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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 10, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the first draft of a possible agreement at the cop26 climate summit is published by the un. the document urges countries to strengthen commitments to cut carbon emissions within the next year. it comes as borisjohnson is heading back to glasgow to meet delegations, as part of attempts to bridge the gaps preventing a new global deal. a call for an investigation into british conservative mp sir geoffrey cox as labour claim pictures may show him breaking parliamentary rules. a pandemic of the unvaccinated — the german government explains why hospitals are close to being overwhelmed by record levels of covid. the vaccine deadline for care workers in england — from midnight tonight, those without two jabs won't be allowed
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to work in the care industry. poland says migrants have made attempts to break through the border from belarus overnight as the crisis between the countries escalates. during a tech conference, prince harry says he warned the head of twitter about political unrest in the us just 2a hours before the 6th of january capitol riots. jack and i were e—mailing each other prior to january the 6th, where i warned him that his platform was allowing a coup to be staged. that e—mail was sent the day before, and then it happened, and i haven't heard anything since. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. this morning, the first draft
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of a potential agreement setting out how countries around the world will cut their emissions has been published, laying out what negotiators hope will be the outcome of the cop26 summit in glasgow aimed at bringing climate change under control. the seven—page document urges nations to outline their long—term strategies to reach net—zero emissions by the middle of this century, and curb global warming to 1.5 degrees celsius. it also encourages richer nations to scale up its support for poorer nations. in addition, the agreement calls for countries to accelerate the phasing out of coal. but the document isn't the final outcome of cop26. it will now have to be negotiated and agreed upon by countries attending the talks and is likely to go through further drafts. borisjohnson is returning to glasgow today to meet those negotiators. he's urged nations to "pull out all the stops." our science and environment correspondent victoria gill is in glasgow. take us through some
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of the key points. yeah, as you said in your introduction, this is an early draft, and we will expect several more drafts before we see the final agreement, and of those will be negotiated. some of the points we have seen may be struck out, and there are placeholders still in this document. let mejust let me just take you through some of the key points, one is a number you will have heard quite a lot about over the last week or so, 1.5 degrees. a bit of disappointment that the language around aiming for the target of limiting global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees is still quite fuzzy. the document says it recognises that the impacts of climate change will be much lower at that temperature compared to 2 degrees, every fraction of a degree counts, as we have been hearing from developing countries and climate scientists throughout the meeting. but in that un language, it is not
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urging parties to set that specific target, so that is a disappointment. where it is still quite fuzzy is we are not clear on the transparent mechanisms for how countries report their carbon emission reductions, you know, how you account for and calculate and count back on carbon. and there is good news in terms of the level of ambition that we are seeing, something you mentioned in your introduction there. the mention of phasing out coal and subsidies forfossilfuels. as far as i know, that hasn't been mentioned in any of the un agreements previously. the paris agreement itself, a landmark treaty on climate change, did not mention fossil fuels, so this is something that sets out a new level of ambition. something that sets out a new level of ambition-— of ambition. what does it tell us about where _ of ambition. what does it tell us about where talks _ of ambition. what does it tell us about where talks are _ of ambition. what does it tell us about where talks are at - of ambition. what does it tell us about where talks are at the - of ambition. what does it tell us - about where talks are at the moment and how things might progress in the last few days? this and how things might progress in the last few days?— last few days? this tells us that we are where we _
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last few days? this tells us that we are where we expected _ last few days? this tells us that we are where we expected to - last few days? this tells us that we are where we expected to be, - are where we expected to be, negotiations are continuing, this is an early draft that will be expected to change, and even the ambitious language, particularly forsome language, particularly for some developing nations language, particularly forsome developing nations that are hanging on this in an existential way, there will be optimism, but it could be struck out at the final agreement, we are not there yet. so it is not far from where we would have expected, it is an early draft of an ongoing process, and we will find out more as the week goes on and possibly into the weekend, if negotiations run over.- possibly into the weekend, if negotiations run over. what has the reaction been _ negotiations run over. what has the reaction been from _ negotiations run over. what has the reaction been from the _ negotiations run over. what has the reaction been from the different - reaction been from the different environmental groups? we reaction been from the different environmental groups?- reaction been from the different environmental groups? we are still kind of gauging _ environmental groups? we are still kind of gauging that, _ environmental groups? we are still kind of gauging that, it _ environmental groups? we are still kind of gauging that, it is _ environmental groups? we are still kind of gauging that, it is mixed. i l kind of gauging that, it is mixed. i think there is some disappointment from developing countries who, you know, small island states and low—lying nations are absolutely existentially dependent on slashing those emissions in what has being called this decisive decade, and the
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target of 1.5 degrees, limiting global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees, so that is a key point, that countries are not being urged to set that as a specific target. there's also some doubt around financing adaptation, so rich countries need to be finance in poorer countries to adapt to an already changing climate, and at finance still is not there yet. we have missed the deadline, and this doesn't seem to get us closer to a doubt. but this draft agreement does set out that the un wants a global mechanism for compensation, so it talks about loss and damage, essentially recognising that climate change has already caused a lot of damage around the world, particularly for poorer countries and those low—lying island states, and those low—lying island states, and that there should be a global mechanism, essentially, to compensate for that damage and repair it. that is something new and positive, so reaction is mixed, and
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we will keep following the negotiations, i am sure i will be coming back to you with more drafts as the week goes on. well, while borisjohnson is due to arrive in glasgow later, he is facing more trouble in westminster over the row regarding the extra work some mps do on top of their parliamentaryjobs. labour is calling on the government to open a standards investigation into the conservative mp sir geoffrey cox. they say this video may show the former attorney general using his commons office to carry out private work, which labour says would be a "brazen breach" of parliamentary rules. the bbc has contacted sir geoffrey, a former attorney general, for comment. our political correspondent jonathan blake joins us from westminster. we have not heard from sir geoffrey cox himself as yet, jonathan, but there is a lot of pressure, even the normally supportive newspapers of the government, a number of different mps being named, questions being asked, especially over sir
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geoffrey cox's use of his commons office. ~ , , ._ geoffrey cox's use of his commons office. ~ , , , ., , office. while yesterday there was [en of office. while yesterday there was plenty of criticism _ office. while yesterday there was plenty of criticism coming - office. while yesterday there was plenty of criticism coming his - office. while yesterday there was| plenty of criticism coming his way way of the government over his work as a lawyer while serving as an mp, particularly travelling abroad to advise the british virgin islands during a corruption inquiry there, there was no evidence to suggest he had broken any parliamentary rules, but it is being seen in a different light today after that video emerged which, again, was available publicly online, which appears to possibly show him undertaking work in that capacity from his commons office, his office that he holds as an mp at westminster. and that is a key point of difference, because the code of conduct governing mps' behaviour is quite clear, in that mps should not use any resources or facilities that they are provided with by the taxpayer, as a result of them being a member of parliament, in the
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course of any other work in which they are benefiting personally. so thatis they are benefiting personally. so that is why labour have doubled down on this, that is why they are calling for an investigation. no comments yet from sir geoffrey cox himself. health secretary sajid javid was asked to this morning what he thought about this. is it ok to do a virtual meeting for your private employer from your house of commons office? look, i'm not going to get into any individual case. . i am asking you about the principle. if you have an external interest, i can't see why you would be - using anything funded by the taxpayer. - that includes your office? i think it would include your office space, yes. you were working forjp morgan. did you ever do virtual meetings for them from your house of commons office? i have had phone calls. i might've received - a phone call or something. but if you are saying, _ did i use parliamentary computers or anything else - for something like that, i wouldn't have done that. and if you had done,
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you would have thought it was the wrong thing to do? you are trying to draw me down a particular line on mr cox... i no, it'sjust interesting, because it is something he has done that you would have chosen not to do. you don't know he has done that, allegations have been made. - you are responding to allegations that have been put out there. - it does look like his office, though, doesn't it? that is not for me. that is something that should be looked at _ by people that are independentl and the appropriate authorities. well, labour are suggesting there has been an egregious, brazen breach of the rules here, and mps on all sides are finding their conduct under question. while labour tried to put the pressure on the government over this and turn it into a leadership issue, calling for changes in the system, sir keir starmer is potentially in a bit of a difficult spot, because the most recent register of interests shows that he was paid around £25,000 in the past 12 months for work
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undertaken as a lawyer before 2020. now, that may well be a long way before, some years ago, and he said that he stopped practising as a lawyer, but he was asked this morning by colleagues at bbc radio leicester what is personal position was on mps having second jobs. there isi million miles between what _ there isi million miles between what owen paterson was doing and one of our— what owen paterson was doing and one of our mps. _ what owen paterson was doing and one of our mp5, for tooting, who is a qualified — of our mp5, for tooting, who is a qualified health professional, she has been — qualified health professional, she has been working on the front line during _ has been working on the front line during covid in a&e in her local hospitah — during covid in a&e in her local hospital. so i think we need to have a clear_ hospital. so i think we need to have a clear distinction between those two types of cases. i would let the independent commissioner decide which _ independent commissioner decide which side of the line, i think there — which side of the line, i think there is— which side of the line, i think there is common sense, which side of there is common sense, which side of the line _ there is common sense, which side of the line cases fall. it is difficult, because mps, are they allowed to take phone calls, as sajid javid said he had, send e—mails from the commons office if they are doing outside work? mps'
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jobs are obviously unstable, they can risk losing previous professional careers, and then you lose great expertise and people coming into politics. that lose great expertise and people coming into politics.— coming into politics. that is the debate that _ coming into politics. that is the debate that is _ coming into politics. that is the debate that is being _ coming into politics. that is the debate that is being hired - coming into politics. that is the debate that is being hired at. coming into politics. that is the | debate that is being hired at the moment, does it benefit parliament and the country as a whole to have people in public life who have experience, current experience, doing otherjobs, which can inform their work as an mp? but on the flip side, do some mps take advantage of that and do work which, potentially, calls into question whether they are using their elected office for personal gain, rather than to serve their constituents, and that is very much the live debate being had at westminster at the moment, and one which there is no clear answer to at the moment, but certainly efforts on all sides to clarify the rules and potentially change the rules of the game for mps going forward. and a game for mps going forward. and a number of mps _ game for mps going forward. and a number of mps being _ game for mps going forward. and a number of mps being named - game for mp5 going forward. and a number of mps being named with their previous activity is being looked
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at, this whole row really has escalated from where it was just over a week ago with 0wen paterson. does it look as though geoffrey cox, for example, will be referred for investigation?— for example, will be referred for investigation? there is no sign of that this morning _ investigation? there is no sign of that this morning yet. _ investigation? there is no sign of that this morning yet. it - investigation? there is no sign of that this morning yet. it is - that this morning yet. it is obviously what labour think should happen, but it will be down to the parliamentary commissioner for standards, kathryn stone, as to whether any investigation is taken up. that process, though, is not played out in public, and we won't know for some time if anything is under there. know for some time if anything is underthere. so know for some time if anything is under there. so i expect the moves to take it in that direction, certainly from the opposition's point of view, will continue, and i will be further scrutiny of all mps and their actions and how much money they have earned in the cause of otherjobs while serving as mps here at westminster as part of the general debate on standards and
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conduct in public life that has come to the fore after the government's botched, failed attempts a week ago to overhaul the system.— to overhaul the system. jonathan blake, to overhaul the system. jonathan blake. many _ to overhaul the system. jonathan blake, many thanks _ to overhaul the system. jonathan blake, many thanks indeed - to overhaul the system. jonathan blake, many thanks indeed there to overhaul the system. jonathan - blake, many thanks indeed there come alive at westminster. the authorities in some parts of germany have banned unvaccinated people from bars, restaurants and leisure facilities as the country battles a fourth wave of covid. in recent days, germany has recorded its highest rates of infection since the pandemic began and doctors warn that some hospitals will soon reach capacity. 0ur berlin correspondent, jenny hill, has been to the state of saxony, which has the lowest vaccine take—up in the country, and the highest rate of infection. the relentless struggle against a persistent and brutal reality. against a persistent this is intensive care at leipzig hospital, where the covid ward is filling up fast. the young woman in this bed had just given birth. her baby's fine, but doctors weren't
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sure if she would survive. there are 18 covid patients here — only four of them vaccinated. it is very difficult to get staff motivated to treat patients now in this fourth wave. a large part of the population still underestimate the problem, and everybody should have a friend, someone in theirfamily who had covid infection in the past and therefore should realise what the problem could be for themselves, but nevertheless, we are still seeing so many patients that are not vaccinated. germany's anti—vaxxers are on furious form. 16 million germans over the age of 12 are still unvaccinated. this region, saxony, has the lowest vaccine uptake in the country and the highest rate of infection. the authorities here now restrict unvaccinated people.
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they're banned from restaurants, cinemas, football matches. this is discrimination, - and we want to say vehemently we do not accept this in our society. - they say the vaccination is ok, | i should give it to my children. j never! i have a feeling it should never go to my body, i and i will fight all i can— to prevent it coming into my body! the german government admits it's unlikely now to persuade these people to accept a vaccine, but it has a bigger problem — how to stop the deep voice of dissent growing into real social division. because what many fear is another lockdown. nadine's bar barely survived the last one. even before the authorities required it, she banned unvaccinated drinkers. my business is dying. my dreams came true, and now they are suffering from people who do not do the logical thing to prevent others from getting ill or dying, and i am so angry!
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long queues at this vaccine centre — evidence perhaps that some have changed their minds, though germany is rolling out the boosterjab as well, nervous about waning protection. but on the ward, they fear the damage is done. operations have been cancelled, procedures postponed to make way for covid patients. doctors here warn the fourth wave could be the worst yet. they told us nearly half of the people who end up here will die, and for the country which invented one of the world's first covid vaccines, that is a source of great shame. jenny hill, bbc news. the health secretary has also been speaking today about covid—19 and has defended the new compulsory vaccination rules that take effect for care home workers in england at midnight, saying they're "all about patient safety and protecting vulnerable people. "
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yesterday, sajid javid announced it will be compulsory for front—line nhs staff in england to be fully vaccinated against covid by the beginning of april. from midnight tonight, unjabbed care home staff in england cannot work unless they are exempt. the government estimates there are still 32,000 of them who aren't fully vaccinated. this rule will also apply to anybody who enters a care home for work, including any agency workers and tradespeople. jon donnison has this report. for care homes across england, many already short on staff, tonight's midnight deadline has been looming. so you've still got some edges here, look. here at hill house nursing home in croydon, all workers, except two who say they have a medical exemption, have now been vaccinated. but for some, they took some persuading. watching the news, understanding statistics, i think it made me understand that it's notjust good for myself, but also for residents, to protect them. also, my colleagues, my family, people around me.
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in croydon, and across england, there has been a big push to get care home staff vaccinated. but there are still gaps. in croydon, we have 94% of care workers that have taken the initialjab. 88% has taken the double jab. we've provided a plethora of initiatives in order to get there. but the government says there are still 32,000 care home workers in england who haven't yet been fully jabbed. unless they have a medical exemption, they won't be able to work in the sector any more — until they're double vaccinated. today's my last day of caring, which is really sad, because i love myjob, and i'm quite annoyed about it, to be fair. in regards to this vaccine, i feel like it's being forced on us, or on me. and i don't agree with that, to be fair, and i kind of think it's against human rights.
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losing people like delma means some care homes could be stretched in terms of staffing. but the government says the compulsory vaccination policy is needed to protect care home residents. and from april, all front—line nhs staff in england, unless medically exempt, will also have to be fully vaccinated against covid—19 to keep theirjobs. unions are warning that too could lead to staff shortages. jon donnison, bbc news. the welsh parliament has voted to extend the use of covid passes to cinemas and theatres from next week. the scheme currently only applies to nightclubs and large events, such as rugby games. visitors will have to show they are fully vaccinated, have tested negative for covid, or have recently had the virus to enter the venue. back to our main story now, and the first draft of a potential agreement setting out how countries around the world will cut their emissions has been published, laying out what negotiators hope will be the outcome of the cop26
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summit in glasgow aimed at bringing climate change under control. moving to renewable energy is important to reduce emissions, but a report from the ellen macarthur foundation has found that 45% of emissions come from the way we make and use products and food. dame ellen macarthurjoins me now. thank you very much indeed for joining us today. i don't know whether you've had a chance to see what's come out with this first draft from glasgow, it is early days and obviously not the final report, but what is your sense of how much progress is being made there? aha, lat progress is being made there? a lot of rouress progress is being made there? a lot of progress has _ progress is being made there? a lot of progress has been _ progress is being made there? lot of progress has been made, but obviously with all these targets, it is what actually happens afterwards, thatis is what actually happens afterwards, that is the great challenge, isn't it, how we deliver that? i think it is very interesting that there is a strong narrative on finance around cop26 and how we finance the
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transition, and obviously that comes in two elements, government finance and something ifelt in two elements, government finance and something i felt in glasgow last week, that business is really there waiting to deliver what is necessary, and i sat on a panel with the number two in black rock, and it was interesting that he was saying the money is there, we just need to get it to where it needs to be, and thatis get it to where it needs to be, and that is key when we talk about this 55-45%, it is that is key when we talk about this 55—45%, it is notjust about renewable energy, it is about how we make and use things, including food, and that is vital for businesses. have you become interested in this as a result of your adventures at sea? ~ , ., ,., as a result of your adventures at sea? ~ ., ., as a result of your adventures at sea? ~ i., . ., ., sea? when you sail around the world on a boat, sea? when you sail around the world on a boat. you _ sea? when you sail around the world on a boat, you really— sea? when you sail around the world on a boat, you really begin _ sea? when you sail around the world on a boat, you really begin to - on a boat, you really begin to understand the definition of finite, what you have on the bout is all you have, and at the finish of the round the world in 2005, i realise our world is no different. we have finite resources available, and yet our economic model uses them up, and
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this is where my interest in a circular economy came from. if we have a linear system that makes something out of a material and throws it away, it can never run in the long term, no matter how efficient we make it. we need an economic model that is regenerative and restorative, circular, where you eliminate waste and pollution, you circulate what you need in the economy, and you have the opportunity in that to regenerate natural systems, and that gives you an idea of what success looks like. and when you say that 45% of greenhouse emissions come from the way we make and use products including food, what in particular? there is a massive amount of embedded energy in product. if you take a car engine, for example, if you re—manufacture it, it saves 85% energy and materials, reducing the energy and materials, reducing the energy needed to power our economic model. if you produce a new one, it is 100%, so you can massively save
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the energy needed for the system when you shift to circular models. regenerative agriculture has massive carbon savings, when you look at keeping products in the economic system for longer, such as fashion, if we wear clothes for twice as long, carbon emissions are reduced by 45%. so big shifts can happen through how we make and use things, which are notjust about renewables, but how our economic model actually functions, how as consumers we have access to the choices that can help fix the system. i access to the choices that can help fix the system.— access to the choices that can help fix the system. i heard an interview with the head _ fix the system. i heard an interview with the head of _ fix the system. i heard an interview with the head of a _ fix the system. i heard an interview with the head of a big _ fix the system. i heard an interview with the head of a big german - fix the system. i heard an interview with the head of a big german car l with the head of a big german car company saying it is possible to make a car from completely renewable materials, but obviously, you know, cars, clothing companies, they are in business to make money and sell products, so it is a complete contradiction in terms, isn't it, what everyone is asking for? well, no, when what everyone is asking for? well, no. when you _ what everyone is asking for? well, no, when you look— what everyone is asking for? well, no, when you look at _ what everyone is asking for? well, no, when you look at the - what everyone is asking for? well, no, when you look at the circular. no, when you look at the circular economic model, it is notjust the design of the product, the card that
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you build with recycled materials, but how you have access to it. we did a big study several years ago looking at a washing machine, and when you look at how we have access to a washing machine now, we buy it, we pay tax when we buy it, we own all the materials in the home, and when it breaks, we pay landfill tax when it breaks, we pay landfill tax when it breaks, we pay landfill tax when it goes into landfill. within a circular economy, we would have a machine provided as a service, it would be repaired when there was a problem, we would not own the materials in it, it would be built well and re—manufacture bought by people who understand what is in it, so it goes back to the manufacturer because they can extract all the valuable materials and feed that back into the economy. if we own it, it becomes a waste, because we have no idea what is in it. it is changing that system, and most importantly that is beneficial for the manufacturer, because they are not tied to continually buying new raw materials to feed into the system to make money only when they
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sell them, but they keep the product within their own system, and we save because we don't have to buy all the materials in the washing machine. economically, it is a win—win. the economically, it is a win-win. the re ort economically, it is a win-win. the report talks _ economically, it is a win—win. the report talks about food production, can you explain what you are calling for there? ~ ., . for there? with our current agricultural _ for there? with our current agricultural system, - for there? with our current agricultural system, it - for there? with our current agricultural system, it is i for there? with our current i agricultural system, it is very extractive, we use a lot of chemical fertiliser, and the cost of soil degradation is $115 billion. if we can switch to more regenerative systems, whereby farmers provide nutrients to the soil, by feeding biological material back to the soil, which has happened for billions of years, you have the ability to regenerate natural capital and make the farmland better. we are beginning to see bigger companies now, some of the biggest in the world, switching to saying they will produce nature positive moods. if you buy this product, the world will be a better place, which is a very different message from that which is making the world slightly less bad. it is a
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the world slightly less bad. it is a comlex the world slightly less bad. it is a complex mix _ the world slightly less bad. it is a complex mix of _ the world slightly less bad. it is a complex mix of change _ the world slightly less bad. it is a complex mix of change in - the world slightly less bad. it is a complex mix of change in behaviour, a lot of government money, perhaps more taxation, and a big push from the private sector, driven by consumer demand, isn't it? it is a revolution in terms of what you're talking about here. i do revolution in terms of what you're talking about here.— talking about here. i do not think it is all consumer _ talking about here. i do not think it is all consumer demand, - talking about here. i do not think it is all consumer demand, that l talking about here. i do not think| it is all consumer demand, that is part of it, but big business needs to be here in the long term. another comment made by the number two in blackrock was that business as usual means gdp reduces by 25% in the next two decades, so that doesn't work, we need a new model, and many of the businesses want to exist in the future, they want to deliver benefits and profits and employ people in the future, and actually this model can run in the long term. and then in many situations and examples, policy can follow that. dame ellen macarthur, very good to speak to you, thank you for your time today. speak to you, thank you for your time today-— a state of emergency has come into force in lithuania as the country grapples with a surge in illegal immigration from neighbouring belarus.
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lithuania fears that migrants currently stuck along the belarusian border with poland will try to find alternative routes to enter the european union. the eu has said it will impose additional sanctions on belarus, because of what it describes as president lukashenko's "gangster—style approach" towards the migrants. aru na iyengar reports. lithuanian troops ready to assist border guards. the alert level is raised. the new measures cover a short five kilometre stretch along a 670 kilometre border with belarus. non—residents are banned. officers have the right to search cars and people. no gatherings are allowed. translation: i do not want to scare anyone, l but you see the situation around the polish border. so as we have seen repeatedly in the story, we simply have to be prepared for various surprises. lithuania, along with latvia and poland, shares a border with belarus.
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the polish prime minister has accused president lukashenko of orchestrating the crisis by allowing people to cross into the eu — this in revenge for eu sanctions. more than 4000 crossed into lithuania injune and july. over 3000 are awaiting for asylum to be processed. they're held in centres like this. under the new measures, freedom to communicate will now be restricted. translation: we face a hybrid | attack, an unconventional attack, where unfortunately children are being pushed to the foreground, they are being manipulated, and we have to evaluate this very rationally. this is the scene lithuania is trying to avert. poland's border with belarus, and hundreds of migrants converge, they're living in makeshift camps and the temperature is freezing. some have died. there are children and babies — many haven't eaten for days. all hoping to get into the eu. aruna iyengar, bbc news.
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the headlines on bbc news. the first draft of a possible agreement at the cop26 climate summit is published by the un. the document urges countries to "strengthen" commitments to cut carbon emissions within the next year. it comes as borisjohnson is heading back to glasgow to meet delegations, as part of attempts to bridge the gaps preventing a new global deal. a call for an investigation into british conservative mp sir geoffrey cox as labour claim pictures may show him breaking parliamentary rules. a pandemic of the unvaccinated. the german government explains why hospitals are close to being overwhelmed by record levels of covid. the vaccine deadline for care workers in england — from midnight tonight those without two jabs won't be allowed to work in the care industry. poland says migrants have made attempts to break through the border from belarus overnight as the crisis between the countries escalates. during a tech conference, prince harry says he warned the head of twitter about political unrest in the us — just 2a hours before the 6th of january capitol riots.
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the un says more than 70 drivers working for the world food programme have been detained by the ethiopian authorities. their trucks were blocked in the afar regiona town on the only route through which aid can be delivered to millions of desperate war victims in the tigray region. a un spokesperson said it was liaising with the ethiopian government to understand the reasons behind the detentions. human rights watch says a government imposed blockade on ethiopia s tigray region is preventing women who have been raped during the one year conflict from getting the medical care they desperately need. the rights group says that during the first nine months of the conflict ethiopian, eritrean, and amhara forces pillaged and destroyed health facilities in tigray.
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live now to emmanuel igunza.emmanuel igunza this marks another low between the un and the ethopian government. 0n un and the ethopian government. on tuesday, round 16 staff were detained by the ethopian authorities, so far, there has not been any reason given by the authorities why they were detained, they want to say that six of them were released, but they are still trying to get access to some of those who are still being detained and a few months ago, several un staff were told to be get out of the country, and this has caused much concern, because currently, as the conflict continues in the north of the country, millions of people are in need of food, medicine and water, and with this stuff now, with the relations between the united
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nations, and the government being at a very low, it means that these people will go without food that is needed. since october, since mid—october, only a0 trucks of food and medicine have been allowed to enter into the tigray area and this is quite a small number, considering that the un says it needs at least1 00 trucks to be arriving in the area every day for them to meet the needs of those who are in urgent need of assistance. how are any international mediation efforts being played out here? what prospect of is session they build to make some progress? well, well, they are —— various channels which are being pursued. the african union, the special envoy, the former president is leading that effort, he has spoken to both prime minister and
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the leadership of the tplf, the tying grey people's liberation front. he has gone to some areas where the trucks are stuck. he has gone to am harare where this war has moved on, and also, significantly, is that the kenyan president, who we are he sits at the chair person of the african union security council has been trying to mediate. quite a few channels to trying to bring the parties together to try and talk and end this war, but so far nothing significant has been achieved. we will leave it there. thank you. the husband of iranian detainee, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe is into his 18th day of a hunger strike outside the foreign office. richard ratcliffe wants to put pressure on the prime minister to meet iranian delegates
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at the climate conference this week, to demand freedom for britons detained in iran — but there are now concerns over his wellbeing. peter henley has more. even though she's not been well herself, barbara radcliffe has been determined to keep making the trip up from hampshire to support her son on his hunger strike. apart from anything else, i'm going up every day to check my boy. 0n the train she shows me the whatsapp messages the family send to keep spirits up, including nazanin in iran. mainly our conversation is about gabriella, and it's heartbreaking watching her on whatsapp, watching us bringing up her little girl. yeah, and there's nothing we can do about it. nazanin was arrested at tehran airport five years ago, taking then baby gabriella to see her parents for the first time. she totally denied the charges of conspiring against the iranian state. after serving a five yearjail term, she has been stopped from leaving,
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with new threats to lock up again. are you 0k? yeah. richard ratliffe's hunger strike outside the doors of the foreign office is now entering its 18th day. he was visited by the labour leader keir starmer this week. it's acknowledged the british government owes the iranians £a00 million over a cancelled arms deal. and barbara radcliffe knows which politician she wants to tackle over that. the one you really want is borisjohnson? yes. when i see him i will be speaking to him. firmly? i hope i will have the courage to do that, yes. i spoke to him twice in a nice polite way. but this time, i won't be rude, but i think i'm going to ask him why he can't pay the money. the camp has become so well established, they even receive parcels, but not food. this is a hunger strike, as richard's brother—in—law, a gp, reminds us. we are keeping as close an eye on him as we possibly can. it's full on, it's very busy here, it's difficult. and all that we have
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at our disposal is, you know, checking in with him, talking to him, making sure he's as well as he can be under the circumstances. he's determined, isn't he? he's a very, very determined person, yeah. so how much further can he stick this out? an iranian delegation visits the foreign office on thursday. you get more stubborn. the longer it goes on, you're less able to make that decision. so, it's not... i think we've got a danger point beyond which we don't want to go. we're now into the uncertainty point, where, you know, it's definitely damaging, but it's hopefully not permanently damaging. you want to see the iranians, don't you, when they come on thursday? i want to be here on thursday, yeah, yeah. i'm not backing down. peter henley, bbc news. prince harry has said he warned twitter bosses about potential political unrest in the us just a day before the capitol
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riots in january. he was speaking at a tech conference about the impact of social media. mark lobel reports. my twitter, my notifications have blown up. in his latest salvo against hate on social media, the former army captain, now misinformation warrior, joined a 33 minute live session for wired's rewired tech conference entitled the internt lie machine. where it emerged referring to these angry riots at the us capitol onjanuary 6th he is also, it seems somewhat of a soothsayer. have you ever had a chance to present your case to the leaders of these companies, mark zuckerberg, jack dorsey? no, not directly, not personally. jack and i were emailing each other prior to jan 6th, where i warned him his platform was allowing a coup to be staged that we know was sent the day before and then it happened and i haven't heard from him since.
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in march twitter�*s chief executive jack dorsey conceded during congressional testimony that yes, his platform had played a role in the storming of the us capitol, but added... prince harry warned a small group of accounts is causing a large amount of chaos online, sullying the internet for future generations, by filling it with hate, division and lies. misinformation is a global humanitarian crisis. as you quite rightly pointed out, i felt it personally over the years and i am now watching it happen globally, affecting everyone, not just america, literally everyone around the world, and the, i guess the scariest part about it you don't need to be online to be affected by this. leading to this personal swipe on somewhat well trodden ground for harry, at sections of the uk press. they have successfully turned fact
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based news into opinion based gossip with devastating consequences for the country. asked for his solution to the problem, he's not as he and meghan have done, conceding it is far too addictive for that, but instead he says it is for big companies and advertisers to kick out the troublesome few whose hate and lies are then spread far and wide. mark lobel, bbc news. there is startling new evidence from africa that shows how climate change is dramatically increasing the number of droughts and floods on the continent. the world bank says the frequency of droughts tripled in the past decade, with parts of south africa already experiencing a devastating seven year dry period. but the city of cape town, which came close to running out of water completely three years ago, is finding unusual ways to cope. 0ur africa correspondent andrew harding reports on south africa's own climate battle.
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high in the mountains around cape town, a bold and frantic fight to save rain water. teams here are scaling the wilderness to remove alien trees, armies of foreign invaders like the pine. that's because pine trees are thirsty, sucking up a quarter of the water that might otherwise end up in cape town's reservoirs. every stump here means more waterfor humans. and these days, africa's big, growing cities need every raindrop. girls in a makeshift settlement near cape town gather at a communal tap. drought, the calling card of climate change, has become part of their childhood. it's not something that will happen in the future, it's something that is happening right now, so it makes me worried,
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frustrated, it makes me want to take a stand and bring up change. it's three years now since cape town came terrifyingly close to running out of water completely. we were here then to report on the world's first big modern city to face that threat. back then, a devastating drought turned the city's reservoirs into dust bowls. the good news is that it shocked the authorities and the public into taking drastic action to slash their water usage. the thought of running out of water in the city was quite tragic and very scary, and the city did quite well in preaching the message of saving water and we halved our water use. but cape town's successes are the exception here in south africa.
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not far from the city, the worst drought in more than a century is in full fury. is this the worst you've ever seen? by far. definitely by far. man—made climate change blamed for these scenes in the eastern cape. in desperation, wild animals are coming to farms in search of food. but it's been seven years with almost no rainfall. farmers here, experts in scraping by, now trudge across their bone dry pasture land and wonder if the game is up. sometimes i don't want to think about the future. if you see are animals now, i'm not thinking about tomorrow. i'm just struggling to see how can i survive today? the future is dark for us infarming.
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and in the towns and even cities here, the mood is not much cheerier. frantic scenes when a charity brings a water truck to a settlement where the taps have been dry for months. but there is more to this than drought. it is easy and very tempting to blame the drought for the desperate conditions facing these families, but the truth is that this is about a failure of planning, of maintaining the infrastructure here. it's about a lack of investment. across this region, some a0% of water reserves are being lost to leaking pipes. that's down to mismanagement and corruption. i'm worried about the future because it's going to be worse and worse and worse.
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why do you think it's going to get worse? because they don't look after us. the government? yeah, they don't look after us. this is now a continent's challenge to manage water better and to manage it more fairly. because the droughts are queueing up ominously. and there is no time to spare. in the uk, the flasgship retail and food chain marks & spencer has reported pre—tax profits of 187 million pounds for the six months to october, against losses of nearly 88 million for the same period last year. it has now raised its annual profits outlook, but says there are still problems over extra costs involved with supply chain issues. our business correspondent alice baxter said these results were better than expected. reasons for marks & spencer to be
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cheerful this morning, shares were up cheerful this morning, shares were up 20% wednesday morning on the back of these better than expected results, pre—tax profit for the six months up to october, results, pre—tax profit for the six months up to 0ctober,187.million, compared to a loss for the same period last year of over £87 million, significant increases were made in the food division, that continues to be the cash cow of the company. sales increased by 10.a%, but happily for the company, the changes they have been implementing in their clothing and home division seb for have started to pay dividend, full price sales round 17.%. lots of analysts pointing to that partnership with 0cado, the online food deliverer as a real driver to the success there. some saying they were late to that online home delivery party, but, they are making great strides to make up with it. they have chose to prioritise their downline presence as well,
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perhaps late to the party, but the results really showing that that change of focus, that pivoting of focus is really starting to work. the chief executive steve rowe saying this morning the hard yards of driving long—term change are being be —— beginning to be borne out, but there are serious head winds on the horizon, which the company is acutely wear of, steve rowe again saying that given the history of m&s the company wouldn't overclaim process, they are planning for increasing significant changes in supply coast, owes —— lorry driver shortages are posing challenges, also global supply chain issues, m&s not immune to those as well, but, the company adding they have deployed several recruitment projects, and, incentives they hope will attract new drivers and it also
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believes it is food services business is comparatively well placed, they are saying, they believe it is resilient enough to deal within the shortages and to weather the short—term storms, better. they are also adding that driver, they are hoping that long—term growth and loyalty will help to keep and recruit drivers through that food delivery service 0cado, so the food side of the business till the main driver behind the growth but this pivot in focus towards trying to boost its home department and clothing showing in the result. pre—tax profits up to october up over £187 million 0ctober up over £187 million compared to that big loss in same period last year. a £3 billion mass legal action against google over claims that it secretly tracked millions of iphone
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users' internet activity has been blocked by the supreme court. the case was brought by complainant richard lloyd, who's the former director of consumer rights group which? he alleged that between 2011 and 2012 google collected data on health, race, ethnicity, sexuality and finance through apple's safari web browser, even when users had chosen a "do not track" privacy setting. let's get more on efforts to tackle climate change. earlier this year carmaker nissan announced a major expansion of electric vehicle production at its car plant in sunderland. the development will see the creation of more than one—and—a—half—thousand jobs at the site and several thousand more in the supply chain. (ani)most of these will facilitate the manufacture of the company's new—generation, all—electric model at the site. alongside this, partner company, envision aesc, will build a new electric battery plant which it believes will produce enough batteries to power over 100,000 nissan electric vehicles each year. nissan hopes the site will be operational by 202a,
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when the level of uk—made components in cars manufactured in the uk is required to start increasing, in line with the terms of the uk's trade deal with the eu. the development has already received billions of pounds worth of funding, with the government thought to have contributed tens of millions of pounds towards the cost. well today, transport is the focus of the cop26 climate change conference in glasgow so we are checking in with expansion project in sunderland. let's cross to our transport correspondent caroline davis, and, caroline, sunderland are pretty icon nick place in the uk for all sorts of reasons, econnick, this is an interesting new move. yes of reasons, econnick, this is an interesting new move.- of reasons, econnick, this is an interesting new move. yes i am in a ureat interesting new move. yes i am in a great location _ interesting new move. yes i am in a great location today, _ interesting new move. yes i am in a great location today, on _ interesting new move. yes i am in a great location today, on transport i great location today, on transport day for cop26. transport contributes 27% of uk's carbon emissions and 90% of those are from road users so no wonder the government wants to try and push people out of their petrol
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and push people out of their petrol and diesel cars and into electric vehicles instead. we are here in a factory that makes the batteries for those vehicle, you can see this is the product that is currently being charged up, lit go from here, the final stage, charged up, lit go from here, the finalstage, once charged up, lit go from here, the final stage, once it is fully charged, i will be installed at the bottom of nissan cars and the gentleman who will be able to tell us more about what is going on at the plant is chris. you are the finance and managing director here. what do you do? so basic will i my yob is to oversee the overall uk operations, the battery plant here in sunderland has been operating for nine year, in that time we have produced badries that will power 180,000 electric vehicles sos that is what has been on the road in europe from production from this site. when the factory was first constructed in 2012, it was the uk and europe's first gigafactory so my job is to oversee current operations but look to the future in business
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expansion. but look to the future in business expansion-_ but look to the future in business exansion. ., _ , ., expansion. there is obviously been a bi surae expansion. there is obviously been a big surge in — expansion. there is obviously been a big surge in interest _ expansion. there is obviously been a big surge in interest in _ expansion. there is obviously been a big surge in interest in electric- big surge in interest in electric vehicle, many more people buying them this year while diesel and petrol vehicles have started to drop down, can you keep up with the demand for that at the moment? yes. demand for that at the moment? yes, the factory is — demand for that at the moment? yes, the factory is not _ demand for that at the moment? 1a: the factory is not operating at demand for that at the moment? 12: the factory is not operating at fay capacity so we have upward flex, we are seeing strong demand so that is positive at the minute. we are seeing an up take in electric vehicle adoption which helps our business in terms of battery demand. if we look forward to future, we are very pleased injuly if we look forward to future, we are very pleased in july we if we look forward to future, we are very pleased injuly we were able to announce we have secured the supply for batteries for the next generation electric vehicle but nissan will make in sunderland and to support that we will be scaling up to support that we will be scaling up and invest £a50 million, in a brand—new factory in sunderland, to provide the battery manufacturing capacity for the future it needs. we know that electric vehicles are better than diesel and pretoria petrol in terms of the environment but it is carbon heavy process to be
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able to be produce the batteries that are dependent, you are holding one of the cells here at the moment. there is 192 you told me. 1512 one of the cells here at the moment. there is 192 you told me.— there is 192 you told me. 192 of these in a _ there is 192 you told me. 192 of these in a finished _ there is 192 you told me. 192 of these in a finished battery - there is 192 you told me. 192 of| these in a finished battery pack. how do you make sure we are notjust moving the carbon emissions from the road into somewhere else that we are not just creating road into somewhere else that we are notjust creating more problems where else. 50 notjust creating more problems where else-— notjust creating more problems where else. ., ., , ., where else. so our factory today the electricity we _ where else. so our factory today the electricity we consume _ where else. so our factory today the electricity we consume here - where else. so our factory today the electricity we consume here is - electricity we consume here is carbon neutral already, so we are not in our energy intensive production process, we are not using carbon in producing the battery. in our new factory in partnership with nissan and sunderland city council we will be implementing a micro grid scheme which means the electricity that will power the new plant will come 100% from renewable energy source, web will see in the future the supply chain that is heavily dominated by shea will move to europe and the uk, as battery manufacturing capacity in the region increase, and that gives the opportunity to decarbonise the supply chain when those changes are made. ., ., ., .
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supply chain when those changes are made. ., . . . . ., made. you are the finance director here, made. you are the finance director here. one — made. you are the finance director here. one of _ made. you are the finance director here, one of the _ made. you are the finance director here, one of the questions - made. you are the finance director here, one of the questions lots - made. you are the finance director here, one of the questions lots of| here, one of the questions lots of people will be asking, these are still often much more expensive than buying a petrol car, buying a diesel car, when are those prices going to drop down, when will you make sure that will going to backbench more affordable? we that will going to backbench more affordable? ~ :, that will going to backbench more affordable? ~ . , ., , affordable? we have started seeing them come down, _ affordable? we have started seeing them come down, there _ affordable? we have started seeing them come down, there has - affordable? we have started seeing them come down, there has been l affordable? we have started seeing them come down, there has been aj them come down, there has been a significant percentage redistrict council six nations battery cost, looking forward there are areas where costs will continue to come down, there is the technology improvement, so if we think of our own product, this cell we make today, the future that will be made in the few trihas 30% more energy on a like—for—like basis, so on a cost per kilowatt hour that will bring it down proportionately. we are goes to see as battery manufacturing scales up see as battery manufacturing scales up the increased capacity in the supply chain will allow the materials will come down as economies of scale and efficiencies are realised there. we
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economies of scale and efficiencies are realised there.— are realised there. we are in a live facto so are realised there. we are in a live factory so times — are realised there. we are in a live factory so times this _ are realised there. we are in a live factory so times this happens. - are realised there. we are in a live j factory so times this happens. two seconds. factory so times this happens. two seconds- and _ factory so times this happens. twp seconds. and then finally we will see the same and we are seeing the same on the equipment manufacturing side, so, the requirement and the up take of electric vehicles is obviously driving significant expansion in battery manufacturing capacity and that means the supply isn't producers, are also seeing massive up take in their requirements and that also builds scale, so brings the equipment costs down, all o that is driving down the finished cost of the battery to the end user. :, ~ finished cost of the battery to the end user. ., ,, , ., , , finished cost of the battery to the end user. :, ~' ,, , , . end user. thank you very up much four talking _ end user. thank you very up much four talking us _ end user. thank you very up much four talking us through _ end user. thank you very up much four talking us through that. - end user. thank you very up much four talking us through that. we i four talking us through that. we will tell you more about the future of electric transport and other forms of greener forms of transport and taking you behind the scenes here. thank you. the saudi arabia energy minister said that accusations it is hampering climate talks in scotland
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are lies and fabrications, and they are lies and fabrications, and they are saying that we shouldn't hamper global energy security orrion any particular energy source. we will say goodbye to our international viewers on bbc world news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. for many northern areas this morning it was a chilly start to the day. some of us seeing a touch of frost, but generally speaking today, it is going to be mild, with temperatures a couple of degrees above average for the time of year, with light winds. now there is an exception to the light winds, that is across the far north of scotland really of scotland where the wind will be gusty. you can see this line of cloud, it's a weather front and that's been producing some rain and drizzle across england and wales through the course of this morning already. it is going to be with us as we go through the day. that will be with us tonight
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and tomorrow as well. in the far south, there are one or two breaks, but generally speaking it is cloudy. for northern england, northern ireland, and scotland though, we are seeing more sunshine with a few showers, more especially in the north—west, and it is across the north and north—west that we have the gustiest winds, gusting 50mph at times. temperatures ranging from about 10 to 15 degrees. now as we head on through the evening and overnight period, what you will find is we still have all this cloud across england and wales, still some drizzle, some spots of rain, some mist and fog round, and at the same time a new front is coming in across northern scotland. but in between we will have clear skies, and for northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england in sheltered areas we could well see a touch of frost, but it does mean tomorrow morning that is where we will see the sunshine. showers moving north across western scotland. brightening up across england and wales with sunshine as our weather front takes its rain into northern england, and southern scotland. and at the same time the wind will start to pick up in the west, and we will see some rain, and that's because we have this deep area of low pressure coming our way.
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now it looks like this is the track it is going to take, but the timing track could change, but what it will do if it comes our way is bring heavy and persistent rain and gusty winds. potentially gales in the north and west with exposure. so on friday, here is all this rain, in the northern half of the country. in the south, any rain will be lighter and more patchy in nature. we could see brightness in southern areas, with temperatures nine to about 15 degrees. and then as we head into saturday, well, the tail end of that front is likely to be affecting the far south—east of england, where we will have rain and blustery conditions, but then high pressure builds in and settles things down.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11am: the first draft of a possible agreement at the cop26 climate summit is published by the un. the document urges countries to strengthen commitments to cut carbon emissions within the next year. it comes as borisjohnson is returning to glasgow to meet delegations, to try to bridge the gaps preventing a new global deal. a call for an investigation into the conservative mp, sir geoffrey cox, as labour claim pictures may show him breaking parliamentary rules. the vaccine deadline for care workers. from midnight tonight, those without two jabs won't be allowed to work in the care industry in england. the supreme court blocks a £3 billion legal action against google over claims it
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secretly tracked millions of iphone users' internet activity. during a tech conference, prince harry says he warned the head of twitter about political unrest in the us just 2a hours before the january capitol riots. jack and i were e—mailing each other prior to january the 6th, where i warned him that his platform was allowing a coup to be staged. that e—mail was sent the day before, and then it happened, and i haven't heard from him since. this morning, the first draft of a potential agreement setting out how countries around the world will cut their emissions has been published, laying out
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what negotiators hope will be the outcome of the cop26 summit in glasgow, aimed at bringing climate change under control. the seven—page document urges nations to outline their long—term strategies to reach net zero emissions by the middle of this century, and to curb global warming to 1.5 degrees celsius. it also encourages richer nations to scale up support for poorer ones. in addition, the agreement calls for countries to accelerate the phasing out of coal. but the document isn't the final outcome of cop26. it will now have to be negotiated and agreed upon by countries attending the talks and is likely to go through further drafts. borisjohnson is returning to glasgow today to meet those negotiators. he's urged nations to pull out all the stops. 0ur science and environment correspondent victoria gill is in glasgow.
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well, victoria, what has been the sense of how it has gone so far? has sense of how it has gone so far? is expected, sense of how it has gone so far? sés expected, i sense of how it has gone so far? sis expected, i would say. the negotiations go on. as you said in your introduction, this is a first draft and it's not even only draft before we get a final agreement, we probably expect to three of these. this draft agreement is more a sense of what is on the table in front of negotiators, rather than the mood in the room in a sense of what issues are causing tension, although there are causing tension, although there are some clear gaps in this agreement. there are simply place where issues have not been agreed, but that's to be expected at this stage. but there are some key highlights, some of which you mentioned there. the end of 22 update on strategies for countries to get the end of the target, that's kind of speeding up the pace and what's been called at the for climate change —— 2022. the pace at which the un wants countries to come back and report how they are doing
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and hold them to account. i was speaking to someone from a climate change think tank this week and the said promises don't cut emissions, policies do, and it will be asking people to show their cards in that timeframe and explain their policies. another highlight is this mention of phasing out coal and ending subsidies for fossil fuels. in many years of covering this issue of climate change, this drawn out process of un consensus on this issue, we've not had that mention of coal and fossil fuel before. the paris agreement itself didn't mention fossil fuels. so that is quite a note they are targeting the causes and drivers of these emissions and they are targeting to phase them out. but there are places where the language is a bit fuzzy and that's been a bit disappointing, particularly for developing nations struggling already with the impact of climate change. there's a lot of focus on mention of the target of 1.5 degrees, that this key target
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that scientists say below that we reduce the impacts of climate change and avoid the most dangerous impacts of climate change. and this document says it recognises that that's an important target, rather than urging the parties involved in these talks to really set out as a specific goal. but, again, as you say, first draft of many and there will be more to come. we will be here to tell you all about it. to come. we will be here to tell you all about it-— with me isjohn ashton, who was the climate change envoy for the uk government between 2006 and 2012. thank you for being with us today, john. what do you make so far on how the climate summit has gone? goad the climate summit has gone? good morninu. i the climate summit has gone? good morning. ithink— the climate summit has gone? good morning. i think there _ the climate summit has gone? good morning. i think there is _ the climate summit has gone? good morning. i think there is a _ the climate summit has gone? (eppc morning. i think there is a big problem no, i mean, this is where the rubber tends to hit the road in these kinds of negotiations. and the problem is this. the aim of the exercise is to keep climate change within 1.5
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exercise is to keep climate change within1.5 degrees and the pledges and plans are on the table that we have at the moment don't do that. they fall well short of it. so, if we want to come out of the summit and be able to claim that it's a success, we either have to get more ambitious pledges and plans, which needs a lot of pressure but it's unlikely we would get enough of them over the next 72 hours, or we need to be able to explain credibly and clearly with urgency but we are going to do to close the gap. so... and there is not very clear path to doing that. if you can't make the pledges and plans add up, and there's hardly any time left, what are you going to do? i think you somehow need to maintain the momentum we've got coming need to build on fact that publics are way ahead of governments in terms of their expectations of getting this problem fixed. you need to take this into some kind of continuous session with an early opportunity to come
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again and say we're going to put stronger plans and pledges on the table so we do close the gaps. it needs to be really clear, there is no room for ambiguities and fudges. i see in this latest text there's a lot of urging and calling for, that kind of soft language, and it will need to be sharpened up, otherwise it will be difficult to claim that this summit has succeeded. well, on that oint, this summit has succeeded. well, on that point. john. _ this summit has succeeded. well, on that point, john, we _ this summit has succeeded. well, on that point, john, we have _ this summit has succeeded. well, on that point, john, we have heard - that point, john, we have heard concerns around fuzzy language that a lot of developing nations are feeling a bit disappointed with how it's gone because of course they particularly feel the impact of the climate change, so specifically in terms of what is on offer for them in the sense of urgency for them, how much further do you think we need to go?— how much further do you think we need to no? ~ need to go? well, some way further. and that's the _ need to go? well, some way further. and that's the other _ need to go? well, some way further. and that's the other big _ need to go? well, some way further. and that's the other big gap - need to go? well, some way further. and that's the other big gap in - need to go? well, some way further. and that's the other big gap in this i and that's the other big gap in this document. because 12 years ago at copenhagen we promised that we would
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mobilise at least $100 billion per yearin mobilise at least $100 billion per year in finance to help those countries which are on the front line, which haven't really done very much to contribute to the problem but which are suffering the most as a result of it. to help them adapt to the consequences of climate change and to push forward their own plans to be part of the transition out of fossil fuels, to a net zero economy. 12 years later, we still haven't mobilised that much money and there really isn't a strong acknowledgement of that and you have to bind people together, you have to build a sense of collective person —— collective purpose in the process, so that everyone is enthusiastic about it. and frankly we have let down those countries and there needs to be more on that because, without that, we won't get more of the 1.5 either. find because, without that, we won't get more of the 1.5 either.— more of the 1.5 either. and do you think one of _ more of the 1.5 either. and do you think one of the _ more of the 1.5 either. and do you think one of the things _ more of the 1.5 either. and do you think one of the things that - more of the 1.5 either. and do you think one of the things that is - think one of the things that is letting things down is, well, the inevitable politics of this? so we have heard that the saudi arabian energy minister has a short while ago said the accusations that they
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are hampering the climate negotiations are lies and fabrications. so how much is the politics a factor in where we are going to get to?— politics a factor in where we are going to get to? well, this is all about politics. _ going to get to? well, this is all about politics. to _ going to get to? well, this is all about politics. to be _ going to get to? well, this is all about politics. to be honest. . going to get to? well, this is alll about politics. to be honest. just stand back a little bit from this. this is about getting out of the fossil energy system very, very quickly now. and some countries and some industries, some sectors, are more vested in the fossil energy system than others. so it's perhaps not surprised that those most vested will try and slow things down. and also there's not much point in sort of commenting in a blame game way from afar on something like this, but unless we can remove those obstacles are get past those obstacles, unless everybody can sign up obstacles, unless everybody can sign up to the necessary level of ambition, we won't at the end of it be able to say that we are keeping 1.5 alive, as the slogan goes. irate
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1.5 alive, as the slogan goes. we are well short of that at the moment. john, thank you so much for your time this morning. that isjohn ashton, who was the climate change envoy between 2006 and 2012. borisjohnson is due to arrive in glasgow later, but he is facing more trouble in westminster over the row regarding the extra work some mps do on top of their parliamentaryjobs. labour is calling on the government to open a standards investigation into the conservative mp, sir geoffrey cox. they say this video may show the former attorney general using his commons office to carry out private work, which labour says would be a brazen breach of parliamentary rules. the bbc has contacted sir geoffrey, a former attorney general, for comment. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake joins us from westminster. jonathan, so the question is then, is this a breach or not? labour are saying that, but what is the situation?— saying that, but what is the
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situation? ~ ~' , ., situation? well, the key role here in the mps _ situation? well, the key role here in the mps code _ situation? well, the key role here in the mps code of— situation? well, the key role here in the mps code of conduct - situation? well, the key role here in the mps code of conduct is - situation? well, the key role here i in the mps code of conduct is around mps use of facilities and resources which are funded by the taxpayer in the course of theirjobs. and the key phrase is that members should ensure their use of public resources is always in support of their parliamentary duties. as you mention, the accusation against sir geoffrey cox now is that he was taking part in that hearing which was streamed online and there is video there for all to see while sitting in his office at westminster. there has been no comment from him to confirm or deny that, but labour are pressing the point with angela rayner, the deputy leader, saying this morning that if he has used his tax funded parliamentary office to do his other job of defending a tax haven, in reference to the british virgin islands, then that's against the rules. sajid javid was asked for his
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thoughts on this this morning, when he was speaking in glasgow to adam fleming. is it ok to do a virtual meeting for your private employer from your house of commons office? look, i'm not going to get into any individual case. i i am asking you about the principle. if you have an external interest, i can't see why you would be - using anything funded by the taxpayer. - that includes your office? i think it would include your office space, yes. you were working forjp morgan. did you ever do virtual meetings for them from your house of commons office? i have had phone calls. i might've received - a phone call or something. but if you are saying, _ did i use parliamentary computers or anything else - for something like that, i wouldn't have done that. and if you had done, you would have thought it was the wrong thing to do? you are trying to draw me down a particular line on mr cox... i no, it'sjust interesting, because it is something he has done that you would have chosen not to do. you don't know he has done that, allegations have been made. - you are responding to allegations that have been put out there. - it does look like his office, though, doesn't it? that is not for me. that is something that should be looked at _ by people that are independentl
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and the appropriate authorities. and those appropriate authorities would be parliamentary commissioner for standards, were this to be taken to an investigation. it is part of the general debate we are seeing at westminster now about what mps get up westminster now about what mps get up to, the money they earn in the course of work other than theirjob as a member of parliament and labour are saying there needs to be a change in the rules. the most recent register of financial interests, which mps have to fill out declaring the money they earn from otherjobs, shows that sir keir starmer, the labour leader was paid around £25,000 in the past year for legal services. he stopped doing that when he became leader of the party and that may be for work sometime ago, but it makes it a little sensitive, perhaps, for him to face questions on this as he did on bbc radio this
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morning. there are different kinds of second jobs _ there isi million miles between what owen paterson was doing and one of our mp5, for tooting, who is a qualified health professional, she has been working on the front line during covid in a&e in her local hospital. so i think we need to have a clear distinction between those two types of cases. i would let the independent commissioner decide which side of the line, i think there is common sense, which side of the line cases fall. a call for common sense then from sir keir starmer. in all this, it's easy to lose sight of the fact that 0wen paterson, conservative mp whose case led to this whole debate, was found to have broken the rules by approaching ministers and officials directly on behalf of companies he was being paid by. there was a clear breach of the rules, mps decided, and they will now vote next week to uphold his suspension.— uphold his suspension. jonathan,
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thank you- _ the health secretary has also been speaking today about covid—19 and has defended the new compulsory vaccination rules that take effect for care home workers in england at midnight, saying they're all about patient safety and protecting vulnerable people. yesterday, sajid javid announced it will be compulsory for front line nhs staff in england to be fully vaccinated against covid by the beginning of april. from midnight tonight, un—jabbed care home staff in england cannot work unless they are exempt. the government estimates there are still 32,000 of them who aren't fully vaccinated. this rule will also apply to anybody who enters a care home for work, including any agency workers and tradespeople. joyce pinfield, from the national care association says the move will make it even more challenging to recruit care workers. through the mandatory vaccinations and pressures that we've been put under during the pandemic, more staff are leaving the sector. we are trying to bring new workers into the sector from all over
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the country, but this simply isn't working. and now, if we are going to lose 32,000 due to mandatory vaccinations, it's almost becoming a situation where there will be no care. it's going to be very difficult. already it's very difficult for people who are the most vulnerable in society, who need care. i'm nowjoined by alan price, the ceo of brighthr, a support service for small business owners. thanks forjoining us, alan, this morning. firstly, legally, where does the nhs stand on forcing staff to get vaccinated?— to get vaccinated? following the government _ to get vaccinated? following the government announcement, - to get vaccinated? following the government announcement, it i to get vaccinated? following the - government announcement, it looks like we _ government announcement, it looks like we will— government announcement, it looks like we will have legislation coming in shortly— like we will have legislation coming in shortly which by april or front line nhs— in shortly which by april or front line nhs workers, and more wider
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than that, — line nhs workers, and more wider than that, anyone working in a cqc regulated _ than that, anyone working in a cqc regulated environment, working with service _ regulated environment, working with service users or patients, will need to be _ service users or patients, will need to be vaccinated. we service users or patients, will need to be vaccinated.— service users or patients, will need to be vaccinated. we have 'ust been heafina to be vaccinated. we have 'ust been hearing from — to be vaccinated. we have 'ust been hearing from the h to be vaccinated. we have 'ust been hearing from the care _ to be vaccinated. we have just been hearing from the care association i hearing from the care association and we have heard from nhs bosses as well who talk about there being a recruitment crisis and fearing the actually as a result of this we are going to end up with understaffed services during what is going to be a difficult winter. so what could the impact of this be? we a difficult winter. so what could the impact of this be?— the impact of this be? we give advice to thousands _ the impact of this be? we give advice to thousands of - the impact of this be? we give advice to thousands of care - the impact of this be? we give - advice to thousands of care homes every— advice to thousands of care homes every day — advice to thousands of care homes every day. what we're seeing is an element _ every day. what we're seeing is an element of— every day. what we're seeing is an element of redeployment but what we are also— element of redeployment but what we are also seeing is a large piece. a lot of— are also seeing is a large piece. a lot of care — are also seeing is a large piece. a lot of care workers and nhs workers have chosen to be not vaccinated due to a lack— have chosen to be not vaccinated due to a lack of— have chosen to be not vaccinated due to a lack of awareness or education or even_ to a lack of awareness or education or even an — to a lack of awareness or education or even an uneasiness about sickness pay and _ or even an uneasiness about sickness pay and what — or even an uneasiness about sickness pay and what would happen to them if there is— pay and what would happen to them if there is any— pay and what would happen to them if there is any complications arising from _ there is any complications arising from vaccination, so we are seeing a
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bil from vaccination, so we are seeing a big call— from vaccination, so we are seeing a big call for— from vaccination, so we are seeing a big call for education notjust in the social— big call for education notjust in the social care sector but also in homes _ the social care sector but also in homes as— the social care sector but also in homes as well. but the social care sector but also in homes as well.— the social care sector but also in homes as well. but don't you think this education _ homes as well. but don't you think this education could _ homes as well. but don't you think this education could have - homes as well. but don't you think this education could have come - homes as well. but don't you think this education could have come up| this education could have come up earlier? we've had the vaccination is around for the best part of a year. why wait until it has already gotten to the stage?— gotten to the stage? from our perspective, — gotten to the stage? from our perspective, it's— gotten to the stage? from our perspective, it's private - gotten to the stage? from our- perspective, it's private employers and small— perspective, it's private employers and small business owners having to provide _ and small business owners having to provide the — and small business owners having to provide the education piece to the end employee themselves. we don't see a _ end employee themselves. we don't see a national programme in terms of employee _ see a national programme in terms of employee awareness of what the vaccination means and also any guidance — vaccination means and also any guidance with regards to employee p5y~ guidance with regards to employee pay the _ guidance with regards to employee pay. the small businesses that we are speaking to, we are advising them _ are speaking to, we are advising them to— are speaking to, we are advising them to not only pay the employee to attend _ them to not only pay the employee to attend the _ them to not only pay the employee to attend the vaccination, but also for any complications arising from it. that is— any complications arising from it. that is more cost—effective than the recruitment— that is more cost—effective than the recruitment crisis we are currently facing _ recruitment crisis we are currently facing across the uk.— recruitment crisis we are currently facing across the uk. thank you for our time facing across the uk. thank you for your time this _ facing across the uk. thank you for your time this morning. _ facing across the uk. thank you for your time this morning. that - facing across the uk. thank you for your time this morning. that is - facing across the uk. thank you for| your time this morning. that is alan price, the ceo of brighthr. a state of emergency has come
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into force in lithuania as the country grapples with a surge in illegal immigration from neighbouring belarus. lithuania fears that migrants currently stuck along the belarusian border with poland will try to find alternative routes to enter the european union. the eu has said it will impose additional sanctions on belarus, because of what it describes as president lukashenko's gangster—style approach towards the migrants. aru na iyengar reports. lithuanian troops readying to assist border guards. the alert level is raised. the new measures cover a short five kilometre stretch along the 670 kilometre border with belarus. non—residents are banned. officers have the right to search cars and people. no gatherings are allowed. translation: i do not want to scare anyone, l but you see the situation around the polish border. so as we have seen repeatedly in the story, we simply have to be prepared for various surprises. lithuania, along with latvia and poland, shares a border with belarus.
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the polish prime minister has accused president lukashenko of orchestrating the crisis by allowing people to cross into the eu — this in revenge for eu sanctions. more than a000 crossed into lithuania injune and july. over 3000 are waiting for asylum to be processed. they're held in centres like this. under the new measures, freedom to communicate will now be restricted. translation: we face a hybrid | attack, an unconventional attack, where unfortunately children are being pushed to the foreground, they are being manipulated, and we have to evaluate this very rationally. this is the scene lithuania is trying to avert. poland's border with belarus, and hundreds of migrants converge, they're living in makeshift camps and the temperature is freezing. some have died. there are children and babies — many haven't eaten for days. all hoping to get into the eu. aruna iyengar, bbc news.
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let's speak to our warsaw correspondent adam easton, and there have been some reports that migrants are receiving text messages when they reach the border. yes, that's actually been the case for several weeks now. the polish government says it implemented a policy per anyone on the border receives a message saying belarusian authorities have been lying to you and you are not allowed to cross the polish border on the eastern flank of the eu, apart from at official crossing points. that is a text message in english and it goes to any foreign registered phone in the border area. fight! any foreign registered phone in the border area-— any foreign registered phone in the border area. : ., ., , . border area. and what do we expect poland to do — border area. and what do we expect poland to do next _ border area. and what do we expect poland to do next as _ border area. and what do we expect poland to do next as a _ border area. and what do we expect poland to do next as a result - border area. and what do we expect poland to do next as a result of - poland to do next as a result of
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this? ., poland to do next as a result of this? . ., , poland to do next as a result of this? . . , ., ., this? paul and his firm about what the lan this? paul and his firm about what they plan to _ this? paul and his firm about what they plan to do. — this? paul and his firm about what they plan to do, which _ this? paul and his firm about what they plan to do, which is - this? paul and his firm about what they plan to do, which is basically| they plan to do, which is basically increased the number of security personnel at the border —— poland is firm. the number of troops has increased by 50%. there are thousands of border guards in 2000 police officers on the border. the policy is basically, we want to prevent those people from getting in. belarus, on the other hand, is stopping these people from going back into belarus in certain cases, looking at the pictures of the camp where people are set up tents, so they are trapped in conditions which are getting worse and worse. because the temperature is dropping as we head into winter and it has already dropped to below zero overnight. they are mostly young men, but there are women and children in this group, so it's a very dangerous
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situation for those people. adam, thank you- — situation for those people. adam, thank you. that _ situation for those people. adam, thank you. that is _ situation for those people. adam, thank you. that is our _ situation for those people. adam, thank you. that is our warsaw - thank you. that is our warsaw correspondent adam easton there. back to our main story now, and the first draft of a potential agreement, setting out how countries around the world will cut their emissions, has been published, laying out what negotiators hope will be the outcome of the cop26 summit in glasgow, aimed at bringing climate change under control. shipping currently accounts for 3% of global co2 emissions, and could rise to as much as 10%. morten bo christiansen joins me now, he's head of decarbonisation at maersk, the world's largest shipping. we have heard the statistics about how much the shipping industry is responsible for carbon emissions. what are you doing about it? this emissions what are you doing about it? t�*i s emissions footprint is clearly unsustainable for the future and i think we and our company, along with many other companies, are determined
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to do something about that. specifically what we have done in our shipping company as we have decided to start the transition to green fuels now, so we have already ordered the first vessels that can sail on green methanol, which can be produced eitherfrom sail on green methanol, which can be produced either from sustainable biomass or from produced either from sustainable biomass orfrom rural produced either from sustainable biomass or from rural energy. produced either from sustainable biomass orfrom rural energy. and we will only order vessels which can sail on this fuel from now on. they will hit the sea in 2023 and later. we have ordered the vessels. today, there is no availability in the market for the fuel, but that is something we're working on with different partners. fight! something we're working on with different partners.— something we're working on with different partners. and how long do ou think different partners. and how long do you think before _ different partners. and how long do you think before you _ different partners. and how long do you think before you start _ different partners. and how long do you think before you start to - different partners. and how long do you think before you start to see i you think before you start to see the effects of the actions you are taking in terms of reducing that level of carbon emissions? this taking in terms of reducing that level of carbon emissions? as soon as these vessels — level of carbon emissions? as soon as these vessels hit _ level of carbon emissions? as soon as these vessels hit the _ level of carbon emissions? as soon as these vessels hit the water - level of carbon emissions? as soon as these vessels hit the water and l as these vessels hit the water and we can hit the fuels, we will see a
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significant reduction. eight of the ships we have ordered our huge vessels. 0nce ships we have ordered our huge vessels. once they are up and running on carbon neutralfuels, they will evade1 million running on carbon neutralfuels, they will evade 1 million tonnes of c02 per year. 0nce they will evade 1 million tonnes of c02 per year. once we scale this up, we will see the results. right now, the shipping trajectory is going up and it should be significantly going down. ., , ., and it should be significantly going down. ., ., , , down. your company saw a “96 rise in rofits last down. your company saw a 44% rise in profits last year. _ down. your company saw a 44% rise in profits last year, that's _ down. your company saw a 44% rise in profits last year, that's $8.2 _ profits last year, that's $8.2 billion. how much of that has been invested in green technology? 50. invested in green technology? so, first and invested in green technology? sp first and foremost, invested in green technology? 5p first and foremost, the vessels we have ordered are about 10—15% more expensive than conventional vessels, so that money has gone on already. we have made the first long—term agreement on green fuels and we will make many more because it is needed to fuel the vessels. the fuels are
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more expensive than burning oil and evenif more expensive than burning oil and even if we do have customers who are willing to help shoulder the costs of that premium, for the first time, we expect we will have to shoulder some of that ourselves before the price of these fuels come down to a competitive level. so price of these fuels come down to a competitive level.— competitive level. so what sort of rice will competitive level. so what sort of price will the _ competitive level. so what sort of price will the customer— competitive level. so what sort of price will the customer be - price will the customer be shouldering as a result of this? because i suppose that's the question. how much of that will be passed on to your customers? this it passed on to your customers? as it looks right — passed on to your customers? as it looks right now. — passed on to your customers? as it looks right now, these _ passed on to your customers? sis it looks right now, these green fuels are more than three times as expensive compared to oil. that will come down over time, for sure. we actually have a product in the market now which is based on biodiesel and their customers pay a premium which covers some but not all of the expected cost of these
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new fuels. all of the expected cost of these new fuels-— all of the expected cost of these new fuels. ., ,, i. ., ., , new fuels. thank you for “oining us. morten bo christiansen _ new fuels. thank you forjoining us. morten bo christiansen from - new fuels. thank you forjoining us. morten bo christiansen from the i morten bo christiansen from the world's largest shipping company. a £3 billion mass legal action against google over claims that it secretly tracked millions of iphone users' internet activity has been blocked by the supreme court. the case was brought by complainant richard lloyd, who's the former director of consumer rights group which? he alleged that between 2011 and 2012 google collected data on health, race, ethnicity, sexuality and finance through apple's safari web browser, even when users had chosen a do not track privacy setting. now we have some breaking news to
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bring you now. it's a statement from sir geoffrey cox. as we have been hearing, there has been used about him this morning. breaking news, which is a statement from him. it says, sir geoffrey cox was asked to advise the attorney general and the elected government of the british virgin islands in a public enquiry into whether corruption, abuse of office or other serious dishonesty may have taken place in recent years in the virgin islands and to carry out a review of its systems of government in preparation for that enquiry. the statement goes on to say that prior to accepting the role, he sought and obtained the approval of the office of the attorney general of england and wales that there would be no conflict—of—interest with his former role as attorney general. it's quite a lengthy statement. there is a bit more to say, butjust the overall gist of it is saying that he sought
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an approval and understood that there would be no conflict of interest with his former role as attorney general. he says he doesn't believe he has breached any rules. and that is of course what the labour party are saying he did, by breaching parliamentary rules, they say. but he denies that. more on that throughout the day. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. it was a chilly start to the day today across the northern half of the country, with some of us seeing a touch of frost. but for northern england, scotland and northern ireland, this is where we will see the lion's share of the sunshine, just a few showers and gusty winds across the north—west. whereas for the rest of england and wales, fairly cloudy, it's some spots of rain and some drizzle, with highs today between 10—15 degrees. through the evening and overnight, we will still have a world where the front draped across parts of england and wales,
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still a lot of cloud, some mist and fog, some dankness, and at the same time a new weather front brings some rain in across scotland. in between though we will have some clear skies for northern england, northern ireland and southern scotland, so temperatures could fall away low enough here for just a touch of frost, but it does mean first thing tomorrow this is where we will see the sunshine. showers pushing north across scotland, brightening up in southern england and wales, with some sunshine as the rain per on through the course of the day. temperatures peaking at 1a or 15. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the first draft of a possible agreement at the cop26 climate summit is published by the un. the document urges countries to "strengthen" commitments to cut carbon emissions within the next year. it comes as borisjohnson is returning to glasgow to meet delegations — to try to bridge the gaps preventing a new global deal. a call for an investigation into the conservative mp, sir geoffrey cox — as labour claim pictures
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may show him breaking parliamentary rules. the vaccine deadline for care workers — from midnight tonight those without two jabs won't be allowed to work in the care industry in england. the supreme court blocks a £3 billion legal action against google over claims it secretly tracked millions of iphone users' internet activity. during a tech conference, prince harry says he warned the head of twitter about political unrest in the us — just 2a hours before the january capitol riots. sport — and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. good morning. yorkshire head coach andrew gale has been suspended pending an investigation into an historic tweet, as the club continues to deal with allegations of racism. he has reportedly said he was unaware of the offensive nature of
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the term. it follows the news that the term. it follows the news that the club have decided not to take any action after allegations of racism and bullying. lord patel, the new chair at yorkshire says he hopes to have a process in place by the end of the week for whistleblowers to come forward, to share any instances of discrimination. tabassum bhatti, who is now 37, signed a contract at yorkshire at the age of 1a, he has told the bbc about his experience. i think it's become clear that it's been going on for a long time and yes, it has been pushed under the carpet, you know? like i said, i was there in 1998. there were incidents prior to me being there. there's been things happening in the last 20 years up to present. so i think that's pretty clear, to be honest, that it has been overlooked. england face new zealand in abu dhabi in the first semifinal of the
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men's t20 cup. they played at lord's in 2019 when england won by the titres of morgans. morgan's thinks england's strength and depth is rubbing off on the t20 side. i think it would be a really strong representation of what 50 overs sides have achieved, since 2015, i think we had a glimpse of that during the summer, where we had to replace players against pakistan, if we could achieve something like that, it would be quite close to, we might get to the final, but getting to the final would be a hell of an achievement. chelsea manager emma hayes said her players were outstanding, as they thrashed swiss champions servette 7—0 in the women's champions league.
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the blues, who led 6—0 at half—time, showed the gulf in quality between the sides with some impressive attacking play. fran kirby scored twice,and so did sam kerr. melanie leupolz, jessie fleming and guro reiten also got on the scoresheet. it's the first time anyone's scored seven in a womens champions league group game. emma raducanu's history—making season is over. she was beaten in her first match in linz in austria. us open champion and top seed, she lost the first set 6—1 to before she lost the first set 6—1 before winning a tie break to level the match at a set apiece. she then took a medical timeout in the deciding set, before she eventually fell to the world number 106, raducanu will now look towards working with new coach torben beltz in preparation for next season. dan da n eva ns
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dan evans is on court like now in the last 16 of the stockholm open. evansis the last 16 of the stockholm open. evans is 3—2 down in at the first set. fellow briton andy murray won his match after beating norwegian qualifier viktor durasovic in straight sets. murray now faces top seeded italianjannik sinner later today. just to bring you some rugby union news quickly. joe marler has been replaced, who is out of the squad after testing positive for coronavirus. let's get someone on the breaking news we have received in the last few minutes, the calls for an investigation into the conservative mp sir geoffrey cox, because labour
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claims that there may be pictures showing him breaking parliamentary rules. in the past few minutes, a statement has been issued by sir geoffrey cox. let's get more from our political correspondent, jonathan blake. jonathan, the statements denying that he breached the parliamentary code of conduct. this is the first we have heard from sir geoffrey cox in public since the accusations against him for the taking up work on behalf of an inquiry into corruption on the british virgin islands earlier this year, and earning hundreds of thousands of pounds in the course of doing that. in a short, he says he has done nothing wrong, he says it is up to the voters of his constituency in devon to decide whether they want someone, in his words, who is a senior and distinguished professional in their field to represent them as an mp, and he is content to abide by their
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decision. he says the matters concerning his work in this inquiry has been referred to the parliamentary commissioner for standards and that he will cooperate with her investigation, although it is yet to be concerned exactly whether there will be an investigation or not. he also says he will fully cooperate with that and accept the judgment of the commissioner on standards, the parliamentary committee made up of mps and others. a defence of his actions, certainly, and also an indication that he does not intend to stand down as an mp, but saying that he will cooperate with any investigation that happens as a result of this. this investigation that happens as a result of this.— investigation that happens as a result of this. : , ., ., ,., , result of this. as we have also been hearinu.
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as we've been hearing, it's transport day at the cop26 climate change conference in glasgow. one of the renewable transport options being talked about are electric cars. 0ur reality check correspondent, chris morris, is here. just a reminder why we're talking about this — the uk is committed by law to get to net—zero carbon emissions no later than 2050 to limit the rise in global temperatures. now, that might sound like a long time in the future, but to get to net—zero, action has to start now and accelerate quickly — and transport is one of the big challenges. it is currently responsible for 27% of all uk emissions of the greenhouse gases that cause global warming. and, as you can see on this chart, cars account for more than half of that amount — all that petrol and diesel which is being used. that's one of the reasons why the government has announced that there will be no more sales of new petrol and diesel cars after the end of this decade. it also means there needs to be a rapid increase in the production and use of electric vehicles — a process which is already under way. at the end of 2020, there were a32,000 licenced electric
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or hybrid vehicles on uk roads — that's not much more than 1% of the overall total — but there were none just over a decade ago. and worldwide global sales of electric cars rose by nearly 50% last year — with well over three million sales taking place during the pandemic. 0ne estimate is that one in five new cars sold will be electric by 2025. so, car companies are making massive investments in electric car production, with plans to phase out the use of the internal combustion engine. the new nissan battery factory in sunderland announced earlier this year is just one example. but there are big challenges. cost has been an issue — electric cars are more expensive to buy than petrol or diesel cars, even if they're cheaper to run. the price of electric car batteries has been falling sharply for several years, although the cost of raw materials is currently threatening to push it up again. still, the industry is confident that as numbers increase, economies of scale will kick in,
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addressing a big question. how we are going to address the full ecosystem to not only create business but also to create an environment friendly society. the other issue is how to recharge your battery, particularly on longerjourneys. range anxiety has been identified as a factor making people reluctant to go electric. the government says there are currently more than 23,800 public charging points around the country, including more than a,000 rapid chargers. £1.3 billion is being invested. but labour says it's not enough — it points out the independent committee on climate change says there should be 150,000 public charging points by 2025, so a big increase is needed. there are regional disparities, too, with far more charging points in london than some other parts of the country. and it's notjust about motorways, there's also the issue of charging at home. it's fine if you have a driveway. but people who only have access
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to on—street parking need far more local schemes, such as chargers on lamp posts. so, the shift to electric cars is happening — the challenge is making sure the infrastructure keeps up with the pace of change. earlier this year carmaker nissan announced a major expansion of electric vehicle production at its car plant in sunderland. the development will see the creation of more than 15000 jobs at the site and several thousand more in the supply chain. most of these will facilitate the manufacture of the company's new generation, all—electric model at the site. alongside this, partner company, envision aesc, will build a new electric battery plant which it believes will produce enough batteries to power over 100,000 nissan electric vehicles each year. nissan hopes the site will be operational by 202a, when the level of uk—made components
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in cars manufactured in the uk is required to start increasing, in line with the terms of the uk's trade deal with the eu. the development has already received billions of pounds worth of funding, with the government thought to have contributed tens of millions of pounds towards the cost. well, today transport is the focus of the cop26 climate change conference in glasgow, so we are checking in with the expansion project in sunderland. caroline, what can you tell us? i am here outside — caroline, what can you tell us? i am here outside the _ caroline, what can you tell us? i am here outside the nissan _ caroline, what can you tell us? i—sn here outside the nissan factory, but also behind me is the factory where they are producing the batteries that will go into those electric vehicles. it is notjust about moving from diesel and petrol cars into electric and other forms of greener energy. it's also about trying to get people out of their cars altogether. this is one of the ideas behind it, and electric
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scooter. the idea and hope is that people will take these instead of taking their cars on shorter journeys. all of our here, we love to have you zooming up and down on the scooter, but of course we can do that because at the moment they are not legal to be driven on most roads. where can they be driven? this is a nationwide scheme where people _ this is a nationwide scheme where people can — this is a nationwide scheme where people can rent our e skaters from their— people can rent our e skaters from their operators will stop at the moment, _ their operators will stop at the moment, we operate at newcastle, sunderland and slough. for now, you are correct— sunderland and slough. for now, you are correct in— sunderland and slough. for now, you are correct in saying the use of private — are correct in saying the use of private e — are correct in saying the use of private e skaters on public land is illegal _ private e skaters on public land is illeaal. ., ., illegal. tell me more about the reen illegal. tell me more about the green initiative _ illegal. tell me more about the green initiative to _ illegal. tell me more about the green initiative to try _ illegal. tell me more about the green initiative to try to - illegal. tell me more about the l green initiative to try to improve the carbon emissions we have across cities across the country. it is cities across the country. it is art of cities across the country. it is part of this — cities across the country. it is part of this modal _ cities across the country. it is part of this modal shift - cities across the country. it is
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part of this modal shift to electric transport — part of this modal shift to electric transport. something like an e—scooter as part of the solution. in a e—scooter as part of the solution. in a busy— e—scooter as part of the solution. in a busy factory setting, sometimes this happens. in a busy factory setting, sometimes this happens-— in a busy factory setting, sometimes this happens. e-scooters can provide a solution to — this happens. e-scooters can provide a solution to the _ this happens. e-scooters can provide a solution to the wider— this happens. e-scooters can provide a solution to the wider transport - a solution to the wider transport question — a solution to the wider transport question. he find 60% of our users in uk _ question. he find 60% of our users in uk actually combine a e—scooter journey— in uk actually combine a e—scooter journey with another mode of transport. here and in north—east, for example. — transport. here and in north—east, for example, since favourite we have racked _ for example, since favourite we have racked up _ for example, since favourite we have racked up over half a million miles travelled, — racked up over half a million miles travelled, that has led to 45 tonnes of emissions not going into the air. they— of emissions not going into the air. they hopers — of emissions not going into the air. they hopers people take these instead of dumping their car to maybe go to the train station on bus stop, a distance may be too far to walk but maybe they take one of these instead. the walk but maybe they take one of these instead.— walk but maybe they take one of these instead. the average trip for us is several _
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these instead. the average trip for us is several kilometres, _ these instead. the average trip for us is several kilometres, that - these instead. the average trip for us is several kilometres, that can l us is several kilometres, that can be a _ us is several kilometres, that can be a little — us is several kilometres, that can be a little bit too far for someone to walk — be a little bit too far for someone to walk. 40% of our trips replace carjourneys, not all because distances _ carjourneys, not all because distances are too far, it is about integrating _ distances are too far, it is about integrating into that wider transport network. integrating into that wider transort network. :, , , transport network. people might be concerned about _ transport network. people might be concerned about safety _ transport network. people might be concerned about safety features. it| concerned about safety features. it is not a legal requirement for people to have to wear a helmet on these. people might suggest they might feel a bit vulnerable in comparison to being in a car. what sort of safety features are on these and measures in place to make sure that people using them are safe? first and foremost, safety is at the forefront _ first and foremost, safety is at the forefront of — first and foremost, safety is at the forefront of everything we do, as well as— forefront of everything we do, as well as sustainability. we were the first operator to induce an integrated helmet lock. the helmet is the _ integrated helmet lock. the helmet is the number—one piece of equipment. we design and manufacture our own— equipment. we design and manufacture our own scooter so we have a wider deck— our own scooter so we have a wider deck and _ our own scooter so we have a wider deck and tires for stability and safety —
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deck and tires for stability and safety. we have got the technology as well _ safety. we have got the technology as well. last week we announced we were running a global trial with dangerous riding detection. there are things — dangerous riding detection. there are things we are investing heavily in to detect dangerous riding and to keep people safe on our e—scooters. we will— keep people safe on our e—scooters. we will be _ keep people safe on our e—scooters. we will be back inside the battery factory later on in showing you a bit more behind the scenes. the headlines on bbc news: the first draft of a possible agreement at the cop26 climate summit is published by the un. the document urges countries to "strengthen" commitments to cut carbon emissions within the next year. it comes as borisjohnson is returning to glasgow to meet delegations — to try to bridge the gaps preventing a new global deal. a call for an investigation into the conservative mp, sir geoffrey cox — as labour claim pictures may show him breaking parliamentary rules. the supreme court blocks of £3 billion legal action against google
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over claims it tracked iphone users' internet activity. the welsh parliament has voted to extend the use of covid passes to cinemas and theatres, from next week. the scheme currently only applies to nightclubs and large events, such as rugby games. visitors will have to show they are fully vaccinated, have tested negative for covid or have recently had the virus to enter the venue. the health and social services secretary for wales, eluned morgan, said they were expanding the covid pass so that businesses can survive during the winter months. we've got the highest rates of covid in the united kingdom at the moment, despite the fact that we are at what england would consider plan b, so that is we are asking people, it's compulsory to wear a face covering in indoor public places, we are asking people to work from home, we have lots of different measures. we are really trying to make sure
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people take a lot more precautions. and yet rates are still very, very high. so we are trying to ensure that we can keep these venues open through what are going to be some very, very challenging winter months ahead, and the way to do that, we think, is by introducing these passes. and what has been interesting is that we have already introduced these for, for example, rugby matches, and there has been a huge amount of support from the public. an experienced caver who was trapped underground for two days in wales has been named. george linnane, from bristol, is said to be in "good spirits" after his remarkable rescue. around 250 people were involved in the delicate operation to free from him a cave in the brecon beacons. let's return to our main story now.
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the first draft of a potential agreement — setting out how countries around the world will cut their emissions — has been published, laying out what negotiators hope will be the outcome of the cop26 summit in glasgow — aimed at bringing climate change under control. juan pablo 0sornio is head of greenpeace uk's delegation, and joins us from the summit. thank you forjoining us. firstly, i imagine that there is a lot that you would like to see go further in at this. but if we start with the positives— what is it that you are pleased with that has come out of this first draft?— this first draft? that's a very hard ruestion, this first draft? that's a very hard question. i _ this first draft? that's a very hard question, iwill— this first draft? that's a very hard question, i will try _ this first draft? that's a very hard question, i will try to _ this first draft? that's a very hard question, i will try to answer- this first draft? that's a very hard question, i will try to answer it. l question, i will try to answer it. the first thing we thought that was surprising for us was the phase out of coal and fossil fuel subsidies. listen first night we have language that at any cop are
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listen first night we have language that at any cop— listen first night we have language that at any c0 that at any cop are you encouraged b the that at any cop are you encouraged by the steps _ that at any cop are you encouraged by the steps to _ that at any cop are you encouraged by the steps to limit _ that at any cop are you encouraged by the steps to limit the _ that at any cop are you encouraged by the steps to limit the rise - that at any cop are you encouraged by the steps to limit the rise to - by the steps to limit the rise to 1.5 celsius? surely that must represent at least baby steps? but we don't represent at least baby steps? first we don't need baby steps at this point, we need grown up responsible steps and we need to reduce emissions as quickly as possible. quite frankly, asking parties to come back next year and resolve it is not good enough.— come back next year and resolve it is not good enough. what would you like to see in — is not good enough. what would you like to see in terms _ is not good enough. what would you like to see in terms of _ is not good enough. what would you like to see in terms of this _ like to see in terms of this agreement? this isjust the like to see in terms of this agreement? this is just the first draft, there will be more to go before the final agreement is reached. what would you like to see that final agreement contain? first. that final agreement contain? first, we would like _ that final agreement contain? first, we would like that _ that final agreement contain? first, we would like that fossil _ that final agreement contain? first, we would like that fossil fuel - that final agreement contain? f st we would like that fossil fuel like to not only stay put but get enhanced. we are expecting saudi arabia and otherfossil enhanced. we are expecting saudi arabia and other fossil —based nations to come back, trying to get that out of the text, so we will be defending it very strongly. we want
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a commitment for countries to come back to the negotiating table every year until emissions are reduced in line with the 1.5 celsius target. it line with the 1.5 celsius target. if those aims you would like to see are not reach within this, if the agreement doesn't go as far as you like it too, what you feel could be the impact on our world and at the future of the climate change in it? well some of the nations in the pacific islands will basically cease to exist. you canjust imagine how all those populations will have to go somewhere else. that will be an incredibly sad world to live in. not only that, but you would expect to see even more severe and more frequent extreme weather events hitting all over the world. not remotely pacific island nations, but the something resort across europe, canada and the us. this is everywhere and we need to take steps now. :, :, , ,
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everywhere and we need to take steps now. . , now. that has been disappointment from developing — now. that has been disappointment from developing countries - now. that has been disappointment from developing countries in - from developing countries in particular because we know they will be worse affected by climate change. do you think there is to be more focus on those nations than there already is? 0r focus on those nations than there already is? or do you think that something that is being taken into consideration enough during this climate summit? trio. consideration enough during this climate summit?— consideration enough during this climate summit? ., ., ., ~ climate summit? no, not enough. when to remember— climate summit? no, not enough. when to remember that _ climate summit? no, not enough. when to remember that the _ climate summit? no, not enough. when to remember that the majority _ climate summit? no, not enough. when to remember that the majority of - climate summit? no, not enough. when to remember that the majority of the - to remember that the majority of the global population actually lives in these countries. what we need want to see in this text is support for adaptation and loss and damage, we want to see in the hundreds of billions of dollars, not the hundreds of millions. frankly, we have not seen enough of that. we are calling to the eu, to the us to come back tomorrow and just show us the money. is. back tomorrow and 'ust show us the mone . : , back tomorrow and 'ust show us the mone . ~ , , , money. a very simple, straightforward - money. a very simple, i straightforward message. money. a very simple, - straightforward message. thank money. a very simple, _ straightforward message. thank you very much. prince harry has said he warned twitter bosses about potential political unrest in the us just
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a day before the capitol riots in january. he was speaking at a tech conference about the impact of social media. mark lobel reports. my twitter, my notifications, have blown up. in his latest salvo against hate on social media, the former army captain, now misinformation warrior, joined a 33 minute live session for a tech conference entitled �*the internet �*the internet lying machine', where it emerged, referring to these angry riots in the us capital onjanuary 6, he is also, it seems, somewhat of a soothsayer. have you ever had a chance to present your case to the leaders of these company, mark zuckerberg, jack dorsey? no, not directly, not personally. jack and i were e—mailing each other prior to january 6, where i warned him that his platform was allowing a coup to be staged. that e—mail was sent the day
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before, then it happened. in march, jack dorsey, the twitter chief executive, admitted his platform had played a role in the storming of the us capitol, but added, "it's notjust about the technological systems that we use." prince harry warned a small group of accounts is causing a large amount of chaos online, sullying the internet for future generations by filling it with hatred, division and lies. misinformation is a global humanitarian crisis. as you quite rightly pointed out, i've felt it personally over the years, and i'm now watching it happen globally, affecting everyone, notjust america, literally everyone around the world. and i guess the scariest part about it is you don't need to be online to be affected by this. leading to this personal swipe on somewhat well trodden ground for harry at sections of the uk price. of the uk press. they've successfully turned
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fact—based news into opinion—based gossip with devastating consequences for the country. as for his solution to the problem, he is not recommending everyone takes leave from social media, as he and meghan have done, conceding its far too addictive for that. but instead he says it's for big companies and advertisers to kick out the troublesome few whose hate and lies are then spread far and wide. mark lobel, bbc news. nobel peace prize winner and women's rights activist malala yousafzai has got married. the 24—year—old made the announcement on twitter, saying she and her family held a small islamic ceremony at her home in birmingham and described it as a "precious day in her life." two diamond bracelets once and about the last queen of france, marry and
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win it, sold for more than a —— $8 million. this bracelets were successfully smuggled out of the country and remained within the family for more than 200 years. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise. an incredibly mild start today. by contrast was for the north. scotla nd scotland and northern ireland just sitting in that cold air. the warmer air down to the south. this is where we car but still producing rain through the remainer of the day.
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quite a lot of clout, like outbreaks of patchy rain drifting across england and wales. further north is where we have the breaks in the cloud the sunshine coming through and a scattering of showers. that is how we will continue through the rest of the afternoon. a little bit cooler although temperatures will recover into the afternoon for scotland and northern ireland. highest values still above the average for the time of year, not quite as warm as tuesday. 3 wednesday evening and overnight, we keep cloud across the south, a little bit more showery rain filtering back into the south—west. another weather front will bring yet more wet weather into the far north of scotland. sandwiched between the two, when you keep clear skies temperatures are likely to fall away. thursday morning is quite a messy picture, two weather fronts squeezing and merging together, a lot of cloud around, a damp, misty and murky
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classic kind of november morning. poor visibility towards the coast. heavier rain will arrive in from the far north—west were entering winds are by the end of the afternoon and temperatures between 8—14 . as low pressure moves in, more wet and windy weather to come on friday. towards the weekend a ridge of high pressure builds quieting things down quite nicely. some wet and windy weather particular in the far north—west on friday. drierfor the weekend, but eh? as to how much sunshine we are going
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this is bbc news. the headlines: conservative mp, sir geoffrey cox, has said he does not believe that he breached parliamentary rules, after a clip appeared to show him using his mp's office for private work. the first draft of a possible agreement at the cop26 climate summit is published by the un. the document urges countries to strengthen commitments to cut carbon emissions within the next year. it comes as borisjohnson is returning to glasgow to meet delegations, to try to bridge the gaps preventing a new global deal. the vaccine deadline for care workers. from midnight tonight, those without two jabs won't be allowed to work in the care industry in england. the supreme court blocks
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a £3 billion legal action against google over claims it secretly tracked millions of iphone users' internet activity. during a tech conference, prince harry says he warned the head of twitter about political unrest in the us, just 24 hours before the january capitol riots. jack and i were e—mailing each other prior to january the 6th, where i warned him that his platform was allowing a coup to be staged. that e—mail was sent the day before, and then it happened, and i haven't heard from him since. 80 years after women were first conscripted into the army, we hear memories of the teenagers who found themselves in the thick of world war two.
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in the last hour, the conservative mp, sir geoffrey cox, has released a statement, saying he does not believe that he breached commons standards rules after video emerged which appeared to show him using his parliamentary office for private work. the former attorney general, who's earned hundreds of thousands of pounds advising a legal firm, said he would accept the judgment of the independent commissioner. let's take a closer look at that statement. sir geoffrey refers to his role advising the british virgin islands with regard to a public inquiry. the statement continues, prior to accepting the role, he sought and obtained the approval of the office of the attorney general of england and wales that there would be no conflict of interest with his former role as attorney general. he goes on to say, this is not
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to defend" a tax haven or, as has been inaccurately reported, to defend any wrongdoing but to assist the public inquiry in getting to the truth. no evidence of tax evasion or personal corruption has been adduced before the inquiry and if it had been, that person would have been required to seek their own representation. sir geoffrey then speaks about his constiteuncy work. his statement says, sir geoffrey regularly works 70—hour weeks and always ensures that his casework on behalf of his constituents is given primary importance and fully carried out. sir geoffrey's view is that it is up to the electors of torridge and west devon whether or not they vote for someone who is a senior and distinguished professional in his field. and he concludes, he understands that the matter has been referred to the parliamentary commissioner and he will fully cooperate with her investigation. he does not believe that he breached the rules but will of course accept thejudgment of the parliamentary commissioner or of the committee on the matter. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake joins
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us from westminster. well, jonathan, labour says they believe it's a breach of the rules, sir geoffrey says he doesn't believe it is. shouldn't rules be clear—cut enough to say either way? it is. shouldn't rules be clear-cut enough to say either way?- it is. shouldn't rules be clear-cut enough to say either way? well, the ke role enough to say either way? well, the key role here _ enough to say either way? well, the key role here which _ enough to say either way? well, the key role here which relates - key role here which relates potentially to this case is the use of facilities and in this case a parliamentary office for work which does not relate to an mp's job. and on that, sir geoffrey cox does not go into very much detail on what is otherwise a very lengthy statement, but he does say, as you read out there towards the end of it, the doesn't believe he breached the rules but he will abide by the judgment of the parliamentary commissionerfor judgment of the parliamentary commissioner for standards or the committee of mps who also looks into possible breaches of the rules. he does, though, talk about voting by
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proxy while he was in the british virgin isles, parky was taking part in a virtual capacity into corruption on a british 0verseas territory. 0n corruption on a british 0verseas territory. on that, he says he sought the advice of the chief whip mark spencer and was told it would be appropriate to do that. he also says he sought advice before taking on this work from the attorney general�*s office to see whether there would be any conflict of interest there, so i think what we're seeing here is a pretty lengthy statement which is an attempt to offer a thorough and comprehensive defence of sir geoffrey cox's actions. he goes on to talk about his work as a lawyer being distinguished in his field as a barrister, something he has made no secret of, and something which the voters in his constituency are well aware of, and it is they, he says, who should be the ultimate
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decider is in whether he should continue as an mp and he is willing to accept their verdict whenever they express it at the next election. they express it at the next election-— they express it at the next election. , ., ., ., ., ,, , ., joshua rosenberg is a lawyer and a non—executive board member of the law commission. speaking to us as a legal commentator. thank you forjoining us. this all comes down to the use of a room, doesn't it? whether sir geoffrey was right to use that room for private business. lloathed geoffrey was right to use that room for private business.— for private business. what are the le . alities for private business. what are the legalities around _ for private business. what are the legalities around that? _ for private business. what are the legalities around that? well, - legalities around that? well, there is a code of conduct for mps and it says members are personally responsible for making sure that use of the sphinxes —— expenses allowances provided by the public purse is in accordance with the rules and it says members should make sure the use of public resources in support of parliamentary duties and should not confer any undue personal or financial benefit on themselves or confer undue advantage on a
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political organisation. so there is a very clear instruction not to use parliamentary meeting rooms for lobbying, that's an instruction not to send out political campaigning on house of commons headed paper, not to misuse your position as an mp. now, whether that applies to taking part in a hearing using a room on the parliamentary estate is the question which ultimately will have to be decided. the point that sir geoffrey cox might add to his statement is that nobody watching the hearing that he was taking part in involving the british virgin isles, would necessarily have known that he was in a parliamentary office. it looks to insiders like portcullis house and he is more or less confirmed that, but i don't think there was a big sign up saying this is parliament and i'm speaking as an mp. : this is parliament and i'm speaking as an mp. ., ., , , this is parliament and i'm speaking asanmp. ., ., , , �*, as an mp. that would suggest it's about the impression _ as an mp. that would suggest it's about the impression rather - as an mp. that would suggest it's about the impression rather than | as an mp. that would suggest it's i about the impression rather than the reality but actually it comes to a
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question of, in reality, was this within the rules are not? indeed, and i within the rules are not? indeed, and i won't _ within the rules are not? indeed, and i won't pass _ within the rules are not? indeed, and i won't passjudgment, i within the rules are not? indeed, | and i won't passjudgment, that's for the parliamentary authorities and ultimately for mps. clearly there is concern about mps misusing their privileges. equally, is it to be suggested that every time you make a call involving your outside work, and of course mps are entitled to have outside jobs, work, and of course mps are entitled to have outsidejobs, this is one of the controversies, some people say they shouldn't, but so long as people are allowed to have outside jobs, is there a suggestion you have to leave the building to make a phone call or send an e—mail? you could have gone to his chambers across london to take this call, but then he would not have been available to take part in parliamentary votes. 50 available to take part in parliamentary votes. available to take part in arliamenta votes. ., , , parliamentary votes. so does this su: est parliamentary votes. so does this suggest there _ parliamentary votes. so does this suggest there are _ parliamentary votes. so does this suggest there are muddy - parliamentary votes. so does this suggest there are muddy waters. suggest there are muddy waters around mps having second jobs? in his case in law. is that what is competing it, really? is there a question over whether that should be
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allowed or not? izierr; question over whether that should be allowed or not?— allowed or not? very much so. i wrote a blog _ allowed or not? very much so. i wrote a blog this _ allowed or not? very much so. i wrote a blog this morning i allowed or not? very much so. i wrote a blog this morning say i allowed or not? very much so. i i wrote a blog this morning say that when i started covering the law it was perfectly normal for mps to have second jobs. all mps or ministers have second jobs, they're paid extra to be ministers and therefore they have less time that they can devote to their constituency matters. i suggested it was perfectly reasonable for somebody who is not a member of the government to have a second job, particularly as he is a former law officer, he might be a law officer in the future, and they need to be good lawyers and hone their skills in court. a lot of people disagreed with me on twitter and said being an mp is a full—time job. if that's what people think, then that's what the law will have to say. then that's what the law will have to sa . ~ :: �* then that's what the law will have tosa. ., to say. well, we can't always agree with everyone _ to say. well, we can't always agree with everyone on _ to say. well, we can't always agree with everyone on twitter, - to say. well, we can't always agree with everyone on twitter, can i to say. well, we can't always agree with everyone on twitter, can we? | with everyone on twitter, can we? thank you very much for your time, joshua, we appreciate that. that is joshua, we appreciate that. that is joshua rosenberg. now we have some breaking news from the house of lords. the brexit chief negotiator has been speaking, lord frost. mr;
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has been speaking, lord frost. my lords, has been speaking, lord frost. mi lords, underlying all has been speaking, lord frost. m1: lords, underlying all the has been speaking, lord frost. m1 lords, underlying all the issues to which the statement refers, there are two substantive problems for the government. the first relates to trust. as the noble lord made clear in his lisbon speech, the uk is widely mistrusted as a reliable partner. as a result, everything becomes more difficult. and what should be relatively small, easily resolvable issues, like the licensing of fishing goods, become potential major flashpoints. the second is that there exists at the heart of the northern ireland problem the resolvable issue of where the eu — uk trade boundary are set. the government in reality doesn't want a boundary at all when it comes to gb trading with northern ireland. we it comes to gb trading with northern ireland. ~ . ., it comes to gb trading with northern ireland. ~ _, ., ._ it comes to gb trading with northern ireland. ~ _, ., ., ., ireland. we will come away from that now. i can ireland. we will come away from that now- i can bring _ ireland. we will come away from that now. i can bring you _ ireland. we will come away from that
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now. i can bring you up-to-date i ireland. we will come away from that now. i can bring you up-to-date on i now. i can bring you up—to—date on what the british brexit minister david frost has been saying. he says there is more work to be done in negotiations with the european union over post—brexit trade with northern ireland and he wasn't ready to give up ireland and he wasn't ready to give up yet. he says that this process of negotiations has not reached its end, though we have been talking for nearly four weeks now. there remain possibilities that the talks have not yet seriously been examined. he went on to say, there is more to do and i certainly won't give up on this process unless and until it's abundantly clear that nothing more can be done. that was the british brexit minister david frost, speaking in the house of lords earlier. this morning, the first draft of a potential agreement setting out how countries around the world will cut their emissions has been published, laying out what negotiators hope will be the outcome of the cop26 summit in glasgow, aimed at bringing climate change under control. the seven—page document urges
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nations to outline their long—term strategies to reach net zero emissions by the middle of this century, and to curb global warming to 1.5 celsius. it also encourages richer nations to scale up support for poorer ones. in addition, the agreement calls for countries to accelerate the phasing out of coal, but the document isn't the final outcome of cop26. it will now have to be negotiated and agreed upon by countries attending the talks and is likely to go through further drafts. borisjohnson is returning to glasgow today to meet those negotiators. he's urged nations to pull out all the stops. joining me now is lord adair turner, chairman of the energy transitions commission and also a friend of cop26. this is a group of international experts who have been advising the uk government ahead of the climate conference.
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thank you so much forjoining us. we have been hearing voices today saying that, yes, this is the first draft, but there is already a sense of disappointment at some of the progress that's been made and people are arguing it's just not gone far enough? are arguing it's 'ust not gone far enou~h? ~ ,: are arguing it's 'ust not gone far enou~h? ~ ., enough? well, i disagree with that. i think in particular _ enough? well, i disagree with that. i think in particular in _ enough? well, i disagree with that. i think in particular in the _ enough? well, i disagree with that. i think in particular in the section i i think in particular in the section of what's called mitigation, which is how we reduce emissions, this is a very good draft and i very strongly hope that it will survive the negotiation process. because what it clearly does, for those who want to look at the details, in clause two 22—26, is say we really have to try to limit global warming to it makes it clear the commitments made so far are not sufficient to get there and it then says we need to commit countries to bringing forward, by the end of 2022,
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strengthened policies focused on what you're going to achieve by 2030. this is exactly what we need to come out of cop26. what we have heard is a lot of very optimistic and encouraging things from the private sector and technology and sectors including coalitions of countries about what can be achieved, and we need those commitments now to come back into strengthened mdcs. this text is basically saying that that should be the agreement. if we can get agreement to this text, i think this will be, and it's not the end, this is a struggle which will go on for some time, but i think will be an important step forward. welcome the head of greenpeace _ important step forward. welcome the head of greenpeace uk _ important step forward. welcome the head of greenpeace uk spoke - important step forward. welcome the head of greenpeace uk spoke to i
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head of greenpeace uk spoke to earlier and he suggested that this is baby steps were what we need is bigger strides in order to achieve what is required, to effectively curb climate change?- what is required, to effectively curb climate change? well, look, you can write down _ curb climate change? well, look, you can write down ideally _ curb climate change? well, look, you can write down ideally what _ curb climate change? well, look, you can write down ideally what you i can write down ideally what you want, but you've got to get 190 countries to agree to it. this agreement, if we can get it, would be a significant step forward. it would be the first time that countries have agreed to a text which very clearly describes what is required to get to 1.5. paris at the last moment had a broad commitment to 1.5, but this basically says, if you want to get 1.5 is a feasible pathway, we will have to cut emissions in 2030 about 50% below where they are on target to at the moment and it says clearly, it gets everybody to agree, if they can,
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that the existing contributions are a step forward but they are way short of that. the process of international diplomacy in this climate diplomacy is to go through a series of processes where you get people to agree some principles and then deliver against that. that is all that one was ever going to achieve at cop. as i say, if we can get this text to actually come through and get agreed, and i would strongly urge everybody to support it, it will be a step forward. it won't mean we have solved it because we will then have to deliver it, but the process of countries agreeing that this is what has to be delivered, that is important, that would be an important step forward in itself. :, would be an important step forward in itself. ., ~ ., would be an important step forward in itself. ., : . ., ,, in itself. lord adair turner, thank ou for in itself. lord adair turner, thank you for your _ in itself. lord adair turner, thank you for your time _ in itself. lord adair turner, thank you for your time today. - in itself. lord adair turner, thank you for your time today. thank i in itself. lord adair turner, thank l you for your time today. thank you forjoining us. 0ur science and environment correspondent victoria gill is in glasgow. give us a sense of how these victorious are going. we were just hearing from lord adair turner that
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the challenges of getting this many countries around the table on this issue, so how much agreement is there so far?— issue, so how much agreement is there so far? this draft agreement kind of gives _ there so far? this draft agreement kind of gives us _ there so far? this draft agreement kind of gives us a _ there so far? this draft agreement kind of gives us a sense _ there so far? this draft agreement kind of gives us a sense of- there so far? this draft agreement kind of gives us a sense of where l kind of gives us a sense of where the negotiations are at. the gaps that remain in the text that needs to be filled in, there are some sections where there are square brackets that leave gaps for ongoing negotiations, but there are no big surprises in the status of this. this was always going to be something that really went right down to the wire and negotiators say they are just working all hours to bring consensus because that's what we need, as lord turner was explaining. although this is a draft agreement that shows us where we need to be lays out where we need to be, we need to get everybody in that room, we need to get all of those nations signed up because this is a process of consensus. iihd. nations signed up because this is a process of consensus. and, victoria, one of the focuses _ process of consensus. and, victoria, one of the focuses is _ process of consensus. and, victoria, one of the focuses is what _ process of consensus. and, victoria, one of the focuses is what can i process of consensus. and, victoria, one of the focuses is what can be i one of the focuses is what can be done for developing countries, to help them? we heard from the head of
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greenpeace uk earlier seeing some of the language was a bit fuzzy around the language was a bit fuzzy around the commitments to supporting them, so what sort of material, concrete things have come out of this first draft of the agreement focusing on developing countries? 1 draft of the agreement focusing on developing countries?— draft of the agreement focusing on developing countries? i think one of the thins developing countries? i think one of the things is — developing countries? i think one of the things is this _ developing countries? i think one of the things is this mention _ developing countries? i think one of the things is this mention of- developing countries? i think one of the things is this mention of loss i the things is this mention of loss and damage, so this is essentially and damage, so this is essentially an agreement in the draft stage that is including a global compensation mechanism for the loss and damage already caused to developing nations by climate change. that recognition is new and it's also asking richer nations to step up in this funding for them to adapt and mitigate, so for them to adapt and mitigate, so for them to adapt and mitigate, so for them to adapt to a changing climate and for them to really adjust their whole economies because this is a real kind of overturn to a more sustainable energy system, transport system and of course poorer nations are going to struggle to do that and need that investment. so the request is there to step up.
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where the criticism is common is that that is a request and at that language has been rather woolly, there is no mandate there. the other thing for the mandate has been criticised is on that 1.5 degrees target. this threshold at which the science is showing us beyond that we face the much more dangerous impacts of climate change, sometimes called the tipping point. this draft text says it recognises that as an important target, again it's not setting a real obligation in that language to commit these parties around the table over the river to commit to that target really set out in stone, so there is some concern about that, that we are really taking baby steps, but this is the process we have to tackle climate change globally, this truly global issue. and before this started we were on a trajectory to a much bigger temperature increase, so it's turning down the dial commits a question of whether it's doing that
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quickly enough. question of whether it's doing that quickly enough-— question of whether it's doing that quickly enough. let's now speak to hakan samuelsson, he is the ceo of volvo cars. he joins us from the conference. thank you forjoining us from there. one of the questions is how much is the car industry doing when it comes to their responsibility in contributing to reducing carbon emissions? 1 contributing to reducing carbon emissions?— contributing to reducing carbon emissions? ~ j ., contributing to reducing carbon emissions? ~' j ., ., emissions? i think they're doing a lot, but emissions? i think they're doing a lot. but more _ emissions? i think they're doing a lot, but more importantly - emissions? i think they're doing a lot, but more importantly i i emissions? i think they're doing a lot, but more importantly i think. lot, but more importantly i think they're doing and more because we have, i think to a mindset where we believe we need to see climate change as an opportunity, more than a threat where we are forced to do something. we believe this is an opportunity for our company and we can bring out new, attractive cars
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for consumers. d0 can bring out new, attractive cars for consumers-— can bring out new, attractive cars for consumers. do you think it is a ste that for consumers. do you think it is a step that car _ for consumers. do you think it is a step that car manufacturers i for consumers. do you think it is a | step that car manufacturers should have been working on well before now? i mean, this isn't something we have been unaware of is a priority, so why not sooner than this? that's a aood so why not sooner than this? that's a good question- — so why not sooner than this? that's a good question. i _ so why not sooner than this? that's a good question. i think— so why not sooner than this? that's a good question. i think we - so why not sooner than this? that's a good question. i think we may i so why not sooner than this? that's a good question. i think we may be | a good question. i think we may be concluded... we have been working of course on making our cars cleaner for many years, i think the industry should get credit for that. it really the tipping point for us was two or three years ago and we realised now we have electrification and it's really a very good solution notjust and it's really a very good solution not just to get the cars and it's really a very good solution notjust to get the cars more c02 free but also to make more effective cars. so when you realise things in life, it's good for you. the industry is gradually seeing this as an opportunity. it is something we should do to make our industry stronger and that's the conclusion
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we made. {131 stronger and that's the conclusion we made. . ., , stronger and that's the conclusion we made. _, , ., , , stronger and that's the conclusion we made. , ., , , ., we made. of course, it does rely on u take we made. of course, it does rely on uptake among _ we made. of course, it does rely on uptake among consumers. - we made. of course, it does rely on uptake among consumers. electric i uptake among consumers. electric cars do remain relatively out of reach for some buyers, so what can you do? what is being done to make them more affordable, to make sure there is more of the population buying them?— there is more of the population buying them? no, i mean, that's definitely something. _ buying them? no, i mean, that's definitely something. they i buying them? no, i mean, that's definitely something. they have | buying them? no, i mean, that's. definitely something. they have to be affordable and that's of course also a sort of process. so you need to have high volumes, battery price has to come down and that will happen. there will be some years where they will be very valuable with some kind of incentive government support to really kick—start sales, that's one thing, but i think electric cars also have the advantage, it's notjust an environmental solution, it's also really very attractive car. and
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people who have tested an electric car off and come back and say, wow, i like this and i don't want to go back. so that is something that i think will help us all bring consumers into electric vehicles. thank you very much. that is hakan samuelsson, the ceo of volvo cars, joining us from the summit in glasgow. the health secretary has also been speaking today about covid—i9 and has defended the new compulsory vaccination rules that take effect for care home workers in england at midnight, saying they're all about patient safety and protecting vulnerable people. yesterday, sajid javid announced it will be compulsory for front line nhs staff in england to be fully vaccinated against covid by the beginning of april. from midnight tonight, un—jabbed care home staff in england cannot work unless they are exempt. the government estimates there are still 32,000 of them who aren't fully vaccinated. this rule will also apply to anybody who enters a care home for work — including any agency
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workers and tradespeople. jon donnison has this report. for care homes across england, many already short on staff, tonight's midnight deadline has been looming. so you've still got some edges here, look. here at hill house nursing home in croydon, all workers, except two who say they have a medical exemption, have now been vaccinated. but, for some, they took some persuading. watching the news, understanding statistics, i think it made me understand that it's notjust good for myself, but also for residents, to protect them. also, my colleagues, my family, people around me. in croydon, and across england, there has been a big push to get care home staff vaccinated. but there are still gaps. in croydon, we have 94% of care workers that have taken the initial jab.
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88% has taken the double jab. we've provided a plethora of initiatives in order to get there. but the government says there are still 32,000 care home workers in england who haven't yet been fully jabbed. unless they have a medical exemption, they won't be able to work in the sector any more — until they're double vaccinated. today's my last day of caring, which is really sad, because i love myjob and i'm quite annoyed about it, to be fair. in regards to this vaccine, i feel like it's being forced on us, or on me. and i don't agree with that, to be fair, and i kind of think it's against human rights. losing people like delma means some care homes could be stretched in terms of staffing. but the government says the compulsory vaccination policy is needed to protect care home residents. and from april, all front line nhs staff in england,
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unless medically exempt, will also have to be fully vaccinated against covid—i9 to keep theirjobs. unions are warning that too could lead to staff shortages. jon donnison, bbc news. the welsh parliament has voted to extend the use of covid passes to cinemas and theatres, from next week. the scheme currently only applies to nightclubs and large events, such as rugby games. visitors will have to show they are fully vaccinated, have tested negative for covid or have recently had the virus to enter the venue. a £3 billion mass legal action against google over claims that it secretly tracked millions of iphone users' internet activity has been blocked by the supreme court. the case was brought by complainant richard lloyd, who's the former director of consumer rights group which? he alleged that between 2011 and 2012 google collected data on health, race,
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ethnicity, sexuality and finance track privacy setting. he alleged that between 2011 and 2012 google collected data on health, race, ethnicity, sexuality and finance through apple's safari web browser, even when users had chosen a do not track privacy setting. our technology correspondent marc cieslakjoins me now lots of people at google will be breathing a sigh of relief today. this hearing was important because it was known as a mass action where one person could represent a much larger group who all have the same grievance. these are very common in the united states, where they are known as class actions, but not so much over here because everybody involved in these sorts of cases has to opt in, explicitly giving consent for proceedings to occur. this was something of a test case which didn't require that opt in, so one person could be representative of many, howeverthejudge person could be representative of many, however thejudge said person could be representative of many, however the judge said that the claimant had failed to prove
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damage has been caused to individuals by the data collection that google did, so that the end of the case. ,, , ., , ~ the case. the supreme court blocked gooule, the case. the supreme court blocked google. but — the case. the supreme court blocked google, but what _ the case. the supreme court blocked google, but what with _ the case. the supreme court blocked google, but what with the _ google, but what with the ramifications have been if google had one? if ramifications have been if google had one? , ., ., had one? if they had lost today, gooale's had one? if they had lost today, google's lawyers _ had one? if they had lost today, google's lawyers suggested - had one? if they had lost today, google's lawyers suggested it i had one? if they had lost today, - google's lawyers suggested it would have opened the floodgates for a huge number of us style class actions revolving around privacy and data cases in uk courts.— data cases in uk courts. success for gooale data cases in uk courts. success for google today. _ data cases in uk courts. success for google today. but _ data cases in uk courts. success for google today, but what _ data cases in uk courts. success for google today, but what will - google today, but what will campaigners —— what were campaigners after? what were they hoping for? they were hoping to get compensation for each of the people involved in this breach. something like £750 for the 4.4 million users of this iphone, adding up to billions of pounds for google. i think we can expect to see more of these legal
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challenges coming in the next few years, as people become more aware of privacy issues. years, as people become more aware of privacy issues-_ it has been incredibly mild overnight in england and wales. look at this chilly start in scotland, but that's where the sunshine is in the moment. sure a developing further north and west, but the mild air in the south makes it a rather murky afternoon. outbreaks of light drizzly rain drizzling south and east. a weather front to clear as we speak. we keep sunny spells and scattered showers and the far north—west this afternoon. temperatures will recover, 9—11 . further south, 13 or 14, so three or 4 degrees above where they should be for the time of year. staying cloudy
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overnight, persistent rain in the far north. some clear skies over northern england and northern ireland. that happens we will see temperatures dipping into low single figures. outbreaks of light rain, tomorrow will be quite a messy story, looking likely we will see some cloud and rain easing and by friday it's going to turn increasingly wet and windy in the north—west. hello, this is bbc news with luxmy gopal. the headlines: conservative mp, sir geoffrey cox, has said he does not believe that he breached parliamentary rules — after a clip appeared to show him using his mp's office for private work. the first draft of a possible agreement at the cop26 climate summit is published by the un — the document urges countries to "strengthen" commitments to cut carbon emissions within the next year. it comes as borisjohnson is returning to glasgow to meet delegations — to try to bridge the gaps preventing a new global deal.
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the vaccine deadline for care workers — from midnight tonight those without two jabs won't be allowed to work in the care industry in england. the supreme court blocks a £3 billion legal action against google — over claims it secretly tracked millions of iphone users' internet activity during a tech conference, prince harry says he warned the head of twitter about political unrest in the us — just 24 hours before the january capitol riots. 80 years after women were first conscripted into the army — we hear memories of the teenagers who found themselves in the thick of wwii. the authorities in some parts of germany have banned unvaccinated people from bars, restaurants and leisure facilities as the country battles a fourth wave of covid. in recent days, germany has recorded its highest rates
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of infection since the pandemic began and doctors warn that some hospitals will soon reach capacity. our berlin correspondent, jenny hill, has been to the state of saxony — which has the lowest vaccine take—up in the country and the highest rate of infection. the relentless struggle against a persistent and brutal reality. this is intensive care at leipzig hospital, where the covid ward is filling up fast. the young woman in this bed had just given birth. her baby's fine, but doctors weren't sure if she would survive. there are 18 covid patients here — only four of them vaccinated. it's very difficult to get staff motivated to treat patients now in this fourth wave. a large part of the population still underestimate the problem,
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and everybody should have a friend, someone in theirfamily who had covid infection in the past and therefore should realise what the problem could be for themselves, but nevertheless, we are still seeing so many patients that are not vaccinated. germany's anti—vaxxers are on furious form. 16 million germans over the age of 12 are still unvaccinated. this region, saxony, has the lowest vaccine uptake in the country and the highest rate of infection. the authorities here now restrict unvaccinated people. they're banned from restaurants, cinemas, football matches. this is discrimination, - and we want to say vehemently we do not accept this in our society. - they say the vaccination is ok, | i should give it to my children. j never! i have a feeling it should
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never go into my body, i and i will fight all i can— to prevent it coming into my body. the german government admits it's unlikely now to persuade these people to accept a vaccine, but it has a bigger problem — how to stop the voice of dissent growing into real social division. because what many fear is another lockdown. nadine's bar barely survived the last one. even before the authorities required it, she banned unvaccinated drinkers. my business is dying. my dreams came true, and now they suffer from people who do not do the logical thing to prevent others from getting ill or dying, and i am so angry. long queues at this vaccine centre — evidence perhaps that some have changed their minds, though germany is rolling out the boosterjab as well, nervous about waning protection. but on the ward, they fear the damage is done. operations have been cancelled, procedures postponed to make way for covid patients.
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doctors here warn the fourth wave could be the worst yet. they told us nearly half of the people who end up here will die, and for the country which invented one of the world's first covid vaccines, that is a source of great shame. jenny hill, bbc news. as we've been hearing, it's transport day at the cop26 climate change conference in glasgow. today delegates in glasgow announced agreed upon measures to "work towards all sales of new cars and vans being zero emission by 2040 or earlier, or by no later than 2035 in leading markets." one of the renewable transport options being talked about are electric cars. our reality check correspondent, chris morris, is here. just a reminder why we're talking about this — the uk is committed by law to get to net—zero carbon emissions no later than 2050 to limit the rise in global temperatures.
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now, that might sound like a long time in the future, but to get to net—zero, action has to start now and accelerate quickly — and transport is one of the big challenges. it is currently responsible for 27% of all uk emissions of the greenhouse gases that cause global warming. and, as you can see on this chart, cars account for more than half of that amount — all that petrol and diesel which is being used. that's one of the reasons why the government has announced that there will be no more sales of new petrol and diesel cars after the end of this decade. it also means there needs to be a rapid increase in the production and use of electric vehicles — a process which is already under way. at the end of 2020, there were 432,000 licenced electric or hybrid vehicles on uk roads — that's not much more than 1% of the overall total — but there were none just over a decade ago. and worldwide global sales of electric cars rose
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by nearly 50% last year — with well over three million sales taking place during the pandemic. one estimate is that one in five new cars sold will be electric by 2025. so, car companies are making massive investments in electric car production, with plans to phase out the use of the internal combustion engine. the new nissan battery factory in sunderland announced earlier this year is just one example. but there are big challenges. cost has been an issue — electric cars are more expensive to buy than petrol or diesel cars, even if they're cheaper to run. the price of electric car batteries has been falling sharply for several years, although the cost of raw materials is currently threatening to push it up again. still, the industry is confident that as numbers increase, economies of scale will kick in, addressing a big question. how we are going to address the full ecosystem to not only create business but also to create
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an environment friendly society. the other issue is how to recharge your battery, particularly on longerjourneys. range anxiety has been identified as a factor making people reluctant to go electric. the government says there are currently more than 23,800 public charging points around the country, including more than 4,000 rapid chargers. £1.3 billion is being invested. but labour says it's not enough — it points out the independent committee on climate change says there should be150,000 public charging points by 2025, so a big increase is needed. there are regional disparities, too, with far more charging points in london than some other parts of the country. and it's notjust about motorways, there's also the issue of charging at home. it's fine if you have a driveway, but people who only have access to on—street parking need far more local schemes, such as chargers on lamp posts. so, the shift to electric cars is happening — the challenge is making sure the infrastructure keeps up with the pace of change.
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earlier this year carmaker nissan announced a major expansion of electric vehicle production at its car plant in sunderland. the development will see the creation of more than 15000 jobs at the site and several thousand more in the supply chain. most of these will facilitate the manufacture of the company's new generation, all—electric model at the site. alongside this, partner company, envision aesc, will build a new electric battery plant which it believes will produce enough batteries to power over 100,000 nissan electric vehicles each year. nissan hopes the site will be operational by 2024, when the level of uk—made components in cars manufactured in the uk is required to start increasing, in line with the terms of the uk's trade deal with the eu. the development has already received billions of pounds worth of funding, with the government thought to have contributed tens of millions of pounds towards the cost.
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well, today transport is the focus of the cop26 climate change conference in glasgow, so we are checking in with the the expansion project with with our transport correspondent, caroline davies. welcome from sunderland. we do know that transport is a crucial thing to get right if the fight against climate change is to succeed. we also know that 27% of carbon emissions are a form of transport, 90% of them from road users, so no the government wants to move us out of petrol and diesel vehicles into other forms of transport, including electric cars. but you can't have an electric cars. but you can't have an electric cars. but you can't have an electric car if you don't have a battery, that is what is going on behind me here. there are 192 cells
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and each one of these batteries. they will go from here, the charged up they will go from here, the charged up and be taken at next door to nissan when they will be put into the electric vehicles. but there's no point in having these electric vehicles unless they can be charged around to get around the country. tom keitel is more about the charging network. your company runs 167 charging hubs around the country at the moment. how does uk compare to other countries around the world for electric points? we to other countries around the world for electric points?— for electric points? we look at the statistics of _ for electric points? we look at the statistics of where _ for electric points? we look at the statistics of where we _ for electric points? we look at the statistics of where we are - for electric points? we look at the statistics of where we are in - for electric points? we look at the statistics of where we are in uk i statistics of where we are in uk versus what the leading european countries are, for example, you see that we are probably around two or three years behind in terms of vehicle sales and infrastructure. that gap has been closed very quickly. i think the main thing to point out at the difference between
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us and they netherlands is about visibility. often what you hear about consumer reports about why people are not getting into electric vehicles, there are two barriers, one at the price and the other is a lack of availability of charging infrastructure. i had been driving around this country for years in a little vehicles and i can tell you that there isn't a lack of charging infrastructure. people do not see that infrastructure, the visibility is not there. and if you don't see it, it is not there. consumers are right when they say there is a lack of infrastructure. the big difference between what we do in this country is we make sure everything is highly visible. we install our highs power chargers underneath our solar canopies, it is clear branding which is visible from a long way away, meaning you as a driver can navigate to that very easily. you can do it visually. your
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blood pressure decreases as soon as you get into the neighbourhood of a charging station. you can see it and you can no longer say i can't get into an electric car, i don't know where i can charge it. it's right there in front of you. these guys are having a comfortable driving experience, they dive in, take what they need and then get on the go again. that visibility is what we are tackling in the uk. it is clear that as we move beyond the early adoption phase of electric vehicles, where people would probably put up with a less than optimal experience, we are now getting very close to mass—market for regular drivers who are used stay comfortable and seamless driving experience. with our stations, we call them stations but they are hubs, many chargers are located in the same place, they are
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very high—powered, and we can charge for 300 miles of range injust 20 minutes. it has more range than you can try before you need another break, for example. for others, we were set up almost ten years ago, with a mission to accelerate to sustain sustainability. that is where our infrastructure comes in, thatis where our infrastructure comes in, that is where our design principles come in. we want to make sure our sites can be upgraded very quickly, so as the mind is that we can more chargers overnight —— we can add more charges. that is this filiform customer experience, you're not around the back of a copout trying to find a charger and questioning whether it works. that is not what we need as we moved to this next phase in the wake of announcements at cop. ., ., ,, phase in the wake of announcements atcop. ., , phase in the wake of announcements atcop. ., ., at cop. how easy easy is it to create some _
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at cop. how easy easy is it to create some of— at cop. how easy easy is it to create some of these - at cop. how easy easy is it to create some of these hubs? l at cop. how easy easy is it to i create some of these hubs? can at cop. how easy easy is it to - create some of these hubs? can they be rolled out across the whole country? be rolled out across the whole count ? ., , be rolled out across the whole count? ., ,,, country? for us because we prioritise — country? for us because we prioritise the _ country? for us because we prioritise the consumer - country? for us because we prioritise the consumer we | country? for us because we - prioritise the consumer we make our business of selling electricity to electric cord drivers. we look for applications that are high traffic, very visible and are naturally easily accessible and has the space for us to make those investments in infrastructure. so why do charging bays were all cars can access them and charge with comfort. it is really taking things to the next level. in terms of how easy it is, those locations. generally speaking what hoses up as legal agreements, we need the land, long—term leases in order for us to we need the land, long—term leases in orderfor us to make we need the land, long—term leases in order for us to make those investments was that we are building to serve today's market, but also
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the market in five, ten, 15 years time. that can take anywhere between a year and two years from a signed location agreement to a site that is fully fledged and about. we operate across your —— europe. we actually started here in the north—east, our very first station was in sunderland, about two miles that way, and it was the first high—powered charging hub in at the uk. whenever you drive and come to our locations, you can fill your car as quickly as possible and gone on the road again. that is freedom. you shouldn't be thinking can i pay come up shouldn't be thinking can i pay come up well charging work, will it be slow? very nice to speak to you. thank you very much. we will have more from behindy science year at the battery
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later on. an experienced caver who was trapped underground for two days in wales has been named. george linnane, from bristol, is said to be in "good spirits" after his remarkable rescue. around 250 people were involved in the delicate operation to free from him a cave in the brecon beacons. his friend, maxine bateman, has been speaking about the ordeal. when i first saw george, i was really, really upset. it made me feel quite sick my stomach to think that a friend of mine, a caver, had had an accident. but i took five minutes, deep breaths, got on with thejob in hand. later on it was much easier, knowing we are all here for him and we were making progress and she was going to come out of that cave. prince harry has said he warned twitter bosses about potential political unrest in the us just a day before the capitol
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riots in january. he was speaking at a tech conference about the impact of social media. mark lobel reports. my twitter, my notifications, have blown up. in his latest salvo against hate on social media, the former army captain, now misinformation warrior, joined a 33—minute live session for a tech conference entitled the internet lying machine, where it emerged, referring to these angry riots at the us capital onjanuary 6, he is also, it seems, somewhat of a soothsayer. have you ever had a chance to present your case to the leaders of these company, mark zuckerberg, jack dorsey? no, not directly, not personally. jack and i were e—mailing each other prior to january 6, where i warned him that his platform was allowing a coup to be staged. that e—mail was sent the day before, then it happened.
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in march, jack dorsey, the twitter chief executive, admitted his platform had played a role in the storming of the us capitol, but added, "it's notjust about the technological systems that we use." prince harry warned a small group of accounts is causing a large amount of chaos online, sullying the internet for future generations by filling it with hatred, division and lies. misinformation is a global humanitarian crisis. as you quite rightly pointed out, i've felt it personally over the years, and i'm now watching it happen globally, affecting everyone, notjust america, literally everyone around the world. and i guess the scariest part about it is you don't need to be online to be affected by this. leading to this personal swipe on somewhat well trodden ground for harry at sections of the uk press. they've successfully turned fact—based news into opinion—based gossip with devastating consequences
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for the country. asked for his solution to the problem, he is not recommending everyone takes leave from social media, as he and meghan have done, conceding its far too addictive for that. but instead he says it's for big companies and advertisers to kick out the troublesome few whose hate and lies are then spread far and wide. mark lobel, bbc news. some more to bring you on the breaking news we brought you earlier. in the past hour the conservative mp, sir geoffrey cox, released a statement saying he doesn't believe he breach common standards rules after a video image that appeared to show him using his parliamentary office for private work. and at the past few minutes labour�*s deputy leader angela rayner has been speaking about this. i hope has been speaking about this. i have wrote to the — has been speaking about this. i have wrote to the independent _ has been speaking about this. i we wrote to the independent commission
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on today because once again we find conservative mps are breaking the rules to make hundreds pounds for themselves and see being an mp as a leg up to make sure that they can make their own personal gain. this is not acceptable. we are here to represent our constituents, not represent our constituents, not represent ourselves, and it stinks of sleaze and corruption. maurice johnson can't get his house in order. i've written to the commissioner about borisjohnson commissioner about boris johnson himself. you commissioner about borisjohnson himself. you know what they say, a fish rots from the head up. you can see this is what happening with the conservatives is at the moment, they're not representing the british people, they are representing themselves and making a huge amount of money off the back of it. 80 years ago, an act was passed in parliament which led to more than seven million women being called up to help with the wwii effort. it was the only time in british history that women were compelled to serve, taking up roles from mechanics, ambulance drivers
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and air raid wardens. john maguire has been to meet some of them. archive: in the concrete emplacements at a gun l site in the london area, | battle—dressed ats girls are in training for active service. they were teenaged girls on the verge of womanhood in a time of a world war. i wanted to do something for the war effort and i think most people did. i wanted something exciting to do and to learn a skill. i wanted to be a driver. daphne was in search of a world outside her norfolk village. i'd like to have gone at 17 and a half, but my mother wouldn't sign the form. but at 18 you could go. so immediately i was 18, i wanted to go. gracejoined for love. it sounds a bit silly but one of the reasons was i had a boyfriend. he was in the army. my first boyfriend, of course. and he had been told he was going to be sent abroad. and i thought if ijoined the army, i might meet up with him again. i didn't like the idea
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of him being sent away. all signed up to the auxiliary territorial service, the ats. young, keen to learn and to understand army ways. so i went to norwich and my mother came. and i remember she was buying all new underclothes, pyjamas and everything. we didn't realise, of course, we were going to be issued with all this stuff. the greatcoat was five and the jacket was five. the jersey were one and the knickers was two. 3,100. 225! grace worked on anti—aircraft guns. you see, the two chaps who were on the guns had to sit with their backs to the actual target. they had to do as they were told from us girls. so in actual fact the girls were targeting the aircraft, but the men were doing the actual firing.
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all three are featured in a book on the ats, titled army girls. daphne's copy arrived as we were filming with her. are you on the back? yes! aha!j pride of place, daphne. and all have fond memories of their wartime service, despite the dangers they faced. it was a wonderful experience. you were there and you never thought you might be killed. i certainly wasn't terrified. you were just doing yourjob. when you were told to take posts, of course, you ran to get to your instrument as fast as you can, and all you girls are running at the same time. you just got to grab your gas mask and your sealed helmet, take the covers off your instrument and start searching the skies. their training meant they learned the skills they could only dream of. if you put a three—tonne bedford on my drive now, i could strip the engine down and put it back again. we did everything. you see, the carburettors were all sealed on army vehicles to 40 mph because of the petrol situation.
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but staff cars and ambulances weren't sealed. so i could put my foot down and do 80! they have a very high wheelbase. as you are coming up to 70, you had to push it through that last bit, otherwise you'd get a wobble. and what they remember most are the friends they made, despite or often because of the hardships they faced together. i know we had some dreadful times during the war but i enjoyed being with so many girls. we could have a laugh. when we were travelling in the 1500 weights in the back, we'd sing. we used to sing in descant, you know. because of the ats, it stood me instead for a wonderfuljob, because i had a wonderfuljob with the gpo all my life. it was the best university i could have gone too. it was wonderful. it wasn't all beer and
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skittles, as they say. there were some sad times, very sad. and that was when the war was really brought home to you. when the site was in action, we never thought about the people in the aircraft that were being brought down. it was the enemy, it was there caught in the searchlights and it was there to be destroyed. you didn't think about anybody in it until later. and 80 years since they firstjoined up, many of their memories are as vivid as ever. memories they remain determined to share so that we remember the sacrifices their generation made. john maguire, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise. contrasting weather conditions to start our wednesday today. these were the two faces we will cut too, quite cloudy, misty and mercury
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across england and wales. by contrast it was cold further north and east. scotland and northern ireland sitting in that cold air, the warmer air down to the south. a weather front still producing the risk of some rain as we go through the remainer of the day. quite a lot of cloud, light outbreaks of patchy rain drifting across england and wales. further north is where we have the breaks in the cloud the sunshine coming through and a scattering of showers. that is how we will continue through the rest of the afternoon. a little bit cooler although temperatures will recover into the afternoon for scotland and northern ireland. highest values still above the average for the time of year, not quite as warm as tuesday.
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through wednesday evening and overnight, we keep cloud across the south, a little bit more showery rain filtering back into the south—west. another weather front will bring yet more wet weather into the far north of scotland. sandwiched between the two, where we keep clear skies temperatures are likely to fall away. thursday morning is quite a messy picture, two weather fronts squeezing and merging together, a lot of cloud around, a damp, misty and murky classic kind of november morning. poor visibility towards the coast. heavier rain will arrive in from the far north—west with strengthening winds are by the end of the afternoon and temperatures between 8—14 degrees. as low pressure moves in, more wet and windy weather to come on friday. towards the weekend a ridge of high pressure builds, quieting things down quite nicely.
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some wet and windy weather, particularly in the far north—west on friday. drierfor the weekend, but a questiion mark as to how much sunshine we are going to see.
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a draft climate agreement is published at the glasgow un summit — countries are asked to strenghten their commitment to cutting carbon emissions. there's a drive for all nations to reach net zero by the middle of this century, and to give poorer countries more support. the impact of climate change are much bigger and happening all over the world including bangladesh and we will need a lot more money than they are offering right now. but this is by no means the final agreement, we'll ask how much work remains to be done if the summit is to be succesful. also this lunchtime: the conservative mp geoffrey cox says he doesn't believe he broke the rules, after images appeared to show him using his westminster office for private work. vaccination deadline —
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anyone working in care homes in england must be fully jabbed by today unless they're medically exempt.

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