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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 9, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm christian fraser. a sobering assessment from the experts on the pledges made at the climate summit — they don't go nearly far enough. analysts calculate that the world will still be emitting almost twice as much as it should be by 2030 if we are to keep the global temperature rise to a safe level. that will bring misery to millions of people who are at risk in developing nations. we'll speak to the prime minister of antigua and barbuda, who represents the small island states. the us congress has sent a 20—strong delegation to the summit as it tries to repair some of the damage of the past four years. but will the divisive politics in washington hamper the ambition to lead? and to complete our look at what the summit has delivered so far, we are going to talk trees.
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will glasgow reverse the deforestation that continues apace? we'll speak to an organisation that is planting on a major scale. hello. in the first few days of the climate change summit in glasgow, we had a flurry of carbon—cutting pledges from the assembled world leaders. more than 140 countries, in line with the paris agreeement, produced new national targets to cut their greenhouse gas emmissions. but this past week, analysts have been going through the figures, and there is still an awful lot more to do. there is a massive gap in the level of ambition we are seeing from governments and a gaping hole in the plans they have set out to halve emissions by 2030. and that inevitably means temperatures will keep rising to dangerous levels. before the climate conference, average global temperatures were predicted to rise by 2.7 degrees celsius by the
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end of this century. taking into account all the short—term commitments we have had since the summit started, that is now revised to 2.4 celsius, which is far above the 1.5 degrees target, past which the scientists say things will go from bad to an awful lot worse. let's discuss the facts with professor niklas hohne from the new climate institute. good to have you with us. i washed your press conference today. before we get into the detail of it, can we go right back to basics and take everyone with this? what is 1.5 celsius and why is it so important? welcome global temperatures have already increased around about 1.2 degrees, and we see already now devastating damages that this brings with us. we have a lot of wildfires, we have storms, droughts, all things
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are very difficult to tackle. at 1.5, all of these will not go wait, they will stay in the even worse and while we all as a society think that 1.5 is the limit that we have to keep, above that, easily becomes unmanageable. and that is not a very bright future, so we really should stick to that goal. {lila bright future, so we really should stick to that goal.— bright future, so we really should stick to that goal. ok, so you have one stick to that goal. ok, so you have gone away. _ stick to that goal. ok, so you have gone away. you — stick to that goal. ok, so you have gone away, you look— stick to that goal. ok, so you have gone away, you look at _ stick to that goal. ok, so you have gone away, you look at all- stick to that goal. ok, so you have gone away, you look at all the - stick to that goal. ok, so you have i gone away, you look at all the new nationally determined contributions, everything that countries and put on the table in the last week, and what is a conclusion you draw?— is a conclusion you draw? well, one aood is a conclusion you draw? well, one good news — is a conclusion you draw? well, one good news is _ is a conclusion you draw? well, one good news is the _ is a conclusion you draw? well, one good news is the vision _ is a conclusion you draw? well, one good news is the vision is _ is a conclusion you draw? well, one good news is the vision is rifles - is a conclusion you draw? well, one good news is the vision is rifles of l good news is the vision is rifles of the countries now really are clear that they want to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, they want to get phase out of coal, oil and gas and go to zero by the middle of the century and if they really do that, then temperatures could be quite levels that we calculate currently 1.8 degrees. it's still a way from 1.5 but much better. but
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the big problem is that none of these countries have plans in the short term or has implemented policies in the short term to put itself on track towards their own zero emission goals. and that's the big gamble. the short term gap is huge and countries have to do much more in the short term.— more in the short term. talking about the _ more in the short term. talking about the short _ more in the short term. talking about the short term _ more in the short term. talking about the short term gap - more in the short term. talking - about the short term gap committees or by the end of the decade, 2030, correct? ., �* , or by the end of the decade, 2030, correct? . �*, _, . or by the end of the decade, 2030, correct? . �* , _, . ., correct? that's correct. if we add u . correct? that's correct. if we add on everything — correct? that's correct. if we add on everything the _ correct? that's correct. if we add up everything the countries - correct? that's correct. if we add up everything the countries have| up everything the countries have proposed here at the summit and before, we would still emit twice as much of emissions than we should if we want to be on the way to the 1.5 degrees goal. that by 2030. some will be really have to do is cut emissions immediately so that we can have them by 2030. fine emissions immediately so that we can have them by 2030.— have them by 2030. one of the central provisions _ have them by 2030. one of the central provisions of _ have them by 2030. one of the central provisions of the - have them by 2030. one of the central provisions of the paris l central provisions of the paris agreement was that countries would come back every five years and
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increase the ambition, so increase the targets that they put down five years ago. we call that the ratchet mechanism. do you think on the evidence of what you have seen in the past week that is working? is working in parts. so in one way, the long term targets are good, so basically all countries in the last year have put forward long—term targets and they want to get to zero. that's good, they are vision now. but they also were asked to provide short—term targets until 2030, and there the use gap has decreased, yes. some countries have provided more ambitious targets but it has decreased only by roughly a fifth. and that's a good signal, yes, but the gap is still huge so the ratchet mechanism in this last five—year period has reduced the gap a little bit but we are not done yet. so if we come back in five years' time, and then think what can
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we do, that's basically too late. then the 1.5 goal will be lost so that tells me that we have to come back next year to do more in the year after to do more and the year after until that gap is really closed. ~ ., after until that gap is really closed. ~ . ., ., ~ after until that gap is really closed. . ., ., ~ ., after until that gap is really closed. . ., ., ~ ._, ,, closed. we are soon to talk to a us serviceman — closed. we are soon to talk to a us serviceman who _ closed. we are soon to talk to a us serviceman who was _ closed. we are soon to talk to a us serviceman who was part _ closed. we are soon to talk to a us serviceman who was part of - closed. we are soon to talk to a us serviceman who was part of the - serviceman who was part of the delegation that has come over. walking to us with the big countries, china, india, and of course the us?— countries, china, india, and of course the us? ,, , ., course the us? the us is back on the stare. course the us? the us is back on the stage- they — course the us? the us is back on the stage- they have _ course the us? the us is back on the stage. they have set _ course the us? the us is back on the stage. they have set themselves - course the us? the us is back on the stage. they have set themselves the | stage. they have set themselves the reduction target for 2030 which they now have to implement with policies that will be very difficult. but at least it's first of all an ambitious target. china and india, they do have a bit of a different strategy. they propose internationally actually only something that they are 100% sure to meet him as above countries we see that they will probably achieve their target so they put forward and hopefully overachieve it. both strategies, the one of us with difficulties meeting the target and it was in china and
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india are proposing something weak, is not good. so both basically have to do more. is not good. so both basically have to do more-— is not good. so both basically have to do more. ., , _, , to do more. professor come he very much indeed _ to do more. professor come he very much indeed for _ to do more. professor come he very much indeed for that. _ that news will be met with dismay by countries worst affected by climate change, particularly the smaller island nations that are already affected by the rising sea levels and ever more dangerous storms. gaston browne is the president of antigua and barbuda. he also is the chair of the alliance of small island states. good to see you again. what you make of what you have just heard? absolutely correct. the issue of overshooting the 1.5 could be catastrophic, and only for small island _ catastrophic, and only for small island states, but for the entire planet — island states, but for the entire planet because the longer we take to achieve _ planet because the longer we take to achieve the 1.5 the more difficult it will_ achieve the 1.5 the more difficult it will become. so even the long term _ it will become. so even the long term goals could be undermined as a result— term goals could be undermined as a result of— term goals could be undermined as a result of missing the 1.5 go. so we have _ result of missing the 1.5 go. so we have to _ result of missing the 1.5 go. so we have to understand that climate
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change — have to understand that climate change is — have to understand that climate change is an essential threat facing all of— change is an essential threat facing all of humanity, and there cannot be any urgency— all of humanity, and there cannot be any urgency that is or any other issue _ any urgency that is or any other issue that — any urgency that is or any other issue that is more agent than addressing the issue of climate change — addressing the issue of climate chan . e. addressing the issue of climate chance. , , ., ., change. the ministers have arrived in glasaow change. the ministers have arrived in glasgow for _ change. the ministers have arrived in glasgow for the _ change. the ministers have arrived in glasgow for the final _ change. the ministers have arrived in glasgow for the final few - change. the ministers have arrived in glasgow for the final few days i change. the ministers have arrived in glasgow for the final few days of the negotiations. they are there to get things over the final hurdle, to get things over the final hurdle, to get into the stickiest issues that have yet been unresolved. what do you hope to achieve in the next two or three days? and if you don't get what you want, what happens on friday when it comes to the final communique? i friday when it comes to the final communique?— friday when it comes to the final communique? i am not normally a pessimistic — communique? i am not normally a pessimistic person _ communique? i am not normally a pessimistic person but _ communique? i am not normally a pessimistic person but i _ communique? i am not normally a pessimistic person but i can - communique? i am not normally a pessimistic person but i can tell. pessimistic person but i can tell you that — pessimistic person but i can tell you that we will see increased ambitions compared to what, you know, _ ambitions compared to what, you know. was— ambitions compared to what, you know, was announced earlier. and it means— know, was announced earlier. and it means therefore that we will have to increase _ means therefore that we will have to increase our— means therefore that we will have to increase our activism and we will have _ increase our activism and we will have to — increase our activism and we will have to obviously push the major
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polluters — have to obviously push the major polluters to review their nationally determined attributions on an annual basis to— determined attributions on an annual basis to increase the ambitions and i basis to increase the ambitions and i don't _ basis to increase the ambitions and i don't know— basis to increase the ambitions and i don't know that we can rely on these _ i don't know that we can rely on these large polluters to achieve or to set _ these large polluters to achieve or to set ambitious in the seas and you may have _ to set ambitious in the seas and you may have to— to set ambitious in the seas and you may have to pursue legal action and that is— may have to pursue legal action and that is why— may have to pursue legal action and that is why tuvalu and anti—camera but i _ that is why tuvalu and anti—camera but i have — that is why tuvalu and anti—camera but i have lots this commission on climate _ but i have lots this commission on climate change in international law. in climate change in international law. in which— climate change in international law. in which we — climate change in international law. in which we are also pursuing legal remedies _ in which we are also pursuing legal remedies in order to address this issue _ remedies in order to address this issue so — remedies in order to address this issue so it— remedies in order to address this issue. so it is one thing to have these _ issue. so it is one thing to have these voluntary commitments, but it is evident _ these voluntary commitments, but it is evident that the voluntary commitments will not result in the urgency— commitments will not result in the urgency that is required to achieve the i5— urgency that is required to achieve the 1.5 degrees goal. and therefore we have _ the 1.5 degrees goal. and therefore we have to — the 1.5 degrees goal. and therefore we have to pursue other remedies, even _ we have to pursue other remedies, even in _ we have to pursue other remedies, even in terms of activism, the fact that the _ even in terms of activism, the fact that the micro and macro levels will be important. this requires all of society— be important. this requires all of society approach in which i believe that these — society approach in which i believe that these large polluters, they should — that these large polluters, they should be punished even in terms of
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patronising — should be punished even in terms of patronising their products and politicians for example who lead these _ politicians for example who lead these countries that fail to make good _ these countries that fail to make good ambitions to help us to achieve this 15— good ambitions to help us to achieve this 15 go _ good ambitions to help us to achieve this 1.5 go that ultimately this be punished — this 1.5 go that ultimately this be punished at the polls. try this 1.5 go that ultimately this be punished at the polls.— this 1.5 go that ultimately this be punished at the polls. try to get to the bottom — punished at the polls. try to get to the bottom of— punished at the polls. try to get to the bottom of what _ punished at the polls. try to get to the bottom of what happens - punished at the polls. try to get to the bottom of what happens on - the bottom of what happens on friday. clearly you are signalling that you will stay at the table and would not likely walk out on any conclusions... would not likely walk out on any conclusions. . ._ conclusions... no, we have to engage- _ conclusions... no, we have to engage- itut _ conclusions... no, we have to engage. but are _ conclusions... no, we have to engage. but are you - conclusions... no, we have to engage. but are you worried l conclusions... no, we have to - engage. but are you worried given there is not _ engage. but are you worried given there is not to _ engage. but are you worried given there is not to miss _ engage. but are you worried given there is not to miss it _ engage. but are you worried given there is not to miss it figure - engage. but are you worried given there is not to miss it figure here | there is not to miss it figure here will .8 which of being bandied around all week and is suddenly being thrown at the window by the analyst today. are you worried that it's a boy the politicians are try to put a bit of loss on what comes out of the summit at the end of the week? ~ , ,., , �* out of the summit at the end of the week? ~ , ~ ., ., out of the summit at the end of the week? . ,,., , . ., ., ., week? absolutely. and again, we on the front lines _ week? absolutely. and again, we on the front lines and _ week? absolutely. and again, we on the front lines and we _ week? absolutely. and again, we on the front lines and we are _ week? absolutely. and again, we on the front lines and we are very - the front lines and we are very worried — the front lines and we are very worried. we have to get ambitions that will_ worried. we have to get ambitions that will reduce global literatures below _ that will reduce global literatures below 1.5. that will reduce global literatures below1.5. for us it's that will reduce global literatures below 1.5. for us it's a matter of life and — below 1.5. for us it's a matter of life and death. i mean this is not a theoretical— life and death. i mean this is not a theoretical issue, this is an issue
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in which — theoretical issue, this is an issue in which we — theoretical issue, this is an issue in which we do not achieve those objectives — in which we do not achieve those objectives and livelihoods will be imperilled. objectives and livelihoods will be imerilled. , . objectives and livelihoods will be imerilled. ., ., objectives and livelihoods will be imerilled. , ., ., ., ,, ., imperilled. great to talk to you aaain i imperilled. great to talk to you again i know — imperilled. great to talk to you again i know that _ imperilled. great to talk to you again i know that we _ imperilled. great to talk to you again i know that we will - imperilled. great to talk to you again i know that we will talk i again i know that we will talk before the end of the week. thank you very much for your time. mr; you very much for your time. my pleasure. _ you very much for your time. my pleasure, thank you. the high—level negotiations in glasgow now involve the minister of each country whose job it will be to break the deadlock on various contested elements of the paris agreement. how soon will countries agree to re—visit pledges they've made? will they produce improved targets every year? how do we measure the emissions for each country and monitor them to ensure there's no cheating? in all of this, the leadership of the united states will be crucial. and today, the speaker of the us house of representatives, nancy pelosi, arrived in glasgow with a sizeable delegation of democratic lawmakers. in the next two weeks, they hope to conclude the stalled negotiations on president biden's build back better plan, which has within it $550 billion of climate provision. but they did vote through on friday the bispatisan infrastructure bill, which the speaker says is a major first step.
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0ur congressional delegation comes here fresh from advancing _ legislation to build back better, build back better for women, i which represents the most ambitious |and consequential climate and clean| energy legislation of all time. i'm joined now by congressman brendan boyle, who is part of the delegation in glasgow and a democrat from pennsylvania serving on the ways and means committee. lovely to have you with us on the programme. what sort of reception did you get today in glasgow? you know, i think _ did you get today in glasgow? you know, i think of _ did you get today in glasgow? ym. know, i think of one of the comments one of the members of the european parliament said to us and that was it is so nice and refreshing to have the us back at the table. i am one of those americans who was very much embarrassed about our previous president in so many ways but especially when it came to climate change. but now that eric, thank god, is over and we have a president
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of the us as well as a congressional democratic—controlled congress that is completely committed to meeting this historic moment. we already delivered on half of that late friday night when we passed the bipartisan infrastructure bill and thatis bipartisan infrastructure bill and that is not fully done. then we return to congress next week we will pass the second piece of legislation which contains within it so much more in terms of a sustainability to the tune of over $500 billion. you're the professor say that when it comes to china and india, they are under promise and over deliver but it's the reverse when it comes to the us. and he thermally thinking about the politics in congress and in particular when it comes to the build back better plan and the decision to strip out the clean electricity programme. that was stripped out because the senator from west virginia did not like the
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onus that it put on energy companies to turn to greener technologies. and of course he comes from a coal state. and a lot of this comes down to trust, trust is whether congress can actually get through the things that are needed, pass a big lobbying companies. aha, that are needed, pass a big lobbying comanies. �* u, , that are needed, pass a big lobbying comanies. �* , ., , that are needed, pass a big lobbying comanies. �* , ., companies. a couple of points on that. first, _ companies. a couple of points on that. first, the _ companies. a couple of points on that. first, the us _ companies. a couple of points on that. first, the us rather- companies. a couple of points on i that. first, the us rather uniquely, we have one of our two major parties, our centre—right party that is filled with climate deniers. that does make things more challenging and you don't see that and other western democracies. so what that means is on the democratic side we basically have to put up 100% of the votes in orderfor basically have to put up 100% of the votes in order for legislation like this to pass. now i will say and i will refer you not to anything that any democratic party official has said but to the independent analysis that has been done by for example that has been done by for example that makes the when we talk about if it ends up being 1.7 5 trillion in the bill back better act, the biggest single part of that, over
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half $1 trillion, has to do with tackling climate change so i understand why some around the world might be sceptical looking at major countries like the us because of what has happened in years past and past opportunities that were missed, but i do think they are being perhaps a little bit too pessimistic and don't recognise the scale of what has just been partly achieved. we talk about the single largest investment in america's infrastructure in the history of the nation. ., ., , , , ., nation. there are two issues what ou've nation. there are two issues what you've just _ nation. there are two issues what you've just said — nation. there are two issues what you've just said and _ nation. there are two issues what you've just said and one - nation. there are two issues what you've just said and one is - nation. there are two issues what you've just said and one is we - nation. there are two issues what i you've just said and one is we don't have time for america to transition to clean energy in every other political cycle. that's the first point and that's what people are not particularly hopeful in the second point is that it is half $1 trillion in the bill which is ask nancy pelosi just had a massive step forward, many think that you need a stick to go with the carrot. i am lad that
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stick to go with the carrot. i am glad that we — stick to go with the carrot. i am glad that we all— stick to go with the carrot. i am glad that we all recognise - stick to go with the carrot. ian glad that we all recognise the scale of this investment they were talking about, which is truly historic and there is no previous president for evenin there is no previous president for even in franklin roosevelt's new deal. as far as the pressure we feel, i guess it's to follow that first it is because recognise that we have a democratic house and senate and a white house and that's the first time in 12 years and we do have majority so we don't want to take that for granted. but in the second clock that is ticking in the back of our minds is notjust the us delegation but i think for all the delegates is that is if we don't act right now, we might miss the last best window of opportunity to finally get us on a path to sustainability, to reaching that 1.5 degrees target. i personally feel that pressure and speaking to a number of the delegates today who are from countries other than the us, i know they felt that as well. you serve on the ways and means
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committee, which oversees policy when it comes to trade and taxation. can you hand on heart say then that going forward from this point, every decision that your committee makes will put climate change at the heart of that decision? i will put climate change at the heart of that decision?— of that decision? i will say that it will be one _ of that decision? i will say that it will be one of— of that decision? i will say that it will be one of the _ of that decision? i will say that it will be one of the major- will be one of the major considerations. take for example the effort some years ago on the tpp which ended up not succeeding. at some point there will be an effort to return to what kind of leadership of trade we will have enough and the pacific nations and i don't think there is any question that the environmental considerations and climate change will play a leading role in those discussions and debates. ~ ., ., , ., role in those discussions and debates. ~ ., ., ., debates. we love having you on the programme — debates. we love having you on the programme congressman, - debates. we love having you on the programme congressman, think - debates. we love having you on the| programme congressman, think you very much for your time. shall programme congressman, think you very much for your time.— very much for your time. all right, thank you. — very much for your time. all right, thank you, take _ very much for your time. all right, thank you, take care. _ stay with us on bbc news. still to come, we look at why all front—line health staff in england must be fully vaccinated against coronavirus by spring.
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the mother of a ten—year—old boy who was killed by a dog has paid tribute to her "beautiful" and "sweet" son. jack lis died yesterday afternoon while visiting a friend's house in caerphilly. the dog has since been destroyed. tomos morgan reports. a heartbreaking note, a close—knit community torn apart after hearing that ten—year—old jack lis was killed by a dog on monday. in a facebook post, his mother emma whitfield wrote today... it's understood jack was visiting a friend who didn't sustain any injuries after school last night when the attack took place. and neighbours here have described the event as both
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tragic and upsetting. climate change is affecting the ocean's ability to absorb our carbon emissions, according to scientists who've sent robots down to the sea floor. the latest discovery by the uk—led iatlantic project has revealed that if global temperatures increase to levels predicted, the ocean might no longer be able to provide what is currently earth's largest long—term carbon store. 0ur science correspondent victoria gill has more. diving to ocean depths of up to 3.5 miles. this is the abyssal zone, where robotic explorers are taking samples from places no—one has ever touched. a third of the carbon dioxide in our atmosphere dissolves in the surface of the ocean.
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when tiny marine plants and animals feed on that carbon it becomes part of a cycle that's made the deep ocean and its muddy floor earth's largest carbon store. in an aquarium like this, you get a snippet of the life in the shallower parts of the ocean, but in the deep ocean floor there are single—celled organisms that we can't even see, and it's those that are responsible for locking away carbon in the deep. in experiments carried out in the equatorial atlantic, about 500 miles off the coast of west africa, researchers brought tubes of sea floor mud into their ocean laboratories to test what happens to the carbon that's contained in the sediments as the ocean temperature rises. so, we have to understand how this part of our planet will work in the future. in this abyssal ocean,
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that covers 60% of the planet, we find that under higher temperatures, we can store less carbon in these places. the ecosystems are turning over the carbon faster. they're running at a higher temperature more quickly, and they're going to release more carbon in the future, and that's really worrying. we know more about the surface of the moon than we do about life at these extreme depths, and researchers say this latest finding isjust a glimpse of how our greenhouse gas emissions are transforming this huge and misunderstood habitat. working out how the deep ocean will be affected by climate change and how it could help us to solve this very human—made problem will require much deeper exploration. victoria gill, bbc news. in the first few days of the summit, over 100 countries signed a pledge to reverse deforestation by the end of 2030. brazil, the democratic republic of congo, russia and indonesia, which together account fo about 85% of the world's forests, are among the signatories. the deal is backed by $19 billion of financial assistance.
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dr stephen fitch is the founder of the eden reforestation project. tells about some of the work that you do. tells about some of the work that ou do. ~ , ' ~ tells about some of the work that oudo. you do. well, eden is 16 years old now and we _ you do. well, eden is 16 years old now and we are _ you do. well, eden is 16 years old now and we are currently - you do. well, eden is 16 years old now and we are currently working | you do. well, eden is 16 years old l now and we are currently working in nine nations. we are adding four or five new nations every year. we have already planted over 700 million trees, and we have globally tens of thousands of full season and partial season employees who are paid to plant or produce, plan and protect those trees. and it's incredible to watch. a desert affiant area turned back into a forest and that is my privilege for a decade now. i bet it is. i bet privilege for a decade now. i bet it is- i bet that _ privilege for a decade now. i bet it is. i bet that if — privilege for a decade now. i bet it is. i bet that if something - privilege for a decade now. i bet it is. i bet that if something see. - privilege for a decade now. i bet it| is. i bet that if something see. how do you think this $19 million in this agreement enhance the work that are doing? this agreement enhance the work that are doinu? ~ ., this agreement enhance the work that are doinu ? ~ ., .,, ., are doing? well, we are hoping that are doing? well, we are hoping that a significant — are doing? well, we are hoping that
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a significant proportion _ are doing? well, we are hoping that a significant proportion of— are doing? well, we are hoping that a significant proportion of that - a significant proportion of that transitions from the sources hands to our hands and was evidently on to the local communities, which are the true agents of forest preservation and restoration. so, that's how it will make a difference. but and restoration. so, that's how it will make a difference.— and restoration. so, that's how it will make a difference. but some of these agreements _ will make a difference. but some of these agreements to _ will make a difference. but some of these agreements to have - will make a difference. but some of these agreements to have been - will make a difference. but some of. these agreements to have been signed before and it was a big one signed in new york, they did not amount to much. brazil reneged on the deal they signed and in an agent reneged on a deal they sign so what confidence do you have on this one? ultimately it comes down to behaviour, not words, and it's been said the best predictor of successful patterns in the future is past performance. but in our case, we are not waiting around for any governments to make or break. we go and approach from a bottom up
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perspective by working with local communities. of course we still work with regional and federal governments, but ultimately empowering those local communities, benefiting those local communities economically to change their behaviour so they are no longer in a sense preying on the local forests and the local environment but now they see all the benefits and advantages to restoring it is key. do you get involved in carbon offsetting? because carbon offsetting? because carbon offsetting is the money that comes from companies to plant trees in another part of the world and also in the carbon emissions they put into the air. it's had some bad press. do you think it works and could it be reformed at this summit to make it better? late could it be reformed at this summit to make it better?— could it be reformed at this summit to make it better? we have become involved in carbon _ to make it better? we have become involved in carbon offsets _ to make it better? we have become involved in carbon offsets was - to make it better? we have become involved in carbon offsets was that i involved in carbon offsets was that we have formed an llc called compassionate carbon commitment here is the ultimate scenario. we are in an era where we desperately needed
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transition period away from carbon —based fuel. in planting trees and protecting forests is the most cost—effective means to accomplishing the transition area goal. and so we have got our commitment and now and with the name compassionate carbon, we are radically committed to seeing that overwhelmingly percentage of the resource going back to what it was really supposed to go to, those local communities who will plan and protect that forest. you local communities who will plan and protect that forest.— protect that forest. you are truly creatin: protect that forest. you are truly creating jobs _ protect that forest. you are truly creating jobs and _ protect that forest. you are truly creating jobs and doing - protect that forest. you are truly creating jobs and doing a - protect that forest. you are truly creating jobs and doing a lot - protect that forest. you are truly creating jobs and doing a lot of l creating jobs and doing a lot of good work around the world for some of the money that's been placed this summit further enhances that. doctor, get a view to come want to talk to us, thank you very much. thank you so much. latte talk to us, thank you very much. thank you so much.— talk to us, thank you very much. thank you so much. we will be back in glasaow thank you so much. we will be back in glasgow on _ thank you so much. we will be back in glasgow on thursday _ thank you so much. we will be back in glasgow on thursday so - thank you so much. we will be back in glasgow on thursday so i - thank you so much. we will be back in glasgow on thursday so i hope i thank you so much. we will be back| in glasgow on thursday so i hope he willjoin us for the end of the summit and willjoin us for the end of the summitand back willjoin us for the end of the summit and back after the break and talking about the situation on the border between poland and belarus
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and also more subpoenas in the january six committee issuing six new subpoenas do not for associates of donald trump and took about that. stay with us. well, it's been a relatively mild day for the time of the year. not gloriously sunny by any means, but temperatures above the average, and it's going to stay like it for most of us tonight, not everywhere. in fact, further north, there is a chance of a touch of frost, but that's mostly around the glens of scotland, where the skies will clear through tonight. right now, there's a weather front that's slighting the uk almost in half. you can see it moving across wales, northern parts of england as well into the midlands, so thicker cloud here and some spits and spots of rain. this is where the weather front is. south of that, that's where the really mild air is. north of that, it's not desperately cold, but there's certainly chill in the air, and first thing in the morning, temperatures in glasgow will only be around four degrees, and that touch of frost
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there certainly possible across some central and northern parts of scotland. but belfast and newcastle should be around seven or eight degrees very early tomorrow morning. so, here's the forecast for tomorrow. the weather front�*s more or less in the same place, so that means fairly cloudy conditions for the bulk of wales and the southern two thirds, say, of england. and north of that, we've got bright weather, nice weather for belfast, glasgow and aberdeen, but it will be a little bit colder here. here's thursday's weather, and low pressure is approaching, but it's still way out to sea. high pressure is in charge of the weather, so that means light winds. could be a bit murky and cloudy first thing in the morning, but the day itself is looking mostly fine across the uk. here are the temperatures — still mild, 1a in london, double figures for glasgow, edinburgh and aberdeen as well, but here's that rain making its way into ireland thursday night and into friday. friday will be a pretty unsettled day. we're not entirely sure where and exactly how much rainfall there will be on friday because this position of the low
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is a little uncertain. could be a little bit further north, could be a bit further south, but i think the wind will be a feature on friday. these blobs of rain could shift in the following forecasts, but let's call it a mild day with stronger winds and the chance of rain almost anywhere. there'll some sunshine around as well, although it sounds a bit like i'm sitting on the fence, but it is what it is. it's going to be an unsettled end to the week. the weekend's looking a little bit better. should be settled for saturday and sunday, and that settled weather should last into monday and tuesday as well. that's it from me.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. trying to reach the eu through poland — thousands of migrants are trapped on the belarus border —the eu accuses minsk of inhumanity. all front line health staff in england must be fully vaccinated against coronavirus by spring. the us commission investigating the capitol riots have subpoenaed 16 allies of president trump plus , when is a dog not a dog? we'll tell you the curious tail of one family's disastrous puppy—purchase.
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welcome back. at least 2,000 migrants who are trying to get into europe are gathered in freezing temperatures on poland's border with belarus. the polish prime minister says president lukashenka is luring people into belarus and directing them to europes borders, in order to put pressure on the eu. today he accused the russian of collaborating with them in order destabilise the situation. both moscow and minsk deny they are orchestrating the crisis. from the border here's our europe correspondent nick beake. 0n the edge of the european union, a new, desperate migrant camp hasjust emerged. 0n the left, those who have come to belarus and now made their way to the border with poland. 0n the right, barbed wire and lines of troops stopping them from crossing. throughout the day we watched dozens of reinforcements race to this area. poland already has a force of 12,000 guarding its eastern border
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and is keeping aid agencies and journalists away. but we managed to make contact with some of those now trapped in the freezing forest. we feel bad because nobody else is here and we are so hungry and thirsty, no water, no food, no help. like most here, aziz is kurdish, and from iraq. so many families and little children who are here. poland has vowed to defend its — and the eu's — borders, and accuses belarus of using civilians as weapons in retaliation for sanctions. translation: we know that this is a fully planned operation - which aims to disrupt the sovereignty of our country. that's absolutely clear to us. we know for sure that there is a search for weak spots happening on the border.
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but getting any nearer to where this crisis has erupted is not possible, as we soon found out. can we go further in? are we allowed to go further towards the border today? no, no. poland, like neighbouring lithuania, has declared a state of emergency. well, this is as close as we can get to the poland—belarus border today, because beyond this checkpoint lies a part of the european union that the polish authorities do not want us to see for ourselves. they are dealing with this growing migrant crisis, out of sight and on their own terms. the european union is backing poland and calling for tighter sanctions on belarus, which continues to deny it is creating this chaos. deny it's creating this chaos. tonight, its president said he didn't want an armed confrontation, but claimed that any escalation would bring in its ally, russia. translation: it would immediately involve russia in this whirlpool -
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and they are the largest nuclear power. - the united nations is calling for calm, but the politics are bitter and the situation on the ground increasingly desperate. nick beake, bbc news, and the polish—belarussian border. i've been speaking to hanna liubakova — a journalist from belarus and fellow at the atlantic council — on what might behind the belarussian president's actions i think lukashenko is trying to raise costs, is trying to escalate the situation so that the eu would consider negotiating with him, talking with him about the solution of the crisis. and i would say that state security forces should have known about large crowds of large groups of people travelling from minsk to the border with poland, and they did not prevent it — they basically allowed it to happen. theyjust ignored it or maybe even helped those migrants to travel to the border. and judging by nick's report, which we'vejust seen, it would appear that the migrants are now trapped between the polish soldiers and the belarussian soldiers, so the belarussian soldiers
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doing nothing to allow them to return to minsk, if that's what they wanted? this might be true. that's what i also saw from these videos. it happened also before that belarussian border guards who are armed would force, would push migrants towards the border. so it's been happening throughout months, and migrants were saying, were telling journalists throughout this period that they were pushed from the belarussian side and they were not able to come back. and whenever the other side, polish or lithuanian would push them back, migrants would not be able to go to minsk and travel back to their country, so belarussian border guards would tell them, "oh, you have to come back, you have to cross the border," and so on so the similar situation
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might be happening right now at the border. and we're seeing that armed border guards who are basically standing behind those migrants, behind this camp, where migrants are currently staying. do you believe what the polish prime minister is saying today that moscow is also playing a role in this? i cannot confirm this, i don't have evidence, but i'm confident that moscow knows about the situation on the border, and judging from the conversation between putin and lukashenko that took place today, a phone call between them, moscow is on the side of lukashenko — at least so far — and the communication that came from the kremlin was rather supporting the regime in minsk, and they basically criticised the west for hypocrisy, as they say, because the eu, poland or lithuania did not allow these migrants to come. so i think they are also using this situation to spread propaganda, to weaken the west and destabilise the situation on the border.
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clearly this is rooted in the sanctions that the eu has imposed on belarus. what sort of effect are those sanctions having? when it comes to economic sanctions this is the only, one of the very few western tools that actually provokes reaction in belarus, provokes the reaction from the regime, so it is really painful and that's something that lukashenko and his oligarchs and state—owned enterprises are scared of — the increase of sanctions but also the current sanctions regime. so they want to increase the cost and escalate so that europe agrees to lift sanctions in exchange for lukashenko stopping this flow of migrants. so that's one of the assumptions, one of the reasons why lukashenko might be escalating with this migration crisis most recently. the uk health secretary sajid javid says all front line
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national health service staff in england will have to be fully vaccinated against covid—19 by next spring, unless they're medically exempt. it's estimated thatjust over 100,000 nhs workers in england are currently unvaccinated. health unions say people should be encouraged, rather than forced, to have jabs. there are no plans yet for a similar move for nhs staff in scotland, wales and northern ireland. our medical editor, fergus walsh, has more. do you want to roll up your sleeve for me? nojab, nojob — that appears to be the stark reality facing nhs workers in england. those with face—to—face contact with patients have until the 1st of april to have two doses of vaccine. sajid javid. the health secretary said the move would protect both patients and staff from infection. no—one in the nhs or care that is currently unvaccinated
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should be scapegoated, singled out or shamed. that would be totally unacceptable. this is about supporting them to make a positive choice, to protect vulnerable people, to protect their colleagues, and, of course, to protect themselves. the nhs staff we spoke to in london were broadly in favour. i'm all for it. yeah? yeah. if people want to work here, - then they should be prepared to have whatever vaccinations they need. everyone needs to have the vaccine. but this trainee gp said she's recently had covid and believes she's now protected and so she doesn't want be vaccinated. it is unethical to force anyone to have a medical procedure, | |and if i have decided for various| reasons to not have a procedure, it shouldn't be up to— the government to force me to, or to say i'm going to lose myjob.
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in england, 90% of nhs staff have had two doses of covid vaccine, but 103,000 are completely unvaccinated. among care home workers in england, 88,000 were unvaccinated just a few months ago. that's now down to 32,000, but the deadline for them to be fully vaccinated is this thursday. there are over 90,000 job vacancies in the nhs, and employers are concerned that that could rise even further. if we lose significant numbers of staff as a result of mandatory vaccination, then that's going to put very, very significant pressure on the nhs, so what we're saying to the government today is, yep, absolutely see the logic of why you would want to do this, but please help us to manage the risk of losing nhs staff. several european countries already have compulsory vaccination for health workers. it prompted protests in france, but the government there says take—up amongst staff soared
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from just 60% injuly to 99% now. ministers here will be hoping for a big boost in immunisation rates, but there's a risk that this may alienate some staff, who choose to leave the nhs rather than being taken off the wards and redeployed. fergus walsh, bbc news. in washigton, the congressional committee that's investigating the january 6 assault on capitol hill, has issued further subpoenas to staffers who worked in the former presidents inner circle. they are targeting individuals who the panel says were involved in promoting the lie that the presidential election was stolen. the ten subpoenas that were issued in just the last hour are for administration officials who were in the white house on the day of the riot. they include kayleigh mcenany, the white house press secretary and stephen miller who served as special advisor to the president.
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on monday the committee subpoenaed six people who were not part of the adminsitration, but were involved in his campaign. some of whom attended a meeting at the willard hotel in washington, and were involved in discussions to overturn the election result. let's bring in former assistant us attorney kim wehle. what you see in these ten subpoenas that we find in the last couple of hours? . ., , , , hours? clinic on this is turning up the heat as _ hours? clinic on this is turning up the heat as they _ hours? clinic on this is turning up the heat as they should. - hours? clinic on this is turning up the heat as they should. as - hours? clinic on this is turning up the heat as they should. as we i hours? clinic on this is turning up - the heat as they should. as we know, there are over 500 people who participated in the interaction who have been prosecuted across the country and so father has been no accountability at all for the lead up accountability at all for the lead up on the planning of the intellection so i think what they are getting too is who inside government was involved in planning this, paying for it, and executing it by the sidelines and, as you mentioned, there is that january the 5th meeting in the hotel and there also was an oval 0ffice meeting in december and one of the lawyers, john eastman, that was helping on this has become clear that he did a memo to the president laying out,
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sort of, this strategy for outmanoeuvring the constitution and bullying mike pence into basically handing election into donald trump and taking it away from the people and taking it away from the people and from joe biden. it is stuff almost of hollywood fiction but, unfortunately for america, it is real. , . , unfortunately for america, it is real. , ., , ,, ., real. yes, all these people know something- _ real. yes, all these people know something. the _ real. yes, all these people know something. the trouble - real. yes, all these people know something. the trouble is - real. yes, all these people know something. the trouble is the i real. yes, all these people know. something. the trouble is the other two have been subpoenaed, most of them have not testified, including steve bannon, and thejustice department is dithering on whether to prosecute him is the question must be, is it optional? to the have to abide by the subpoenas? this must be, is it optional? to the have to abide by the subpoenas?- must be, is it optional? to the have to abide by the subpoenas? this is a hue to abide by the subpoenas? this is a huge problem _ to abide by the subpoenas? this is a huge problem that _ to abide by the subpoenas? this is a huge problem that american - to abide by the subpoenas? this is a i huge problem that american democracy itself and it stems back to the first impeachment where the united states will make state senate let donald trump off the hook for obstruction of congress where when he was in the white house he refused to obey or honour any request for information and they let that go so, as you indicate, steve bannon was voted to be held in contempt by
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congress for not complying with subpoenas and is now up to the us attorney in washington, dc to actually an indictment. he was just ceded four days ago, brand—new us attorney so it is possible with that transition things are slowing down and we do know about 150 witnesses have already testified but before the committee so now they're getting to the higher ranking people and, for sure, to the higher ranking people and, forsure, if to the higher ranking people and, for sure, if thejustice department doesn't stand up and form converse's power i think you're absolutely right, they'rejust power i think you're absolutely right, they're just going to hold this out until the midterm elections which are scheduled for one year from today, christian, and if is go to put the congress with the republicans, into republican hands, this whole investigation shut down. the trouble as it is a well rehearsed drill right now. even if steve bannon was prosecuted and goes to the appeals court, then supreme court a new was that by the number of subpoenas that have gone on and
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you just wonder if we're ever going to hear these people testify given the timescales you have just set out? to make some are still testifying. number one. and of the two as their claims of executive privilege, there are reasons for not testifying a really wheat, so my guess is that some are going to say, listen, i am just going to comply because it is a bogus defence and it is going to cost me money. number three is we have seen the supreme court, this conservative majority sort of allow litigants to hopscotch and to avoid, sort of, the deliberate process, like how the abortion case in texas got to supreme court so hopefully the question of executive privilege by a non—white house employee like steve bannon could make it up to the supreme court on an expedited basis and i would hope people likejustice kavanagh he used to teach constitutional law at harvard would understand the paramount importance of protecting the power of converse for both parties in the american
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people and hear these things in an expedited basis but it is impossible to predict with this court. you expedited basis but it is impossible to predict with this court.— to predict with this court. you do wonder how _ to predict with this court. you do wonder how executive _ to predict with this court. you do wonder how executive pete - to predict with this court. you do - wonder how executive pete privilege could cover people who weren't even the administration.— the administration. kim, lovely to see, the administration. kim, lovely to see. thank _ the administration. kim, lovely to see. thank you — the administration. kim, lovely to see, thank you very _ the administration. kim, lovely to see, thank you very much. - stay with us on bbc news, still to come: ukraine hits another record for daily coronavirus deaths amid a spike in infections, we'll have the latest from kyiv. a man rescued from a cave in the breacon beacons after more than two days underground is said to be in "good spirits" despite multiple injuries. around 300 people were involved in the operation to bring him out on a stretcher from what is one of the deepest cave systems in the uk. hywel griffith reports. pulling together to help one of their own. the rescuers own picture tell a story of teamwork in the most challenging conditions. today, as they cleared up, a chance to realise just what they had achieved. we look after each other and we are an extended family, effectively. we don't know each other, all of us.
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we are like a big family, but if one of us is in trouble, no matter where it is, we'll go and help. the man they rescued was an experienced caver in his 40s. when he fell he broke bones in his leg and jaw. there was no way he could make his own way out. it's hard to fathom on the surface, but beneath us here are 37 miles worth of tunnels crisscrossing between the caves. there are only three ways in and out, and this tiny metal door is one of them, an entrance to a hidden world. it was here at cwm dwr that the caver entered as part of a group on saturday. they'd travelled around 500 metres when the caver fell from a 9m ledge as it gave way. the road back was too narrow,
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so teams of rescuers had to carry him 3km towards the top entrance. manoeuvring the stretcher meant it took ten times longer than usual, clocking up 5a hours — the longest carry in uk caving history. it's rare for cavers to be in the limelight. for these volunteers, the only reward is knowing others would come to their aid. hywel griffith, bbc news. the evacuation flights out of afghanistan are few and far between, but with international funding frozen, and a humanitarian crisis escalating there are thousands still desperate to find a way out. the remote town of zaranj, close to the borders of both pakistan and iran, is a major crossing point, as secunder kermani and cameraman malik mudassir report. afghans are leaving in their thousands.
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smuggled out from this remote corner of the country, headed for the desert through pakistan into iran. no visas, no immigration, just people smugglers who pay a small fee to the taliban. most, desperate men hoping to find work. but there are whole families here, too. aren't you worried about going with all these young children? at times, it feels as if the whole of afghanistan is trying to find a way out. in this dusty car park, passengers wait to start a journey that will take more than a week. the economy is collapsing
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and few have faith in the new taliban government. at least 4,000 leave here every day, we're told. this is a deeply surreal sight — a huge people—smuggling hub, operating completely openly. the taliban say that rising poverty here means that it's not possible to stop all these people from trying to leave the country. they say all they can do is control how many people get into these trucks to make the journey a little safer. everyone wants to go to turkey or to europe? where do they want to go? the taliban are making money off this trade, around $10 per truck. but they say the economic crisis and freezing of international funding makes the flow of people unstoppable.
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all these people are travelling without visas. it's illegal. zaranj has long been a people—smuggling centre. under the previous government, corrupt officials were paid off. now, the trade is flourishing. secunder kermani reporting from afghanistan. the eu has removed ukraine from its list of covid safe countries, following a sustained increase in cases. ukraine s covid statistics make for grim reading. less than 1 in 5 ukrainians are double vaccinated ?
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that is the lowest rate in europe — and the health ministry has reported a record daily high of 833 covid—related deaths. from kyiv here s our correspondentjonah fisher. in ukraine's hospitals, the alarm bells are ringing. this latest record—breaking covid wave is filling the wards in ukraine's hospitals, the alarm bells are ringing. this latest record—breaking covid wave is filling the wards with patients, and the vast majority of them are unvaccinated. this doctor says she is fighting to save the life of a iio—year—old mother of three. three other members of her family are sick. all rejected the vaccine. fewer than one in five ukrainians are double jabbed — the product of deep—rooted scepticism of both doctors and the authorities. last week, hundreds gathered outside parliament to protest against vaccinations. vaccine is poison, it's poisoned. many people now died because they took vaccine. many people are alive now because they took the vaccine, too. no, it's not true, it's not true! you're a doctor. yes, i'm a doctor and neurologist.
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and you're against vaccination? totally. why? because it's not the way to not spread the infection. you must have a choice. right? with cases soaring, new restrictions have been introduced to try and force people to getjabbed. kyiv�*s now in what's known as the red zone which means if you want to travel on public transport, like this bus or on the metro, you have to be vaccinated and have to have the papers to prove it. in practice, there are lots of fake certificates around. we watched the police taking a very gentle approach to enforcing the rules. this woman has no proof of vaccination or covid test but she's let off with a warning.
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so that lady didn't have a vaccination certificate but you let her stay on the bus? "we're mostly here as a preventative measure", he says. "we can't really demand things from people". the tighter rules have led to queues at vaccination centres. ukraine is now desperately trying to catch up as the beds fill up and the number of covid deaths mount. jonah fisher, bbc news, kyiv. 0urfamily dog, marilyn, is a conundrum. she looks a bit like a labrador that has been short—changed on the legs. she's part corgi, we think, part spaniel...part lemon beagle...maybe. anyway, who cares? well, actually, maybe we should care. there's one family in peru who didn't pay close enough attention and lived to regret it. the sotelos family bought their puppy for $13 from a small shop in lima, believing it was pure—bred husky. but after a while, began receiving
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complaints from neighbours that their so—called dog which they named run run, was taking a particular interest in chickens and ducks. which was hard to explain, until the sotelos discovered that run run was not a husky , but was in fact a fox. an andean fox, which reportedly is more closely related to a wolf than a fox. hello. well, it's time to have a look at the weather for the next few days, and in the short—term, it's actually going to stay mild. we've had a couple of really mild days, so not much change, i think, for the rest of the week. there's a few cold nights on the way, but broadly speaking, if i show you the air mass graphic, or the temperature of the atmosphere, so this is a sped—up animation really for the rest of the week. you can see these vortices, these low pressures forming over the atlantic and making their way towards us, bringing that mild air. and with that also come weather fronts. there's one weather front over us right now that's stretching all the way to the subtropics, in fact, so this is an indication where the air�*s coming from. and we've got the particularly mild air across the southern half of the uk, so south of this line of cloud and spits
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and spots of rain. so, temperatures on wednesday still around about 15 degrees in the south. further north, we're in that fresher atlantic air. it's not cold, cold air for the time of the year. this is all, broadly speaking, pretty mild air, but you can see the mildest conditions will certainly be across the south of the country because this is where the air�*s coming from, the atmosphere is being warmed up by that moisture and the warmth coming in from the subtropics. so, here's thursday's weather map. now, there are couple of weather fronts over us, but that really is just cloud and spits and spots of rain. generally speaking, it's a case of light winds on thursday, i think, a fair amount of bright weather, particularly across eastern areas of the uk. but you'll notice that the weather's already going downhill out towards the west. that's a low pressure that's approaching, so here's the weather map thursday night into friday. so, this low pressure spins in, but whether this low�*s going to be here or whether it's a little bit further north or further south, will change the areas of rain that move basically across the uk. so, if the low pressure's further south on friday, that might take that area of rain
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a little bit further south. so, also, whether it's definitely going to be raining at 4 o'clock in liverpool on friday is very difficult to say, but the broad message is, i think, mild and breezy with a chance of rain certainly friday and also, i think, friday night. but eventually, by saturday, that low pressure kind of falls apart and decays, or takes its rain towards the continent, and you can see that the weather actually calms down on saturday. so, saturday, after that wet and windy spell for some of us on friday, saturday is looking better. but look at the temperatures. you know, 13 for belfast, probably touching 1a, maybe 15 degrees across the south as well. now, this is the weather map for sunday. look at the isobars, they're opening up. that means that the pressure is rising, and when pressure rises, the winds fall light, the weather settles. but i want to show you the wind direction here on sunday. it's actually coming out of the east. there's a lot of cloud here,
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so on some of these north sea coasts, it could be a little on the chilly side. maybe 11—12 degrees at best, so sunday, yes, settled, but it could be a little cold and cloudy. here's monday and tuesday. so, the jet stream's to the north of us, high pressure to the south, so keeping things settled, but watch what happens from wednesday onwards. the jet stream points right at us, making a beeline for us and sending weather fronts. and a lot of pressure lines here, so that means strong winds as well. so, next week's going to be a little bit mixed. we've got a settled start to the week with high pressure, remember the jet stream to the north of us. and then later next week, we've got wind and rain, probably wednesday, thursday, friday, it'll turn more unsettled. so, the weather's looking, i think, quite mixed over the next ten days.
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tonight at ten. all front line nhs staff in england will have to be fully vaccinated against covid—19. the deadline is expected to become the 1st of april next year and missed to save the decision is to protect patients and the health service. latte protect patients and the health service. ~ , ., ., , ., , service. we must avoid preventable harm and protect _ service. we must avoid preventable harm and protect patients - service. we must avoid preventable harm and protect patients and - service. we must avoid preventable harm and protect patients and the l harm and protect patients and the nhs, protect colleagues in the nhs and, of course, protect nhs itself. more than a thousand nhs workers have yet to be jabbed and some are warning that this new approach is not the right one. it is warning that this new approach is not the right one.— not the right one. it is unethical to force anyone _ not the right one. it is unethical to force anyone to _ not the right one. it is unethical to force anyone to have - not the right one. it is unethical to force anyone to have this - to force anyone to have this procedure and if i decide for various reasons do not have this procedure, it should not be up to the government to force us or i will
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lose myjob.

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