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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 10, 2021 6:00am-9:00am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and nina warhurst. our headlines today. the vaccine deadline for care workers — from midnight tonight, those without two jabs won't be allowed to work in england. with similar rules due for the nhs next year, the unions are warning of staff shortages. a call for an investigation into conservative mp sir geoffrey cox, as labour claim pictures show him breaking parliamentary rules. a lack of mechanics to maintain the growing number of electric vehicles over the coming decade. yorkshire's racism row rumbles on, as the club suspends current head coach andrew gale pending an investigation into an historic social media post.
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eighty years after women were first conscripted into the army, we hear memories of the teenagers who found themselves in the thick of world war two it was a wonderful experience. you were there and you never thought you might be killed. i were there and you never thought you might be killed-— might be killed. i certainly wasn't terrified. you _ might be killed. i certainly wasn't terrified. you are _ might be killed. i certainly wasn't terrified. you are just _ might be killed. i certainly wasn't terrified. you are just doing - might be killed. i certainly wasn't terrified. you are just doing a - might be killed. i certainly wasn't| terrified. you are just doing a job. good morning. for northern ireland and england, sunshine and showers. for the rest of england and wales, cloudy with rain. details coming up. good morning. it's wednesday, 10th november. our main story. today is the last day that unvaccinated staff can work in care homes in england, unless they're exempt. the rule applies to most people entering care homes including agency workers, tradespeople and occupational therapists. yesterday, the health secretary announced all frontline nhs staff in england must also be
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vaccinated by april. jon donnison has this report. for care homes across england, many already short on staff, tonight's midnight deadline has been looming. see, you've still got some edges here, look. here at hill house nursing home in croydon, all workers, except two who say they have a medical exemption, have now been vaccinated. but for some, they took some persuading. watching the news, understanding statistics, i think it made me understand that it's notjust good for myself, but also for residents, to protect them. also, my colleagues, my family, people around me. in croydon, and across england, there has been a big push to get a care home staff vaccinated. but there are still gaps. in croydon we have 94% of care workers that have taken the initial jab. 88% has taken the double jab.
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we've provided a plethora of initiatives in order to get there. but the government says there are still 32,000 care home workers in england who haven't yet been fully jabbed. unless they have a medical exemption, they won't be able to work in the sector anymore until they double vaccinated. today's my last day of caring, which is really sad because i love myjob and i'm quite annoyed about it, to be fair. in regards to this vaccine, i feel like it's being forced on us, or on me. and i don't agree with that, to be fair. and i kind of think it's against human rights. losing people like delma means some care homes could be stretched in terms of staffing. but the government says the compulsory vaccination policy is needed to protect care home residents. and from april, all front line nhs staff in england, unless medically exempt, will also have to be fully vaccinated against covid—i9 to keep theirjobs.
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unions are warning that too could lead to staff shortages. jon donnison, bbc news. at 7.30 this morning, we'll be speaking to the health secretary sajid javid. labour is calling on the government to open a standards investigation into the conservative mp, sir geoffrey cox. this video may show the former attorney general using his commons office to carry out private work, which the opposition claim is in breach of parliamentary rules. 0ur chief political correspondent, adam fleming, is in glasgow this morning, where borisjohnson will be later for the final few days of the cop climate conference. good morning, adam. the prime minister's problems at home, might there overshadow any deals he can make on the world stage? deals he can make on the world staue? ~ ., ., deals he can make on the world staue? ., , , stage? morning. you can see why the prime minister _ stage? morning. you can see why the prime minister might _ stage? morning. you can see why the prime minister might want _ stage? morning. you can see why the prime minister might want to - stage? morning. you can see why the prime minister might want to get - stage? morning. you can see why the prime minister might want to get out | prime minister might want to get out of westminster and away from a nathan— of westminster and away from a nathan or— of westminster and away from a nathan or ninth day of stories about what conservative mps do to earn
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money _ what conservative mps do to earn money outside parliament and whether that is— money outside parliament and whether that is inside of the rose, and to come _ that is inside of the rose, and to come to— that is inside of the rose, and to come to a — that is inside of the rose, and to come to a big international gathering like this. i suspect other countries — gathering like this. i suspect other countries will be focusing on the negotiations here on climate change rather— negotiations here on climate change rather than — negotiations here on climate change rather than what is happening at home _ rather than what is happening at home. but what has happened in westminster in the last few hours is that the _ westminster in the last few hours is that the labour deputy leader, angela — that the labour deputy leader, angela rayner, has written to the independent parliamentary standards commissioner and asked him to look into the _ commissioner and asked him to look into the case of geoffrey cox. now it is not— into the case of geoffrey cox. now it is not about the fact he was working — it is not about the fact he was working as a lawyer and he was working — working as a lawyer and he was working for the government of the british— working for the government of the british virgin islands in the caribbean. it is not that he was away— caribbean. it is not that he was away from _ caribbean. it is not that he was away from parliament while parliament was sitting virtually. it is over— parliament was sitting virtually. it is over this — parliament was sitting virtually. it is over this video that has emerged today— is over this video that has emerged today which suggest he was doing that work— today which suggest he was doing that work for the government of the british— that work for the government of the british virgin islands potentially from _ british virgin islands potentially from his— british virgin islands potentially from his house of commons office as what minister. —— at westminster. the rules— what minister. —— at westminster. the rules say— what minister. —— at westminster. the rules say you should only use bil the rules say you should only use big resources like an office for your— big resources like an office for your public duties as an mp. that is what _ your public duties as an mp. that is
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what labour— your public duties as an mp. that is what labour are focusing on today and that _ what labour are focusing on today and that is— what labour are focusing on today and that is what the commission will have to _ and that is what the commission will have to look— and that is what the commission will have to look at. a little bit of a warning — have to look at. a little bit of a warning about timing here and how clear that _ warning about timing here and how clear that process will be. the standards _ clear that process will be. the standards watchdog works in a very private _ standards watchdog works in a very private and — standards watchdog works in a very private and confidential way and takes _ private and confidential way and takes quite a long time to reach a view— takes quite a long time to reach a view on _ takes quite a long time to reach a view on things. so this might be around — view on things. so this might be around for— view on things. so this might be around for a little while yet. and we have — around for a little while yet. and we have not heard from geoffrey cox himself. _ we have not heard from geoffrey cox himself, even though we have approached him quite a few times over the _ approached him quite a few times over the last few days. but again it means— over the last few days. but again it means the — over the last few days. but again it means the newspapers are full of stories— means the newspapers are full of stories about mps and the standard system _ stories about mps and the standard system at _ stories about mps and the standard system at westminster, and who ultimately is responsible for the standards system, who could arguably be standards system, who could arguably he the _ standards system, who could arguably be the prime minister.— be the prime minister. thank you, adam. the welsh parliament has voted to extend the use of covid passes to cinemas and theatres, from next week. the scheme currently only applies to nightclubs and large events, such as rugby games. visitors have to show they are fully vaccinated, have tested negative for covid or have recently had the virus to enter.
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there are warnings that the uk is facing a shortfall of mechanics to maintain electric vehicles, as new petrol and diesel cars are phased out by 2030. the institute of the motor industry says just 7% of mechanics are trained to repair electric cars, and at the current rate of training, there will be a shortfall of more than 35,000 qualified technicians. they don't all know how to work on electric vehicles. even though manufacturers sell them, not all the techs are trained in them, so it becomes an issue to book them in. that's where we come into play, coming to independents like us. health campaigners have warned that some snacks sold as weaning or infant foods contain alarming amounts of sugar, that could encourage a sweet tooth from an early age. action on sugar analysed 73 baby and toddler products, and found that over a third would qualify for a high sugar warning on the traffic light food labelling system. campaign lead dr kawther hashem warned of the impact on children's teeth. the main reason why children
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could be admitted to hospital is because their teeth are so damaged they need to be extracted. and having sugary products, or even sugary products that are specifically for babies and toddlers, it's still exposing their teeth to that risk. two large groups of migrants have broken through fences to enter poland from belarus, as the crisis at the border continues. at least 2,000 migrants are currently stuck at the border in freezing conditions. poland's prime minister has accused russian president vladimir putin of being behind the crisis. meanwhile, belarus's leader has denies claims its sending people over the border in revenge for eu sanctions. prince harry has said he warned twitter bosses about potential political unrest in the us — just a day before the capitol riots in january. he was speaking at a tech conference, discussing whether social media was contributing to misinformation and online hatred. 0ur reporter mark lobel has the story.
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my my twitter, my notifications, have blown up. my twitter, my notifications, have blown u -. , my twitter, my notifications, have blown u. , ., , my twitter, my notifications, have blownu. , ., , ., blown up. in his latest salvo auainst blown up. in his latest salvo against hate _ blown up. in his latest salvo against hate on _ blown up. in his latest salvo against hate on social- blown up. in his latest salvo l against hate on social media, blown up. in his latest salvo - against hate on social media, the former army captain, now misinformation warrior, joined a 33 minute live session for a tech conference entitled the internet lying machine, where it emerged, referring to these angry riots in the us capital onjanuary six, he has also, it seems, somewhat of a soothsayer. has also, it seems, somewhat of a soothsayer-— soothsayer. have you ever had a chance to present _ soothsayer. have you ever had a chance to present your - soothsayer. have you ever had a chance to present your case - soothsayer. have you ever had a chance to present your case to i soothsayer. have you ever had a i chance to present your case to the leaders of these company, mark zuckerberg, jack dorsey? trio. leaders of these company, mark zuckerberg, jack dorsey? no, not directl , zuckerberg, jack dorsey? no, not directly. not _ zuckerberg, jack dorsey? no, not directly, not personally. - zuckerberg, jack dorsey? no, not directly, not personally. jack- zuckerberg, jack dorsey? no, not directly, not personally. jack and | zuckerberg, jack dorsey? no, not| directly, not personally. jack and i directly, not personally. jack and i were _ directly, not personally. jack and i were e—mailing each other prior to january— were e—mailing each other prior to january the — were e—mailing each other prior to january the 6th, where i warned him that his _ january the 6th, where i warned him that his platform was allowing a coup _ that his platform was allowing a coup to — that his platform was allowing a coup to be staged. that e—mail was sent to _ coup to be staged. that e—mail was sent to the — coup to be staged. that e—mail was sent to the day before, then it happened. in sent to the day before, then it happened-— sent to the day before, then it hauened. . , , happened. in march, jack dorsey, the twitter chief —
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happened. in march, jack dorsey, the twitter chief executive, _ happened. in march, jack dorsey, the twitter chief executive, admitted - twitter chief executive, admitted his platform had played a role in the storming of the us capital, but added, it's notjust about the technological systems that we use. prince harry warned a small group of accounts is causing a large amount of chaos online, sullying the internet for future generations by filling it with hatred, division and lies. a ., ., ., filling it with hatred, division and lies. ~ , ., ., ., , filling it with hatred, division and lies. a ., ., ., filling it with hatred, division and lies. ~ , ., ., ., lies. misinformation is a global humanitarian _ lies. misinformation is a global humanitarian crisis. _ lies. misinformation is a global humanitarian crisis. as - lies. misinformation is a global humanitarian crisis. as you - lies. misinformation is a global. humanitarian crisis. as you quite rightly— humanitarian crisis. as you quite rightly pointed out, i've felt it personally over the years, and i'm now watching it happen globally, affecting everyone, notjust american, literally everyone around the world _ american, literally everyone around the world. and i guessed the scariest _ the world. and i guessed the scariest part about it is you don't need _ scariest part about it is you don't need to— scariest part about it is you don't need to he — scariest part about it is you don't need to be online to be affected by this. ., ., , , ., , , this. leading to this personal swipe on somewhat _ this. leading to this personal swipe on somewhat well _ this. leading to this personal swipe on somewhat well trodden - this. leading to this personal swipe on somewhat well trodden ground i this. leading to this personal swipe l on somewhat well trodden ground for harry at sections of the uk price. they've successfully turned fact paste _ they've successfully turned fact paste news into opinion —based gossip — paste news into opinion —based gossip with devastating consequences for the _ gossip with devastating consequences for the country. its gossip with devastating consequences for the country-— for the country. as for his solution to the problem, _
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for the country. as for his solution to the problem, he _ for the country. as for his solution to the problem, he is _ for the country. as for his solution to the problem, he is not - to the problem, he is not recommending everyone takes lead from social media, as he and mag it have done, conceding its far too addictive for that. but instead he says it's for big companies and advertisers to kick out of the troublesome few whose hate and lies are then spread far and wide. mark lobel are then spread far and wide. mark lobel, bbc news. nobel peace prize winner and women's rights activist malala yousafzai has got married. the 24—year—old made the announcement on twitter, saying she and her family held a small islamic ceremony at her home in birmingham and described it as a precious day in her life. congratulations. what a beautiful, beautiful picture. she had kept it really quiet. then the pictures came out in british vogue to start with. absolutely stunning pictures. matching the autumnal leaves, gorgeous. luco else's matching the autumnal leaves this morning, carol. good morning. this morning it is a
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chilly start if you are waking up in north—east scotland. locally there is out for us. in england and wales it is a mile start. for all of us it is going to be mild for the time of the year with light winds. that is where the common denominator and speakers for england and for wales we have got a weather front reducing cloud, mist, fog and some rain. it will brighten up in northern england, northern ireland and scotland too. gusty winds across the north west. a0 to 50 mph, possibly a little bit more than that at times. and these are the temperatures. nine to 15 degrees. yesterday in nantwich in cheshire we reached 17.6. so not quite as mild as that for you today. at these temperatures are still a little bit above average. this evening and overnight we still have all this cloud and some spots of rain, some mist and fog around for england and wales, and a new weather
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front ringing rain in scotland. gusty winds in the northern isles, 60 mph. the winds will ease through the night. with clear skies in southern scotland, northern england and northern ireland, chilly enough in sheltered areas for a touch of frost. no such problems for the south. it is in the south tomorrow we start off on a cloudy note. the mist and fog slowly lifting. the cloud should break up. we will see some sunshine. the weather front retreat northwards and it will bring some more rain. by the end of the day the winds will strengthen and heavy rain will come our way from the west. thank you. the husband of iranian detainee, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe is into his 18th day of a hunger strike outside the foreign office. richard ratcliffe wants to put pressure on the prime minister to meet iranian delegates at the climate conference this week, to demand freedom for britons detained in iran. but there are now concerns over his wellbeing.
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0ur reporter peter henley has more. even though she's not been well herself, barbara radcliffe has been determined to keep making the trip up from hampshire to support her son on his hunger strike. apart from anything else i'm going up every day to check my boy. 0n the train she shows me the whatsapp messages the family send to keep spirits up, including nazanin in iran. mainly our conversation is about gabriella, and it's heartbreaking watching her on whatsapp, watching us bringing up her little girl. yeah, and there's nothing we can do about it. nazanin was arrested at tehran airport five years ago, taking then baby gabriella to see her grandparents for the first time. she totally denied the charges of conspiring against the iranian state. after serving a five yearjail term, she has been stopped from leaving, with new threats to lock up again.
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are you 0k? yeah. richard ratliffe's hunger strike outside the doors of the foreign office is now entering its 18th day. he was visited by the labour leader keir starmer this week. it's acknowledged the british government owes the iranians £a00 million over a cancelled arms deal. and barbara radcliffe knows which politician she wants to tackle over that. the one you really want is borisjohnson? yes. when i see him i will be speaking to him. firmly? i hope i will have the courage to do that, yes. i spoke to him twice in a nice polite way. but this time, i won't be rude, but i think i'm going to ask him why he can't pay the money. the camp has become so well established, they even receive parcels, but not food. this is a hunger strike, as richard's brother a gp, reminds us. we are keeping as close an eye on him as we possibly can. it's full on, it's very busy here, it's difficult. and all that we have
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at our disposal is, you know, checking in with him, talking to him, making sure he's as well as he can be under the circumstances. he's determined, isn't he? he's a very, very determined person, yeah. so how much further can he stick this out? an iranian delegation visits the foreign office on thursday. you get more stubborn. the longer it goes on, you're less able to make that decision. so, it's not... i think we've got a danger point beyond which we don't want to go. we're now into the uncertainty point, where, you know, it's definitely damaging, but it's hopefully not permanently damaging. you want to see the iranians, don't you, when they come on thursday? i want to be here on thursday, yeah, yeah. i'm not backing down. peter henley, bbc news. 16 minutes past six. let's take a look at today's papers. the times reports on the video of former attorney general sir geoffrey cox's, which appears
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to show him using his commons office for his legal work, in apparent breach of parliamentary rules. the metro also leads on this story, reporting that labour has demanded an official inquiry. the front page also features a photo of marcus rashford receiving his mbe from the duke of cambridge yesterday. care homes face a cliff edge, is the headline on the front page of the i newspaper. it says tens of thousands of care workers are set to lose theirjobs, major cities will face acute shortages of care staff and some care homes will not survive the winter. prince harry is trending on twitter, after saying that he warned bosses at the social media firm about potential political unrest in the us, just a day before the capitol riots injanuary. shall we have a look at the inside pages? this is in the guardian. they have pictures from the cave rescue we have been covering the last
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couple of days, it took 5a hours, 250, 350 people involved in the actual rescue. 0ne 250, 350 people involved in the actual rescue. one of the fascinating things we heard is as more details emerged last night was that the rescuers, some of them had to lie on the ground so the structure could be passed between them. that is why it took so long. inch by inch. watching tv is more dangerous, say a lot of the rescuers. they wouldn't be put off at all. ~ . rescuers. they wouldn't be put off atall. ., , at all. what, statistically watching tv is more — at all. what, statistically watching tv is more dangerous? _ at all. what, statistically watching tv is more dangerous? i'm - at all. what, statistically watching tv is more dangerous? i'm not. at all. what, statistically watching l tv is more dangerous? i'm not sure the have tv is more dangerous? i'm not sure they have the _ tv is more dangerous? i'm not sure they have the statistics _ tv is more dangerous? i'm not sure they have the statistics to _ tv is more dangerous? i'm not sure they have the statistics to back- they have the statistics to back that up! they have the statistics to back that u! ~ they have the statistics to back that u -i ~ . , they have the statistics to back thatu!~ ., , ., ~ they have the statistics to back thatu!~ ., , ., ,, ., they have the statistics to back thatu!~ ., , ., ~ ., ., that up! we have been talking a lot about water— that up! we have been talking a lot about water shortages. _ that up! we have been talking a lot about water shortages. now - that up! we have been talking a lot about water shortages. now it's . about water shortages. now it's getting real. look at this. this is in the sun this morning. grotto grief as santa shortages hit the shops. an estimated 3000 centre positions are standing empty around the world. there has been a virtual
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service to bring father christmases to uk kids to meet soaring demand. the blame is on candidates's waning appetite for seasonal roles. that is an interesting trend. people wanted to go for staffjobs instead of seasonal work. 0thers reckon people want to avoid jobs where there may be a risk of catching covid. watch out, santa. nota real one be a risk of catching covid. watch out, santa. not a real one though. we mentioned marcus rashford a moment ago. this is in the daily express. they have pictures of marcus rashford yesterday with the duke of cambridge, receiving his mbe. remember, we announced that mbe when he was first told he was going to get it for services to vulnerable children during covid for his campaign on free school meals. this is in yesterday at windsor castle. marcus in a brand—new suit. what do you think they talked about? football. , . ~ you think they talked about? football. , ., ,, ., ,., football. they talked about football. marcus _ football. they talked about football. marcus was - football. they talked about i football. marcus was saying football. they talked about i football. marcus was saying he football. they talked about - football. marcus was saying he spoke about england and the euros and the atmosphere in the camp, how that
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team had been in a brilliant place, obviously until the very end and the horrendous final. he obviously until the very end and the horrendous final.— horrendous final. he didn't talk about the manchester - horrendous final. he didn't talk about the manchester derby . horrendous final. he didn't talk - about the manchester derby match. perhaps not. this is the bed i spotted, marcus's mum mel in the background there, so proud. and he dedicated it to her. we background there, so proud. and he dedicated it to her.— dedicated it to her. we are talking a lot about — dedicated it to her. we are talking a lot about environmental - dedicated it to her. we are talking - a lot about environmental awareness. this is still reasonably good news for the times. more than 60 years ago the thames river was declared biologically dead. but a recent study has shown seals, sea horses and even baby sharks are living in the river thames more than 60 years later. still a high risk from sewage being pumped and the impact of climate change. listen to this one, sally. 0k. the report also studied plastic pollution in the thames, revealing a wet wide mind covered in sediment had grown to a.5 feet high.
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—— wet wipes mound. it is worth knowing though next time you think about putting a wet wipe. yes. knowing though next time you think about putting a wet wipe.— about putting a wet wipe. yes, we have done — about putting a wet wipe. yes, we have done a _ about putting a wet wipe. yes, we have done a lot _ about putting a wet wipe. yes, we have done a lot about _ about putting a wet wipe. yes, we have done a lot about that - about putting a wet wipe. yes, we i have done a lot about that recently. it's not a thing to do. 20 past six. eighty years ago, an act was passed in parliament which led to more than seven million women being called up to help with the world war two effort. it was the only time in british history that women were compelled to serve, taking up roles from mechanics, ambulance drivers and air raid wardens. breakfast'sjohn maguire has been to meet some of them. archive: in the concrete emplacements at a gun l site in the london area, | battle—dressed ats girls are in training for active service. they were teenaged girls on the verge of womanhood in a time of a world war. i wanted to do something for the war effort and i think most people did. i wanted something exciting to do and to learn a skill. i wanted to be a driver. daphne was in search of a world
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outside her norfolk village. i'd like to have gone at 17 and a half, but my mother wouldn't sign the form. but at 18 you could go. so immediately i was 18, i wanted to go. gracejoined for love. it sounds a bit silly but one of the reasons was i had a boyfriend. he was in the army. my first boyfriend, of course. and he had been told he was going to be sent abroad. and i thought if ijoined the army, i might meet up with him again. i didn't like the idea of him being sent away. all signed up to the auxiliary territorial service, the ats. young, keen to learn and to understand army ways. so i went to norwich and my mother came. and i remember she was buying all new underclothes, pyjamas and everything. we didn't realise, of course, we were going to be issued with all this stuff. the great coat was five
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and the jacket was five. the jersey were one and the knickers was two. 3,100. 225! grace worked on anti—aircraft guns. you see, the two chaps who were on the guns had to sit with their backs to the actual target. they had to do as they were told from us girls. so in actual fact the girls were targeting the aircraft, but the men were doing the actual firing. all three are featured in a book on the ats, titled army girls. daphne's copy arrived as we were filming with her. are you on the back? yes! aha!! pride of place, daphne. and all have fond memories of their wartime service, despite the dangers they faced. it was a wonderful experience. you were there and you never thought you might be killed. i certainly wasn't terrified. you were just doing yourjob. when you are told to take posts, of course, you run to get
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to your instrument as fast as you can, and all you girls are running at the same time. you just got to grab your gas mask and your sealed helmet, take the cameras off your instrument and start searching the skies. their training meant they learned the skills they could only dream of. if you put a three tonne bedford on my drive now, i could strip the engine down and put it back again. we did everything. you see, the carburettors were all sealed on army vehicles to a0 mph because of the petrol situation. but staff cars and ambulances weren't sealed. so i could put my foot down and do 80! they have a very high wheelbase. as you are coming up to 70, you had to push it through that last bit. and what they remember most are the friends they made, despite or often because of the hardships they faced together.
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i know we had some dreadful times during the war but i enjoyed being with so many girls. we could have a laugh. when we were travelling in the 1500 weights in the back, we'd sing. we used to sing in descant, you know. because of the ats, it stood me instead for a wonderfuljob, because i had a wonderfuljob with the gpo all my life. it was the best university i could have gone too. it was wonderful. it wasn't all beer and skittles, as they say. there were some sad times, very sad. and that was when the war was really brought home to you. when the site was in action, we never thought about the people in the aircraft that were being brought down. it was the enemy, it was there caught in the searchlights and it was there to be destroyed. you didn't think about anybody in it until later. and 80 years since they firstjoined
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up, many of their memories are as vivid as ever. memories they remain determined to share so that we remember the sacrifices their generation made. john maguire, bbc news. a little bit of inspiration to start your day. a little bit of inspiration to start our da . . . a little bit of inspiration to start our da . ., ., .,, ., a little bit of inspiration to start ourda . ., ., ., , your day. yeah, and it was a big moment for— your day. yeah, and it was a big moment for women. _ your day. yeah, and it was a big moment for women. until - your day. yeah, and it was a big moment for women. until that i your day. yeah, and it was a big - moment for women. until that point many of those women would not have thought about a career and the war ended and they wanted to keep on working. it changed everything for women. coming up in the next hour... electric cars the future, new research says there aren't enough specially trained mechanics to repair and maintain them. we'll be live at a training facility throughout the morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. a care home manager in north london says he has serious worries over recruiting staff who've had their covid jabs. from tomorrow anyone who's not been vaccinated can't
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work in a care home. nhs figures show london has the highest number of unvaccinated carers in the country. managerjonathan beacham says he's struggling to replace two workers who he lost before the change in the law. there are more jobs than staff at the moment, so if somebody is looking for the kitchen role we have on offer, there will be other care homes advertising the same position. we've got to try and nick staff off each other to get through this time. the future, how many care staff will come into this profession, is still uncertain. the department of health and social care told us it's working closely with local authorities and care home providers to make sure there are enough staff. a major study into the health of the thames the first of its kind in 60 years shows positive signs for wildlife and the river's recovery. it found an increase in a range
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species including birds, seahorses and even sharks. but experts warn climate change is raising the temperature of the water and causing levels to rise. rugby fans have complained about overcrowding at twickenham station at the weekend. it was the first game at twickenham station to have a full crowd since the pandemic stop there was an apology to customers. they said they will make changes for this saturday. let's see how the tube is running this morning. a couple of signal failures to tell you about. there's no circle line or hammersmith and city line at the moment between hammersmith to edgware road and no northern line northbound between kennington and camden town via bank. time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. another very mild start this morning. temperature double figures,
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10, 11 celsius overnight. we are hanging onto this mild air today and into friday. this cold front started to edge towards us yesterday. it has stalled, really taking its time. that is what is bringing today's cloud. we'll see outbreaks of largely light and patchy rain on and off through the day. the wind is light and the temperature mild, we are looking at 15 celsius. this evening and overnight we still hang on to the cloud. you might get one or two breaks in it. that will lead to mist and fog patches with low cloud developing. quite a murky night and a murky start tomorrow. the minimum temperature again very mild, between 9 and 11 celsius. any mist orfog in the morning will take time to lift. it will be a largely cloudy day. you'll notice for friday, low pressure swinging towards the north of the uk and that will bring a spell of windy weather. by the time the front associated with it gets to us, it should be fairly light and patchy rain. as we head into the weekend, the temperature does start to become
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a little chillier. i'm back in half an hour. now it's back to nina and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and nina warhurst. coming up on breakfast this morning... with just two days to go until our weather presenter 0wain takes on breakfast�*s 2a—hour, children in need drumathon, we take a look at how picking up the drum sticks can improve memory and mental health. # i crashed the wedding. # it's better than regretting busted star matt willis willjoin us in the studio just before 9 to chat about taking on a leading role in the hit musical �*waitress' and supporting his bandmate tom fletcher on strictly. and to mark his 80th birthday, footballing legend sir geoff hurst will tell us about the sportsmen who've inspired him throughout his life. let's go back to our main story now. many people in healthcare settings will now have to be double—jabbed
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before being able to work. yesterday, the health secretary announced it will be compulsory for frontline nhs staff to be fully vaccinated against covid by the beginning of april. from midnight tonight, un—jabbed care home staff in england cannot work unless they are exempt. the government estimates there are still 32,000 of them who aren't fully vaccinated. this rule will also apply to anybody who enters the care home for work — including any agency workers and tradespeople. let's speak now tojoyce pinfield, from the national care association. good morning to you. good to see you this morning. before we talk more generally about the picture, just tell me what the situation is in your own experience, in a situation your own experience, in a situation you are working in at the moment. yes, i am a pear provider as well as being vice—chairman of the national care association. we are hearing
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from other members they are in a really critical situation. we went into the pandemic with well over 100,000 staff vacancies. so we were already in major problem trying to get care workers into the sector. then the pandemic hit, which exacerbated it. naturally, we didn't want carers working in more than care setting. now three mandatory vaccinations and pressures we have been put under during the pandemic, more staff are leaving the sector. we are trying to bring new workers into the sector from all over the country but this simply isn't working. now we are going to lose 32,000 due to mandatory vaccinations, it is almost becoming a situation where there will be no care will star it will be very difficult. already it is very
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difficult. already it is very difficult for people who are the most vulnerable in society, who need care. it is so difficult to get care workers in care homes or care in the home. where we will find the workers from we are not terribly sure. we wish the government would add social care workers on the immigration shortage occupation list. so far are cause for this to happen have been ignored. where we find these people from, we do not know. tell ignored. where we find these people from, we do not know.— from, we do not know. tell me this if ou from, we do not know. tell me this if you can. — from, we do not know. tell me this if you can. in _ from, we do not know. tell me this if you can, in practical— from, we do not know. tell me this if you can, in practicalterms, - from, we do not know. tell me this if you can, in practicalterms, i - if you can, in practical terms, i know we are talking about care in different settings, in homes and within a care home setting, in practical terms, when staff shortages really bite but what does that mean for people who need looking after? it that mean for people who need looking after?— looking after? it means if care providers. _ looking after? it means if care providers, and _ looking after? it means if care providers, and it _ looking after? it means if care providers, and it is _ looking after? it means if care| providers, and it is happening, looking after? it means if care - providers, and it is happening, do not feel they can safely look after
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the people they are meant to be caring for within the facility, they will have to lose those beds. social care is there. we support the nhs. we are trying to protect the nhs. social care is there. we prevent people going into hospital and we are there to help the bed booking situation and look after people in the best way we possibly can in a community atmosphere, to prevent the nhs getting overwhelmed due to bed blocking. nhs is really supported by social care. we blocking. nhs is really supported by social care. ~ ., ., ~ ., social care. we are talking to you toda , social care. we are talking to you today. the _ social care. we are talking to you today, the clock _ social care. we are talking to you today, the clock is _ social care. we are talking to you today, the clock is ticking - social care. we are talking to you today, the clock is ticking and - social care. we are talking to you today, the clock is ticking and we are counting down to this moment when the rule comes in. we have known about this since july, when the rule comes in. we have known about this sincejuly, haven't we? are you asking for extra time, for an extension? brute we? are you asking for extra time, for an extension?— we? are you asking for extra time, for an extension? we think we would like extra care. _
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for an extension? we think we would like extra care. of— for an extension? we think we would like extra care. of course _ for an extension? we think we would like extra care. of course we - like extra care. of course we believe vaccination is one of the best ways out of this pandemic. it would be wonderful if everybody was double vaccinated, those that can be, of course there are always exceptions. if the whole of the health and social care sector had mandatory vaccinations all at the same time, that would have made totally more sense. at present, sincejuly, we knew this date was looming. many have let social care and gone into other things, like hospitality and retail, and even went into the nhs as well, where of course they have better pay and better systems in place for remuneration, and of course they are considered more professional. we do want the social care sector to be looked upon as professional work with career opportunities. we really need career pathways and parity of
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pay with the nhs. it is a dire situation at the moment. it does really need looking at on how we're going to staff our care homes to look after most vulnerable people in society. look after most vulnerable people in socie . . ~ look after most vulnerable people in socie . ., ,, , ., look after most vulnerable people in socie . ., ~' , ., , look after most vulnerable people in socie . ., ,, , . ., society. thank you very much for our society. thank you very much for your time — society. thank you very much for your time this — society. thank you very much for your time this morning. - let's check in with the sport. it is not going away for yorkshire, is it? no, the crisis continuing yorkshire. it seems like the spotlight is widening to look at cricket as a whole. the department for media and sport is next week holding a hearing to find out quite how far these allegations of discrimination may go and what is being done to combat them. the investigation continuing yorkshire. morning, everyone. yorkshire head coach andrew gale has been suspended pending an investigation into an historic tweet, as the club continues to deal
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with allegations of racism. lord patel, the new chair at yorkshire, says he hopes to have a process in place by the end of the week for whistleblowers to come forward, to share any instances of discrimination. tabassum bhatti who is now 37, signed a contract at yorkshire at the age of 1a, he has told the bbc about his experience. i think it's become clear that it's been going on for a long time and yes, it has been pushed under the carpet, you know? like i said, i was there in 1998. there were incidents prior to me being there. there's been things happening in the last 20 years up to present. so i think that's pretty clear, to be honest, that it has been overlooked. yorkshire chair lord patel has said allegations made by individuals about their experiences need to be properly investigated, and that anyone who may have suffered issues should come forward, and these will be considered carefully.
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england take on new zealand later in the t20 world cup semi—final. captain eoin morgan says his side are looking forward to a repeat of the 50—over final they played at lords in 2019, when england won by the tightest of margins. i wouldn't say strong favourites. new zealand have a full strength squad. we've obviously been hampered with a lot of injuries throughout this tournament. we're playing really good cricket. and the guys are extremely excited about the challenge against new zealand and potentially, you know, the opportunity that might follow that. but we need to play really good cricket in order to beat the kiwis. they've got match winners throughout their team and that's been a big, i suppose, movement of their white ball side, they're sort of power packed, and that quite deep as well. there are a number of threats and number of match winners.
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and we also have a number of match winners as well. and, at the end of the day, it's trying to commit to, you know, what you do is as a team and we both do it a little bit differently. chelsea manager emma hayes said her players were "outstanding" as they thrashed swiss champions servette 7—0 in the women's champions league. the blues, who led 6—0 at half—time, showed the gulf in quality between the sides with some impressive attacking play. fran kirby scored twice. and so did sam kerr. melanie leupolz, jessie fleming and guro reiten also got on the scoresheet. it's the first time anyone's scored seven in a women's champions league group game. emma raducanu's history—making season is over — she was beaten in her first match in linz in austria. us open champion and top seed, she lost the first set 6—1 to before winning a tie break to level the match at a set apiece. she then took a medical timeout in the deciding set before
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she eventually fell to the world number 106, raducanu will now look towards working with new coach torben beltz in preparation for next season. andy murray is still going though — he's into the second round of the stockholm 0pen after beating norwegian qualifier viktor durasovic in straight sets. murray now faces top seeded italianjannik sinner later today this was a really good match point as well. finally he gets the winner away. hejust keeps as well. finally he gets the winner away. he just keeps going and he marry. no stopping him. incredible. he is literally unbreakable! that is great to see. no problem. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. how are you? very well thanks. good morning. this morning it is a chilly start for some of us, especially
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across scotland, northern ireland and england where we have had clear skies. inbound moraltemperatures skies. inbound moral temperatures only skies. inbound moraltemperatures only two degrees. further south more cloud and rain around. the temperature is ten, 11. this band of rain has been with us for a few days and is sinking southwards. eventually it will move northwards again. a lot of cloud in the south, clearer skies in the north. that is where there is some frost, especially in the northeast where there are low temperatures. quite a bit of sunshine across the north of england and northern ireland as we go through the course of the morning with a few showers in the west. then we run into the cloud and rain across parts of england and wales. in the south there could be pockets of sunshine first thing but the cloud will be building. during the course of the day the weather front will continue to slide southwards. a lot of cloud behind it with showers
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and light winds generally. gusty winds can 2a0, 50 miles an hour, possibly more than that. temperatures nine to 15 degrees. as we go through the latter part of the day you will find a new weather front were coming across the north—west of scotland, bringing in rain as it sinks southwards. gusts of 60 miles an hour possible. 0nce of 60 miles an hour possible. once again we are looking at a fair bit of ploughed, some mist and fog around across parts of england and wales. with the clear skies across northern ireland, southern scotland and england, in sheltered areas it could be cold enough for a touch of frost. these are the areas which will start the sunshine. showers will start the sunshine. showers will move across scotland. it will start cloudy and damp across england and wales but the weather front. to retreat to the north, at times
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bringing in heavy rain. the cloud will break up. we will see more bright and sunny spells. temperatures eight to 15 degrees. at the same time the wind will strengthen in the west, heralding the arrival of an area of low pressure. as well as the wind strengthening, we will see heavy and persistent rain coming our way. what we think is it will bring strong winds and rain are direction as go through the course of the night. during the course of friday it will be a blustery day, there will be outbreaks of rain which will be heavy and persistent. you can see them coming in across northern ireland and england. the rain will not be as heavy in the south. 0n not be as heavy in the south. on saturday there could be gales potentially. saturday will start off blustery and wet in the south—east and then high pressure will build on. with the wind coming in from the east and more cloud in the is, the
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sunniest conditions will be in the west. tonnes going on with the weather in the next few days. it is all happening. thank you. labour is calling on the government to investigate the conservative mp, geoffrey cox, after reports he used his westminster office to carry out his second job in what they say is a "breach of the rules." it follows the controversy over the former mp 0wen paterson, who resigned after being found to have broken lobbying rules. we can speak now to the labour mp and chair of the standards committee, chris bryant. can we start with just explaining to our viewers what the alleged will breakers and whether you believe he has broken them? serra; breakers and whether you believe he has broken them?— has broken them? sorry about this, nina, ou has broken them? sorry about this, nina. you are _ has broken them? sorry about this, nina, you are going _ has broken them? sorry about this, nina, you are going to _ has broken them? sorry about this, nina, you are going to think - has broken them? sorry about this, nina, you are going to think i - nina, you are going to think i am being a terrible stickler stop because i am the chair on the committee on standards which might had to adjudicate if the parliamentary commissioner decides to start an investigation into
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geoffrey cox, that investigation would come to my committee, i am not going to hold forth about the geoffrey cox case at all, i am afraid. in relation to 0wen paterson, i would say one thing... everybody knows alan paterson took £112,000 a year, more than the average cost of a home in the rhondda to lobby government officials on behalf of those paying clients which is completely forbidden in parliamentary laws. he used his parliamentary office on originally we thought it was 25 occasions, he managed to persuade us it the 16 occasions. 16 occasions for those paying clients. it has been clear for a long for those paying clients. it has been clearfor a long time for those paying clients. it has been clear for a long time you and for those paying clients. it has been clearfor a long time you and i do use your parliamentary office to run a commercial operation. you would think that is obvious and stands to reason. the offices provided by the taxpayer and you are not meant to usual office for any
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kind of commercial operation. just to be clear. _ kind of commercial operation. just to be clear. if _ kind of commercial operation. just to be clear, if geoffrey cox has used his office in video which is in the public domain, for a private gig. the public domain, for a private gig, he has breached those rules in the same way. you gig, he has breached those rules in the same way-— the same way. you are a very good uenus the same way. you are a very good genus and — the same way. you are a very good genus and you _ the same way. you are a very good genus and you are _ the same way. you are a very good genus and you are going _ the same way. you are a very good genus and you are going to - the same way. you are a very good genus and you are going to try - the same way. you are a very good genus and you are going to try to l genus and you are going to try to get me to hold forth on this specific person. i have not looked at the knees. i had to be an independentjudge. he would never want a person chairing the committee to be someone who has already hold forth and decided on the case. it is a hypothetical question and i am not going to our spirit. if a hypothetical question and i am not going to our spirit.— going to our spirit. if any mp used the private _ going to our spirit. if any mp used the private office _ going to our spirit. if any mp used the private office to _ going to our spirit. if any mp used the private office to and _ going to our spirit. if any mp used the private office to and raise - the private office to and raise money, what would the ramifications be? ., ., ., ., ., .,
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be? you have to read a report on owen paterson. _ be? you have to read a report on owen paterson. despite - be? you have to read a report on owen paterson. despite the - be? you have to read a report on owen paterson. despite the fact| 0wen paterson. despite the fact incidentally that a couple of other mps wrote to us and said they were not aware of any rule saying you could not use a parliamentary office to run a business, it has been very clear for a to run a business, it has been very clearfor a long time to run a business, it has been very clear for a long time that you are not meant to use your parliamentary office to run a commercial operation. you might end up occasionally meeting other people in your office but you are not meant to run a commercial operation out of your taxpayer funded office, run a commercial operation out of your taxpayerfunded office, either your taxpayer funded office, either in your taxpayerfunded office, either in parliament or in your constituency. it is an important and basic rule. that is not me prejudging the individual, it is me explaining the process. the independent parliamentary commissioner, it is up to her whether she launches an investigation into an individual pace. she goes through a very thorough process, investigates and corresponds with the individual
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member. that report comes to the parliamentary commission. and it is. we adjudicate on that. that is what we did with 0wen paterson. 0ne terrible thing over the last fortnight as the prime minister decided to force the tory mps to go through the whole of the lobby to blow up the standard system, as if he did not care about standards at all. i am glad to say we won that battle. the report which is currently in limbo will be agreed on monday evening. is it currently in limbo will be agreed on monday evening-— currently in limbo will be agreed on monday evening. is it not time for a wider conversation _ monday evening. is it not time for a wider conversation about _ monday evening. is it not time for a wider conversation about capacitive | wider conversation about capacitive mps to and money —— and money in this way? anyone who goes outside these rams were can i say hand on heart i had never sat in the palace of westminster and reply to an e—mail, use the wi—fi? do we need to question about whether it should be
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allowed article? we question about whether it should be allowed article?— allowed article? we have said they should be dealt _ allowed article? we have said they should be dealt with _ allowed article? we have said they should be dealt with with - allowed article? we have said they should be dealt with with a - allowed article? we have said they should be dealt with with a sense i allowed article? we have said they. should be dealt with with a sense of proportion and that should be fair. the kind of thing my constituents in the rhondda care about is whether i am doing a good enoughjob by then. do they get answers to e—mails from me? am i that in parliament doing my bit, speaking up for people in the rhondda? that is a judgment everyone makes up and down the land. some would argue you should not have any outside interest whatsoever. we deal with and income but we do not deal with and income but we do not deal with and income but we do not deal with an ending can. you may end up with an ending can. you may end up with people owning thousands and thousands of acres of land or large investment portfolios but do not have any and income. that would rejig parliament, ithink. iwelcome the fact you have some of the gps who are still working in the medical capacity. you have to do a certain
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number of days a year as i understand it to remain in the medical profession, to keep your iron as it were. it medical profession, to keep your iron as it were.— iron as it were. it is one thing workin: iron as it were. it is one thing working on — iron as it were. it is one thing working on the _ iron as it were. it is one thing working on the front - iron as it were. it is one thing working on the front line - iron as it were. it is one thing | working on the front line when iron as it were. it is one thing - working on the front line when the nhs is in crisis mode, and another when you and 200 and speaking at an event for goldman sachs. deloitte, citibank, google, facebook. do you understand how that fits with the public? i understand how that fits with the ublic? ~ .., , , understand how that fits with the ublic? ~' .., , , ., understand how that fits with the ublic? ~ _, , , ., ., public? i think constituents want to see ou public? i think constituents want to see you are — public? i think constituents want to see you are doing _ public? i think constituents want to see you are doing your— public? i think constituents want to see you are doing yourjob - public? i think constituents want to | see you are doing yourjob properly. i am not aware of anybody complaining in my constituency about that. i work hard, i work long hours. i am that. i work hard, i work long hours. iam not that. i work hard, i work long hours. i am not seeking any kind of sympathy for that. i love being a member of parliament. for most of us, it is notjust our primary duty, it is our 60 hours a week duty. the vast majority of mps certainly i would also add during the
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coronavirus period, we have been doing many, many hours. the number of people who have got in touch with us with problems in the constituency because of coronavirus have absolutely rocketed. i because of coronavirus have absolutely rocketed.- because of coronavirus have absolutely rocketed. i am sure we will seak absolutely rocketed. i am sure we will speak to _ absolutely rocketed. i am sure we will speak to you _ absolutely rocketed. i am sure we will speak to you again _ absolutely rocketed. i am sure we will speak to you again about - absolutely rocketed. i am sure we i will speak to you again about this. thank you for having me. there's just two days to go until weather presenter 0wain wyn evans takes his position and kicks off breakfast�*s 2a—hour drumathon for children in need. how is he doing it? drumming has been scientifically proven to benefit memory and mental health and some of the money raised will go towards music therapy projects, helping young people across the uk. breakfast�*s jayne mccubbin has been finding out more. we are born to be drummers, but we just don't know it. when your mother is carrying you for nine months, you are listening to that heartbeat for nine months. two, three, and... you're born with this vibration and to continue it, it's wonderful.
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drumming has a power — a power which has now been medically proven. this neuroscientist has looked deep into the brain to see the transformative powers of drumming in groundbreaking studies of teenagers and people with autism. it was a bit of a punt taking a look at this. no—one's ever done this before. it's incredible, really. we've looked at brains after eight weeks of training our children to drum and the changes are incredible. we see the tuning in the brain change dramatically. there's fine tuning that we've never seen before, which is reflected in what we then see in their behaviour. what their parents are reporting is these children are less hyperactive, they're more attentive. they're not having the mood swings that maybe they're having before. hi, everybody.
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here we go. this is the milestone special school in gloucester, where they take drumming very seriously. and this is gabriel. somebody told me, gabriel, you have your own band. yes. what are they called? sirroc. and is it true that you are the drummer in the band? yeah, iam. wow. the drumming journey of gabriel and his classmates is being tracked by hartpury university. wahay! yes. look at that! and what psychologists have discovered is that drumming helps these kids in ways no other lesson can. it makes me feel happy when i'm drumming.
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it's really good and i like feeling it. i like druming because it's got really loud music. - i like making a noise. these sessions were inspired by a project, which was born in wembley arena, 1999. this is professor marcus smith, and this is the moment he met blondie drummer clem burke for the very first time. the definitive moment of the clem burke drumming project commencing really was the song, dreaming. i've watched clem play dreaming so many times, but never get bored of it because i'm just picturing what's going on in the brain. # when i met you in the restaurant... professor smith has worked with blondie's drummer to better understand the science of drumming. when i first met dr smith at wembley arena, i immediately understood what he was getting at. it's very primal playing the drums, but also its your mind
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and your body need to be in sync. over two decades, they've carried out research, which proves one thing. the secret behind the power of the drums is the combination of physical exertion and complex mental challenge. i think it's important for people to get a positive spin on what it's like to be a musician, what it's like to be a drummer, what's required of you and the mental and physical aspects of it, which is what the study began with. and it's just really important for me to have people realise that it's more than just having a beer and walking on stage, let's say. this research is still in its infancy. we're onlyjust beginning to understand its potential. it's such a potent stimulus to the brain. it is an awesome, awesome instrument.
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wasn't that amazing? it is right. that psychology can if you are focusing on an activity challenging your body and mind, it means you escape everything else in your life. for that moment you have freedom. whether it is on the drums or in sport, fantastic. let's find out how you can support 0wain's drumathon challenge. if you'd like to support 0wain's bbc breakfast drumathon challenge attempt and donate to bbc children in need, you can donate £5, by texting the word "drum" to 70a05. to donate £10, text "drum" to 70a10. or to donate £20, text the word "drum" to 70a20. texts will cost your donation plus your standard network charge and 100% of your donation will go to bbc children in need. you must be 16 or over and have the bill payer's permission. forfull terms, more information,
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or to donate any amount you'd like online, go to bbc.co.uk/pudsey. thank you. the benefits of drumming outjust as good even if you use a pen. for two seconds, like you did! we will be here on saturday morning catching him after his 2a—hour is. i might get some hand massages for him. he will be exhausted and emotional, i am sure. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. a care home manager in north london says he has serious worries over recruiting staff who've had their covid jabs. from tomorrow anyone who's not been vaccinated can't work in a care home. nhs figures show london has the highest number of unvaccinated carers in the country.
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managerjonathan beacham says he's struggling to replace two workers who he lost before the change in the law. there are more jobs than staff at the moment, so if somebody is looking for the kitchen role we have on offer, there will be other care homes advertising the same position. we've got to try and nick staff off each other to get through this time. the future, how many care staff will come into this profession, is still uncertain. the department of health and social care told us it's working closely with local authorities and care home providers to make sure there are enough staff. a major study into the health of the thames the first of its kind in 60 years shows positive signs for wildlife and the river's recovery. it found an increase in a range species including birds, seahorses and even sharks. but experts warn climate change is raising the temperature of the water and causing levels to rise. rugby fans have complained
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about overcrowding at twickenham station at the weekend. it was the first game at twickenham station to have a full crowd since the pandemic. the train operator has apologised and say they will make changes ahead of saturday. let's see how the tube is running this morning. a couple of signal failures to tell you about. there's no circle line or hammersmith and city line at the moment between hammersmith to edgware road and no northern line northbound between kennington and camden town via bank. time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. another very mild start this morning. temperature double figures, 10, 11 celsius overnight. we are hanging onto this mild air today and into friday. this cold front started to edge towards us yesterday. it has stalled, really taking its time. that is what is bringing today's cloud. we'll see outbreaks of largely light and patchy rain
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on and off through the day. the wind is light and the temperature mild, we are looking at 15 celsius. this evening and overnight we still hang on to the cloud. you might get one or two breaks in it. that will lead to mist and fog patches with low cloud developing. quite a murky night and a murky start tomorrow. the minimum temperature again very mild, between 9 and 11 celsius. any mist orfog in the morning will take time to lift. it will be a largely cloudy day. you'll notice for friday, low pressure swinging towards the north of the uk and that will bring a spell of windy weather. by the time the front associated with it gets to us, it should be fairly light and patchy rain. as we head into the weekend, the temperature does start to become a little chillier. i'm back in half an hour. do take a look at our website bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and sally nugent. 0ur headlines today. the vaccine deadline for care workers — from midnight tonight, those without two jabs won't be allowed to work in england. with similar rules due for the nhs next year, the unions are warning of staff shortages. a call for an investigation into conservative mp sir geoffrey cox, as labour claim pictures show him breaking parliamentary rules. a shortage of mechanics to maintain the growing number of electric vehicles over the coming decade. yorkshire's racism row rumbles on, as the club suspends current head coach andrew gale pending an investigation into an historic social media post. footballing legend sir geoff hurst marks his 80th birthday by talking about the sporting heroes who've inspired him. good morning. for scotland, northern ireland and
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northern end and we are looking at sunny spells and showers, most in the north west. for england and north of wales a lot of cloud and outbreaks of rain. all of us be mild. details coming up. good morning. it's wednesday, 10th november. our main story. today is the last day that unvaccinated staff can work in care homes in england, unless they're exempt. the rule applies to most people entering care homes including agency workers, tradespeople and occupational therapists. yesterday, the health secretary announced all frontline nhs staff in england must also be vaccinated by april. jon donnison has this report. for care homes across england, many already short on staff, tonight's midnight deadline has been looming. see, you've still got some edges here, look. here at hill house nursing home in croydon, all workers, except two who say they have a medical exemption, have now been vaccinated. but for some, they took
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some persuading. watching the news, understanding statistics, i think it made me understand that it's notjust good for myself, but also for residents, to protect them. also, my colleagues, my family, people around me. in croydon, and across england, there has been a big push to get care home staff vaccinated. but there are still gaps. in croydon we have 9a% of care workers that have taken the initialjab. 88% has taken the double jab. we've provided a plethora of initiatives in order to get there. but the government says there are still 32,000 care home workers in england who haven't yet been fully jabbed. unless they have a medical exemption, they won't be able to work in the sector any more until they double vaccinated. today's my last day of caring, which is really sad because i love myjob and i'm quite annoyed about it, to be fair.
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in regards to this vaccine, i feel like it's being forced on us, or on me. and i don't agree with that, to be fair. and i kind of think it's against human rights. losing people like delma means some care homes could be stretched in terms of staffing. but the government says the compulsory vaccination policy is needed to protect care home residents. and from april, all front line nhs staff in england, unless medically exempt, will also have to be fully vaccinated against covid—19 to keep theirjobs. unions are warning that too could lead to staff shortages. jon donnison, bbc news. at 7.30 this morning, we'll be speaking to the health secretary sajid javid. labour is calling on the government to open a standards investigation into the conservative mp, sir geoffrey cox. this video may show the former attorney general using his commons office to carry out private work, which the opposition claim
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is in breach of parliamentary rules. 0ur chief political correspondent adam fleming is in glasgow this morning, where borisjohnson will be later for the final few days of the cop climate conference. good morning. how damaging is this for the prime minister at a time when he wants his big moment in glasgow? weill. minister at a time when he wants his big moment in glasgow?— minister at a time when he wants his big moment in glasgow? well, i think the prime minister _ big moment in glasgow? well, i think the prime minister is _ big moment in glasgow? well, i think the prime minister is coming - big moment in glasgow? well, i think the prime minister is coming to - the prime minister is coming to glasgow— the prime minister is coming to glasgow to buy some heads together in the _ glasgow to buy some heads together in the last— glasgow to buy some heads together in the last few days of the negotiations. as you might expect a prime _ negotiations. as you might expect a prime minister to do. labour accused him of— prime minister to do. labour accused him of making a day trip to distract from _ him of making a day trip to distract from what — him of making a day trip to distract from what is happening at westminster. people will have to make _ westminster. people will have to make up — westminster. people will have to make up their own minds. in terms of geoffrey— make up their own minds. in terms of geoffrey cox, — make up their own minds. in terms of geoffrey cox, until yesterday, everything he had been doing had been _ everything he had been doing had been in _ everything he had been doing had been in the rules. he had gone to the british— been in the rules. he had gone to the british virgin islands when parliament was sitting virtually, so he wasn't — parliament was sitting virtually, so he wasn't breaking the rules. and he was declaring the earnings he was getting _ was declaring the earnings he was getting from his outside legal work as a 0c— getting from his outside legal work as a qc and as a lawyer. what has changed _
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as a qc and as a lawyer. what has changed overnight of though is that this video _ changed overnight of though is that this video and these pictures have emerged — this video and these pictures have emerged in the newspapers which show him appearing to take part in a hearing— him appearing to take part in a hearing virtually that was taking piace _ hearing virtually that was taking piace in — hearing virtually that was taking place in the british virgin islands, but using — place in the british virgin islands, but using his parliamentary office. ifyou _ but using his parliamentary office. ifyou look— but using his parliamentary office. if you look the furnishings do look quite _ if you look the furnishings do look quite familiar. if you look at the times— quite familiar. if you look at the times he — quite familiar. if you look at the times he leaves his desk, that could coincide _ times he leaves his desk, that could coincide with when parliamentary business — coincide with when parliamentary business was happening on that day in september. and labour say this would _ in september. and labour say this would be — in september. and labour say this would be a — in september. and labour say this would be a breach of parliamentary standards — would be a breach of parliamentary standards. they point to the code of conduct _ standards. they point to the code of conduct for— standards. they point to the code of conduct for mps which says you should — conduct for mps which says you should only use public resources, likely— should only use public resources, likely parliamentary building, for your public duties as an mp. so this will now— your public duties as an mp. so this will now be — your public duties as an mp. so this will now be a matter for the independent parliamentary standards commissioner, katherine stone, to look at _ commissioner, katherine stone, to look at her— commissioner, katherine stone, to look at. her process is very confidential and she doesn't give a running _ confidential and she doesn't give a running commentary on her investigations. when they are under way or— investigations. when they are under way or we _ investigations. when they are under way or we know is a little bit further — way or we know is a little bit further down the line an mp's name is added _ further down the line an mp's name is added to— further down the line an mp's name is added to the list. so this could rumble _ is added to the list. so this could rumble on— is added to the list. so this could rumble on and hang over geoffrey cox
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for quite _ rumble on and hang over geoffrey cox for quite some time yet. and we haven't— for quite some time yet. and we haven't heard from sir geoffrey cox himself— haven't heard from sir geoffrey cox himself beyond his entries into the register— himself beyond his entries into the register of— himself beyond his entries into the register of members interests about the work— register of members interests about the work it— register of members interests about the work it does outside parliament, which, _ the work it does outside parliament, which, as— the work it does outside parliament, which, as an — the work it does outside parliament, which, as an mp, he is allowed to do. . ~' , ., the welsh parliament has voted to extend the use of covid passes to cinemas and theatres, from next week. the scheme currently only applies to nightclubs and large events, such as rugby games. visitors will have to show they are fully vaccinated, have tested negative for covid or have recently had the virus to enter the venue. health campaigners have warned that some snacks sold as weaning or infant foods contain alarming amounts of sugar, that could encourage a sweet tooth from an early age. action on sugar analysed 73 baby and toddler products, and found that over a third would qualify for a high sugar warning on the traffic light food labelling system. campaign lead dr kawther hashem warned of the impact on children's teeth. the main reason why children could be admitted to hospital is because their teeth
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are so damaged they need to be extracted. and having sugary products, or even sugary products that are specifically for babies and toddlers, it's still exposing their teeth to that risk. two large groups of migrants have broken through fences to enter poland from belarus, as the crisis at the border continues. poland and lithuania have recently strengthened border security in response to thousands of migrants gathering on the belarusian side. 0ur europe correspondent nick beake is close to the polish—belarusian border for us this morning. morning to you. what is the very latest? ,., ., ., , , morning to you. what is the very latest? ., , , ., latest? good morning. this is about as close as — latest? good morning. this is about as close as we _ latest? good morning. this is about as close as we can _ latest? good morning. this is about as close as we can get _ latest? good morning. this is about as close as we can get to _ latest? good morning. this is about as close as we can get to the - latest? good morning. this is about as close as we can get to the border 'ust as close as we can get to the border just over— as close as we can get to the border just over the — as close as we can get to the border just over the horizon, that is belarus _ just over the horizon, that is belarus. there is a state of emergency which meansjournalists emergency which means journalists can't get _ emergency which meansjournalists can't get near to the border. crucially. _ can't get near to the border. crucially, aid agencies and charities— crucially, aid agencies and charities can't. so they cannot
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reach — charities can't. so they cannot reach some of the 2000 to 4000 people _ reach some of the 2000 to 4000 people who have now spent a second 11! l ht people who have now spent a second night in _ people who have now spent a second night in subzero conditions. most of the people — night in subzero conditions. most of the people there are men but we know there are _ the people there are men but we know there are women and children too. i've there are women and children too. we just _ there are women and children too. we just got — there are women and children too. i've just got a text message from someone — i've just got a text message from someone who said, it's a desperate situation, _ someone who said, it's a desperate situation, is— someone who said, it's a desperate situation, is life really supposed to be _ situation, is life really supposed to be like — situation, is life really supposed to be like this? what is happening here is— to be like this? what is happening here is this — to be like this? what is happening here is this has been a migrant crisis _ here is this has been a migrant crisis that— here is this has been a migrant crisis that has been going on for a few weeks— crisis that has been going on for a few weeks now but has erupted over the last— few weeks now but has erupted over the last 48— few weeks now but has erupted over the last a8 hours. what is happening is people _ the last a8 hours. what is happening is people are arriving in belarus over— is people are arriving in belarus over the — is people are arriving in belarus over the border in the capital and they are — over the border in the capital and they are coming to the border with poland _ they are coming to the border with poland. they are trying to get into this country, which is part of the european — this country, which is part of the european union. the eu are accusing belarus _ european union. the eu are accusing belarus of— european union. the eu are accusing belarus of using these people as weapons — belarus of using these people as weapons to try and destabilise the european — weapons to try and destabilise the european union. so there's lots of political— european union. so there's lots of political talk this morning. but none _ political talk this morning. but none of— political talk this morning. but none of that helps the people who are trapped. and the reason they are trapped _ are trapped. and the reason they are trapped is _ are trapped. and the reason they are trapped is that poland are building a border— trapped is that poland are building a border fence. they have sent 12.000 — a border fence. they have sent 12,000 troops to the border and they are not— 12,000 troops to the border and they
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are not letting people through. the people _ are not letting people through. the people we — are not letting people through. the people we are speaking to a video call and _ people we are speaking to a video call and text messages say they are trapped _ call and text messages say they are trapped it— call and text messages say they are trapped. it is a desperate situation with no— trapped. it is a desperate situation with no end or solution inside, i'm afraid _ with no end or solution inside, i'm afraid. w' �* . ~ with no end or solution inside, i'm afraid. �* ., ,, prince harry has said he warned twitter bosses about potential political unrest in the us, just a day before the capitol riots in january. speaking at a tech conference, discussing whether social media was contributing to misinformation and online hatred, he said he had warned the chief executive of twitter that inflammatory comments on the platform could lead to trouble on the streets of washington. it is ten past seven. let's check in with carol and the weather. i was just telling sally, yesterday i was out and about and i went early with the thermals and ended up overheating. it was pretty mild. is that going to carry on? yes, it is for the next few days. notjust by dead but by night as well. as always, not all of us. this weather
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picture has got a clear skies, some parts of scotland were called last night with temperatures close to freezing. in the north—east you may well be looking at a little bit of frost. where we have got these cloud, this is a weather front and it is also producing some rain. for england and wales it is a mild start. temperatures between eight and 11 degrees. we have got this rain slowly slipping southwards. some parts of the south—east will see some sunshine first thing. it's northern england, northern ireland and scotland that will see the lion's share of the sunshine today. a few showers in the north—west. gusty winds across the north—west of scotland and also towards the northern isles. light winds for the rest of the uk. temperatures between nine and 15 degrees. through this evening and overnight we still have the weather front. there will be some low cloud, most of fog, spots of rain, before a new one introduces
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rain in parts of scotland. gusty winds in the north will start to ease. where we have got a clear skies across northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england, in sheltered areas it will be cold enough for a touch of frost. this is where we see the sunshine tomorrow. winds in north—west scotland. brightening up in wales. wet and windy weather looks set to come in from the west later. thank you. see you in half an hour. access to life—saving equipment and an awareness of basic first aid can be vital in improving a person's chance of survival in an emergency. now, stjohn ambulance is calling for trauma kits, which would include military grade dressings and tourniquets, to be installed in venues like football stadiums and train stations, to help save lives in the event of a stabbing or terrorist attack. let's speak now to richard lee, from the stjohn ambulance service, and consultant general and trauma surgeon, nikhil misra.
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good morning to you both. you walked in with this kit and the first thing sally said, we thought a trauma kit would be cut. brute sally said, we thought a trauma kit would be cut-— would be cut. we have been... as in'uries would be cut. we have been... as injuries change, _ would be cut. we have been... as injuries change, first _ would be cut. we have been... as injuries change, first need - would be cut. we have been... as injuries change, first need needsi would be cut. we have been... asi injuries change, first need needs to change _ injuries change, first need needs to change. today we are delighted to be partnering _ change. today we are delighted to be partnering with citizen eight, a fellow— partnering with citizen eight, a fellow charity, and the national counter—terrorism office to provide guidance _ counter—terrorism office to provide guidance to people on what they should _ guidance to people on what they should have in an area to provide first aid _ should have in an area to provide first aid for— should have in an area to provide first aid for really serious traumatic injuries. not a cut finger~ _ traumatic injuries. not a cut finger. injuries where people may bleed _ finger. injuries where people may bleed to— finger. injuries where people may bleed to death before professional help arrives. bleed to death before professional help arrives-— bleed to death before professional help arrives._ so - bleed to death before professional help arrives._ so in i help arrives. what is in it? so in this kit is _ help arrives. what is in it? so in this kit is a _ help arrives. what is in it? so in this kit is a range _ help arrives. what is in it? so in this kit is a range of— help arrives. what is in it? so in this kit is a range of equipment| help arrives. what is in it? so in i this kit is a range of equipment to stem _ this kit is a range of equipment to stem bleeding. the preventable cause of death— stem bleeding. the preventable cause of death in— stem bleeding. the preventable cause of death in all of this is bleeding. we have — of death in all of this is bleeding. we have face masks, eye protection, a tourniguet — we have face masks, eye protection, a tourniquet to stop somebody bleeding from their arm or their leg if dressings fail. and in here we
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have _ if dressings fail. and in here we have some _ if dressings fail. and in here we have some military grade addressing. these _ have some military grade addressing. these are _ have some military grade addressing. these are not dressings you find in a first— these are not dressings you find in a first aid _ these are not dressings you find in a first aid kit. these are dressings to stem _ a first aid kit. these are dressings to stem major bleeding when somebody will die _ to stem major bleeding when somebody will die before professional help arrives — will die before professional help arrives it— will die before professional help arrives. it all sounds very frightening but it isn't. it is the same _ frightening but it isn't. it is the same as— frightening but it isn't. it is the same as putting on any other bandits _ same as putting on any other bandits. we have all done that at home _ bandits. we have all done that at home. these are the same. they are 'ust home. these are the same. they are just more _ home. these are the same. they are just more sticky, more elastic and they hold — just more sticky, more elastic and they hold themselves on really tightly — they hold themselves on really tightly. its they hold themselves on really tiuhtl. a ., tightly. as soon as you say the word tourni . uet tightly. as soon as you say the word tourniquet that _ tightly. as soon as you say the word tourniquet that makes _ tightly. as soon as you say the word tourniquet that makes me _ tightly. as soon as you say the word tourniquet that makes me panic - tightly. as soon as you say the word tourniquet that makes me panic and tightly. as soon as you say the word i tourniquet that makes me panic and i think in an emergency situation i would not know what to do, or many people would know what to do. these are really serious _ people would know what to do. these are really serious emergencies, - are really serious emergencies, somebody with a wound to their leg or arm _ somebody with a wound to their leg or arm and — somebody with a wound to their leg or arm and you cannot stop the bleeding — or arm and you cannot stop the bleeding and every minute counts. applying _ bleeding and every minute counts. applying a — bleeding and every minute counts. applying a tourniquet, either a professional one like this one in the kit. — professional one like this one in the kit. or— professional one like this one in the kit, or an professional one like this one in the kit, oran improvised professional one like this one in the kit, or an improvised one, professional one like this one in the kit, oran improvised one, using something _ the kit, oran improvised one, using something like this first aid device _ something like this first aid device, which are our colleagues at citizen _ device, which are our colleagues at citizen aid — device, which are our colleagues at citizen aid devised, will save someone's like. it
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citizen aid devised, will save someone's like.— citizen aid devised, will save someone's like. it looks very straightforward _ someone's like. it looks very straightforward actually - someone's like. it looks very! straightforward actually from someone's like. it looks very l straightforward actually from a non—medical perspective. how much of a difference could this make for a patient is that you see coming into a&e? ., ., , , , patient is that you see coming into a&e? ., ., ,, , , a&e? yeah, massive. this could be the difference _ a&e? yeah, massive. this could be the difference between _ a&e? yeah, massive. this could be the difference between life - a&e? yeah, massive. this could be the difference between life and - the difference between life and death — the difference between life and death these _ the difference between life and death. these kits _ the difference between life and death. these kits will- the difference between life and i death. these kits will undoubtedly make _ death. these kits will undoubtedly make a _ death. these kits will undoubtedly make a difference. _ death. these kits will undoubtedly make a difference. they— death. these kits will undoubtedly make a difference. they are - death. these kits will undoubtedly make a difference. they are a - make a difference. they are a positive — make a difference. they are a positive step _ make a difference. they are a positive step forward. - make a difference. they are a positive step forward. there i make a difference. they are a . positive step forward. there are similar— positive step forward. there are similar bleeding _ positive step forward. there are similar bleeding control- positive step forward. there are similar bleeding control kits - positive step forward. there are similar bleeding control kits in. similar bleeding control kits in different— similar bleeding control kits in different areas— similar bleeding control kits in different areas around - similar bleeding control kits in different areas around the - similar bleeding control kits in different areas around the uki different areas around the uk already _ different areas around the uk already. there _ different areas around the uk already. there are _ different areas around the uk already. there are some - different areas around the uk - already. there are some bleeding control— already. there are some bleeding control kits — already. there are some bleeding control kits which _ already. there are some bleeding control kits which have _ already. there are some bleeding control kits which have been - control kits which have been organised _ control kits which have been organised by— control kits which have been organised by the _ control kits which have been organised by the pioneering| control kits which have been - organised by the pioneering daniel baird foundation— organised by the pioneering daniel baird foundation in— organised by the pioneering daniel baird foundation in birmingham. . organised by the pioneering daniel| baird foundation in birmingham. in merseyside — baird foundation in birmingham. in merseyside our— baird foundation in birmingham. in merseyside, our own _ baird foundation in birmingham. in merseyside, our own campaign - baird foundation in birmingham. ini merseyside, our own campaign has distributed — merseyside, our own campaign has distributed around _ merseyside, our own campaign has distributed around 900 _ merseyside, our own campaign has distributed around 900 kits - merseyside, our own campaign has distributed around 900 kits in - merseyside, our own campaign has distributed around 900 kits in less| distributed around 900 kits in less than two _ distributed around 900 kits in less than two years _ distributed around 900 kits in less than two years now. _ distributed around 900 kits in less than two years now. we _ distributed around 900 kits in less than two years now. we have - distributed around 900 kits in less than two years now. we have got. than two years now. we have got documented _ than two years now. we have got documented evidence _ than two years now. we have got documented evidence of- than two years now. we have got documented evidence of four- than two years now. we have got l documented evidence of four cases than two years now. we have got - documented evidence of four cases of these _ documented evidence of four cases of these kits _ documented evidence of four cases of these kits being — documented evidence of four cases of these kits being used _ documented evidence of four cases of these kits being used and _ documented evidence of four cases of these kits being used and the - these kits being used and the training — these kits being used and the training we _ these kits being used and the training we have _ these kits being used and the training we have given- these kits being used and the! training we have given behind these kits being used and the - training we have given behind them having _ training we have given behind them having stopped _ training we have given behind them having stopped major— training we have given behind them having stopped major bleeding. - training we have given behind theml having stopped major bleeding. this is going _ having stopped major bleeding. this is going to _ having stopped major bleeding. this is going to work _ having stopped major bleeding. this is going to work. do _ having stopped ma'or bleeding. this is going to work._ having stopped ma'or bleeding. this is going to worio_ is going to work. do you know what struck me when _ is going to work. do you know what struck me when i _ is going to work. do you know what struck me when i started _ is going to work. do you know what struck me when i started reading i struck me when i started reading into this story? the fact that this
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is necessary now is quite depressing. in your time working in medicine, have you noticed this trajectory going up in a significant way? trajectory going up in a significant wa ? , ., �*, ., trajectory going up in a significant wa? , ._ trajectory going up in a significant wa? , way? yes, that's a really good ooint. way? yes, that's a really good point- yes _ way? yes, that's a really good point- yes is _ way? yes, that's a really good point. yes is the _ way? yes, that's a really good point. yes is the short - way? yes, that's a really good| point. yes is the short answer. way? yes, that's a really good - point. yes is the short answer. we have _ point. yes is the short answer. we have the _ point. yes is the short answer. we have the metrics _ point. yes is the short answer. we have the metrics to _ point. yes is the short answer. we have the metrics to prove - point. yes is the short answer. we have the metrics to prove it. - have the metrics to prove it. national— have the metrics to prove it. national trauma _ have the metrics to prove it. national trauma data - have the metrics to prove it. national trauma data in - have the metrics to prove it. - national trauma data in liverpool in different _ national trauma data in liverpool in different areas— national trauma data in liverpool in different areas around _ national trauma data in liverpool in different areas around the - national trauma data in liverpool in different areas around the country. different areas around the country have shown — different areas around the country have shown this _ different areas around the country have shown this upward _ different areas around the country have shown this upward trend, . different areas around the country have shown this upward trend, so| have shown this upward trend, so it's almost— have shown this upward trend, so it's almost become _ have shown this upward trend, so it's almost become endemic - have shown this upward trend, so it's almost become endemic in i it's almost become endemic in society — it's almost become endemic in society i'm _ it's almost become endemic in society. i'm specifically- it's almost become endemic in society. i'm specifically talking about — society. i'm specifically talking about knives _ society. i'm specifically talking about knives and _ society. i'm specifically talking about knives and knife - society. i'm specifically talking about knives and knife crime. i society. i'm specifically talking - about knives and knife crime. that has been _ about knives and knife crime. that has been proven— about knives and knife crime. that has been proven both _ about knives and knife crime. that has been proven both by— about knives and knife crime. that has been proven both by myself. about knives and knife crime. that| has been proven both by myself on the front— has been proven both by myself on the front line — has been proven both by myself on the front line and _ has been proven both by myself on the front line and with _ has been proven both by myself on the front line and with numbers - has been proven both by myself on. the front line and with numbers with data _ the front line and with numbers with data. . ., ., ., , data. richard, how important is it? we are talking _ data. richard, how important is it? we are talking about _ data. richard, how important is it? we are talking about timing, - data. richard, how important is it? we are talking about timing, the i we are talking about timing, the minutes after an attack, that golden hour after something has gone badly wrong. how important is it that help is sought super—quick? 50. wrong. how important is it that help is sought super-quick?— wrong. how important is it that help is sought super-quick? so, in severe blood loss every _ is sought super-quick? so, in severe blood loss every moment _ is sought super-quick? so, in severe blood loss every moment counts. - is sought super-quick? so, in severe | blood loss every moment counts. you have to _ blood loss every moment counts. you have to stem — blood loss every moment counts. you have to stem the bleeding. we are used _ have to stem the bleeding. we are used to— have to stem the bleeding. we are used to seeing fire extinguishers and defibrillators in different
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buildings for fire and cardiac arrest — buildings for fire and cardiac arrest. this is the next step. immediate action for trauma. 200 people _ immediate action for trauma. 200 people died last year in the uk from life —related injuries. some of those — life —related injuries. some of those patients may have been saved with better first—aid. 0ur those patients may have been saved with better first—aid. our mission is to— with better first—aid. our mission is to make — with better first—aid. our mission is to make sure nobody dies because first aid _ is to make sure nobody dies because first aid was — is to make sure nobody dies because first aid was not available. this is about— first aid was not available. this is about giving people the right equipment. in about giving people the right equipment-— about giving people the right ei-uiment. ., ., ., equipment. in your 'ob, a trauma surieon, equipment. in your 'ob, a trauma sgoon i _ equipment. in your 'ob, a trauma sgoon rinsi— equipment. in yourjob, a trauma surgeon, ijust asked _ equipment. in yourjob, a trauma surgeon, ijust asked richard - equipment. in yourjob, a trauma | surgeon, ijust asked richard how important those minutes are after an event like this. when someone has brought to you, whatever state they are in, what are you looking at, what is the situation and what are the things that you are trying to deal with in that point? how long do you have to save someone?- you have to save someone? yeah, aiain an you have to save someone? yeah, again an excellent _ you have to save someone? yeah, again an excellent point. - you have to save someone? yeah, again an excellent point. bleeding | again an excellent point. bleeding is time _ again an excellent point. bleeding is time critical. _ again an excellent point. bleeding is time critical. what _ again an excellent point. bleeding is time critical. what we _ again an excellent point. bleeding is time critical. what we say- again an excellent point. bleeding is time critical. what we say when| is time critical. what we say when we go _ is time critical. what we say when we go to— is time critical. what we say when we go to schools, _ is time critical. what we say when we go to schools, we _ is time critical. what we say when we go to schools, we go - is time critical. what we say when we go to schools, we go to - is time critical. what we say when we go to schools, we go to parksl we go to schools, we go to parks around _ we go to schools, we go to parks around merseyside, _ we go to schools, we go to parks around merseyside, it's - we go to schools, we go to parks around merseyside, it's like - we go to schools, we go to parks around merseyside, it's like a . around merseyside, it's like a stopwatch— around merseyside, it's like a stopwatch going _ around merseyside, it's like a stopwatch going off. - around merseyside, it's like a stopwatch going off. as - around merseyside, it's like a stopwatch going off. as soon| around merseyside, it's like a i stopwatch going off. as soon as around merseyside, it's like a - stopwatch going off. as soon as the injury_ stopwatch going off. as soon as the injury occurs — stopwatch going off. as soon as the
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injury occurs the _ stopwatch going off. as soon as the injury occurs the blood _ stopwatch going off. as soon as the injury occurs the blood is _ stopwatch going off. as soon as the injury occurs the blood is coming i injury occurs the blood is coming out, _ injury occurs the blood is coming out, each — injury occurs the blood is coming out, each stopwatch _ injury occurs the blood is coming out, each stopwatch has - injury occurs the blood is coming i out, each stopwatch has started. you've _ out, each stopwatch has started. you've only — out, each stopwatch has started. you've only got _ out, each stopwatch has started. you've only got minutes, - out, each stopwatch has started. you've only got minutes, around| out, each stopwatch has started. - you've only got minutes, around five minutes, _ you've only got minutes, around five minutes, 45— you've only got minutes, around five minutes, as minutes, _ you've only got minutes, around five minutes, as minutes, for— you've only got minutes, around five minutes, as minutes, for such - minutes, as minutes, for such massive — minutes, as minutes, for such massive blood _ minutes, as minutes, for such massive blood loss _ minutes, as minutes, for such massive blood loss from - minutes, as minutes, for such massive blood loss from a - minutes, as minutes, for such i massive blood loss from a major artery _ massive blood loss from a major artery until— massive blood loss from a major artery until the _ massive blood loss from a major artery until the heart _ massive blood loss from a major artery until the heart starts - massive blood loss from a major artery until the heart starts to i artery until the heart starts to weaken — artery until the heart starts to weaken and _ artery until the heart starts to weaken and stop. _ artery until the heart starts to weaken and stop. this - artery until the heart starts to weaken and stop. this is- artery until the heart starts to| weaken and stop. this is more partnered _ weaken and stop. this is more partnered nowadays— weaken and stop. this is more partnered nowadays with - weaken and stop. this is more partnered nowadays with the i weaken and stop. this is more - partnered nowadays with the whole healthcare — partnered nowadays with the whole healthcare system _ partnered nowadays with the whole healthcare system under _ partnered nowadays with the whole healthcare system under such- healthcare system under such pressure _ healthcare system under such pressure it— healthcare system under such pressure. it affects _ healthcare system under such. pressure. it affects ambulances healthcare system under such- pressure. it affects ambulances and ambulance — pressure. it affects ambulances and ambulance waiting _ pressure. it affects ambulances and ambulance waiting times. _ pressure. it affects ambulances and ambulance waiting times. this - pressure. it affects ambulances and ambulance waiting times. this wasl ambulance waiting times. this was reported _ ambulance waiting times. this was reported in— ambulance waiting times. this was reported in the _ ambulance waiting times. this was reported in the press _ ambulance waiting times. this was reported in the press a _ ambulance waiting times. this was reported in the press a couple - ambulance waiting times. this was reported in the press a couple of. reported in the press a couple of days— reported in the press a couple of days ago — reported in the press a couple of days ago there _ reported in the press a couple of days ago. there is _ reported in the press a couple of days ago. there is a _ reported in the press a couple of days ago. there is a queue - reported in the press a couple of days ago. there is a queue of. reported in the press a couple of. days ago. there is a queue of what we call— days ago. there is a queue of what we call a _ days ago. there is a queue of what we call a therapeutic _ days ago. there is a queue of what we call a therapeutic vacuum - days ago. there is a queue of what we call a therapeutic vacuum will. days ago. there is a queue of whati we call a therapeutic vacuum will be rin- we call a therapeutic vacuum will be ring 999. _ we call a therapeutic vacuum will be ring 999. or— we call a therapeutic vacuum will be ring 999, or someone _ we call a therapeutic vacuum will be ring 999, or someone rings - we call a therapeutic vacuum will be ring 999, or someone rings 999, i we call a therapeutic vacuum will be. ring 999, or someone rings 999, and there _ ring 999, or someone rings 999, and there is— ring 999, or someone rings 999, and there is a _ ring 999, or someone rings 999, and there is a wait— ring 999, or someone rings 999, and there is a wait for— ring 999, or someone rings 999, and there is a wait for help _ ring 999, or someone rings 999, and there is a wait for help to _ ring 999, or someone rings 999, and there is a wait for help to write. - there is a wait for help to write. this— there is a wait for help to write. this is— there is a wait for help to write. this is where _ there is a wait for help to write. this is where these _ there is a wait for help to write. this is where these kits - there is a wait for help to write. this is where these kits come i there is a wait for help to write. i this is where these kits come in. the st— this is where these kits come in. the stjohn — this is where these kits come in. the stjohn kits, _ this is where these kits come in. the stjohn kits, the _ this is where these kits come in. the stjohn kits, the daniel- this is where these kits come in. i the stjohn kits, the daniel baird kits, _ the stjohn kits, the daniel baird kits, we — the stjohn kits, the daniel baird kits, we want _ the stjohn kits, the daniel baird kits, we want them _ the stjohn kits, the daniel baird kits, we want them on _ the stjohn kits, the daniel baird kits, we want them on every- the stjohn kits, the daniel baird i kits, we want them on every street corner~ _ kits, we want them on every street corner~ what's _ kits, we want them on every street corner. what's more _ kits, we want them on every street corner. what's more powerful- kits, we want them on every street corner. what's more powerful is i kits, we want them on every streetl corner. what's more powerful is the education _ corner. what's more powerful is the education underpinning _ corner. what's more powerful is the education underpinning how- corner. what's more powerful is the education underpinning how to - corner. what's more powerful is the education underpinning how to use i education underpinning how to use them _ education underpinning how to use them and — education underpinning how to use them and what _ education underpinning how to use them and what to _ education underpinning how to use them and what to do _ education underpinning how to use them and what to do if— education underpinning how to use them and what to do if you - education underpinning how to use them and what to do if you haven't! them and what to do if you haven't got one _ them and what to do if you haven't iot one. �* ., �* , them and what to do if you haven't iotone. �* ., v , �* got one. and that's it, isn't it richard, _ got one. and that's it, isn't it richard, having _ got one. and that's it, isn't it richard, having them - got one. and that's it, isn't it richard, having them in - got one. and that's it, isn't it i richard, having them in football stadium but also knowing what to do with them? how do you improve that awareness? brute with them? how do you improve that awareness? ~ ., with them? how do you improve that awareness?— awareness? we want people to have the confidence _ awareness? we want people to have the confidence to _ awareness? we want people to have the confidence to use _ awareness? we want people to have the confidence to use that _ awareness? we want people to have the confidence to use that kit. - awareness? we want people to have the confidence to use that kit. if - the confidence to use that kit. if you travel— the confidence to use that kit. if you travel to our website there is lots of _
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you travel to our website there is lots of advice on how to apply a trauma — lots of advice on how to apply a trauma dressing. we are all used to putting _ trauma dressing. we are all used to putting plasters on and bandages on when we _ putting plasters on and bandages on when we cause ourselves minor injuries — when we cause ourselves minor in'uries. ~ ., when we cause ourselves minor in'uries. s ., , ., , when we cause ourselves minor in'uries. s ., , injuries. would you very quickly show us how — injuries. would you very quickly show us how to _ injuries. would you very quickly show us how to put _ injuries. would you very quickly show us how to put a _ injuries. would you very quickly | show us how to put a tourniquet injuries. would you very quickly - show us how to put a tourniquet on? i certainly will. if i use this one, a velcro— i certainly will. if i use this one, a velcro one. you can see it affected _ a velcro one. you can see it affected is— a velcro one. you can see it affected isjust a big loop, so you apply— affected isjust a big loop, so you apply the — affected isjust a big loop, so you apply the loop onto the pad that is bleeding _ apply the loop onto the pad that is bleeding and you tighten it up. having — bleeding and you tighten it up. having tightened it up, once it is attached — having tightened it up, once it is attached around, this is the thing you turn— attached around, this is the thing you turn that makes it tighter and tighten _ you turn that makes it tighter and tighter. you should turn this until the patient's hands go blue. this needs— the patient's hands go blue. this needs to — the patient's hands go blue. this needs to stop the blood flow. above the injury_ needs to stop the blood flow. above the injury and tighten it until the bleeding — the injury and tighten it until the bleeding stops. that the injury and tighten it until the bleeding stops.— the injury and tighten it until the bleeding stops. that is the kind of information _ bleeding stops. that is the kind of information you _ bleeding stops. that is the kind of information you would _ bleeding stops. that is the kind of information you would need - bleeding stops. that is the kind of - information you would need alongside the kit in your hand. the information you would need alongside the kit in your hand.— the kit in your hand. the kit has instructions _ the kit in your hand. the kit has instructions in _ the kit in your hand. the kit has instructions in it. _ the kit in your hand. the kit has instructions in it. and _ the kit in your hand. the kit has instructions in it. and there - the kit in your hand. the kit has instructions in it. and there are| instructions in it. and there are easy— instructions in it. and there are easy to — instructions in it. and there are easy to follow instructions. but really. — easy to follow instructions. but really, these patients are at risk of death — really, these patients are at risk of death. in the same way we encourage people to use a defibrillator, you can't do them a charm _ defibrillator, you can't do them a charm this— defibrillator, you can't do them a charm. this is about trying to save their— charm. this is about trying to save
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their life — charm. this is about trying to save their life hn— charm. this is about trying to save their life. . ,., ., , their life. an important message because i think _ their life. an important message because i think people _ their life. an important message because i think people are - their life. an important message i because i think people are slightly frightened they might hurt someone and make it worse? in frightened they might hurt someone and make it worse?— and make it worse? in these situations. _ and make it worse? in these situations, where _ and make it worse? in these situations, where the - and make it worse? in these| situations, where the patient and make it worse? in these i situations, where the patient is and make it worse? in these - situations, where the patient is at imminent— situations, where the patient is at imminent risk of dying, it's difficult _ imminent risk of dying, it's difficult to do anything to make the situation _ difficult to do anything to make the situation worse. the same with a defibrillator. it is the same with this trauma kit. if somebody is bleeding — this trauma kit. if somebody is bleeding severely, get a dressing on and stop— bleeding severely, get a dressing on and stop the bleeding. it is hard as you have _ and stop the bleeding. it is hard as you have to— and stop the bleeding. it is hard as you have to push to stop the bleeding _ you have to push to stop the bleeding into evidence arrives. presumably you have never said to someone, i wish you hadn't tried to help? someone, i wish you hadn't tried to hel- ? ., . someone, i wish you hadn't tried to hel ? ., s ., someone, i wish you hadn't tried to hel-? ., s ., help? no, never. we have documented evidence where — help? no, never. we have documented evidence where we _ help? no, never. we have documented evidence where we know _ help? no, never. we have documented evidence where we know this _ help? no, never. we have documented evidence where we know this works, i evidence where we know this works, basically _ evidence where we know this works, basically. exactly— evidence where we know this works, basically. exactly as _ evidence where we know this works, basically. exactly as was _ evidence where we know this works, basically. exactly as was just - evidence where we know this works, basically. exactly as was just said i basically. exactly as was just said then _ basically. exactly as was just said then if— basically. exactly as was just said then if you — basically. exactly as was just said then. if you don't _ basically. exactly as was just said then. if you don't do _ basically. exactly as was just said then. if you don't do something i basically. exactly as was just said i then. if you don't do something that person— then. if you don't do something that person in— then. if you don't do something that person in front — then. if you don't do something that person in front of _ then. if you don't do something that person in front of you _ then. if you don't do something that person in front of you has _ then. if you don't do something that person in front of you has a - then. if you don't do something that person in front of you has a good i person in front of you has a good chance _ person in front of you has a good chance of— person in front of you has a good chance of bleeding _ person in front of you has a good chance of bleeding out _ person in front of you has a good chance of bleeding out and i person in front of you has a good| chance of bleeding out and dying. anything — chance of bleeding out and dying. anything would _ chance of bleeding out and dying. anything would really— chance of bleeding out and dying. anything would really help. - chance of bleeding out and dying. anything would really help. what| chance of bleeding out and dying. i anything would really help. what we do in the _ anything would really help. what we do in the life—savers _ anything would really help. what we do in the life—savers campaign i anything would really help. what we do in the life—savers campaign is i do in the life—savers campaign is teach _ do in the life—savers campaign is teach a _ do in the life—savers campaign is teach a simple _ do in the life—savers campaign is teach a simple algorithm. - do in the life—savers campaign is teach a simple algorithm. a, i do in the life—savers campaign is teach a simple algorithm. a, bel teach a simple algorithm. a, be alert _ teach a simple algorithm. a, be alert ring _ teach a simple algorithm. a, be alert. ring 999. _ teach a simple algorithm. a, be alert. ring 999. b, _ teach a simple algorithm. a, be alert. ring 999. b, where i teach a simple algorithm. a, be alert. ring 999. b, where is- teach a simple algorithm. a, be! alert. ring 999. b, where is the bleeding — alert. ring 999. b, where is the bleeding coming _ alert. ring 999. b, where is the
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bleeding coming from? - alert. ring 999. b, where is the bleeding coming from? and i alert. ring 999. b, where is the bleeding coming from? and c, i alert. ring 999. b, where is the i bleeding coming from? and c, two hands, _ bleeding coming from? and c, two hands, press— bleeding coming from? and c, two hands, press hard. _ bleeding coming from? and c, two hands, press hard.— hands, press hard. really good advice. thank _ hands, press hard. really good advice. thank you _ hands, press hard. really good advice. thank you both. - hands, press hard. really good advice. thank you both. good i hands, press hard. really good i advice. thank you both. good luck with the campaign. it is one of those very simple but brilliant ideas. , ., ., those very simple but brilliant ideas. , ., ,, , ., , those very simple but brilliant ideas. , ., ,, , . electric cars will be the future of road travel. but new research says there aren't enough specially trained mechanics to repair and maintain them. by 2030, petrol and diesel vehicles will no longer be sold, but the institute of the motor industry says we'll be facing a shortfall in more than 35,000 qualified technicians. tim muffett is at a mechanics' training facility this morning. morning. good morning to you from north— morning. good morning to you from north london garages training centre in ponders _ north london garages training centre in ponders end in enfield, where mechanics— in ponders end in enfield, where mechanics are being shown how to safely— mechanics are being shown how to safely maintain and service an electric— safely maintain and service an electric vehicle. we hear a lot about— electric vehicle. we hear a lot about the _ electric vehicle. we hear a lot about the impact on the charging
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infrastructure is the growth of electric— infrastructure is the growth of electric vehicles takes off, but not so much _ electric vehicles takes off, but not so much about the challenges posed for those _ so much about the challenges posed for those who need to maintain and service _ for those who need to maintain and service those cars. and there are fears— service those cars. and there are fears there — service those cars. and there are fears there is going to be a real shortage — fears there is going to be a real shortage of people able to do so. james likes his electric car, but getting it serviced and maintained involves a long journey. i getting it serviced and maintained involves a long journey.— involves a long 'ourney. i bought the car in involves a long journey. i bought the car in north _ involves a long journey. i bought the car in north wales _ involves a long journey. i bought the car in north wales and i involves a long journey. i bought the car in north wales and they. the car in north wales and they don't repair or maintain. theyjust sell them. so i've always come across the border into england to chester, to have the car looked after and maintained. flail} chester, to have the car looked after and maintained.— chester, to have the car looked after and maintained. a30 mild round tri, which after and maintained. a30 mild round trip. which james _ after and maintained. a30 mild round trip, which james says _ after and maintained. a30 mild round trip, which james says it _ after and maintained. a30 mild round trip, which james says it is _ after and maintained. a30 mild round trip, which james says it is only - trip, which james says it is only viable option. it trip, which james says it is only viable option.— viable option. it is a bit of a faff. viable option. it is a bit of a faff- there _ viable option. it is a bit of a faff. there was _ viable option. it is a bit of a faff. there was actually - viable option. it is a bit of a faff. there was actually one viable option. it is a bit of a - faff. there was actually one time where the car broke down and it was recovered back to my local dealer. they turned round and said they
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couldn't accept it because they can't repair it. so, it was then shunted back off to chester for repair. shunted back off to chester for re air. ,. , shunted back off to chester for re air. , , shunted back off to chester for reair. , , , ., repair. the battery is surrounded in a nice metallic— repair. the battery is surrounded in a nice metallic cage. _ repair. the battery is surrounded in a nice metallic cage. mechanics - repair. the battery is surrounded in | a nice metallic cage. mechanics who work on an — a nice metallic cage. mechanics who work on an electric _ a nice metallic cage. mechanics who work on an electric vehicle, - a nice metallic cage. mechanics who work on an electric vehicle, or - a nice metallic cage. mechanics who work on an electric vehicle, or a - work on an electric vehicle, or a hybrid like this one, need special training. hybrid like this one, need special trainina. , .,, training. they might -- the most important _ training. they might -- the most important thing _ training. they might -- the most important thing is _ training. they might -- the most important thing is training. - training. they might -- the most} important thing is training. there are high— important thing is training. there are high voltage batteries, motor generators, so we are talking a couple — generators, so we are talking a couple of — generators, so we are talking a couple of hundred volts at a minimum. about the same voltage as mains_ minimum. about the same voltage as mains electricity.— mains electricity. these mechanics believe the — mains electricity. these mechanics believe the cost _ mains electricity. these mechanics believe the cost of _ mains electricity. these mechanics believe the cost of this _ mains electricity. these mechanics believe the cost of this training - believe the cost of this training will pay off in the long term. ladle will pay off in the long term. we are seeing _ will pay off in the long term. - are seeing a very large amount of people 7 for vehicles coming into our workshop, electric and hybrid. they are broken down. i personally don't know anybody in my neighbourhood who is electric or hybrid trend. it’s neighbourhood who is electric or hybrid trend-— hybrid trend. it's becoming the future now- — hybrid trend. it's becoming the future now. it's _ hybrid trend. it's becoming the future now. it's going - hybrid trend. it's becoming the future now. it's going to - hybrid trend. it's becoming the i future now. it's going to become hybrid trend. it's becoming the - future now. it's going to become the future _ future now. it's going to become the future more — future now. it's going to become the future more quickly. and i
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personally don't know many people who are _ personally don't know many people who are trained in electric vehicles _ who are trained in electric vehicles-_ who are trained in electric vehicles. ., , ., , , vehicles. one, two, three phases. have ou vehicles. one, two, three phases. have you had _ vehicles. one, two, three phases. have you had people _ vehicles. one, two, three phases. have you had people coming - vehicles. one, two, three phases. have you had people coming in i vehicles. one, two, three phases. i have you had people coming in with electric vehicles which have been misdiagnosed?— electric vehicles which have been misdiagnosed? electric vehicles which have been misdiaanosed? , , . , ., misdiagnosed? yes. yes. we see about two to three — misdiagnosed? yes. yes. we see about two to three a — misdiagnosed? yes. yes. we see about two to three a month. _ misdiagnosed? yes. yes. we see about two to three a month. i _ misdiagnosed? yes. yes. we see about two to three a month. i had _ misdiagnosed? yes. yes. we see about two to three a month. i had one - misdiagnosed? yes. yes. we see about two to three a month. i had one last - two to three a month. i had one last weel— two to three a month. i had one last week actually. we've found the car had a _ week actually. we've found the car had a problem with a water pump and someone _ had a problem with a water pump and someone diagnosed and air gasket. most of— someone diagnosed and air gasket. most of the technicians have been trained _ most of the technicians have been trained on — most of the technicians have been trained on petrol or diesel cars. from _ trained on petrol or diesel cars. from 2030, the government says the sale of new petrol and diesel cars will be banned. so the increase in the sales of electric vehicles, which we are already seeing, is expected to accelerate. but the institute of the motor industry predicts that by 2030, we will need 90,000 qualified technicians to service those electric vehicles. the problem is with the current rate of training it predicts they will be a
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shortfall of more than 35,000. electric vehicle manufacturers often sell service and repair plans as well. but neil runs an independent garage. he says many are bringing in their electric and hybrid vehicles to him. ,., ., ., to him. even some of the main dealers, to him. even some of the main dealers. they _ to him. even some of the main dealers, they don't _ to him. even some of the main dealers, they don't all- to him. even some of the main dealers, they don't all know i to him. even some of the main i dealers, they don't all know how to him. even some of the main - dealers, they don't all know how to work on electric vehicles even though manufacturers sell them, not all the tags are trained in them. it becomes an issue to book them in. that is where we come into play, they come to independence like ours. although electric vehicles have fewer moving parts than those powered by petrol or diesel engines, and often require less servicing, they bring their own challenges. the batte they bring their own challenges. tue: battery cells and things coming out now are new technology and they are changing, evolving all the time. in orderfor us to get changing, evolving all the time. in order for us to get wiring diagrams, data, what we need to fix electric cars is difficult at the moment. which one of those has got the plus and minus? —
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which one of those has got the plus and minus? a which one of those has got the plus and minus?— and minus? a not-for-profit organisation _ and minus? a not-for-profit organisation provides - and minus? a not-for-profit organisation provides car- and minus? a not-for-profit - organisation provides car safety. it runs electric car training courses for anybody in the auto industry. this session is being run for members of staff. there is a skills gap and many predict it will get worse by 2030. how confident are you that skills gap can be closed? i that skills gap can be closed? i think it can be. i think what does need _ think it can be. i think what does need to— think it can be. i think what does need to have any significant investment needs to be brought into drain the _ investment needs to be brought into drain the industry to be able to deal— drain the industry to be able to deal with— drain the industry to be able to deal with repair maintenance services _ deal with repair maintenance services of electric vehicles. the significant — services of electric vehicles. the significant investment going into infrastructure for charging, that same _ infrastructure for charging, that same investment needs to be made into skills — same investment needs to be made into skills. ., . . into skills. powering electric vehicles is _ into skills. powering electric vehicles is one _ into skills. powering electric vehicles is one thing. - into skills. powering electric i vehicles is one thing. keeping into skills. powering electric - vehicles is one thing. keeping them serviced and maintained is the other huge challenge facing this industry. the government says it has launched a number— the government says it has launched a number of— the government says it has launched a number of initiatives designed to boost _ a number of initiatives designed to boost training across the sector and it has— boost training across the sector and it has also— boost training across the sector and it has also endorsed an industrywide scheme _ it has also endorsed an industrywide scheme designed to ensure that mechanics are trained to service
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electric— mechanics are trained to service electric vehicles. but it is a huge challenge — electric vehicles. but it is a huge challenge. mark, you are running one of the _ challenge. mark, you are running one of the training sessions, how big a challenge — of the training sessions, how big a challenge is this?— challenge is this? yeah, it is a challenge- _ challenge is this? yeah, it is a challenge. only _ challenge is this? yeah, it is a challenge. only 696 _ challenge is this? yeah, it is a challenge. only 696 to - challenge is this? yeah, it is a challenge. only 696 to 796 - challenge is this? yeah, it is a challenge. only 696 to 796 of. challenge. only 6% to 7% of technicians are trained on electric vehicles. there is a big shortage across the industry. there is a shortage of training providers as well as specialise in the training. we cover all of london but we also cover a lot of the uk because people from wales come across over to us, they come from brighton, we have had them from southend. we cover a large area. we have technicians of all types. we do the levels one to four. but when they come here, they come here with basic knowledge. they work on the cards, gain that knowledge, keep themselves safe, take the knowledge back into the garage as well. ., . . knowledge back into the garage as well. ., ., ., ., , ., well. you are about to start learning — well. you are about to start learning on _ well. you are about to start learning on electric - well. you are about to start| learning on electric vehicles. well. you are about to start - learning on electric vehicles. why have _ learning on electric vehicles. why have you — learning on electric vehicles. why have you decided to make this leap? i have _ have you decided to make this leap? i have just _
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have you decided to make this leap? i have just finished my level four qualification _ i have just finished my level four qualification. i— i have just finished my level four qualification. i wanted _ i have just finished my level four qualification. i wanted to - i have just finished my level four qualification. i wanted to do - i have just finished my level four qualification. i wanted to do myl qualification. i wanted to do my hybrid _ qualification. i wanted to do my hybrid course _ qualification. i wanted to do my hybrid course because - qualification. i wanted to do my hybrid course because that - qualification. i wanted to do my hybrid course because that is. qualification. i wanted to do my. hybrid course because that is the new feature _ hybrid course because that is the new feature i _ hybrid course because that is the new feature. i want _ hybrid course because that is the new feature. i want to _ hybrid course because that is the new feature. i want to be - hybrid course because that is the new feature. i want to be ahead i hybrid course because that is the i new feature. i want to be ahead of it. new feature. i want to be ahead of it we _ new feature. i want to be ahead of it we are — new feature. i want to be ahead of it we are doing _ new feature. i want to be ahead of it. we are doing hybrid _ new feature. i want to be ahead of it. we are doing hybrid and - new feature. i want to be ahead of| it. we are doing hybrid and electric vehicles _ it. we are doing hybrid and electric vehicles and — it. we are doing hybrid and electric vehicles and i— it. we are doing hybrid and electric vehicles and i want _ it. we are doing hybrid and electric vehicles and i want to _ it. we are doing hybrid and electric vehicles and i want to be _ it. we are doing hybrid and electric vehicles and i want to be fully - vehicles and i want to be fully prepared _ vehicles and i want to be fully prepared because _ vehicles and i want to be fully prepared because that - vehicles and i want to be fully prepared because that is- vehicles and i want to be fullyj prepared because that is what vehicles and i want to be fully. prepared because that is what i vehicles and i want to be fully - prepared because that is what i want to do in— prepared because that is what i want to do in the — prepared because that is what i want to do in the future. _ prepared because that is what i want to do in the future. what— prepared because that is what i want to do in the future.— to do in the future. what are the main differences _ to do in the future. what are the main differences for _ to do in the future. what are the main differences for a _ to do in the future. what are the main differences for a mechanic| to do in the future. what are the - main differences for a mechanic when it comes _ main differences for a mechanic when it comes to— main differences for a mechanic when it comes to these kind of cars? | it comes to these kind of cars? i think it comes to these kind of cars? think it's it comes to these kind of cars? i think it's fully electric so it's good — think it's fully electric so it's good for— think it's fully electric so it's good for emissions - think it's fully electric so it's good for emissions and - think it's fully electric so it'si good for emissions and stuff. think it's fully electric so it's - good for emissions and stuff. you are not— good for emissions and stuff. you are not really— good for emissions and stuff. you are not really changing _ good for emissions and stuff. you are not really changing oil- good for emissions and stuff. you are not really changing oil and - are not really changing oil and filters. — are not really changing oil and filters. but _ are not really changing oil and filters, but you _ are not really changing oil and filters, but you are _ are not really changing oil and filters, but you are mainly- are not really changing oil and - filters, but you are mainly focusing on battery— filters, but you are mainly focusing on battery voltage _ filters, but you are mainly focusing on battery voltage and _ filters, but you are mainly focusing on battery voltage and stuff- filters, but you are mainly focusing on battery voltage and stuff and i on battery voltage and stuff and other— on battery voltage and stuff and other components. _ on battery voltage and stuff and other components.— on battery voltage and stuff and other components. safety is a real issue. other components. safety is a real issue- these _ other components. safety is a real issue. these batteries _ other components. safety is a real issue. these batteries are - other components. safety is a real issue. these batteries are more i issue. these batteries are more powerful— issue. these batteries are more powerful than people realise? yes, powerfulthan people realise? yes, es the powerfulthan people realise? yes, yes they are- _ powerfulthan people realise? yes, yes they are- l _ powerfulthan people realise? yes, yes they are. ithink— powerfulthan people realise? yes, yes they are. i think for _ powerful than people realise? yes, yes they are. i think for me once i am finished — yes they are. i think for me once i am finished this _ yes they are. i think for me once i am finished this that _ yes they are. i think for me once i am finished this that is _ yes they are. i think for me once i am finished this that is what - yes they are. i think for me once i am finished this that is what i'm i am finished this that is what i'm going _ am finished this that is what i'm going to — am finished this that is what i'm going to do _ am finished this that is what i'm going to do because _ am finished this that is what i'm going to do because i— am finished this that is what i'm going to do because i am - am finished this that is what i'm going to do because i am still. am finished this that is what i'm i going to do because i am still level three _ going to do because i am still level three qualified _ going to do because i am still level three qualified as _ going to do because i am still level three qualified as a _ going to do because i am still level three qualified as a mechanic, - going to do because i am still level three qualified as a mechanic, so. going to do because i am still level three qualified as a mechanic, so i| three qualified as a mechanic, so i want _ three qualified as a mechanic, so i want to— three qualified as a mechanic, so i want to be — three qualified as a mechanic, so i want to he may— three qualified as a mechanic, so i want to he may be _ three qualified as a mechanic, so i want to he may be like _ three qualified as a mechanic, so i want to he may be like them, - three qualified as a mechanic, so i| want to he may be like them, level four qualified. _ want to he may be like them, level four qualified, and _ want to he may be like them, level four qualified, and be _ want to he may be like them, level four qualified, and be safe - want to he may be like them, level four qualified, and be safe to - want to he may be like them, level four qualified, and be safe to work| four qualified, and be safe to work in high _ four qualified, and be safe to work in high voltage _ four qualified, and be safe to work in high voltage electric— four qualified, and be safe to work in high voltage electric vehicles. . in high voltage electric vehicles. when _ in high voltage electric vehicles. when people _ in high voltage electric vehicles. when people come _ in high voltage electric vehicles. when people come to _ in high voltage electric vehicles. when people come to you - in high voltage electric vehicles. - when people come to you hopefully in the future _ when people come to you hopefully in the future to get their cars serviced. _ the future to get their cars serviced, there is a sense of satisfaction being able to help.
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relatively few people can at the moment — relatively few people can at the moment. ., ~ ., ., �* moment. for me, i know what i'm doinu so moment. for me, i know what i'm doing so i— moment. for me, i know what i'm doing so i can _ moment. for me, i know what i'm doing so i can tell— moment. for me, i know what i'm doing so i can tell the _ moment. for me, i know what i'm doing so i can tell the customers i doing so i can tell the customers what _ doing so i can tell the customers what to— doing so i can tell the customers what to expect _ doing so i can tell the customers what to expect from _ doing so i can tell the customers what to expect from the - doing so i can tell the customersl what to expect from the vehicles. when _ what to expect from the vehicles. when i'm — what to expect from the vehicles. when i'm fully— what to expect from the vehicles. when i'm fully trained _ what to expect from the vehicles. when i'm fully trained i— what to expect from the vehicles. when i'm fully trained i will- what to expect from the vehicles. when i'm fully trained i will know| when i'm fully trained i will know more _ when i'm fully trained i will know more l— when i'm fully trained i will know more. , ., when i'm fully trained i will know more. i. . ~ ., more. i will let you get back to it. thank you- _ more. i will let you get back to it. thank you. good _ more. i will let you get back to it. thank you. good luck _ more. i will let you get back to it. thank you. good luck with - more. i will let you get back to it. thank you. good luck with your i thank you. good luck with your qualifications. at the moment a shortage — qualifications. at the moment a shortage, the shortage it is thought will get _ shortage, the shortage it is thought will get worse, according to the motor— will get worse, according to the motor industry, but the government does say— motor industry, but the government does say there are initiatives in place _ does say there are initiatives in place to— does say there are initiatives in place to try and boost the number of mechanics — place to try and boost the number of mechanics. you have to know what you are doing _ mechanics. you have to know what you are doing before you start getting involved _ are doing before you start getting involved in an electric or hybrid vehicle — involved in an electric or hybrid vehicle. these batteries, 400, 800 volts often — vehicle. these batteries, 400, 800 volts often. mains electricity is 230 volts — volts often. mains electricity is 230 volts in the uk. that gives you a sense _ 230 volts in the uk. that gives you a sense of— 230 volts in the uk. that gives you a sense of how powerful these cards are. a sense of how powerful these cards are you _ a sense of how powerful these cards are. you need to know what you are doing _ are. you need to know what you are doing. luckily these mechanics, one qualified. _ doing. luckily these mechanics, one qualified, will dojust doing. luckily these mechanics, one qualified, will do just that.— qualified, will do 'ust that. thank ou. jim qualified, will do 'ust that. thank you. jim moffat. — time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning, i'm sonja jessup. a care home manager in north london says he has serious worries over recruiting staff who've had their covid jabs. from tomorrow anyone who's not been vaccinated can't work in a care home. nhs figures show london has the highest number of unvaccinated carers in the country. managerjonathan beacham says he's struggling to replace two workers who he lost before the change in the law. there are more jobs than staff at the moment, so if somebody is looking for the kitchen role we have on offer, there will be other care homes advertising the same position. we've got to try and nick staff off each other to get through this time. the future, how many care staff will come into this profession, is still uncertain. the department of health and social care told us it's working closely with local authorities and care home providers to make sure there are enough staff.
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a major study into the health of the thames the first of its kind in 60 years shows positive signs for wildlife and the river's recovery. it found an increase in a range species including birds, seahorses and even sharks. but experts warn climate change is raising the temperature of the water and causing levels to rise. rugby fans have complained about overcrowding at twickenham station at the weekend. it was the first game at twickenham station to have a full crowd since the pandemic. the train operator has apologised and say they will make changes ahead of saturday. let's see how the tube is running this morning. minor delays on circle line or hammersmith and city line at the moment. and for all the latest travel news
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where you are tune into your bbc local radio station for regular updates throughout the morning. time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. another very mild start this morning. temperature double figures, 10, ii celsius overnight. we are hanging onto this mild air today and into friday. this cold front started to edge towards us yesterday. it has stalled, really taking its time. that is what is bringing today's cloud. we'll see outbreaks of largely light and patchy rain on and off through the day. the wind is light and the temperature mild, we are looking at a maximum of 15 celsius. this evening and overnight we still hang on to the cloud. we might get one or two breaks in it. that will lead to mist and fog patches with low cloud developing. quite a murky night and a murky start tomorrow. the minimum temperature again very mild, between 9 and ii celsius. any mist orfog in the morning will take time to lift. it will be a largely cloudy day. you'll notice for friday, low pressure swinging
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towards the north of the uk and that will bring a spell of windy weather. by the time any fronts associated with it gets to us, it should be fairly light and patchy rain. as we head into the weekend, the temperature does start to become a little chillier. i'm back in an hour. do take a look at our website for much more. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and nina warhurst. as we've been hearing this morning, from midnight, unvaccinated care home workers in england will no longer be able to work, unless they are exempt. our chief political correspondent adam fleming is with the health secretary now. morning, adam. hello. the great thing about the climate change conference in glasgow as there is a government minister here every morning for us to chat to. today it is sajid javid. lead us to. today it is sajid javid. lead us to discuss today. tomorrow is when
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the new rule for care home staff with vaccinations comes in. do you still think care home staff will not get a vaccination as part of that policy? get a vaccination as part of that oli ? , ., ., ~' policy? first of all i think the oli is policy? first of all i think the policy is exactly _ policy? first of all i think the policy is exactly right. - policy? first of all i think the policy is exactly right. we i policy? first of all i think the - policy is exactly right. we extended that yesterday to cover the whole of the nhs _ that yesterday to cover the whole of the nhs and other social temper macro— the nhs and other social temper macro settings and that is from april— macro settings and that is from april next— macro settings and that is from april next year. it is all about patient — april next year. it is all about patient safety. —— social care. it is about— patient safety. —— social care. it is about making sure we reduce the risk of— is about making sure we reduce the risk of infection from this horrid virus _ risk of infection from this horrid virus as— risk of infection from this horrid virus as much as we possibly can. in terms _ virus as much as we possibly can. in terms of— virus as much as we possibly can. in terms of what — virus as much as we possibly can. in terms of what might happen in care homes, _ terms of what might happen in care homes, perhaps there are people who still have _ homes, perhaps there are people who still have not been vaccinated and choose _ still have not been vaccinated and choose to — still have not been vaccinated and choose to leave, i would like that number _ choose to leave, i would like that number to — choose to leave, i would like that number to be as low as possible. i do not _ number to be as low as possible. i do not know— number to be as low as possible. i do not know what the final number will be _ do not know what the final number will be at — do not know what the final number will be. at the end of last month, the number— will be. at the end of last month, the number from c 32,000 which
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remain— the number from c 32,000 which remain completely unvaccinated. i think— remain completely unvaccinated. i think it _ remain completely unvaccinated. i think it will — remain completely unvaccinated. i think it will be lower than that, much _ think it will be lower than that, much lower than that. there will be people _ much lower than that. there will be people last — much lower than that. there will be people last minute and some medical exemptions that come through. i do not want _ exemptions that come through. i do not want to— exemptions that come through. i do not want to see anyone leave but if it means _ not want to see anyone leave but if it means care homes are safer, that is the _ it means care homes are safer, that is the right— it means care homes are safer, that is the right decision. the it means care homes are safer, that is the right decision.— is the right decision. the care industry says _ is the right decision. the care industry says it _ is the right decision. the care industry says it might - is the right decision. the care industry says it might put - is the right decision. the care - industry says it might put pressure on staffing. maybe they are being too pessimistic? i on staffing. maybe they are being too pessimistic?— too pessimistic? i think they are riaht too pessimistic? i think they are ri . ht to too pessimistic? i think they are right to say _ too pessimistic? i think they are right to say this _ too pessimistic? i think they are right to say this will _ too pessimistic? i think they are right to say this will put - too pessimistic? i think they are right to say this will put on - right to say this will put on pressure. there is a need for more people _ pressure. there is a need for more people working in care homes. we want _ people working in care homes. we want to— people working in care homes. we want to support the industry and care homes in doing that. there is a balance _ care homes in doing that. there is a balance to _ care homes in doing that. there is a balance to be struck. of course we need _ balance to be struck. of course we need more — balance to be struck. of course we need more people in care homes. if they leave _ need more people in care homes. if they leave they will need to be replaced — they leave they will need to be replaced. that is why we are having the largest— replaced. that is why we are having the largest recruitment campaign. we are giving _ the largest recruitment campaign. we are giving millions of pounds to the
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retention _ are giving millions of pounds to the retention sector. it is far safer to have _ retention sector. it is far safer to have everyone working facing people on a daily— have everyone working facing people on a daily basis, to have them vaccinated.— on a daily basis, to have them vaccinated. ., ., ., ., ., vaccinated. tomorrow morning at the care home owner _ vaccinated. tomorrow morning at the care home owner does _ vaccinated. tomorrow morning at the care home owner does not _ vaccinated. tomorrow morning at the care home owner does not have - vaccinated. tomorrow morning at the i care home owner does not have enough staff because someone has left and they have not been vaccinated and have not acquitted someone else, what did they do?— what did they do? unlikely a care home will be _ what did they do? unlikely a care home will be surprised _ what did they do? unlikely a care home will be surprised by - what did they do? unlikely a care home will be surprised by that i home will be surprised by that tomorrow morning. many will have planned _ tomorrow morning. many will have planned for this. there were a number— planned for this. there were a number of— planned for this. there were a number of months given to care homes for workforce _ number of months given to care homes for workforce planning. they will already— for workforce planning. they will already have been talking to the council. — already have been talking to the council, the government department, the regulator. what we have seen, we do not _ the regulator. what we have seen, we do not anticipate there will be a situation — do not anticipate there will be a situation of care homes being in a kind of— situation of care homes being in a kind of situation. i do not doubt there _ kind of situation. i do not doubt there will— kind of situation. i do not doubt there will be more pressure perhaps fulsome _ there will be more pressure perhaps fulsome care homes. we will be working — fulsome care homes. we will be working closely with them during a retention _ working closely with them during a retention funding, the recruitment campaign — retention funding, the recruitment campaign to give them everything they can _ campaign to give them everything they can to give them the support
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they can to give them the support they deserve. you they can to give them the support they deserve-— they deserve. you are mentioning this oli they deserve. you are mentioning this policy will _ they deserve. you are mentioning this policy will be _ they deserve. you are mentioning this policy will be applied - they deserve. you are mentioning this policy will be applied to - they deserve. you are mentioning this policy will be applied to front | this policy will be applied to front line nhs workers from next year as well. why is it next year for the nhs at the next day for the care sector? a, nhs at the next day for the care sector? �* . ., nhs at the next day for the care sector? �* .. ., nhs at the next day for the care sector? �* ., . , ., , sector? a care home decision, this full care homes, _ sector? a care home decision, this full care homes, that _ sector? a care home decision, this full care homes, that decision - sector? a care home decision, this full care homes, that decision was| full care homes, that decision was made _ full care homes, that decision was made a _ full care homes, that decision was made a few— full care homes, that decision was made a few months back the summer. at the _ made a few months back the summer. at the time _ made a few months back the summer. at the time for a variety of reasons the government felt that was the number— the government felt that was the number one priority and that was what _ number one priority and that was what the — number one priority and that was what the consultation was on. during the summer, i wanted to explore, perhaps— the summer, i wanted to explore, perhaps extending that to the nhs and other care settings like domiciliary care. that is why we had the second — domiciliary care. that is why we had the second consultation and enhancing yesterday was as a result of the _ enhancing yesterday was as a result of the second consultation. why the i a . ? of the second consultation. why the aa - ? wh of the second consultation. why the gap? why not _ of the second consultation. why the gap? why not at _ of the second consultation. why the gap? why not at the _ of the second consultation. why the gap? why not at the same - of the second consultation. why the gap? why not at the same time? i i gap? why not at the same time? i think it is right that time is given to those — think it is right that time is given to those people who are still unvaccinated. i estimate around 100,000 — unvaccinated. i estimate around 100,000 in the nhs, that they had
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the time _ 100,000 in the nhs, that they had the time to make a positive choice to get— the time to make a positive choice to get vaccinated. i am very clear there _ to get vaccinated. i am very clear there should be no scapegoating, no singling _ there should be no scapegoating, no singling no— there should be no scapegoating, no singling no shaming of everyone who at this— singling no shaming of everyone who at this point has chosen not to take the vaccine — at this point has chosen not to take the vaccine. it is about supporting them, _ the vaccine. it is about supporting them, working with them, giving them information— them, working with them, giving them information they need, perhaps one—to—one discussions to try to persuade — one—to—one discussions to try to persuade them it is not only good for them — persuade them it is not only good for them and persuade them it is not only good forthem and their persuade them it is not only good for them and their colleagues but there _ for them and their colleagues but there stubble good for the people they care — there stubble good for the people they care the most, their patients. do you _ they care the most, their patients. do you think people will leave the nhs as a result of this? i do you think people will leave the nhs as a result of this?— do you think people will leave the nhs as a result of this? i hope not. let's be realistic. _ nhs as a result of this? i hope not. let's be realistic. if _ nhs as a result of this? i hope not. let's be realistic. if i _ nhs as a result of this? i hope not. let's be realistic. if i said _ nhs as a result of this? i hope not. let's be realistic. if i said to - nhs as a result of this? i hope not. let's be realistic. if i said to you i let's be realistic. if i said to you every— let's be realistic. if i said to you every single one of them will take the vaccine, that cannot be the outcome — the vaccine, that cannot be the outcome, no matter how much i desire it. i outcome, no matter how much i desire it i do _ outcome, no matter how much i desire it i do not _ outcome, no matter how much i desire it. i do not think it will be 100,000 _ it. i do not think it will be 100,000 or anything remotely close. if we look— 100,000 or anything remotely close. if we look at similar situations, in france _ if we look at similar situations, in france they— if we look at similar situations, in france they put in a similar policy injuly. _ france they put in a similar policy injuly. today the number of people
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vaccinated — injuly. today the number of people vaccinated in the french health system — vaccinated in the french health system has gone up from 60% to 90%. if anyone _ system has gone up from 60% to 90%. if anyone puts out and he backs propaganda on social media will around spreading lives about the vaccine to a colleague, with that concern you? it vaccine to a colleague, with that concern you?— vaccine to a colleague, with that concern ou? ., , , _, . concern you? it would deeply concern me. there concern you? it would deeply concern me- there is — concern you? it would deeply concern me- there is a _ concern you? it would deeply concern me. there is a big _ concern you? it would deeply concern me. there is a big difference - me. there is a big difference between _ me. there is a big difference between someone who is vaccine hesitant, — between someone who is vaccine hesitant, perhaps someone who is not totally _ hesitant, perhaps someone who is not totally convinced from what they had. totally convinced from what they had 0f— totally convinced from what they had. of course people can be hesitant _ had. of course people can be hesitant i— had. of course people can be hesitant. i understand that and it is our— hesitant. i understand that and it is ouriob— hesitant. i understand that and it is ourjob to work with them and make _ is ourjob to work with them and make sure — is ourjob to work with them and make sure they have the information they need _ make sure they have the information they need. anyone who is anti—bac sly take _ they need. anyone who is anti—bac sly take from that someone who is spreading — sly take from that someone who is spreading false information, is completely wrong. it is wrong because — completely wrong. it is wrong because if they do not want to take it themselves, that is the decision but they—
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it themselves, that is the decision but they should not be passing false information to anyone.— information to anyone. should they be disciplined _ information to anyone. should they be disciplined by _ information to anyone. should they be disciplined by the _ information to anyone. should they be disciplined by the manager? i i be disciplined by the manager? i think if it is anti vax information, i do not — think if it is anti vax information, i do not want to be the judge of that, _ i do not want to be the judge of that, it — i do not want to be the judge of that, it is — i do not want to be the judge of that, it is something for managers. it will— that, it is something for managers. it will be _ that, it is something for managers. it will be for — that, it is something for managers. it will be for managers. you that, it is something for managers. it will be for managers.— it will be for managers. you are here this morning. _ it will be for managers. you are here this morning. boris - it will be for managers. you are l here this morning. boris johnson here this morning. borisjohnson will be here at lunchtime. labour say he is doing a day trip to avoid headlines. ouryou say he is doing a day trip to avoid headlines. our you comfortable that geoffrey cox was doing his job as an mp at the same time he was representing the government of the british virgin islands in the british virgin islands in the british virgin islands in the british virgin islands? first of all the prime minister _ british virgin islands? first of all the prime minister is _ british virgin islands? first of all the prime minister is coming i british virgin islands? first of all| the prime minister is coming here today— the prime minister is coming here today to _ the prime minister is coming here today to glasgow to help us make even _ today to glasgow to help us make even more — today to glasgow to help us make even more progress. we have had a good _ even more progress. we have had a good couple — even more progress. we have had a good couple of weeks, a good run—up to the _ good couple of weeks, a good run—up to the whole — good couple of weeks, a good run—up to the whole conference. we have gone _ to the whole conference. we have gone from — to the whole conference. we have gone from something like a bird of
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the world's— gone from something like a bird of the world's gdp committed to net zero to— the world's gdp committed to net zero to something like 90%. it is not enough. all of that taken together does not get us to be1.5%. i think— together does not get us to be1.5%. i think it _ together does not get us to be1.5%. i think it is _ together does not get us to be1.5%. i think it is absolutely right the prime — i think it is absolutely right the prime minister is here to do that. everyone — prime minister is here to do that. everyone would understand that. you have also _ everyone would understand that. you have also asked about an individual case: _ have also asked about an individual case the _ have also asked about an individual case, the geoffrey cox case. i am not going — case, the geoffrey cox case. i am not going to — case, the geoffrey cox case. i am not going to get into that, certainly if i do not know the details _ certainly if i do not know the details. what i do know that any mp, if they— details. what i do know that any mp, if they have _ details. what i do know that any mp, if they have an external interest when _ if they have an external interest when they should be open and transparent about that and follow the rules — transparent about that and follow the rules all the time, including no lobbying _ the rules all the time, including no lobbying if— the rules all the time, including no lobbying. if there is any mp someone thinks _ lobbying. if there is any mp someone thinks has _ lobbying. if there is any mp someone thinks has not done that, it is not for me. _ thinks has not done that, it is not for me. it — thinks has not done that, it is not for me. it is — thinks has not done that, it is not for me, it is for the regulator. is it for me, it is for the regulator. [s it ok for me, it is for the regulator. it ok to do a for me, it is for the regulator. is it ok to do a virtual meeting for your private employer from a house of commons office? i am your private employer from a house of commons office?— your private employer from a house of commons office? i am not going to net into of commons office? i am not going to get into any — of commons office? i am not going to get into any individual— of commons office? i am not going to get into any individual cases. - of commons office? i am not going to get into any individual cases. if i get into any individual cases. if you have —
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get into any individual cases. if you have an external interest, i cannot — you have an external interest, i cannot see _ you have an external interest, i cannot see why you would be using anything _ cannot see why you would be using anything funded by the taxpayer. that would include your office space — that would include your office sace. ., . ., ~ that would include your office sace. ., ., ., ~ ., that would include your office sace. ., . .,~ ., space. you are working forjpmorgan sto ed space. you are working forjpmorgan stopped was — space. you are working forjpmorgan stopped was advising. _ space. you are working forjpmorgan stopped was advising. did _ space. you are working forjpmorgan stopped was advising. did you i space. you are working forjpmorgan stopped was advising. did you do i stopped was advising. did you do virtual meetings from your house of commons office? i virtual meetings from your house of commons office?— commons office? i might have received a _ commons office? i might have received a phone _ commons office? i might have received a phone call. - commons office? i might have received a phone call. if- commons office? i might have received a phone call. if you i commons office? i might have. received a phone call. if you are asking _ received a phone call. if you are asking did — received a phone call. if you are asking did i— received a phone call. if you are asking did i use parliamentary computers or anything like that, i did not— computers or anything like that, i did not do— computers or anything like that, i did not do that? if computers or anything like that, i did not do that?— did not do that? if you did, you would have _ did not do that? if you did, you would have thought _ did not do that? if you did, you would have thought that i did not do that? if you did, you would have thought that was i did not do that? if you did, you | would have thought that was the wrong thing to do. you would have thought that was the wrong thing to do.— would have thought that was the wrong thing to do. you are trying to draw me down _ wrong thing to do. you are trying to draw me down a _ wrong thing to do. you are trying to draw me down a particular - wrong thing to do. you are trying to draw me down a particular line i wrong thing to do. you are trying to draw me down a particular line with | draw me down a particular line with geoffrey— draw me down a particular line with geoffrey cox. you do not know what he has _ geoffrey cox. you do not know what he has done — geoffrey cox. you do not know what he has done. you are responding to allegations — he has done. you are responding to allegations that have been put out there _ allegations that have been put out there it— allegations that have been put out there. ., , “ allegations that have been put out there. ., , ~ , allegations that have been put out there. ., , ~ there. it does look like his office. that is not _ there. it does look like his office. that is not for _ there. it does look like his office. that is not for me. _ there. it does look like his office. that is not for me. that - there. it does look like his office. that is not for me. that should i there. it does look like his office. | that is not for me. that should be looked _ that is not for me. that should be looked at — that is not for me. that should be looked at by people who are independent and the appropriate authorities. the independent and the appropriate authorities. ., independent and the appropriate authorities.—
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independent and the appropriate authorities. ., authorities. the view from the prime minister seems _ authorities. the view from the prime minister seems to _ authorities. the view from the prime minister seems to be, _ authorities. the view from the prime minister seems to be, and _ authorities. the view from the prime l minister seems to be, and the deputy prime minister said yesterday, public life is enriched by the fact mps can work for other people while they are still mps. howard's public life enriched by you working for jpmorgan and also advising californian artificial intelligence? in my case, which i'm happy to talk about, _ in my case, which i'm happy to talk about, what— in my case, which i'm happy to talk about, what i did, i was very open and transparent. it did not involve any kind _ and transparent. it did not involve any kind of— and transparent. it did not involve any kind of lobbying whatsoever and it took— any kind of lobbying whatsoever and it took about one to two days of my time and _ it took about one to two days of my time and month, and that meant the vast majority of my time was spent on my— vast majority of my time was spent on my parliamentary affairs. i was very open— on my parliamentary affairs. i was very open about that. i do think it is right— very open about that. i do think it is right for— very open about that. i do think it is right for mps...| very open about that. i do think it is right for mps. . ._ is right for mps... i am not accusing — is right for mps... i am not accusing you _ is right for mps... i am not accusing you of _ is right for mps... i am not accusing you of breaking i is right for mps. .. i am not l accusing you of breaking the is right for mps. .. i am not - accusing you of breaking the rules. that is you defending it being within the rules. i was turning it round and asking what we as the public would get as a result of you being an adviser.—
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public would get as a result of you being an adviser. different mps have different external _ being an adviser. different mps have different external roles. _ being an adviser. different mps have different external roles. we - being an adviser. different mps have different external roles. we were i different external roles. we were talking _ different external roles. we were talking about mine. there will be others~~ — talking about mine. there will be others~~ i— talking about mine. there will be others... i want the nhs to do well for doctors — others... i want the nhs to do well for doctors who are hippies, nurses who are _ for doctors who are hippies, nurses who are mps are still helping. —— who are mps are still helping. —— who are — who are mps are still helping. —— who are mps. i think mps that have broad _ who are mps. i think mps that have broad experience, experience outside politics. _ broad experience, experience outside politics. as _ broad experience, experience outside politics. as a — broad experience, experience outside politics, as a general rule, i think that is— politics, as a general rule, i think that is important. we politics, as a general rule, i think that is important.— politics, as a general rule, i think that is important. we last saw the rimers to that is important. we last saw the primers to visiting _ that is important. we last saw the primers to visiting a _ that is important. we last saw the primers to visiting a hospital- that is important. we last saw the primers to visiting a hospital in i primers to visiting a hospital in northumberland on sunday. —— the prime minister. when you go into hospital, do you put a mask and you go in the front door? i hospital, do you put a mask and you go in the front door?— go in the front door? i followed the rules, like the _ go in the front door? i followed the rules, like the prime _ go in the front door? i followed the rules, like the prime minister- go in the front door? i followed the rules, like the prime minister did. l rules, like the prime minister did. a number— rules, like the prime minister did. a number of people have mentioned that to _ a number of people have mentioned that to me — a number of people have mentioned that to me. i do not that reporting is fair— that to me. i do not that reporting is fair at _ that to me. i do not that reporting is fair at all — that to me. i do not that reporting is fair at all. as the hospital trust — is fair at all. as the hospital trust has _ is fair at all. as the hospital trust has said themselves, the prime minister— trust has said themselves, the prime minister and his entire team
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followed all the rules on infection control— followed all the rules on infection control in— followed all the rules on infection control in the clinical areas all the time _ control in the clinical areas all the time-— control in the clinical areas all the time. ~ , , . , ., the time. why in the pitches to doctors and — the time. why in the pitches to doctors and nurses _ the time. why in the pitches to doctors and nurses have i the time. why in the pitches to j doctors and nurses have masks the time. why in the pitches to i doctors and nurses have masks on the time. why in the pitches to - doctors and nurses have masks on and borisjohnson does not? it is boris johnson does not? it is important — boris johnson does not? it is important we _ boris johnson does not? it is important we all _ borisjohnson does not? it is important we all followed the rules and the _ important we all followed the rules and the prime minister and his team did. ., and the prime minister and his team did. . , ., ., and the prime minister and his team did. . i. ., ., and the prime minister and his team did. have you had a booster 'ab yet? not et, did. have you had a booster 'ab yet? not yet. hopefurryfi did. have you had a booster 'ab yet? not yet, hopefully very i did. have you had a boosterjab yet? not yet, hopefully very soon. - did. have you had a boosterjab yet? not yet, hopefully very soon. the i not yet, hopefully very soon. the system _ not yet, hopefully very soon. the system has changed. from monday to speak— system has changed. from monday to speak people will be able to but the booster— speak people will be able to but the boosterjab speak people will be able to but the booster jab at a speak people will be able to but the boosterjab at a five—month point. they— boosterjab at a five—month point. they will— boosterjab at a five—month point. they will still have to wait six months — they will still have to wait six months but you can book early and that means — months but you can book early and that means more people coming forward — that means more people coming forward. yesterday there were 800,000 people booking. it is fantastic— 800,000 people booking. it is fantastic people are coming forward. allow— fantastic people are coming forward. allow me _ fantastic people are coming forward. allow me to say to anyone watching, please _ allow me to say to anyone watching, please get _ allow me to say to anyone watching, please get your sister if you are eligible — please get your sister if you are eligible because it is helping to protect— eligible because it is helping to protect your loved ones and everyone else _ protect your loved ones and everyone else -- _ protect your loved ones and everyone else -- get — protect your loved ones and everyone else. —— get your booster. we
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else. -- get your booster. we understand — else. -- get your booster. we understand the _ else. —— get your booster. - understand the prime minister will do a press conference after he has banned to some heads together in the climate change negotiations. —— he has banged. now for the sport and an update on yorkshire. the investigating continuing at yorkshire. they say they will be opening more pathways so people feel more comfortable to come forward and report their experiences. meanwhile the spotlight appears to be widening into cricket as a whole. there will be a gc ms hearing next week. —— dcms. questions will be asked about cricket as a whole and his commendation.— cricket as a whole and his commendation. ., ., commendation. you wonder if it will 0 en commendation. you wonder if it will oen u- a commendation. you wonder if it will
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open up a pandora's _ commendation. you wonder if it will open up a pandora's box. _ commendation. you wonder if it will open up a pandora's box. we i commendation. you wonder if it will open up a pandora's box. we have i open up a pandora's box. we have already seen _ open up a pandora's box. we have already seen issues _ open up a pandora's box. we have already seen issues in _ open up a pandora's box. we have already seen issues in some i open up a pandora's box. we have| already seen issues in some sports and other professional athletes coming forward to talk about their experiences. it is cricket under the spotlight at the moment. i am sure there are questions to be answered by other governing bodies across the spectrum as well. yorkshire head coach andrew gale has been suspended pending an investigation into an historic tweet, as the club continues to deal with allegations of racism. lord patel, the new chair at yorkshire, says he hopes to have a process in place by the end of the week for whistleblowers to come forward, to share any instances of discrimination. tabassum bhatti who is now 37, signed a contract at yorkshire at the age of 14, he has told the bbc about his experience. i think now�*s the time for change. like i said, it's gone on long enough. i'm not here to be on camera. this is only because it's got to a stage where i think asian communities and ethnic minorities have suffered enough in this game and being of pakistani heritage, this game, it runs
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through our blood. yorkshire chair lord patel has said allegations made by individuals about their experiences need to be properly investigated, and that anyone who may have suffered issues should come forward, and these will be considered carefully. england take on new zealand later in the t20 world cup semi—final. captain eoin morgan says his side are looking forward to a repeat of the 50 over final they played at lords in 2019, when england won by the tightest of margins. i wouldn't say strong favourites. new zealand have a full strength squad. we've obviously been hampered with a lot of injuries throughout this tournament. we're playing really good cricket. and the guys are extremely excited about the challenge against new zealand and potentially, you know, the opportunity that might follow that. but we need to play really good
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cricket in order to beat the kiwis. there are a number of threats and a number— there are a number of threats and a numberof— there are a number of threats and a number of matchwinners. and we also have a number of match winners as well. and, at the end of the day, it's trying to commit to, you know, what you do as a team and we both do it a little bit differently. chelsea manager emma hayes said her players were "outstanding" as they thrashed swiss champions servette 7—0 in the women's champions league. the blues, who led 6—0 at half—time, showed the gulf in quality between the sides with some impressive attacking play. fran kirby scored twice, and so did sam kerr. melanie leupolz, jessie fleming and guro reiten also got on the scoresheet. it's the first time anyone's scored seven in a womens champions league group game. emma raducanu's history—making season is over — she was beaten in her first match in linz in austria. us open champion and top seed, she lost the first set 6—1 to before winning a tie break to level the match at a set apiece. she then took a medical timeout
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in the deciding set before she eventually fell to the world number 106, raducanu will now look towards working with new coach torben beltz in preparation for next season. andy murray is still going though — he's into the second round of the stockholm open after beating norwegian qualifier viktor durasovic in straight sets. murray now faces top seeded italianjannik sinner later today. i know mm ada carney last but what a season _ i know mm ada carney last but what a season she _ i know mm ada carney last but what a season she has had! —— emma raducanu _ season she has had! —— emma raducanu. a season she has had! -- emma raducanu-— season she has had! -- emma raducanu. ., ., , ., , raducanu. a lot of people have been mean about — raducanu. a lot of people have been mean about that. _ raducanu. a lot of people have been mean about that. understandably, . raducanu. a lot of people have been i mean about that. understandably, she is a superstar. next season, watching this space, i am predicting big things. i think that is quite s8
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prediction. —— a safe prediction. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. depends where you are. chilly in the north. forsome depends where you are. chilly in the north. for some there is a touch of frost. furthersouth north. for some there is a touch of frost. further south across the rest of england and wales you are right, not as chilly as in the north. today will be mild. light winds, except in the far north and west of scotland where there are gusty winds. here we will see the lion's share of the sunshine. a showers peppering the north and the west. for the rest of england and wales there will be a lot of cloud around. drizzle and spots of rain. hanging on to brighter skies in the south for a time. you can see the black circles representing the strength of the wind. today temperatures will range between ten and 15. this evening and
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overnight we still will have all this cloud. across parts of england and wales still drizzle and spots of rain with hill fog as well. another weather front sinking sounds bringing in rain. in between the two areas, it will be holding adjustable areas, it will be holding adjustable a touch of frost in some sheltered areas. still very mild for the time of year in the south. tomorrow the sound starts off on a cloudy note. through the day the cloud will break up through the day the cloud will break up as the weather front pushes northwards taking rain with it. the showers in scotland will push northwards as well. later the wind will strengthen and we will see heavier rain coming our way, courtesy of an area of low pressure. we will talk to you again soon. footballing legend sir geoff hurst remains the only male player to have ever scored a hat—trick in a world cup final, taking england to victory in the famous 1966 game against west germany.
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now, as he approaches his 80th birthday, he's remembered some of the sportsmen that have inspired and motivated him throughout his life and career in a book. we'll chat to him in a moment, but first let's remind ourselves of that history—making hat—trick. the equaliser. that was a brilliant piece of football there. there's ball, running himself daft. yes! no. the linesman says no. it's a goal, it's a goal. the germans have gone mad at the referee. it's all over, i think. no. it's... and here's comes hurst.
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some people are on the pitch. they think it's all over. it is now. it's four. and charlton. and the players bring themselves down. and here's the three—goal star geoff hurst. and bobby charlton weeping with emotion. 0h, oh, my goodness. still so magical to see those pictures. sir geoffjoins us now. morning to you. great to see you. good morning. what is it like to listen to that?— good morning. what is it like to listen to that? hearing it with the eariece listen to that? hearing it with the earpiece in _ listen to that? hearing it with the earpiece in my — listen to that? hearing it with the earpiece in my ear, _ listen to that? hearing it with the earpiece in my ear, it _ listen to that? hearing it with the earpiece in my ear, it sounds i listen to that? hearing it with the | earpiece in my ear, it sounds even more dramatic, quite frankly. i was getting slightly excited about it. amazing listening to those three things with an earpiece. still a
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certain amount of emotion attached to that fantastic final moment. great commentary, absolutely brilliant. so great commentary, absolutely brilliant. g ' great commentary, absolutely brilliant. . ' ., brilliant. so true. jeff, you have written a book. _ brilliant. so true. jeff, you have written a book. it _ brilliant. so true. jeff, you have written a book. it is _ brilliant. so true. jeff, you have written a book. it is not - brilliant. so true. jeff, you have written a book. it is not an i written a book. it is not an ordinary sporting book. tell us why you decided to write a book in the style you have. it is you decided to write a book in the style you have-— you decided to write a book in the style you have. it is geoff hurst 80 at 80. i style you have. it is geoff hurst 80 at 80- l was _ style you have. it is geoff hurst 80 at 80. i was picking _ style you have. it is geoff hurst 80 at 80. i was picking at— style you have. it is geoff hurst 80 at 80. i was picking at sporty i style you have. it is geoff hurst 80 at 80. i was picking at sporty men| at 80. i was picking at sporty men over the last 50 odd years i have seen, bumped into, admired, excited me. it was started by the biographer forjimmy greaves. he did an enormous amount of the work. they came to me along with pitch publishing. here we are, the finished article, which is out now. you are shining a spotlight on other people, which is an interesting thing to do. who are the headline acts in the book? who are the stars?
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what are the best toys? we acts in the book? who are the stars? what are the best toys?— what are the best toys? we have not icked what are the best toys? we have not picked them — what are the best toys? we have not picked them in _ what are the best toys? we have not picked them in terms _ what are the best toys? we have not picked them in terms of _ what are the best toys? we have not picked them in terms of importance i picked them in terms of importance or other medical order. a couple of stories of the top of my head. muhammad ali fell asleep during the 1966 final. he flew over with jet lag. many, many years later, he was getting off an aircraft in chicago, my wife has a younger sister. we were collecting our bags off the carousel at the same time and were about ten yards from him. for the first time in my wife's life, she wanted to talk to another celebrity and get his autograph. i played cricket with jim laker. and get his autograph. i played cricket withjim laker. my and get his autograph. i played cricket with jim laker. my first and only game for essex, playing cricket. zero and zero not out. there are many stories like that across the years.— there are many stories like that across the years. there is a great story about _ across the years. there is a great story about shane _ across the years. there is a great story about shane warne. - across the years. there is a great story about shane warne. why i across the years. there is a great story about shane warne. why is| across the years. there is a great i story about shane warne. why is he in the book? — story about shane warne. why is he in the book? he _ story about shane warne. why is he
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in the book? he bowled _ story about shane warne. why is he in the book? he bowled this - story about shane warne. why is he in the book? he bowled this magic, | in the book? he bowled this magic, unbelievable bull, which i think was probably the first ball against england for australia. against mike gatting. it knocked off the stump. mike gatting was dumbfounded. he is second in the all—time left of wickets, 700. he knocked over 94 wickets, 700. he knocked over 94 wickets in one calendar year, i think, in 2004. a great pundit of the screen as well. that memorable moment, wicket against mike gatting sticks in your mind. you moment, wicket against mike gatting sticks in your mind.— sticks in your mind. you obviously have a tremendous _ sticks in your mind. you obviously have a tremendous love _ sticks in your mind. you obviously have a tremendous love for- sticks in your mind. you obviously have a tremendous love for sport | sticks in your mind. you obviously i have a tremendous love for sport in general. i know you said cricket did not go so well. actually you could have been a cricketer, i suppose, couldn't you? do you still watch sport all the time? how up—to—date
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are you? how much do you keep in touch? ~ ., ., , touch? like all football fans, i watch football _ touch? like all football fans, i watch football fairly _ touch? like all football fans, i watch football fairly regularlyl touch? like all football fans, i. watch football fairly regularly and naturally england. i am a west ham fan and avidly watching west ham's performance this season, third in the knee. all the hammers fans are so excited. more people admitting to be hammers fans than in the last ten years. i keep up to date. i watch rugby and tennis is another sport i like. golf, naturally. strangely enough, once people took over, cricket went out the window and is one of the least sports i watch now. it's a real issue for me trying to do both when it was the end of a nero when you could compete in both sports. purely by chance, ron greenwood struck me up front against liverpool and we won 1—0. —— stuck
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me up. i scored 14 goals in 27 games from a standing start in a new position. today if you did that you would be worth about 50 million. you mentioned tennis and moment ago. tell me why roger federer is in the book. �* .., , , tell me why roger federer is in the book. because he is simply one of the greats- _ book. because he is simply one of the greats- my — book. because he is simply one of the greats. my grandson - book. because he is simply one of the greats. my grandson now, i book. because he is simply one of| the greats. my grandson now, who book. because he is simply one of i the greats. my grandson now, who is 30 many years ago, he was a roger federerfan as well. 30 many years ago, he was a roger federer fan as well. i took him to see roger federer play at wimbledon which was a highlight of my life, no my grandson was such a fan. in the warm up, he was only ten yards from where we were sitting on the front row of the stands. roger federer of course is one of the greats. you have to include not many stories about him apart from that, you have to include the great sporting heroes in a sport that i watch. tell]! to include the great sporting heroes in a sport that i watch.— in a sport that i watch. tell me a little bit about... _
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in a sport that i watch. tell me a little bit about... there - in a sport that i watch. tell me a little bit about... there is i in a sport that i watch. tell me a little bit about... there is a i little bit about... there is a brilliant bit in the book. tell me about gordon banks. i want to talk about gordon banks. i want to talk about that save from pele in mexico in 1970. , , , , about that save from pele in mexico in1970. _ _ ., in 1970. very simply, gordon banks was the in1970. very simply, gordon banks was the best— in 1970. very simply, gordon banks was the best goalkeeper _ in 1970. very simply, gordon banks was the best goalkeeper i _ in 1970. very simply, gordon banks was the best goalkeeper i have i in 1970. very simply, gordon banks i was the best goalkeeper i have seen, the best goalkeeper that has been around probably ever. an absolutely magnificent goalkeeper. he is renowned for that. he is renowned for that save against brazil. i always maintain his best save, more important save, was sailing a penalty for when west ham played stoke in the semifinal of the league cup and that got them through the final and winning it. cup and that got them through the finaland winning it. i cup and that got them through the final and winning it. i always talk about the rubbish about the great save against pele can i do not go along with it. he was the best. as a character, he was a joke. at every reunion, every golf day over the years, he always turned up with a
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joke, a fabulous character. simply the best in one of the positions on the best in one of the positions on the field where you do not get other players where you move around in the outfield, you are the key pattern thatis outfield, you are the key pattern that is your only position and it is so important to have one of the greatest. that is why we were so successful over the years, with that great keypad. successful over the years, with that great keypad-— great keypad. thank you for talking to us. great keypad. thank you for talking to us- great — great keypad. thank you for talking to us. great to _ great keypad. thank you for talking to us. great to see _ great keypad. thank you for talking to us. great to see you _ great keypad. thank you for talking to us. great to see you looking i great keypad. thank you for talking to us. great to see you looking so i to us. great to see you looking so well. —— great goalkeeper. stay with us, headlines coming up. good morning, welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and sally nugent. our headlines today. the vaccine deadline
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for care workers — from midnight tonight, those without two jabs won't be allowed to work in england. with similar rules due for the nhs next year, the health secretary admits there will be pressure on the system. a call for an investigation into conservative mp sir geoffrey cox, as labour claim pictures show him breaking parliamentary rules. a shortage of mechanics to maintain the growing number of electric vehicles over the coming decade. eighty years after women were first conscripted into the army, we hear memories of the teenagers who found themselves in the thick of world war two. it was a wonderful experience. you were there and you never thought you might be killed. i certainly wasn't terrified. you are just doing a job. l we look at the health benefits of drumming — with just two days to go until weather presenter 0wain's, bbc breakfast 24—hour, children in need drumathon good morning.
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it's very cloudy across england and wales today with some drizzle and some rain. for scotland, northern ireland and the far north of england, brighterwith ireland and the far north of england, brighter withjust ireland and the far north of england, brighterwithjusta ireland and the far north of england, brighter with just a few showers. details coming up. good morning. it's wednesday, 10th november. our main story. today is the last day that unvaccinated staff can work in care homes in england, unless they're exempt. the rule applies to most people entering care homes including agency workers, tradespeople and occupational therapists. yesterday, the health secretary announced all frontline nhs staff in england must also be vaccinated by april. jon donnison has this report. for care homes across england, many already short on staff, tonight's midnight deadline has been looming. see, you've still got some edges here, look. here at hill house nursing home in croydon, all workers, except two who say they have a medical exemption, have now been vaccinated. but for some, they took
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some persuading. watching the news, understanding statistics, i think it made me understand that it's notjust good for myself, but also for residents, to protect them. also, my colleagues, my family, people around me. in croydon, and across england, there has been a big push to get care home staff vaccinated. but there are still gaps. in croydon we have 94% of care workers that have taken the initial jab. 88% has taken the double jab. we've provided a plethora of initiatives in order to get there. but the government says there are still 32,000 care home workers in england who haven't yet been fully jabbed. unless they have a medical exemption, they won't be able to work in the sector anymore until they double vaccinated. from what we have seen so far from
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the regulator, we don't anticipate there will be a situation of care homes being in that kind of situation. i don't doubt for a second there will be more pressure perhaps for some care homes but we will be working with them very closely for the extra funding, the retention fund, recruitment campaign, to do everything we can to give them the support they deserve. today's my last day of caring, which is really sad because i love myjob and i'm quite annoyed about it, to be fair. in regards to this vaccine, i feel like it's being forced on us, or on me. and i don't agree with that, to be fair. and i kind of think it's against human rights. losing people like delma means some care homes could be stretched in terms of staffing. but the government says the compulsory vaccination policy is needed to protect care home residents. and from april, all front line nhs staff in england, unless medically exempt, will also have to be fully vaccinated against covid—i9 to keep theirjobs.
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unions are warning that too could lead to staff shortages. jon donnison, bbc news. labour is calling on the government to open a standards investigation into the conservative mp, sir geoffrey cox. it follows reports he used his westminster office to carry out his second job as a barrister. this westminster office to carry out his second job as a barrister.- second 'ob as a barrister. this is the second job as a barrister. this is the video that _ second job as a barrister. this is the video that may _ second job as a barrister. this is the video that may show- second job as a barrister. this is the video that may show the - second job as a barrister. this is - the video that may show the former attorney general using his house of commons office to carry out private work which the opposition claim is a breach of parliamentary rules. adam fleming is in glasgow this morning, where borisjohnson will be lighter for the finalfew where borisjohnson will be lighter for the final few days of the cop conference. he has hundreds of miles away from westminster but there is no getting away from this ongoing storm over second jobs for mps, is there? storm over second 'obs for mps, is there? ., ., ., , ., ., there? no, and it has gone from bein: an there? no, and it has gone from being an individual _ there? no, and it has gone from being an individual to _ there? no, and it has gone from being an individual to the - there? no, and it has gone from j being an individual to the overall rules_ being an individual to the overall rules of— being an individual to the overall rules of the system, back to another individual. _ rules of the system, back to another individual, and in this case it is the former_ individual, and in this case it is the former attorney general sir
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geoffrey— the former attorney general sir geoffrey cox. he was working as a lawyer— geoffrey cox. he was working as a lawyer while at the same time he was an mp _ lawyer while at the same time he was an mp that _ lawyer while at the same time he was an mp. that is allowed. at some point _ an mp. that is allowed. at some point this— an mp. that is allowed. at some point this year he was in the british— point this year he was in the british virgin islands and the caribbean representing the government of the british virgin islands — government of the british virgin islands. that is allowed. what is not clear— islands. that is allowed. what is not clear is— islands. that is allowed. what is not clear is whether it was allowed for him _ not clear is whether it was allowed for him to— not clear is whether it was allowed for him to hold a virtual meeting as part of— for him to hold a virtual meeting as part of that — for him to hold a virtual meeting as part of that court case from his house — part of that court case from his house of— part of that court case from his house of commons office, which is what _ house of commons office, which is what several newspapers are accusing him of— what several newspapers are accusing him of doing today. and if you look at the _ him of doing today. and if you look at the pictures, it does suggest, it does _ at the pictures, it does suggest, it does seem — at the pictures, it does suggest, it does seem very familiar, and if you look does seem very familiar, and if you took at _ does seem very familiar, and if you took at the — does seem very familiar, and if you look at the times he gets up from his desk, — look at the times he gets up from his desk, that would tally with parliamentary business that was taking _ parliamentary business that was taking place that day. it will be now up — taking place that day. it will be now up to _ taking place that day. it will be now up to the parliamentary standards committee to decide what is in the _ standards committee to decide what is in the rules and out of the rules — is in the rules and out of the rules and _ is in the rules and out of the rules. and what the rules actually are and _ rules. and what the rules actually are and what is compliant with them is something i have been disgusting with the _ is something i have been disgusting with the health secretary. is with the health secretary. is it — with the health secretary. is it ok— with the health secretary. is it ok to do a virtual meeting for your private — is it ok to do a virtual meeting for your private employer from your house _ your private employer from your house of — your private employer from your house of commons office? look, i'm not auoin house of commons office? look, i'm not going to — house of commons office? look, i'm not going to get _ house of commons office? look, i'm not going to get into _ house of commons office? look, i'm not going to get into any _ house of commons office? look, i'm not going to get into any individual. not going to get into any individual case. i not going to get into any individual case. ., not going to get into any individual case, ., ., not going to get into any individual case. . ., a i.
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not going to get into any individual case. . ., ., case. i am asking you about the principal- _ case. i am asking you about the principal- if— case. i am asking you about the principal. if you _ case. i am asking you about the principal. if you have _ case. i am asking you about the principal. if you have an - case. i am asking you about the| principal. if you have an external interest, principal. if you have an external interest. i _ principal. if you have an external interest, i can't _ principal. if you have an external interest, i can't see _ principal. if you have an external interest, i can't see why - principal. if you have an external interest, i can't see why you - principal. if you have an external. interest, i can't see why you would be using anything funded by the taxpayer. be using anything funded by the taxa er. ., . , . taxpayer. that includes your office? i think it would — taxpayer. that includes your office? i think it would include _ taxpayer. that includes your office? i think it would include your - taxpayer. that includes your office? i think it would include your office i i think it would include your office space, yes. i think it would include your office space. yes— i think it would include your office space, yes. you are working forjp moraan. space, yes. you are working forjp morgan- did _ space, yes. you are working forjp morgan- did you _ space, yes. you are working forjp morgan. did you ever _ space, yes. you are working forjp morgan. did you ever do - space, yes. you are working forjp morgan. did you ever do virtual. morgan. did you ever do virtual meetings — morgan. did you ever do virtual meetings for them from your house of commons _ meetings for them from your house of commons office? | meetings for them from your house of commons office?— commons office? i have had phone calls. i commons office? i have had phone calls- i might've — commons office? i have had phone calls. i might've received _ commons office? i have had phone calls. i might've received a - commons office? i have had phone calls. i might've received a phone i calls. i might've received a phone calls. i might've received a phone call or something. calls. i might've received a phone call orsomething. but calls. i might've received a phone call or something. but if you are saying, did i use parliamentary computers or anything else for something like that, i wouldn't have done that. find something like that, i wouldn't have done that. �* , ., ., ., done that. and if you had done it ou done that. and if you had done it you would _ done that. and if you had done it you would have _ done that. and if you had done it you would have thought - done that. and if you had done it you would have thought it - done that. and if you had done it you would have thought it was i done that. and if you had done it. you would have thought it was the wrong _ you would have thought it was the wrong thing to do? you you would have thought it was the wrong thing to do?— you would have thought it was the wrong thing to do? you are trying to draw me down _ wrong thing to do? you are trying to draw me down a _ wrong thing to do? you are trying to draw me down a particular _ wrong thing to do? you are trying to draw me down a particular line - wrong thing to do? you are trying to draw me down a particular line on i wrong thing to do? you are trying to| draw me down a particular line on mr cox. ., �* , , , cox. no, it's 'ust interesting because it — cox. no, it's 'ust interesting because it is — cox. no, it'sjust interesting because it is something - cox. no, it'sjust interesting because it is something he l cox. no, it'sjust interesting i because it is something he has cox. no, it'sjust interesting - because it is something he has done that you _ because it is something he has done that you have chosen not to do. you don't know — that you have chosen not to do. you don't know he _ that you have chosen not to do. gm. don't know he has done that. allegations have been made. you are responding to allegations that have been put out there. it responding to allegations that have been put out there.— been put out there. it does look like his office _ been put out there. it does look like his office to _ been put out there. it does look like his office to me. _ been put out there. it does look like his office to me. that - been put out there. it does look like his office to me. that is - been put out there. it does look like his office to me. that is notj like his office to me. that is not for me. like his office to me. that is not for me- that — like his office to me. that is not for me. that is _ like his office to me. that is not for me. that is something - like his office to me. that is not for me. that is something that. for me. that is something that should be looked at by people that are independent and the proper
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authorities. so, labour have written to the independent parliamentary standards watchdog. she would look at the case _ watchdog. she would look at the case all — watchdog. she would look at the case all i — watchdog. she would look at the case. all i will say is that process is very— case. all i will say is that process is very confidential and we don't hear— is very confidential and we don't hear much — is very confidential and we don't hear much about it. we might not get any update _ hear much about it. we might not get any update from her for quite some time in _ any update from her for quite some time in the — any update from her for quite some time in the case of geoffrey cox, if he has _ time in the case of geoffrey cox, if he has a _ time in the case of geoffrey cox, if he has a case to answer.— he has a case to answer. these processes _ he has a case to answer. these processes are _ he has a case to answer. these processes are never _ he has a case to answer. these processes are never swift. - he has a case to answer. these processes are never swift. you | he has a case to answer. these - processes are never swift. you have been following the conference all along. one of the criticisms as it opened last week was that they would be lots of talk but nothing actually finalised, nothing that you could really say was substantial. what do we know about the final deal that we are expecting before the weekend? we're getting to the end of this conference. it is meant to finish on friday. _ conference. it is meant to finish on friday, although apparently these things— friday, although apparently these things always run over. at what we have _ things always run over. at what we have got _ things always run over. at what we have got today, at last, something in black— have got today, at last, something in black and white, a draft of the overall— in black and white, a draft of the overall glasgow deal that the 197 members of the conference will have to sign _ members of the conference will have to sign so. — members of the conference will have to sign. so, it's a draft. it's the
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early— to sign. so, it's a draft. it's the early stages. it's not the final thing — early stages. it's not the final thing it— early stages. it's not the final thing it is— early stages. it's not the final thing. it is seven pages long. there's— thing. it is seven pages long. there's quite a lot in there. the officials, — there's quite a lot in there. the officials, the ministers and the campaigning organisations are now going _ campaigning organisations are now going through it to see what has been _ going through it to see what has been agreed. my first glance, there are still— been agreed. my first glance, there are still lots of big issues unresolved. they have little square brackets _ unresolved. they have little square brackets in — unresolved. they have little square brackets in the text saying, this is a placeholder, which gives you a hint of— a placeholder, which gives you a hint of how— a placeholder, which gives you a hint of how many negotiations are still to— hint of how many negotiations are still to take place. the other thing i am still to take place. the other thing i am taking — still to take place. the other thing i am taking away from it is there is a lot— i am taking away from it is there is a lot more — i am taking away from it is there is a lot more processes in there. so for example, saying to countries, maybe _ for example, saying to countries, maybe if— for example, saying to countries, maybe if you haven't made a very ambitious — maybe if you haven't made a very ambitious pledge to reduce your greenhouse gases, you should come back next— greenhouse gases, you should come back next year with an updated one. then maybe — back next year with an updated one. then maybe there should be another bil then maybe there should be another trig summit _ then maybe there should be another big summit of leaders in two years to see _ big summit of leaders in two years to see where we have got to. and already— to see where we have got to. and already one — to see where we have got to. and already one of the campaigning groups. — already one of the campaigning groups, greenpeace, is saying that is basicatty— groups, greenpeace, is saying that is basically crossing your fingers and hoping for the best rather than getting _ and hoping for the best rather than getting countries to sign up to specific. — getting countries to sign up to specific, detailed, measurable things — specific, detailed, measurable thins. ., , ., things. not necessarily the moment man were things. not necessarily the moment many were hoping _ things. not necessarily the moment many were hoping for. _ things. not necessarily the moment many were hoping for. thank - things. not necessarily the moment
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many were hoping for. thank you. l the welsh parliament has voted to extend the use of covid passes to cinemas and theatres, from next week. the scheme currently only applies to nightclubs and large events, such as rugby games. visitors will have to show they are fully vaccinated, have tested negative for covid or have recently had the virus to enter the venue. the bbc has learnt that the caver who was rescued after a 5k hour operation in the brecon beacons is george linnane. 300 volunteers worked together to rescue mr linnane, who'd fallen in the cave system and became trapped underground for 2 days. he suffered multiple injuries, but was said to be in good spirits when he was eventually rescued on monday night. incredible pictures every time. incredible pictures every time. incredible story. ijust keep thinking about what must have been going through his head.— going through his head. apparently he was very — going through his head. apparently he was very calm. _ going through his head. apparently he was very calm. that _ going through his head. apparently he was very calm. that is _ going through his head. apparently he was very calm. that is what - going through his head. apparently| he was very calm. that is what they all say. i don't think i would be so calm stuck down there. let's get some fresh air with carol who has all of the weather.
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good morning. good morning. if you are stepping out and you are in the north of the country you will notice a chilly start. these are some of the temperatures in the north, five to nine degrees. in the north—east of scotland we have had a touch of frost first thing. further south, the temperatures are that bit higher. and you can see why. there is a lot of cloud around, some drizzle and we have also got some rain. it is a weather front that is draped across parts of england and wales. it has been with us for the last couple of days. it is still producing some rain and that drizzle and it will continue to do so as it slowly slips southwards through the day. some southern areas will hang on to brightness for a while yet. to the north of that for northern england, northern ireland and scotland, we are looking at a brighter day. they will be some sunny spells. and a few showers. predominantly in the north west of scotland. we are looking at gusty winds here. a0 to 50 mph. for most
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of us we are looking at light winds with top temperatures of 15 degrees. this evening and overnight we still have the weather front producing all this cloud. they will be some most and fog. some drizzle and some spots of rain. at the same time a new weather front of rain. at the same time a new weatherfront will bring of rain. at the same time a new weather front will bring in some rain across the north of scotland. for a time very gusty winds in the northern outs. they will ease through the night. in between these systems we will have clear skies for northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england, so in sheltered areas temperatures could fall low enough for frost. you will have sunshine first thing. meanwhile, showers moving north across scotland, and it will brighten up across england and wales after a cloudy start. sunny spells. as a weather front retreat into northern england and the south—west and then, it takes the rain with it. then the winds will strengthen and we will see some persistent rain later in the day. thank you. let's go back to our main story now.
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many people in healthcare settings will now have to be double jabbed before being able to work. yesterday, the health secretary announced it will be compulsory for frontline nhs staff to be fully vaccinated against covid by the beginning of april. from midnight tonight, unjabbed care home staff in england cannot work unless they are exempt. the government estimates there are still 32,000 of them who aren't fully vaccinated. this rule will also apply to anybody who enters the care home for work, including any agency workers and tradespeople. our reporter mairead smyth is at a care home near preston, where all the staff have been fully vaccinated. no doubt they are going through the same anxieties as many care homes around recruitment and keeping staffing levels up?— staffing levels up? that's right, es. staffing levels up? that's right, yes- welcome _ staffing levels up? that's right, yes. welcome to _ staffing levels up? that's right, yes. welcome to longridge - staffing levels up? that's right, j yes. welcome to longridge hall staffing levels up? that's right, - yes. welcome to longridge hall and ridge _ yes. welcome to longridge hall and ridge care home in preston. i am yes. welcome to longridge hall and ridge care home in preston. lam in the sitting _ ridge care home in preston. lam in the sitting area, the breakfast room — the sitting area, the breakfast room it— the sitting area, the breakfast room it is— the sitting area, the breakfast room. it is a little bit quieter so
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far this — room. it is a little bit quieter so far this morning. room. it is a little bit quieter so farthis morning. it room. it is a little bit quieter so far this morning. it will pick up in the next — far this morning. it will pick up in the next few minutes. and they are watching _ the next few minutes. and they are watching bbc breakfast, which is good _ watching bbc breakfast, which is good to— watching bbc breakfast, which is good to see. this is a care home that— good to see. this is a care home that won't— good to see. this is a care home that won't lose any staff because all of _ that won't lose any staff because all of them chose to be vaccinated. tracy. _ all of them chose to be vaccinated. tracy, you — all of them chose to be vaccinated. tracy, you are the manager. this programme — tracy, you are the manager. this programme to make sure that your staff got— programme to make sure that your staff got vaccinated, it started before — staff got vaccinated, it started before the vaccine was even available? it before the vaccine was even available?— before the vaccine was even available? ~ ., ~' available? it did. we worked with our local gp _ available? it did. we worked with our local gp surgeries _ available? it did. we worked with our local gp surgeries and - available? it did. we worked with our local gp surgeries and nurse l our local gp surgeries and nurse practitioner, who attended the home to answer questions and concerns of staff might have had. that happened from au . ust staff might have had. that happened from august last _ staff might have had. that happened from august last year. _ staff might have had. that happened from august last year. a _ staff might have had. that happened from august last year. a nurse - from august last year. a nurse practitioner coming in here speaking to your— practitioner coming in here speaking to your staff. what difference did that make? it to your staff. what difference did that make?— to your staff. what difference did that make? it filled the staff with more confidence. _ that make? it filled the staff with more confidence. any _ that make? it filled the staff with more confidence. any concerns i that make? it filled the staff with i more confidence. any concerns they might have had they were able to raise eight and have answers. loath? raise eight and have answers. why was it important _ raise eight and have answers. why was it important to you? to - raise eight and have answers. why| was it important to you? to protect residents and _ was it important to you? to protect residents and their _ was it important to you? to protect residents and their families - was it important to you? to protect residents and their families and - residents and their families and ourselves as well. flan residents and their families and ourselves as well.— ourselves as well. can you understand _ ourselves as well. can you understand why _ ourselves as well. can you understand why some - ourselves as well. can you | understand why some care ourselves as well. can you - understand why some care staff say that they _
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understand why some care staff say that they don't want to get the vaccine, — that they don't want to get the vaccine, and are prepared to lose their— vaccine, and are prepared to lose theiriob? — vaccine, and are prepared to lose theiriob? lt— vaccine, and are prepared to lose their 'ob? , , ., theirjob? it is personal preference. _ theirjob? it is personal preference. but - theirjob? it is personal preference. but i - theirjob? it is personal preference. but i feel. theirjob? it is personal. preference. but i feel that theirjob? it is personal- preference. but i feel that to protect the ones we look after people should take the vaccine. let's speak to lindsay. you are an exception — let's speak to lindsay. you are an exception. you came back into care in february— exception. you came back into care in february of this year. so many people _ in february of this year. so many people finding the pressure of this industry— people finding the pressure of this industry so hard that they are leaving — industry so hard that they are leaving. you wanted to come back in. why? _ leaving. you wanted to come back in. why? i_ leaving. you wanted to come back in. why? i wanted to come back to care. i why? i wanted to come back to care. i miss— why? i wanted to come back to care. i miss kurt _ why? i wanted to come back to care. i miss kurt so— why? i wanted to come back to care. i miss kurt so much. _ why? i wanted to come back to care. i miss kurt so much. find _ why? i wanted to come back to care. i miss kurt so much.— i miss kurt so much. and it means everything — i miss kurt so much. and it means everything to _ i miss kurt so much. and it means everything to you _ i miss kurt so much. and it means everything to you to _ i miss kurt so much. and it means everything to you to be _ i miss kurt so much. and it means everything to you to be able - i miss kurt so much. and it means everything to you to be able to - i miss kurt so much. and it meansl everything to you to be able to look after the _ everything to you to be able to look after the residents? it everything to you to be able to look after the residents?— after the residents? it means everything — after the residents? it means everything to _ after the residents? it means everything to me, _ after the residents? it means everything to me, especially| after the residents? it means i everything to me, especially the song _ everything to me, especially the song i_ everything to me, especially the song ifeel— everything to me, especially the song. i feel like _ everything to me, especially the song. i feel like it— everything to me, especially the song. i feel like it is— everything to me, especially the song. i feel like it is home - everything to me, especially the song. i feel like it is home to- song. i feel like it is home to myself — song. i feel like it is home to m self. ., , ., , myself. you came back in february, he not myself. you came back in february, he got jabbed _ myself. you came back in february, he got jabbed in _ myself. you came back in february, he got jabbed in march. _ myself. you came back in february, he got jabbed in march. what - he got jabbed in march. what difference is that made to people here? _ difference is that made to people here? lt— difference is that made to people here? , difference is that made to people here? . ., ., .,, here? it is protection against the residents- _ here? it is protection against the residents. to _ here? it is protection against the residents. to protect _ here? it is protection against the residents. to protect loved - here? it is protection against the residents. to protect loved ones| here? it is protection against the - residents. to protect loved ones and myself _ residents. to protect loved ones and m self. ~ , . myself. when we say residence, i think sometimes _
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myself. when we say residence, i think sometimes we _ myself. when we say residence, i think sometimes we can - myself. when we say residence, i think sometimes we can forget i myself. when we say residence, i think sometimes we can forget is | think sometimes we can forget is that this — think sometimes we can forget is that this is — think sometimes we can forget is that this is the home, this is the home _ that this is the home, this is the home of— that this is the home, this is the home of 53 _ that this is the home, this is the home of 53 people, including donald. donald. _ home of 53 people, including donald. donald, you moved in during covid because _ donald, you moved in during covid because your wife has as almost. —— alzheimer's — because your wife has as almost. -- alzheimer's-— alzheimer's. yes, in october last ear she alzheimer's. yes, in october last year she told _ alzheimer's. yes, in october last year she told two _ alzheimer's. yes, in october last year she told two covid _ alzheimer's. yes, in october last year she told two covid herself i year she told two covid herself here. we thought she was going to die here. —— taught. everybody here looks after her so well. with even further lockdown two i decided the best way to see her and make sure she remembered me was to move in. so i did. i don't regret it at all. what does it mean to you to know that all— what does it mean to you to know that all of— what does it mean to you to know that all of the staff here are vaccinated?— that all of the staff here are vaccinated? �*, . ., , ., vaccinated? it's a great peace of mind. vaccinated? it's a great peace of mind- you _ vaccinated? it's a great peace of mind. you don't _ vaccinated? it's a great peace of mind. you don't have _ vaccinated? it's a great peace of mind. you don't have to - vaccinated? it's a great peace of mind. you don't have to worry i vaccinated? it's a great peace of - mind. you don't have to worry about it. you know you can mix. you are not likely to pass anything on. it is just peace of mind.
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not likely to pass anything on. it isjust peace of mind. molar not likely to pass anything on. it isjust peace of mind. now tracy, we have mentioned _ isjust peace of mind. now tracy, we have mentioned the _ isjust peace of mind. now tracy, we have mentioned the recruitment - isjust peace of mind. now tracy, we have mentioned the recruitment of. have mentioned the recruitment of staff, _ have mentioned the recruitment of staff, retention of staff is difficult. is that something you are still facing? difficult. is that something you are still facin: ? ., difficult. is that something you are still facing?— still facing? no, fortunately for us here all of our— still facing? no, fortunately for us here all of our staff _ still facing? no, fortunately for us here all of our staff are _ still facing? no, fortunately for us here all of our staff are willing - still facing? no, fortunately for us here all of our staff are willing to l here all of our staff are willing to take the vaccine so we have not had to lose any staff and we are finding that more staff are wanted to come into the care sector, we have new recruits starting this week. ok. into the care sector, we have new recruits starting this week. ok, and the are recruits starting this week. ok, and they are all — recruits starting this week. ok, and they are all fully _ recruits starting this week. ok, and they are all fully vaccinated. - recruits starting this week. ok, and they are all fully vaccinated. that i they are all fully vaccinated. that is what _ they are all fully vaccinated. that is what it — they are all fully vaccinated. that is what it is — they are all fully vaccinated. that is what it is about. that midnight tonight— is what it is about. that midnight tonight deadline is looming ever closer — tonight deadline is looming ever closer. anyone who wants to work in the care _ closer. anyone who wants to work in the care sector must have that double — the care sector must have that double vaccination. back— double vaccination. back to you. a big moment. lovely hearing those personal stories. thank you. one home owner, who we spoke to, has gone as far as offering his workforce incentives to getjabbed, and others say it means they are facing staff shortages. let's have a listen to some people working in the industry. we decided to offer a prize draw with a _ we decided to offer a prize draw with a car— we decided to offer a prize draw
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with a car and some travel vouchers. it's with a car and some travel vouchers. it's going _ with a car and some travel vouchers. it's going to — with a car and some travel vouchers. it's going to cost us about 20 5000, 20 £6,000 — it's going to cost us about 20 5000, 20 £6,000. when you think the cost of replacing — 20 £6,000. when you think the cost of replacing any fully trained, experienced member of staff, is somewhere between £3000 and £5,000, when you _ somewhere between £3000 and £5,000, when you include the recruitment cost, _ when you include the recruitment cost, the — when you include the recruitment cost, the costs of overtime and agency— cost, the costs of overtime and agency to— cost, the costs of overtime and agency to fill the gap, and all the training _ agency to fill the gap, and all the training that a new member of staff would _ training that a new member of staff would have to undergo to come close to the _ would have to undergo to come close to the skills _ would have to undergo to come close to the skills of the experienced members of staff that we have lost, the car _ members of staff that we have lost, the car pays for itself. it is also a way _ the car pays for itself. it is also a way of — the car pays for itself. it is also a way of saying thank you to those staff who — a way of saying thank you to those staff who are staying behind, who have committed to us. and have been committed _ have committed to us. and have been committed throughout this pandemic. we've _ committed throughout this pandemic. we've had _ committed throughout this pandemic. we've had various people objecting to vaccinations for various different reasons. obviously running the home and makes it difficult, especially when you are low and staff. an agency, when they come in, even though they worked in care before, it is a newjob to them. i don't have a clue what i am bound
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to idon't have a clue what i am bound to do— i don't have a clue what i am bound to do next. — idon't have a clue what i am bound to do next. if— i don't have a clue what i am bound to do next, if i'm _ i don't have a clue what i am bound to do next, if i'm honest. _ i don't have a clue what i am bound to do next, if i'm honest. yes, - i don't have a clue what i am bound to do next, if i'm honest. yes, i- to do next, if i'm honest. yes, i have _ to do next, if i'm honest. yes, i have been— to do next, if i'm honest. yes, i have been looking _ to do next, if i'm honest. yes, i have been looking at _ to do next, if i'm honest. yes, i have been looking at a - to do next, if i'm honest. yes, i have been looking at a offers i to do next, if i'm honest. yes, i- have been looking at a offers online -- job— have been looking at a offers online -- job offers — have been looking at a offers online -- job offers and _ have been looking at a offers online —— job offers. and nothing - have been looking at a offers online —— job offers. and nothing really- —— job offers. and nothing really appeals — —— job offers. and nothing really appeals to— —— job offers. and nothing really appeals to me _ —— job offers. and nothing really appeals to me because - —— job offers. and nothing really appeals to me because caring i —— job offers. and nothing really appeals to me because caring is| —— job offers. and nothing really. appeals to me because caring is my passion _ appeals to me because caring is my passion caring _ appeals to me because caring is my passion caring is— appeals to me because caring is my passion. caring is what _ appeals to me because caring is my passion. caring is what i _ appeals to me because caring is my passion. caring is what i wanted - appeals to me because caring is my passion. caring is what i wanted to| passion. caring is what i wanted to do. passion. caring is what i wanted to do i_ passion. caring is what i wanted to do i got— passion. caring is what i wanted to do i got my— passion. caring is what i wanted to do i got my degree _ passion. caring is what i wanted to do. i got my degree to _ passion. caring is what i wanted to do. i got my degree to do - passion. caring is what i wanted to do. i got my degree to do it. - passion. caring is what i wanted to do. i got my degree to do it. so i passion. caring is what i wanted tol do. i got my degree to do it. so the 'obs do. i got my degree to do it. so the jobs l _ do. i got my degree to do it. so the jobs i am _ do. i got my degree to do it. so the jobs i am looking _ do. i got my degree to do it. so the jobs i am looking at— do. i got my degree to do it. so the jobs i am looking at is— do. i got my degree to do it. so the jobs i am looking at is not- do. i got my degree to do it. so the jobs i am looking at is not really- jobs i am looking at is not really ideal— jobs i am looking at is not really ideal but— jobs i am looking at is not really ideal but obviously— jobs i am looking at is not really ideal but obviously we'll - jobs i am looking at is not really ideal but obviously we'll need i jobs i am looking at is not reallyj ideal but obviously we'll need to jobs i am looking at is not really. ideal but obviously we'll need to do something — ideal but obviously we'll need to do something so— ideal but obviously we'll need to do something. so i've _ ideal but obviously we'll need to do something. so i've looked - ideal but obviously we'll need to do something. so i've looked at- something. so i've looked at driving _ something. so i've looked at driving l've _ something. so i've looked at driving. i've looked - something. so i've looked at driving. i've looked at - something. so i've looked at. driving. i've looked at obviously retail. _ driving. i've looked at obviously retail. as— driving. i've looked at obviously retail, as and _ driving. i've looked at obviously retail, as and stuff— driving. i've looked at obviously retail, as and stuff like - driving. i've looked at obviously retail, as and stuff like that, . driving. i've looked at obviouslyl retail, as and stuff like that, but it's not— retail, as and stuff like that, but it's not really— retail, as and stuff like that, but it's not really what _ retail, as and stuff like that, but it's not really what i— retail, as and stuff like that, but it's not really what i want - retail, as and stuff like that, but it's not really what i want to - retail, as and stuff like that, but it's not really what i want to do. | mike padgham, from the independent care group, joins us now. morning to you. thank you for coming in. i morning to you. thank you for coming in. ~' ., , ., morning to you. thank you for coming in. ~' ., i. ., morning to you. thank you for coming in. ~' ., ., , morning to you. thank you for coming in. i know you have been watching the programme — in. i know you have been watching the programme this _ in. i know you have been watching the programme this morning - in. i know you have been watching - the programme this morning listening to the secretary of state on what he had to say. tell me your message to him now about the situation in care homes across the country? it’s him now about the situation in care homes across the country? it's very difficult. i would _ homes across the country? it's very difficult. i wouldjust _ homes across the country? it's very difficult. i would just say _ homes across the country? it's very difficult. i would just say i - homes across the country? it's very difficult. i would just say i am - difficult. i would just say i am very— difficult. i would just say i am very much— difficult. i would just say i am very much in favour of the vaccination. i have had mine. but he was concerned about patient safety. my view _ was concerned about patient safety. my view is _ was concerned about patient safety. my view is that patient safety will be compromised if there aren't enough — be compromised if there aren't enough staff. it is between a rock
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and a _ enough staff. it is between a rock and a hard — enough staff. it is between a rock and a hard place. we willjust appeal— and a hard place. we willjust appeal to _ and a hard place. we willjust appeal to him to give us time until next april — appeal to him to give us time until next april. the appealto him to give us time until next aril. ., appealto him to give us time until next aril. . , appealto him to give us time until next aril. ., , next april. the deadline is coming, it is hours away _ next april. the deadline is coming, it is hours away but _ next april. the deadline is coming, it is hours away but he _ next april. the deadline is coming, it is hours away but he wanted - next april. the deadline is coming, it is hours away but he wanted to i next april. the deadline is coming, | it is hours away but he wanted to be delayed? it is hours away but he wanted to be dela ed? , ., , , it is hours away but he wanted to be dela ed? , ., , .., , ~' delayed? yes, i do, because i think it would be — delayed? yes, i do, because i think it would be sensible. _ delayed? yes, i do, because i think it would be sensible. a _ delayed? yes, i do, because i think it would be sensible. a social- delayed? yes, i do, because i think it would be sensible. a social care i it would be sensible. a social care is not _ it would be sensible. a social care is not there — it would be sensible. a social care is not there to help the health service — is not there to help the health service everything backed up. the secretary— service everything backed up. the secretary of state doesn't understand the link between social care and _ understand the link between social care and health.— care and health. arguably the government _ care and health. arguably the government would _ care and health. arguably the government would say - care and health. arguably the government would say this i care and health. arguably the - government would say this deadline has been on the horizon for three months. anybody who has not decided to get vaccinated in that time is not going to get vaccinated? hie. to get vaccinated in that time is not going to get vaccinated? no, but i do think the — not going to get vaccinated? no, but i do think the figures _ not going to get vaccinated? no, but i do think the figures would - not going to get vaccinated? no, but i do think the figures would get - i do think the figures would get better— i do think the figures would get better if— i do think the figures would get better if we were given longer. although — better if we were given longer. although the government has launched a recruitment campaign, there is in the pay— a recruitment campaign, there is in the pay in _ a recruitment campaign, there is in the pay in terms of terms and conditions _ the pay in terms of terms and conditions for recruitment staff. we would _ conditions for recruitment staff. we would like _ conditions for recruitment staff. we would like the government to have temporary— would like the government to have temporary visas for overseas staff but they _ temporary visas for overseas staff but they block that. they seem to be doing _ but they block that. they seem to be doing everything they can to make it difficult _ doing everything they can to make it difficult. what i would say to the government is we need to have social care given _ government is we need to have social care given a _ government is we need to have social care given a bit longer to get the vaccine _ care given a bit longer to get the vaccine done and we can all work together — vaccine done and we can all work torether. ., ., , ,., .., together. could it means some care homes will lose _
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together. could it means some care homes will lose staff _ together. could it means some care homes will lose staff overnight? . homes will lose staff overnight? yes, and the challenges some care homes _ yes, and the challenges some care homes may— yes, and the challenges some care homes may have to reduce the care they give _ homes may have to reduce the care they give or— homes may have to reduce the care they give or even close. where will these _ they give or even close. where will these people go? there is no room in hospital? _ these people go? there is no room in hospital? dash—mac. no room in the community — hospital? dash—mac. no room in the community. it is impossible. nothing wrong _ community. it is impossible. nothing wrong with— community. it is impossible. nothing wrong with saying we have listened to the _ wrong with saying we have listened to the experts and we are going to delay— to the experts and we are going to delay it _ to the experts and we are going to delay it a — to the experts and we are going to delay it a bit longer. the same as the health— delay it a bit longer. the same as the health service. we are weak and social— the health service. we are weak and social care — the health service. we are weak and social care. the health service is much _ social care. the health service is much stronger at lobbying and they -ot much stronger at lobbying and they got a _ much stronger at lobbying and they got a stay— much stronger at lobbying and they got a stay of execution. we want something similar. we want to work with the _ something similar. we want to work with the government not against them _ with the government not against them. lt— with the government not against them. . ,, . , , with the government not against them. . , , . , , ., them. it appears time is running out thourh, them. it appears time is running out though. mike. _ them. it appears time is running out though, mike. you _ them. it appears time is running out though, mike. you haven't - them. it appears time is running out though, mike. you haven't got - them. it appears time is running outj though, mike. you haven't got long. at this point it doesn't look as if the government will change their mind? ., , ., mind? no, but i would say the government— mind? no, but i would say the government has _ mind? no, but i would say the government has changed - mind? no, but i would say the government has changed its i mind? no, but i would say the - government has changed its course and many— government has changed its course and many issues. take some more time. _ and many issues. take some more time, please, we want to help you. one thing _ time, please, we want to help you. one thing i— time, please, we want to help you. one thing i think it is important to establish today is, when you talk about shortages and difficulties in recruitment, what does that mean for the people being looked after? what difference will there be and how they are looked after? are you now down to the bare minimum? obviously
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care homes have _ down to the bare minimum? obviously care homes have to _ down to the bare minimum? obviously care homes have to meet _ down to the bare minimum? obviously care homes have to meet the - care homes have to meet the requirements of the care quality commission and there is a danger we can't meet _ commission and there is a danger we can't meet the standards. the cqc may say— can't meet the standards. the cqc may say you can't continue, but that goes _ may say you can't continue, but that goes against what the government needs _ goes against what the government needs. care can be compromised but we don't _ needs. care can be compromised but we don't want that to happen. we need _ we don't want that to happen. we need staff — we don't want that to happen. we need staff. 10% of the workforce in england _ need staff. 10% of the workforce in england we have lost. we can't continue — england we have lost. we can't continue like this.— england we have lost. we can't continue like this. what needs to ha en to continue like this. what needs to happen to address _ continue like this. what needs to happen to address that _ continue like this. what needs to | happen to address that problem? every family will be affected by this at some point. do we need to pay the morecambe address the status of carers in the way that they are perceived? i of carers in the way that they are perceived?— perceived? i don't wish to be critical but _ perceived? i don't wish to be critical but the _ perceived? i don't wish to be critical but the reforms - perceived? i don't wish to be critical but the reforms the i critical but the reforms the government announced don't go anywhere — government announced don't go anywhere near enough. we have to pay more tax. _ anywhere near enough. we have to pay more tax, unfortunately, to get care staff better — more tax, unfortunately, to get care staff better paid. it is a skilled job _ staff better paid. it is a skilled job they— staff better paid. it is a skilled job. they need more pay. we want the government— job. they need more pay. we want the government to take social care seriously~ _ government to take social care seriously. the nhs comes first. the nhs is _ seriously. the nhs comes first. the nhs is important but social care has to be _ nhs is important but social care has to be at— nhs is important but social care has to be at the — nhs is important but social care has to be at the front of the queue. how difficult is it — to be at the front of the queue. how difficult is it for _ to be at the front of the queue. how difficult is it for you _ to be at the front of the queue. firm difficult is it for you to to be at the front of the queue. firm-hr difficult is it for you to recruit? well, virtually impossible. we haven't—
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well, virtually impossible. we haven't got the people from overseas. we can't recruit people because — overseas. we can't recruit people because the pay is far too low. local _ because the pay is far too low. local authorities don't fund it correctly _ local authorities don't fund it correctly. it is a mess, the system. it correctly. it is a mess, the system. it needs— correctly. it is a mess, the system. it needs a _ correctly. it is a mess, the system. it needs a radical shake—up. what correctly. it is a mess, the system. it needs a radical shake-up. what is the 'ob it needs a radical shake-up. what is the job like — it needs a radical shake-up. what is the job like to _ it needs a radical shake-up. what is the job like to do? _ it needs a radical shake-up. what is the job like to do? it _ it needs a radical shake-up. what is the job like to do? it takes - it needs a radical shake-up. what is the job like to do? it takes a - the job like to do? it takes a special person, doesn't it? it is special person, doesn't it? it is not 'ust special person, doesn't it? it is not just about _ special person, doesn't it? it is notjust about pay, _ special person, doesn't it? it is notjust about pay, of - special person, doesn't it? it is not just about pay, of course, special person, doesn't it? it is notjust about pay, of course, but when _ notjust about pay, of course, but when you — notjust about pay, of course, but when you payjust above the minimum a-e when you payjust above the minimum age you _ when you payjust above the minimum age you need a bit more to have a decent _ age you need a bit more to have a decent quality of life. it is highly skilled — decent quality of life. it is highly skilled. people need that one—to—one service _ skilled. people need that one—to—one service and _ skilled. people need that one—to—one service and we want to attract more people _ service and we want to attract more people in _ service and we want to attract more people in. we have not got incentives. it is a big challenge but i _ incentives. it is a big challenge but i think— incentives. it is a big challenge but i think people in this country deserve — but i think people in this country deserve better care than they are having _ deserve better care than they are having at — deserve better care than they are having at the moment. everybody deserves the _ having at the moment. everybody deserves the best _ having at the moment. everybody deserves the best possible - having at the moment. everybody deserves the best possible care. i having at the moment. everybody i deserves the best possible care. do you feel like we have this conversation constantly and then we are not making the strides forward? yes, unfortunately. i have been in social— yes, unfortunately. i have been in social care — yes, unfortunately. i have been in social care for 30 years. each government, notjust this one, they all failed _ government, notjust this one, they all failed social care. it is time for someone to grasp the nettle and do something different, be bold. i would _ do something different, be bold. i would say— do something different, be bold. i would say to the prime minister, be bold and _ would say to the prime minister, be bold and social care, stop tinkering. people deserve better. it
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tinkering. people deserve better. it affects every family. the government say their message is clear that vaccines save lives and staff and residents in care homes have been prioritised, and they are working closely with local authorities and care homes. thank you. care homes. thank ou. ., ,, care homes. thank ou. ., e care homes. thank ou. ., m time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. a care home manager in north london says he has serious worries over recruiting staff who've had their covid jabs. from tomorrow anyone who's not been vaccinated can't work in a care home. nhs figures show london has the highest number of unvaccinated carers in the country. there are more jobs than staff at the moment, so if somebody is looking for the kitchen role we have on offer, there will be other care homes advertising the same position. we've got to try and nick staff off each other to get through this time. the future, how many
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care staff will come into this profession, is still uncertain. the department of health and social care told us it's working closely with local authorities and care home providers to make sure there are enough staff. a major study into the health of the thames the first of its kind in 60 years shows positive signs for wildlife and the river's recovery. but experts warn climate change is raising the temperature of the water and causing levels to rise. a new magic show in the west end. do not expect everything to go to plan. it is by the creators of the goes wrong series. brute it is by the creators of the goes wrong series-— it is by the creators of the goes wrong series. it is by the creators of the goes wron: series. ~ ., ., wrong series. we had a meeting with the man saw — wrong series. we had a meeting with the man saw the _ wrong series. we had a meeting with the man saw the show— wrong series. we had a meeting with the man saw the show and _ wrong series. we had a meeting with the man saw the show and that - wrong series. we had a meeting with the man saw the show and that is - the man saw the show and that is exciting, in the amazing green room with tropical fish. exciting, in the amazing green room with tropicalfish. it exciting, in the amazing green room with tropical fish. it grew from there. i think they have a real
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sense of humour about magic as well which is amazing. they certainly take the mickey a little bit, hopefully not too much. let's see how the tube is running this morning. it looks a lot better now. the metropolitan line has minor delays. time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. another very mild start this morning. temperature double figures, 10, ii celsius overnight. we are hanging onto this mild air today and into friday. this cold front started to edge towards us yesterday. it has stalled, really taking its time. that is what is bringing today's cloud. we'll see outbreaks of largely light and patchy rain on and off through the day. the wind is light and the temperature mild, we are looking at 15 celsius. this evening and overnight we still hang on to the cloud. you might get one or two breaks in it. that will lead to mist and fog patches with low cloud developing. quite a murky night and a murky start tomorrow. the minimum temperature again very
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mild, between 9 and ii celsius. any mist orfog in the morning will take time to lift. it will be a largely cloudy day. you'll notice for friday, low pressure swinging towards the north of the uk and that will bring a spell of windy weather. by the time the front associated with it gets to us, it should be fairly light and patchy rain. as we head into the weekend, the temperature does start to become a little chillier. i'm back in half an hour. do take a look at our website for much more at the usual address of course and there's also our facebook, instagram and twitter. now it's back to nina and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with nina warhurst and sally nugent. 'morning live' follows us on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's in store with kimberly and gethin. coming up on morning live — bit of a scary one, this. but new research out today shows
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that this friday is the day of the year that you are most likely to be burgled. but don't panic — rav�*s here with your a8—hour warning for how you can protect your home. yes, burglaries increase by a third during the winter months but i'll be telling you the simple ways you can make your house safer so you can stop the criminals in their tracks. it's also the time of year when we're more likely to be lacking in energy and tempted to reach for a sweet treat. dr rupy�*s here to tell us how to avoid blood sugar spikes and slumps and which foods will help you to stay fuller for longer. also today, as the climate change conference cop26 continues in glasgow, expert james stewart visits a lower league football club in gloucestershire that's beaten every football team in the world to a very prestigious award. plus we followed the incredible rickshaw team of inspirational young people as they peddled across uk for children in need. ahead of tonight's documentary all about their epicjourney, matt baker tells us why this year has been a bigger challenge than ever before.
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and janette will be here with your daily work—out when we try out another charleston move in today's strictly fitness. we are trying very hard. all that and more at 9:15! thank you for your support and sensitivity. always. there's just two days to go until weather presenter 0wain wyn evans takes his position and kicks off breakfast�*s 2a—hour drumathon for children in need. drumming has been scientifically proven to benefit memory and mental health and some of the money raised will go towards music therapy projects, helping young people across the uk. breakfast�*s jayne mccubbin has been finding out more. we are born to be drummers, but we just don't know it. when your mother is carrying you for nine months,
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you are listening to that heartbeat for nine months. and you're born with this vibration and to continue it, it's wonderful. drumming has a power, a power which has now been medically proven. this neuroscientist has looked deep into the brain to see the transformative powers of drumming in groundbreaking studies of teenagers and people with autism. it was a bit of a punt. taking a look at this. no—one's ever done this before. it's incredible, really. we've looked at brains after eight weeks of training our children to drum. and the changes are incredible. we see the tuning in. the brain changes dramatically. there's fine tuning that we've never seen before, which is reflected in what we then see in their behavior. what their parents are reporting is these children
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are less hyperactive, they're more attentive. they're not having the mood swings that maybe they were having before. here we go. this is the milestone special school in gloucester, where they take drumming very seriously. and this is gabriel. somebody told me, gabriel, you have your own band. yes. what are they called? do you work, zerok? zerok. yeah. and is it true that you are the drummer in the band? yeah, iam. wow. the drumming journey of gabriel and his classmates is being tracked by hartpury university. and what psychologists have discovered is that drumming
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helps these kids in ways no other lesson can. it makes me feel happy. when i'm drumming. it is really good and i like feeling it. i like druming because it's got really loud music. - i like making the noise. these sessions were inspired by a project which was born in wembley arena, 1999. this is professor marcus smith, and this is the moment he met blondie drummer clem burke for the very first time. the definitive moment of the clem burke drumming project commence and really the song dream. and i've watched clem play dreaming so many times, but never get bored of it because i'm just picturing what's going on in the brain. professor smith has worked
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with blondie's drummer to better understand the science of drumming. well, when i first met dr smith at wembley arena, i immediately understood what he was getting at. it's very primal playing the drums, but also inside your mind and your body need to be in sync. over two decades, they've carried out research which proves one thing. the secret behind the power of the drums is the combination of physical exertion and complex mental challenge. i think it's important for people to get a positive spin on what it's like to be a musician, what it's like to be a drummer, what's required of you and the mental and physical aspects of it, which is what the study began with. and it's just really important for me to have people realise that it's more than just having a beer and walking on stage, let's say. this research is still in its infancy. we're onlyjust beginning to understand its potential. it's such a potent stimulus to the brain.
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it is an awesome, awesome instrument. we can speak to 0wain now, and we're also joined in the studio by skunk anansie drummer mark richardson, who will be helping 0wain with the challenge. morning to you both. how are you? not long to go now. oh, my gosh, not long to go. i cannot believe we are nearly here now, you three. it has just been the most incredible journey. just been the most incredible 'ourne . . . just been the most incredible 'ourne. ., ., ., ,, journey. special thanks to mark as well. it journey. special thanks to mark as well- it has — journey. special thanks to mark as well. it has been _ journey. special thanks to mark as well. it has been a _ journey. special thanks to mark as well. it has been a great _ journey. special thanks to mark as well. it has been a great help. - journey. special thanks to mark as well. it has been a great help. i i journey. special thanks to mark as | well. it has been a great help. i am not a professional drummer. it has been really great to have a professional drummer and a really good drama as well like mark to be
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able to help me with tips about how to harden my hands up, just playing for longer periods of time. to answer the question, i am feeling, oh my gosh, a mix of excited and sometimes a bit terrified. it is sometimes a bit terrified. it is 'ust so sometimes a bit terrified. it is just so close _ sometimes a bit terrified. it is just so close now. _ sometimes a bit terrified. it is just so close now. i _ sometimes a bit terrified. it is just so close now. i do - sometimes a bit terrified. it is just so close now. i do not blame you. you are running out of colour schemes to put behind your drum kit. we are on the final straight. what had been your tips? when you are asked what the longest time you have jumped for and you said ten hours. that has to be a mental game as much as anything. i that has to be a mental game as much as an hina. .,, that has to be a mental game as much as an hina. .n that has to be a mental game as much as an hina. .fi ., that has to be a mental game as much as anything-— as anything. i was 14 at the time. i did not as anything. i was 14 at the time. i did rrot know _ as anything. i was 14 at the time. i did not know what _ as anything. i was 14 at the time. i did not know what i _ as anything. i was 14 at the time. i did not know what i was _ as anything. i was 14 at the time. i did not know what i was just - as anything. i was 14 at the time. i did not know what i wasjust doing | did not know what i wasjust doing it. did not know what i wasjust doing it it _ did not know what i wasjust doing it it was _ did not know what i wasjust doing it it was for — did not know what i wasjust doing it. it was for the scarborough hospital— it. it was for the scarborough hospital baby unit which my niece ended _ hospital baby unit which my niece ended up— hospital baby unit which my niece ended up using my setup is kinda good _ ended up using my setup is kinda good in — ended up using my setup is kinda good. in terms of tips, it is about making _ good. in terms of tips, it is about making sure _ good. in terms of tips, it is about making sure he is not washing up too much _ making sure he is not washing up too much the _ making sure he is not washing up too much. the thing that will stop him more _ much. the thing that will stop him more than — much. the thing that will stop him
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more than anything as a blister that -ets more than anything as a blister that gets worse — more than anything as a blister that gets worse and worse and worse. what we have _ gets worse and worse and worse. what we have been trying to do is stop him washing up. him going in the steam— him washing up. him going in the steam room, having long basking anything — steam room, having long basking anything that will soften up his calluses~ — anything that will soften up his calluses. yes, simple things like that _ calluses. yes, simple things like that what — calluses. yes, simple things like that. what kind of stool he will sit on for _ that. what kind of stool he will sit on for 24 — that. what kind of stool he will sit on for 24 hours, it is a long time to sit— on for 24 hours, it is a long time to sit down _ on for 24 hours, it is a long time to sit down. he gets small breaks. things— to sit down. he gets small breaks. things like — to sit down. he gets small breaks. things like that, that physiologically will help him get through. physiologically will help him get throurh. . ~ physiologically will help him get throurh. . ,, ., physiologically will help him get throuuh. . ~' . ,. . ., through. talk about the science of drumming- _ through. talk about the science of drumming. how— through. talk about the science of drumming. how important - through. talk about the science of drumming. how important is - through. talk about the science of drumming. how important is it. through. talk about the science of. drumming. how important is it that 0wain is not thinking about 2a—hour is? owain is not thinking about 24-hour is? ., ., , , .,~ owain is not thinking about 24-hour is? ., ., , , w ., is? how does he break it down? the beau of is? how does he break it down? the beauty of getting — is? how does he break it down? the beauty of getting professors - is? how does he break it down? the beauty of getting professors like - beauty of getting professors like marcus — beauty of getting professors like marcus smith and greg white on board as they— marcus smith and greg white on board as they can— marcus smith and greg white on board as they can apply the knowledge to these _ as they can apply the knowledge to these things. what they have done is broken _ these things. what they have done is broken down the 24 hours into our
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segments — broken down the 24 hours into our segments. within each hour there is a strict _ segments. within each hour there is a strict regimen to be step two. whilst _ a strict regimen to be step two. whilst it— a strict regimen to be step two. whilst it is... the end result is the end — whilst it is... the end result is the end goal line. it is not about looking — the end goal line. it is not about looking at— the end goal line. it is not about looking at 24—hour zz the end goal line. it is not about looking at 24—hour 22 big lamp, it is about— looking at 24—hour 22 big lamp, it is about breaking it down into tiny chunks _ is about breaking it down into tiny chunks if— is about breaking it down into tiny chunks. if you can do that you can do anything — chunks. if you can do that you can do anything. —— as a big lump. just do anything. -- as a big lump. just to echo what _ do anything. —— as a big lump. just to echo what mark said, i have been really lucky with marcus and greg, kind of helping me basically achieve this. this isn't something that you normally do. you know, it is a very unusual thing, normally do. you know, it is a very unusualthing, i normally do. you know, it is a very unusual thing, i suppose. normally do. you know, it is a very unusualthing, isuppose. i have normally do. you know, it is a very unusual thing, isuppose. i have had a look at the running order. we have been looking all the songs. they are in now. looking at it as if it is a series of hour—long things will make it so much easier. i hope my and my
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wrists and my hands are able to cope with it. it is still a big challenge. we are doing it for such a great cause. we would have to remember why we are doing this. that is of course to raise money for children in need and it will help young people up and down the uk. it young people up and down the uk. it is a great cause. he mentioned the running order and the songs. how important is the music itself going to be to keep you going? to give you adrenaline when you need it? it will adrenaline when you need it? it will be really important. _ adrenaline when you need it? it will be really important. my— adrenaline when you need it? it it be really important. my musical tastes are incredibly varied. we go from... we have all sorts of stuff in there. ~ . ., ,~. from... we have all sorts of stuff in there. ~ . ., ., from... we have all sorts of stuff. in there.— celine in there. what have you got? celine dion, i in there. what have you got? celine dion. i think— in there. what have you got? celine dion. i think i _ in there. what have you got? celine dion, i think i am _ in there. what have you got? celine dion, i think i am starting _ in there. what have you got? celine dion, i think i am starting with - dion, i think i am starting with celine dion. she is a great drummer! some bonjovi. skunk nancy. the carpenters. and some mcfly as well.
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i have put some of the running order onto my social media yesterday. hopefully that will get people interested because there is a real variety of music in there. iurethat interested because there is a real variety of music in there. what do ou think variety of music in there. what do you think of _ variety of music in there. what do you think of celine _ variety of music in there. what do you think of celine dion? - variety of music in there. what do you think of celine dion? starting | you think of celine dion? starting with celine- _ you think of celine dion? starting with celine. i _ you think of celine dion? starting with celine. i would _ you think of celine dion? starting with celine. i would start - you think of celine dion? starting with celine. i would start with . you think of celine dion? starting j with celine. i would start with her every _ with celine. i would start with her every time — with celine. i would start with her every time. i the choice of music is going _ every time. i the choice of music is going to _ every time. i the choice of music is going to be — every time. i the choice of music is going to be key in sparing him on and getting him going. —— i think. that— and getting him going. —— i think. that is— and getting him going. —— i think. that is what— and getting him going. —— i think. that is what will push him through. especially— that is what will push him through. especially the more typical hours between — especially the more typical hours between midnight and 6am, that will between midnight and 6am, that will be the _ between midnight and 6am, that will be the tricky bit. that is when we will be _ be the tricky bit. that is when we will be upping the ante. myjob will become _ will be upping the ante. myjob will become more important at that point. plenty— become more important at that point. plenty to _ become more important at that point. plenty to do _ become more important at that point. plenty to do during the day but during — plenty to do during the day but during the night it will be harder. the darkest hoursjust before the the darkest hours just before the dawn. 0wain talked as well about the
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endgame, the money that was raised. you witness that with your knees. the sense of satisfaction must be great. it the sense of satisfaction must be areat. . . the sense of satisfaction must be i reat, , ., ., , the sense of satisfaction must be areat. , . ., , . , great. it is a really incredible thin. great. it is a really incredible thing- the — great. it is a really incredible thing. the school— great. it is a really incredible thing. the school i _ great. it is a really incredible thing. the school i went - great. it is a really incredible thing. the school i went to i great. it is a really incredible i thing. the school i went to see ended — thing. the school i went to see ended my— thing. the school i went to see ended my film with, it isjust amazing _ ended my film with, it isjust amazing. when you see children playing — amazing. when you see children playing and physical instrument like this, playing and physical instrument like this. you _ playing and physical instrument like this, you can literally see them coming — this, you can literally see them coming out of themselves. we have -ot coming out of themselves. we have got to— coming out of themselves. we have got to get— coming out of themselves. we have got to get more of that back in their— got to get more of that back in their schools. we have two. it is intrinsic — their schools. we have two. it is intrinsic. science is backing that up. intrinsic. science is backing that up we — intrinsic. science is backing that up. we have proof of what happens in the brain. _ up. we have proof of what happens in the brain. in— up. we have proof of what happens in the brain, in our bodies. it is reallym _ the brain, in our bodies. it is really... resin is an innate thing in all— really... resin is an innate thing in all of— really... resin is an innate thing in all of us _ really... resin is an innate thing in all of us. we had to somehow get more _ in all of us. we had to somehow get more music— in all of us. we had to somehow get more music and more rhythm and more dancing _ more music and more rhythm and more dancing back— more music and more rhythm and more dancing back in schools. more more music and more rhythm and more dancing back in schools.— dancing back in schools. more rhythm and more music— dancing back in schools. more rhythm and more music back _ dancing back in schools. more rhythm and more music back in _ dancing back in schools. more rhythm and more music back in your- dancing back in schools. more rhythm and more music back in your life. - and more music back in your life. how has it helped you over the years? it how has it helped you over the ears? . . how has it helped you over the ears? . , . , , years? it has really helped me. the one thing i— years? it has really helped me. the one thing i love _ years? it has really helped me. the one thing i love about _ years? it has really helped me. the one thing i love about the _
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years? it has really helped me. the one thing i love about the drums i one thing i love about the drums is... as mark said, rhythm is in all of us. it is the oldest instrument, really, a very accessible instrument for most of us. for me, getting behind the drum kit and having it wrapped around you like that, it definitely takes me out of the moment. i do sufferfrom anxiety. when iron behind the drums, it takes me somewhere else almost. —— when i am behind. iwant me somewhere else almost. —— when i am behind. i want to fly the flag for how drumming can help as well. it has helped a lot of people in many ways. it can calm me down and take me out of a moment. it hasjust been incredible, you know, to learn how drumming and how music is helping people across the uk and how children in need is helping achieve that. as i said just now, this is why we are doing this. hopefully it will help a lot of young people as well. . ., ., , .,
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will help a lot of young people as well. _, ., , ., ., , well. the countdown is on. it has been fascinating _ well. the countdown is on. it has been fascinating learning - well. the countdown is on. it has been fascinating learning about i well. the countdown is on. it has i been fascinating learning about the science. good luck. i will talk to you before it happens. sending you lots of love. tell your partner you have the perfect excuse now not to do any washing up! actually, he has brought me club so i cannot get out of it. no, it does not count. not allowed to wash up. mark said that was the rule. stay out of the sauna as well. i will see one saturday morning. let's find out how you can support owain's drumathon challenge. if you'd like to support owain's bbc breakfast drumathon challenge attempt and donate to bbc children in need, you can donate £5, by texting the word "drum" to 70a05. to donate £10, text "drum" to 70a10. or to donate £20, text the word "drum" to 70a20. texts will cost your donation plus your standard network charge
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and 100% of your donation will go to bbc children in need. you must be 16 or over and have the bill payer's permission. forfull terms, more information, or to donate any amount you'd like online, go to bbc.co.uk/pudsey. thank you. 80 years ago, an act was passed in parliament which led to more than 7 million women being called up to help with the war effort. during the second world war, women were compelled to serve for the only time in british history, taking up roles from mechanics, ambulance drivers and air raid wardens. breakfast�*sjohn maguire has been to meet some of them. archive: in the concrete emplacements at a gun i site in the london area, | battle—dressed ats girls are in training for active service. they were teenaged girls on the verge of womanhood in a time of a world war. i wanted to do something for the war effort and i think most people did.
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i wanted something exciting to do and to learn a skill. i wanted to be a driver. daphne was in search of a world outside her norfolk village. i'd like to have gone at 17 and a half, but my mother wouldn't sign the form. but at 18 you could go. so immediately i was 18, i wanted to go. gracejoined for love. it sounds a bit silly but one of the reasons was i had a boyfriend. he was in the army. my first boyfriend, of course. and he had been told he was going to be sent abroad. and i thought if ijoined the army, i might meet up with him again. i didn't like the idea of him being sent away. all signed up to the auxiliary territorial service, the ats. young, keen to learn and to understand army ways. so i went to norwich and my mother came.
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and i remember she was buying all new underclothes, pyjamas and everything. we didn't realise, of course, we were going to be issued with all this stuff. the great coat was five and the jacket was five. the jersey were one and the knickers was two. 3,100. 225! grace worked on anti—aircraft guns. you see, the two chaps who were on the guns had to sit with their backs to the actual target. they had to do as they were told from us girls. so in actual fact the girls were targeting the aircraft, but the men were doing the actual firing. all three are featured in a book on the ats, titled army girls. daphne's copy arrived as we were filming with her. are you on the back? yes! aha!i pride of place, daphne. and all have fond memories of their wartime service, despite the dangers they faced.
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it was a wonderful experience. you were there and you never thought you might be killed. i certainly wasn't terrified. you were just doing yourjob. when you are told to take posts, of course, you run to get to your instrument as fast as you can, and all you girls are running at the same time. you just got to grab your gas mask and your sealed helmet, take the covers off your instrument and start searching the skies. their training meant they learned the skills they could only dream of. if you put a three tonne bedford on my drive now, i could strip the engine down and put it back again. we did everything. you see, the carburettors were all sealed on army vehicles to a0 mph because of the petrol situation. but staff cars and ambulances weren't sealed. so i could put my foot down and do 80! they have a very high wheelbase. as you are coming up to 70, you had to push it through that last bit, otherwise you'd get a wobble.
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and what they remember most are the friends they made, despite or often because of the hardships they faced together. i know we had some dreadful times during the war but i enjoyed being with so many girls. we could have a laugh. when we were travelling in the 1500 weights in the back, we'd sing. we used to sing in descant, you know. because of the ats, it stood me instead for a wonderfuljob, because i had a wonderfuljob with the gpo all my life. it was the best university i could have gone too. it was wonderful. it wasn't all beer and skittles, as they say. there were some sad times, very sad. and that was when the war was really brought home to you. when the site was in action, we never thought about the people in the aircraft that were being brought down. it was the enemy, it was there caught in the searchlights
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and it was there to be destroyed. you didn't think about anybody in it until later. and 80 years since they firstjoined up, many of their memories are as vivid as ever. memories they remain determined to share so that we remember the sacrifices their generation made. john maguire, bbc news. just incredible. all three of the ladies john spoke to there are featured in a new book about the auxiliary territorial service, called 'army girls.�* we can speak now to the book's author — tessa dunlop and betty webb, who worked at bletchley park during world war ii. betty and tessa, brilliant to see you both. betty, if i can come to you both. betty, if i can come to you festival. great to have you on the programme this morning. tell me a bit about your time war and what you did at bletchley. most
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a bit about your time war and what you did at bletchley.— you did at bletchley. most of my work was clerical. _ you did at bletchley. most of my work was clerical. i _ you did at bletchley. most of my work was clerical. i was - you did at bletchley. most of my work was clerical. i was not - you did at bletchley. most of my work was clerical. i was not a . you did at bletchley. most of my i work was clerical. i was not a code break as such but i had a lot of registering to do of the 10,000 messages, which came through from our signal ladies and gentlemen throughout the country and throughout the country and throughout the country and throughout the world. all of them had to be registered so that the codebreakers could call on a particular date at a particular time, depending on the urgency of the message. time, depending on the urgency of the message-— the message. betty, you weren't conscripted. — the message. betty, you weren't conscripted, where _ the message. betty, you weren't conscripted, where you? - the message. betty, you weren't conscripted, where you? you . the message. betty, you weren't. conscripted, where you? you chose the message. betty, you weren't- conscripted, where you? you chose to volunteer. ~ , , ., ., ., conscripted, where you? you chose to volunteer. ~ , ., ., ., volunteer. why did you do that? no. because i volunteer. why did you do that? no. because i am — volunteer. why did you do that? no. because i am several— volunteer. why did you do that? no. because i am several others - volunteer. why did you do that? no. because i am several others who . volunteer. why did you do that? no. i because i am several others who were at a domestic science college decided that we weren't doing anything towards the war effort. so in midtown we decided to leave and join up. and i went into the ats and
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the others went into the rents and all the air. —— the wrens or the air force. i have got to credit betty, who was a huge _ have got to credit betty, who was a huge part— have got to credit betty, who was a huge part of the inspiration for the book _ huge part of the inspiration for the book she — huge part of the inspiration for the book. she was a member of the ats, the largest— book. she was a member of the ats, the largest female military service, the largest female military service, the territorial service. very unusually she was seconded, siphoned off to bletchley park because of her german _ off to bletchley park because of her german i _ off to bletchley park because of her german. i chatted to betty and i thought— german. i chatted to betty and i thought it — german. i chatted to betty and i thought it would be exciting to look at the _ thought it would be exciting to look at the wall from this broader lens. it at the wall from this broader lens. it was _ at the wall from this broader lens. it was a _ at the wall from this broader lens. it was a broad social church, the ats. _ it was a broad social church, the ats. and — it was a broad social church, the ats. and is _ it was a broad social church, the ats, and is often derided in public and parliament. there was a lot of anxiety— and parliament. there was a lot of anxiety about putting so many young -irls anxiety about putting so many young girls in— anxiety about putting so many young girls in uniform. they said the wrong — girls in uniform. they said the wrong girls were going into the service — wrong girls were going into the service and there was a lot of
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huffing — service and there was a lot of huffing and puffing. i wanted to unpick~ — huffing and puffing. i wanted to unpick~ it — huffing and puffing. i wanted to unpick. it transformed lockdown really~ _ unpick. it transformed lockdown really it — unpick. it transformed lockdown really. it was so restorative and weirdly— really. it was so restorative and weirdly prescient stop i was speaking to women at the pinnacle of life, speaking to women at the pinnacle of life. in— speaking to women at the pinnacle of life. in the _ speaking to women at the pinnacle of life, in the middle trapped in this terrible _ life, in the middle trapped in this terrible crisis, looking back on another— terrible crisis, looking back on another national crisis. it was credibly— another national crisis. it was credibly emotional. i have two especially credit betty. with the help and — especially credit betty. with the help and the help of the wrc association which looks after all women. — association which looks after all women, she is great at sourcing unusual— women, she is great at sourcing unusual characters. | women, she is great at sourcing unusual characters.— women, she is great at sourcing unusual characters. i and president ofthe unusual characters. i and president of the women's _ unusual characters. i and president of the women's royal— unusual characters. i and president of the women's royal army - unusual characters. i and president of the women's royal army corps i of the women's royal army corps association nation, which does an enormous amount notjust socially but also where help is needed in many ways, the association is prepared to listen and to help. that was one of the _ prepared to listen and to help. that was one of the fascinating things for me. despite what girls had to go
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through. there were tough times. i read their letters and they had to put up with some quite pestering men, it had to be said. it was down to them to maintain their morality. also paid less and not given hero worshipping. they were noncombatants. they put up with all of that because of this great sense of that because of this great sense of belonging. that is still mirrored and enjoyed by you all today, the sense of belonging to something. absolutely, yes. it is a very strong bond that we have.— bond that we have. betty can how im ortant bond that we have. betty can how important is _ bond that we have. betty can how important is it _ bond that we have. betty can how important is it that _ bond that we have. betty can how important is it that we _ bond that we have. betty can how important is it that we remember| bond that we have. betty can how - important is it that we remember and celebrate the contribution of women like you, and the women that tessa has been talking about during the war? how important you pass on this message to the younger generations? obviously, it is important. i think
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nowadays. — obviously, it is important. i think nowadays, the schools are beginning to realise _ nowadays, the schools are beginning to realise that wartime stories are well worth— to realise that wartime stories are well worth listening to and i for one have — well worth listening to and i for one have been privileged to have talked _ one have been privileged to have talked to— one have been privileged to have talked to a number of schools, not during _ talked to a number of schools, not during the — talked to a number of schools, not during the pandemic, but i think there _ during the pandemic, but i think there is— during the pandemic, but i think there is a — during the pandemic, but i think there is a growing need... well, the schools— there is a growing need... well, the schools are — there is a growing need... well, the schools are realising the growing need _ schools are realising the growing need for — schools are realising the growing need for the young to understand what _ need for the young to understand what we — need for the young to understand what we did and what we went through — what we did and what we went through i— what we did and what we went throurh. . ,., ~ , through. i also think it is transformative, - through. i also think it is transformative, anyway. | through. i also think it is| transformative, anyway. i through. i also think it is - transformative, anyway. i was through. i also think it is _ transformative, anyway. iwas going to ask betty. _ transformative, anyway. iwas going to ask betty. if _ transformative, anyway. iwas going to ask betty, if she _ transformative, anyway. iwas going to ask betty, if she was _ transformative, anyway. iwas going to ask betty, if she was aware - transformative, anyway. iwas going to ask betty, if she was aware at. to ask betty, if she was aware at the time it was happening of whatever it was for women. prewar a lot of women would not even have considered going out to work. post—war attitudes change for women but also for men returning to a very different society.— different society. absolutely. in my view, it different society. absolutely. in my view. it has — different society. absolutely. in my view, it has turned _ different society. absolutely. in my view, it has turned out _ different society. absolutely. in my view, it has turned out to _ different society. absolutely. in my view, it has turned out to be - different society. absolutely. in my view, it has turned out to be a -
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different society. absolutely. in my view, it has turned out to be a very| view, it has turned out to be a very good _ view, it has turned out to be a very good thing — view, it has turned out to be a very good thing. women can do most things nowadays. _ good thing. women can do most things nowadays, can they not?— nowadays, can they not? indeed they can. nowadays, can they not? indeed they can- including — nowadays, can they not? indeed they can. including live _ nowadays, can they not? indeed they can. including live television - nowadays, can they not? indeed they can. including live television at - can. including live television at 98! . ., , ., ., , 98! what brilliant thing to be able... iwas— 98! what brilliant thing to be able... i wasjust _ 98! what brilliant thing to be able... i wasjust going - 98! what brilliant thing to be able... i wasjust going to . 98! what brilliant thing to be | able... i wasjust going to say 98! what brilliant thing to be i able... i wasjust going to say i able... i was 'ust going to say i feel very — able... i wasjust going to say i feel very pleased _ able. .. i wasjust going to say i feel very pleased i _ able... i wasjust going to say i feel very pleased i was - able... i wasjust going to say i feel very pleased i was in - able... i wasjust going to say i feel very pleased i was in the i able... i wasjust going to say i . feel very pleased i was in the right place _ feel very pleased i was in the right place at _ feel very pleased i was in the right place at the right time. what feel very pleased i was in the right place at the right time.— place at the right time. what a brilliant chance _ place at the right time. what a brilliant chance to _ place at the right time. what a brilliant chance to celebrate i place at the right time. what a . brilliant chance to celebrate these incredible women.— incredible women. yes. what a reminder of— incredible women. yes. what a reminder of what _ incredible women. yes. what a reminder of what they - incredible women. yes. what a reminder of what they did - incredible women. yes. what a reminder of what they did in i incredible women. yes. what a reminder of what they did in a l reminder of what they did in a different time they lived in! let's not forget the introduction of conscription. church or did it against his will. he was worried that conscripting men with demoralised men. —— winston churchill did it against his will. at the end of the war men came back as heroes and bagged the good jobs.
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the 50s was hardly liberating decade. it has been a long, slow trudge to liberation. the decade. it has been a long, slow trudge to liberation.— trudge to liberation. the to say we are getting — trudge to liberation. the to say we are getting there. _ trudge to liberation. the to say we are getting there. not _ trudge to liberation. the to say we are getting there. not quite - trudge to liberation. the to say we j are getting there. not quite there, are getting there. not quite there, are we? -- — are getting there. not quite there, are we? -- fair— are getting there. not quite there, are we? -- fair to _ are getting there. not quite there, are we? -- fair to say _ are getting there. not quite there, are we? -- fair to say we - are getting there. not quite there, are we? -- fair to say we are - are we? —— fair to say we are getting there. there is a slight delay on the line. that is nobody�*s fault. thank you both forjoining us this morning. lovely to hear your stories. part of the team that helped break the enigma code. just in the right place at the right time. the modesty that generation is brilliant, isn't it? electric cars will be the future of road travel — but new research says there aren't enough specially trained mechanics to repair and maintain them. by 2030, petrol and diesel vehicles will no longer be sold, but the institute of the motor industry says we'll be facing a shortfall in more than 35,000 qualified technicians. tim muffett is at a mechanic's
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training facility this morning. iimagine i imagine they are rather busy. they are. good morning _ i imagine they are rather busy. tue: are. good morning from enfield i imagine they are rather busy. tue1: are. good morning from enfield in north london. we hear a lot about impacts on the charging infrastructure when we talk about the switch to electric vehicles. what about the people who will be there to service and maintain them? there are real fears that in the coming years there will be a shortage because you need special skills in order to safely handle an electric or hybrid vehicle. those skills are being taught to mechanics behind me. let's speak to steve nash, executive of the motor industry. nash, executive of the motor indust . ., ., ., industry. you are writing what you sa . industry. you are writing what you say- working _ industry. you are writing what you say- working on — industry. you are writing what you say. working on electric— industry. you are writing what you say. working on electric vehicles i industry. you are writing what you | say. working on electric vehicles is governed _ say. working on electric vehicles is governed by the electricity at work act. governed by the electricity at work act~ my— governed by the electricity at work act. my organisation has some department for transport approved standards. there are roughly a quarter— standards. there are roughly a quarter of— standards. there are roughly a quarter of a million people working
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every— quarter of a million people working every day— quarter of a million people working every day on cars. at the moment only g~5% — every day on cars. at the moment only 6.5% are qualified to work safely— only 6.5% are qualified to work safely with electric vehicles. there is a growing gap. they will need 90.000 — is a growing gap. they will need 90,000 of them in current numbers to be qualified _ 90,000 of them in current numbers to be qualified by 2030. at the moment we are _ be qualified by 2030. at the moment we are about 5000 short. what needs to happen? _ we are about 5000 short. what needs to happen? we are saying to the government this is something you have overlooked. great you are investing — have overlooked. great you are investing in the charging infrastructure. fora investing in the charging infrastructure. for a relatively small — infrastructure. for a relatively small investment of 50 million we could _ small investment of 50 million we could get— small investment of 50 million we could get larger numbers through this kind — could get larger numbers through this kind of training. really we need _ this kind of training. really we need an— this kind of training. really we need an impetus behind it to help people _ need an impetus behind it to help people to — need an impetus behind it to help people to undertake this kind of training — people to undertake this kind of trainina. . .. people to undertake this kind of trainina. ., ,, ,~. , people to undertake this kind of trainina. . ~' ,, , . training. thank you very much indeed. let's _ training. thank you very much indeed. let's talk _ training. thank you very much indeed. let's talk to _ training. thank you very much indeed. let's talk to some - training. thank you very much | indeed. let's talk to some who training. thank you very much - indeed. let's talk to some who are undertaking it. mark, what are these people learning here today? thea;r undertaking it. mark, what are these people learning here today? they are all here on a — people learning here today? they are all here on a course. _ people learning here today? they are all here on a course. an _ people learning here today? they are all here on a course. an electric- all here on a course. an electric vehicle — all here on a course. an electric vehicle hybrid _ all here on a course. an electric vehicle hybrid course. _ all here on a course. an electric vehicle hybrid course. they- all here on a course. an electric vehicle hybrid course. they will|
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vehicle hybrid course. they will learn _ vehicle hybrid course. they will learn how — vehicle hybrid course. they will learn how to _ vehicle hybrid course. they will learn how to keep _ vehicle hybrid course. they will learn how to keep themselves i vehicle hybrid course. they will. learn how to keep themselves safe from other— learn how to keep themselves safe from other types— learn how to keep themselves safe from other types of— learn how to keep themselves safe from other types of technology, i learn how to keep themselves safel from other types of technology, the new components _ from other types of technology, the new components that _ from other types of technology, the new components that are _ from other types of technology, the new components that are involved i from other types of technology, the i new components that are involved in the manufacture _ new components that are involved in the manufacture of— new components that are involved in the manufacture of these _ new components that are involved in. the manufacture of these components enable _ the manufacture of these components enable take _ the manufacture of these components enable take that _ the manufacture of these components enable take that knowledge _ the manufacture of these components enable take that knowledge back - the manufacture of these components enable take that knowledge back intoi enable take that knowledge back into the garage _ enable take that knowledge back into the garage bre — enable take that knowledge back into the rearae. . i. enable take that knowledge back into the rearae. �* enable take that knowledge back into the eearae. �* ,, the garage. are you en'oying it? what are the garage. are you en'oying it? what you t the garage. are you enjoying it? what are you learning? - the garage. are you enjoying it? what are you learning? i - the garage. are you enjoying it? what are you learning? i am - the garage. are you enjoying it? - what are you learning? i am learning how to _ what are you learning? i am learning how to install and remove the batteries _ how to install and remove the batteries. we have dental how to do that. batteries. we have dental how to do that it_ batteries. we have dental how to do that. �* . ,. . batteries. we have dental how to do that. . . ,. ., ., , that. a fascinating 'ourney you e oin e that. a fascinating 'ourney you eeoin to that. a fascinating 'ourney you going to be h that. a fascinating 'ourney you going to be go — that. a fascinating 'ourney you going to be go on - that. a fascinating journey you going to be go on -- - that. a fascinating journey you going to be go on -- going . that. a fascinating journey you | going to be go on -- going on. going to be go on —— going on. thereafter is there will be a shortage of people able to maintain and service electric vehicles. the growth of the sales of which really is going up. growth of the sales of which really is going up— you're watching bbc breakfast.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. the first draft of a possible agreement at the cop26 climate summit is published by the un. the document urges countries to strengthen commitments to cut carbon emissions within the next year. it comes as borisjohnson is due to return to glasgow to meet delegations, as part of attempts to bridge the gaps preventing a new global deal. a call for an investigation into conservative mp sir geoffrey cox, as labour claim pictures may show him breaking parliamentary rules. the vaccine deadline for care workers — from midnight tonight, those without two jabs won't be allowed to work in the care industry england. during a tech conference, prince harry says he warned the head of twitter about political unrest in the us — just 2a hours before

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