started this disinformation?— possible to work out who started this disinformation? we know there are uuite a this disinformation? we know there are quite a few _ this disinformation? we know there are quite a few different _ this disinformation? we know there are quite a few different actors - are quite a few different actors that intend to do this. but a lot of it is to shift policymaking often because policymaking instrument will people believe. and so often to create pressure around these topics. and the other thing is often what you will see is there are bot armies, essentially bot accounts that try to undermine scientific consensus en masse going to make it seem like people are very against climate science that is quite well proven. climate science that is quite well roven. �* . ' . climate science that is quite well roven. . . , . ., proven. and what effect do the andemic proven. and what effect do the pandemic and _ proven. and what effect do the pandemic and anti-vaccine - proven. and what effect do the | pandemic and anti-vaccine have proven. and what effect do the - pandemic and anti-vaccine have on pandemic and anti—vaccine have on the pandemic on accelerating
9:41 pm
misinformation? i the pandemic on accelerating misinformation?— the pandemic on accelerating misinformation? i think what they reall did misinformation? i think what they really did is _ misinformation? i think what they really did is they _ misinformation? i think what they really did is they proved _ misinformation? i think what they really did is they proved that - misinformation? i think what they really did is they proved that the l really did is they proved that the formula works too often spread very bizarre conspiracies. if you can touch upon the points that will create the most fear, and the more you share particular narrative, the more often you see it and you hear it, the more you get a group who really do start to believe it. and that really involves anyone who lives in the information ecosystem today. could be a policymaker or government official orjust someone who is going to cast a vote at the ballot, everyone is susceptible in the space that we live in today this all online, largely due to the pandemic. all online, largely due to the pandemic-— all online, largely due to the andemic. ., ,, . there is startling new evidence from africa that shows how climate change is dramatically increasing the number of droughts and floods on the continent. the world bank says the frequency of droughts tripled in the past decade.
9:42 pm
parts of south africa are already experiencing a devastating seven—year dry period. but the city of cape town, which came close to running out of water completely three years ago, is finding unusual ways to cope. 0ur africa correspondent andrew harding reports on south africa's own climate battle. high in the mountains around cape town, a bold and frantic fight to save rain water. teams here are scaling the wilderness to remove alien trees, armies of foreign invaders, like the pine. that's because pine trees are thirsty, sucking up a quarter of the water that might otherwise end up in cape town's reservoirs. every stump here means more waterfor humans. and these days, africa's big, growing cities need every raindrop. girls in a makeshift settlement near cape town gather at a communal tap.
9:43 pm
drought, the calling card of climate change, has become part of their childhood. it's not something that will happen in the future, it's something that is happening right now, so it makes me worried, frustrated, it makes me want to take a stand and bring up change. it's three years now since cape town came terrifyingly close to running out of water completely. we were here then to report on the world's first big modern city to face that threat. back then, a devastating drought turned the city's reservoirs into dust bowls. the good news is that it shocked the authorities and the public into taking drastic action to slash their water usage. the thought of running out of water in the city was quite tragic and very scary, and the city did quite well in preaching the message of saving
9:44 pm
water and we halved our water use. but cape town's successes are the exception here in south africa. not far from the city, the worst drought in more than a century is in full fury. man—made climate change blamed for these scenes in the eastern cape. in desperation, wild animals are coming to farms in search of food. but it's been seven years with almost no rainfall. farmers here now trudge across their bone—dry pasture land and wonder if the game is up. sometimes i don't want i to think about the future. if you see our animals now, - i'm not thinking about tomorrow. i'm just struggling to see how can i survive today. _
9:45 pm
and in the towns and even cities here, the mood is not much cheerier. frantic scenes when a charity brings a water truck to a settlement where the taps have been dry for months. but there is more to this than drought. it is easy and very tempting to blame the drought for the desperate conditions facing these families, but the truth is that this is about a failure of planning, of maintaining the infrastructure here. it's about a lack of investment. across this region, some 40% of water reserves are being lost to leaking pipes. that's down to mismanagement and corruption. i'm worried about the future. why do you think it's going to get worse? because they don't look after us. the government? yeah, they don't look after us. this is now a continent's challenge to manage water better
9:46 pm
and to manage it more fairly. because the droughts are queueing up ominously and there is no time to spare. andrew harding, bbc news, south africa. everyone knows what a pain it can be to suffer under a finickety, rule—bound, small—print obsessed boss. but for one japanese train driver, it all got too much. the unnamed driver had 43 yen docked from their wages. equivalent to 37 cents. the transgression? arriving at 0kayama station, pictured here, 60 seconds late. well, the driver is now having the last laugh. they're suing their employer both for the lost wages and also for nearly $19,000 in damages for the mental anguish caused by the ordeal. stay with us on bbc news.
9:47 pm
still to come, $1 million — the prize for being the world's best teacher. we'll speak to this year's lucky winner. from midnight, it will be compulsory for anyone working in a care home in england to be fully vaccinated against covid—19 unless they're medically exempt. care home managers, who are already struggling to fill vacancies, fear it could mean they'll lose staff. 0ur social affairs editor alison holt has more. the end of a breakfast shift for daniela bell, and the end of a job that she loved. she's worked in a care home for older people with dementia for nearly four years, but because she won't have the covid jab, she had to leave before tonight's deadline. she's worried about vaccine side effects and says she already has high antibody levels from having the virus. it was difficult this morning, and it was a bit heartbreaking. but, yeah, i had to.
9:48 pm
and the number of staff leaving remains a real worry, according to the national care forum, which represent services employing 14,000 people looking after 11,000 residents. in a snapshot survey, its members believe they will have lost 3.5% of their workers by midnight tonight, and another group will leave when they can no longer self—certify that they have a medical exemption. in these services alone, that adds up to more than 1000 staff going. care homes feel that they've been guinea pigs in terms of the implementation of this policy. it means that the work force that we need to take in new people who require care particularly whether they're coming from hospitals or the community, are just not there. at this croydon nursing home, they expect to lose three staff before christmas, when self—certified medical exemptions end.
9:49 pm
but information sessions run with their local council and nhs have persuaded most of their staff to have jabs. some had been put off by what they read on social media. but whether care homes will be able to find enough staff to replace those who are going is still uncertain. alison holt, bbc news. what does a teacher get as a reward for good work? traditionally, an apple from a grateful pupil. but one teacher has picked up something more, a $1 million prize. keishia thorpe from the us has just won the unesco—backed varkey foundation global teacher prize 2021 for her work teaching low—income immigrants. keishia, congratulations on winning the varkey foundation global teacher prize 2021. most teachers just get an apple, you got $1 million. how does it feel? is a very proud moment for myself, my school and community and for teachers across the world. this is
9:50 pm
very much for myself as it is for them. it feels amazing, and it really validates the work that teachers put inside and outside of the classroom every day. i teachers put inside and outside of the classroom every day.- the classroom every day. i don't want to embarrass _ the classroom every day. i don't want to embarrass you, - the classroom every day. i don't want to embarrass you, but - the classroom every day. i don't| want to embarrass you, but what makes you a good teacher? what want to embarrass you, but what makes you a good teacher? what makes me a aood makes you a good teacher? what makes me a good teacher? _ makes you a good teacher? what makes me a good teacher? i _ makes you a good teacher? what makes me a good teacher? i think— makes you a good teacher? what makes me a good teacher? i think one - makes you a good teacher? what makes me a good teacher? i think one of - me a good teacher? i think one of the things is that the students especially that i teach, immigrants or refugee students, are just like myself. i was an immigrant student as well in the us and i can see much of their stories really resemble my story and i can relate to my students. and because i'm able to relate to them and because i'm able to understand their struggle and know what their needs are, it gives me a great opportunity to work with them inside and outside of the classroom and also inside with their community and their family to create different opportunities for them and to make sure that they receive the resources they need to be successful individuals. , .,. resources they need to be successful individuals. , .. ., individuals. every teacher, no matter how —
9:51 pm
individuals. every teacher, no matter how good, _ individuals. every teacher, no matter how good, has - individuals. every teacher, no matter how good, has had i individuals. every teacher, no matter how good, has had to | individuals. every teacher, no - matter how good, has had to deal with unruly pupils or board peoples. what are your tips for getting through those kind of classes with those peoples?— those peoples? building relationships _ those peoples? building relationships with - those peoples? building - relationships with students. it is so important we build relationships with students, especially students from different cultural backgrounds. a lot of times, it can pose a challenge for teachers to really think about how to relate to their students but if we really got back i think one of the main things is listen to the student's voices, give them a voice in the classroom, give them a voice in the classroom, give them a voice in the classroom, give them a platform, let them be involved in the current curriculum, to be involved in what we reteach them. what you are teaching don't make it relatable to them and find innovative ways to use technology to bring different things into the classroom that they can relate to. and to just really engage them in learning. and to just really engage them in learnina. . , ., and to just really engage them in learnina. . ,, ., and to just really engage them in learnina. . ., , learning. have you told your peoples that ou learning. have you told your peoples that you just — learning. have you told your peoples that you just one? _ learning. have you told your peoples that you just one? i _ learning. have you told your peoples that you just one? i have _ learning. have you told your peoples that you just one? i have not - learning. have you told your peoples that you just one? i have not told i that you 'ust one? i have not told them that you just one? i have not told them yet- — that you just one? i have not told them yet- they — that you just one? i have not told them yet. they don't _ that you just one? i have not told them yet. they don't know! - that you just one? i have not told them yet. they don't know! i - that you just one? i have not told | them yet. they don't know! i have not told him _
9:52 pm
them yet. they don't know! i have not told him but _ them yet. they don't know! i have not told him but i _ them yet. they don't know! i have not told him but i know— them yet. they don't know! i have not told him but i know they - them yet. they don't know! i have not told him but i know they knowi not told him but i know they know now because i think they had a watch party and i hear all over social media their screams and everything in it feels amazing to know that i am so supported by my students. all of this, i do for them.— of this, i do for them. some countries — of this, i do for them. some countries find _ of this, i do for them. some countries find it _ of this, i do for them. some countries find it really - of this, i do for them. some countries find it really hard l of this, i do for them. some l countries find it really hard to recruit teachers and also to retain teachers. there are otherjobs that pay more money and their otherjobs that are less exhausting. how do you stay working as a teacher and how would you encourage others to become a teacher? you would you encourage others to become a teacher? ., ,, ., would you encourage others to become a teacher? ., ~' ., ~' would you encourage others to become a teacher? ., ,, ., ,, ., a teacher? you know, i think that education is _ a teacher? you know, i think that education is the _ a teacher? you know, i think that education is the legacy _ a teacher? you know, i think that education is the legacy that - a teacher? you know, i think that education is the legacy that we i a teacher? you know, i think that| education is the legacy that we all should have an opportunity to pass on. i know we have always heard teachers create all other professions, and so i don't take this lightly that i'm a teacher. i actually really celebrate my itself and i celebrate other teachers because we take pretty much we feel we do what most don't want to do or most people don't, i guess, build up the courage to do and they will tell
9:53 pm
us but i don't think we are as celebrated as we probably should. but it's really satisfying and it's really rewarding and every time i have ever suited to change of student's life you may remind me why it is so important to stay in the profession. it is so important to stay in the profession-— it is so important to stay in the rofession. , ., , ., profession. there is one question which a lot _ profession. there is one question which a lot of— profession. there is one question which a lot of people _ profession. there is one question which a lot of people are - profession. there is one question which a lot of people are dying i profession. there is one question which a lot of people are dying toi which a lot of people are dying to ask you. you have $1 million now. are you going to quit and retire? 0h, are you going to quit and retire? oh, no. ithink are you going to quit and retire? oh, no. i think that the initiatives that i started out with that brought me here, this isjust really giving me here, this isjust really giving me a platform, a seat at the highest able to really truly get to work and advocate for what really matters for my students which is equity and inclusion and inclusive education. notjust for my inclusion and inclusive education. not just for my students inclusion and inclusive education. notjust for my students in my school, but this, i would notjust for my students in my school, but this, iwould be notjust for my students in my school, but this, i would be the voice of all teachers and all students across the world and because collectively we all have to figure out how to solve this education crisis to make sure that
9:54 pm
there is a level playing field for all students and that they are able to access education at all levels. education is the rights we should definitely champion for all our students. �* definitely champion for all our students. ., ., ., students. and congratulations on our students. and congratulations on your ward- _ students. and congratulations on your ward. keishia _ students. and congratulations on your ward. keishia thorpe, - students. and congratulations on your ward. keishia thorpe, thanki students. and congratulations on - your ward. keishia thorpe, thank you so, so much. your ward. keishia thorpe, thank you so. so much-— so, so much. thank you and can also sa i so, so much. thank you and can also say i want — so, so much. thank you and can also say i want to — so, so much. thank you and can also say i want to thank _ so, so much. thank you and can also say i want to thank the _ so, so much. thank you and can also say i want to thank the varkey - say i want to thank the varkey foundation and unesco and even mr barkley for this wonderful opportunity for teachers all across the world. . ~ opportunity for teachers all across the world. ., ,, , ., ,., opportunity for teachers all across the world. ., ,, y., . the world. 0k, thank you so much. thank you — the world. 0k, thank you so much. thank you so _ the world. 0k, thank you so much. thank you so much. _ the world. 0k, thank you so much. thank you so much. scotland - the world. 0k, thank you so much. l thank you so much. scotland famous for many things... _ scotland is famous for many things known and celebrated the world over, from its natural beauty to its tartan fashion. but when world leaders arrive at glasgow, there is apparently only one thing they want to try — a sip of irn—bru. here was us congresswoman alexandria 0casio—cortez being gifted a can by the scottish first minister after she'd tweeted that she wanted to try a taste of the fizzy orange liquid. so do we! got mess of a can of the cult drink here in the studio. let's
9:55 pm
try it. that is sweeter than i thought it was going to be. good night. hello there. so far, the weather this week has been dominated byjust how mild it's felt for november. now, we will see a mild story into thursday, but rather murky with it. mist and fog playing its part, some slow to clear during the day. and even when it does so, there's going to be quite a lot of cloud around because of these weather fronts that will be moving their way slowly across the country. by the time we had through friday, this large area of low pressure will bring some wet and windy weather, but as we head towards the weekend, we do see a ridge of high pressure building, and that's going to quieten the story down considerably. and so that will certainly come as welcome news for saturday and for sunday. back to the here and now, though, thursday, as i say, a grey affair for many and the cloud thick enough with a spot or two of light drizzly rain. it'll stay misty and murky close to coasts and hills,
9:56 pm
and towards the latter stages of the afternoon, we'll see some wet and windier weather starting to push and from the far north west. in terms of the feel of the weather, still not too bad for the time of year, 10—14 celsius. now, as we move out of thursday into friday, the winds are going to continue to strengthen. gale—force gusts close to this area of low pressure across the far north west. that's going to drive in some wet weather, particularly into scotland and northern ireland, so we'll see bands of heavy rain at times pushing their way steadily eastwards through the day. perhaps not arriving into east anglia and the south—east corner until the end of the afternoon. in terms of the feel of the weather, though, through friday, we are likely to see temperatures peaking between 10—15 degrees. now, as we move out of friday into the start of the weekend, maybe some early rain in the south east first thing, but here's that ridge of high pressure building quite nicely, quieting things down on saturday from the west. certainly the best of the sunshine is likely to be the further west you are. that northerly breeze just
9:57 pm
clinging a little more cloud in off the north sea, so, here, a little bit cooler. we're likely to see temperatures peaking once again at around 15 degrees by the middle of saturday afternoon. now, as we move out of saturday towards sunday, we 'vestill got the high pressure with us, still keeping things largely fine and quiet. still the risk, though, of quite a lot of cloud around, i suspect, for the second half of the weekend. at least it's going to be dry, what we like to call a good deal of usable weather. you'll be able to get out and about. you'll be able to do some gardening maybe, even going to play a spot of football in the park. and those temperatures around about 11—13 degrees. that's pretty much where they should be, really, for this time of year. now, as we start to move out of sunday into monday, this weather front starting to push in from the far north west, but on the whole, the high hangs on in there for one more day. so, still a cloudy story, but still a largely quiet story to start the new working week. that weather front a weak affair as it bumps into the high, not much in the way of significant
9:58 pm
rain at all. and again, 11—12 degrees the overall high through monday afternoon. the change will start to come, though, through tuesday as the high pressure loses its grip, sinking slowly down to the south, and we're going to see areas of low pressure pushing in off the atlantic. certainly more isobars around, which means the winds will strengthen, gale—force gusts as the lows move through and there will be outbreaks of rain, particularly the further north and west you are. so, yes, as we head into next week, it will be a relatively dry start, but turning increasingly wet and windy from mid—week onwards. as for the temperatures, we've lost that really mild feel, but still the temperatures around where they should be for the time of year.
9:59 pm
10:00 pm
tonight at 10:00pm, in a surprise move, the world's biggest economies — china and the us — agree a joint approach to climate change. they will work together on key areas, such as cutting methane ? a powerful greenhouse gas ? promoting clean energy, as well as emissions from industry and transport. the united states and china have no shortage of differences, but on climate — on climate — cooperation is the only way to get this job done. earlier in the day, borisjohnson — the summit host — had appealed for "a determined push" to make progress in the closing days. we'll be asking what the china—us deal means for the overall outcome of the summit. also tonight... sir geoffrey cox, the conservative mp, denies any wrongdoing by using his parliamentary office to do outside work.
10:01 pm
as migrants in belarus continue to suffer as they try to enter

28 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on