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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 9, 2021 8:00pm-9:00pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 8pm — all nhs staff in england who see patients face—to—face will have to be fully vaccinated against covid by next spring. only those who have a medical exemption can say no. we must avoid preventable harm and protect patients in the nhs, protect colleagues in the nhs and, of course, protect the nhs itself. it is unethical to force anybody to have _ it is unethical to force anybody to have a _ it is unethical to force anybody to have a medical procedure and if i have _ have a medical procedure and if i have decided i am not going to have a medical_ have decided i am not going to have a medical procedure, it should not be up _ a medical procedure, it should not be up to— a medical procedure, it should not be up to the government to force me to or say— be up to the government to force me to or say i'm — be up to the government to force me to or say i'm going to lose myjob. labour demands an inquiry into the government's former top law officer, who represents people in the west country and is earnings
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hundreds of thousands representing a government in the carribean. the mother of ten—year—old jack lis, killed by a dog in south wales, pays tribute to her "beautiful, sweet son". "let us in" — thousands camp out on the eu's polish border. brussels blames president lukashenko of an "inhuman, gangster—style approach" for lureing migrants. the british government has urged all uk nationals in ethiopia to leave as the conflict worsens. and england striker marcus rashford collects his mbe for his campaign against food poverty, dedicating his honour to mum. good evening, and welcome to the bbc news. the health secretary, sajid javid, says all front—line nhs staff in england will have to be fully vaccinated against covid—i9
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by next spring unless they're medically exempt. it's estimated thatjust over 100,000 nhs workers in england are currently unvaccinated. health unions say people should be encouraged, rather than forced, to have jabs. there are no plans yet for a similar move for nhs staff in scotland, wales and northern ireland. 0ur medical editor fergus walsh has more. do you want to roll up your sleeve for me? nojab, nojob. that appears to be the stark reality facing nhs workers in england. those with face—to—face contact with patients have until the 1st of april to have two doses of vaccine. the health secretary said the move would protect both patients and staff from infection. no one in the nhs or care that is currently unvaccinated should be scapegoated, singled out or shamed.
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that would be totally unacceptable. this is about supporting them to make a positive choice, to protect vulnerable people, to protect their colleagues and, of course, to protect themselves. the nhs staff we spoke to in london were broadly in favour. i'm all for it. if people want to work here, then they should be prepared to have whatever vaccinations they need. everyone needs to have the vaccine. but this trainee gp said she's recently had covid and believes she's now protected and so she doesn't want be vaccinated. it is unethical to force anyone to have a medical procedure, | and if i have decided - for various reasons to not and if i have decided _ for various reasons to not for various reasons to not have a procedure, it should not be up to the government
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to force me to, or to say i'm - going to lose myjob. in england, 90% of nhs staff have had two doses of covid vaccine, but 103,000 are completely unvaccinated. among care home workers in england, 88,000 were unvaccinated, just a few months ago. that is now down to 32,000, but the deadline for them to be fully vaccinated is this thursday. there are over 90,000 job vacancies in the nhs, and employers are concerned that that could rise even further. if we lose significant numbers of staff as a result of mandatory vaccination, then that's going to put very, very significant pressure on the nhs, so what we're saying to the government today is we absolutely see the logic of why you would want to do this but, please, help us to manage the risk of losing nhs staff. several european countries already have compulsory vaccination for health workers. it prompted protests in france, but the government there says take—up amongst staff soared from just 60% injuly to 99% now. ministers here will be hoping for a big boost
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in immunisation rates, but there's a risk that this may alienate some staff, who choose to leave the nhs rather than being taken off the wards and redeployed. 0ur medical editor fergus walsh has been telling us what this means for the uk as a whole. to be deployed, from the 1st of april next year, in face—to—face contact with patients, if you're a nurse, a doctor, a porter, a receptionist, you will need to be double—jabbed in england. now, it's unclear what will happen to people who dig in and say, "i'm not going to have the jab," if you're a nurse and you decide, "i don't want to be vaccinated." the health care union unison said they would expect them initially to be redeployed into perhaps a call centre or a clerical role, but that could have a big impact on the wards. dismissal would be seen as a last resort, but really we need the detail. there's still a lot of detail of this announcement we don't have,
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but no other parts of the uk yet have decided to go with this move. northern ireland is considering. it's going to have a consultation on it. alison o'connell is from leeds and works in a mental health unit in a hospital. speaking to radio 4 pm's anita anand, she gave her reaction to the announcement. i'm disappointed that it's come to it being made mandatory without any consideration for individual circumstances and the reasons that people have chosen to this point not to have the vaccination. i work on a hospital ward. i've, up to this point, chosen not to have the vaccination based on the evidence that i'm presented with in that i am part of a current study and have been for the last year. it's a siren study. i think it's reasonably well—known.
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it has a lot of nhs staff across the country involved in it. as part of that, i get my antibodies tested on a monthly basis, and i have to have a pcr test fortnightly. i still have antibodies, and i was infected with covid in april 2020. although it does say that you've got antibodies, does it also say how many antibodies you have? because i hear one of the arguments is, yes, you may have had covid, but we just don't know how many antibodies you have. it doesn't say how many antibodies that you have currently. that's one thing it doesn't do. the response i get back each time i have my antibody test is that i have detectable antibodies either from natural infection or from the vaccine. but what is stopping you from having a vaccine? why notjust get one and get it out of the way? i guess it has been the fact that
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i have natural antibodies, and that the vaccine, they've always said, will give you antibodies. i have said all along if i got my test result back and it said, "you haven't got antibodies," then i would go and have the vaccine, so i'm definitely not anti—vaccine. we can speak now to jason leitch, the national clinical director for scotland. jason, thank you very much talking to us again. it's good to have you on bbc news. i want to talk about scotland in terms of what is going on at the moment with figures and rates of vaccination in the general population. just on this question though, it you've looked at this assembly is so far decided not to go down this route england has decided to why is that?— to why is that? good evening. it's a decision for — to why is that? good evening. it's a decision for politicians, _ to why is that? good evening. it's a decision for politicians, as - to why is that? good evening. it's a decision for politicians, as it - decision for politicians, as it should — decision for politicians, as it should be _ decision for politicians, as it should be of— decision for politicians, as it should be of course. - decision for politicians, as it should be of course. the - decision for politicians, as it. should be of course. the advice
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decision for politicians, as it - should be of course. the advice of fort from — should be of course. the advice of fort from us — should be of course. the advice of fort from us has _ should be of course. the advice of fort from us has been— should be of course. the advice of fort from us has been frankly - should be of course. the advice of. fort from us has been frankly really simpie~ _ fort from us has been frankly really simpie~ the — fort from us has been frankly really simple. the rates— fort from us has been frankly really simple. the rates of— fort from us has been frankly really simple. the rates of health - fort from us has been frankly really simple. the rates of health and - simple. the rates of health and sociai— simple. the rates of health and social care _ simple. the rates of health and social care worker— simple. the rates of health and social care worker vaccination l simple. the rates of health and | social care worker vaccination in scotland — social care worker vaccination in scotland are _ social care worker vaccination in scotland are so _ social care worker vaccination in scotland are so high— social care worker vaccination in scotland are so high that - social care worker vaccination in scotland are so high that we - social care worker vaccination in . scotland are so high that we don't think— scotland are so high that we don't think we _ scotland are so high that we don't think we need _ scotland are so high that we don't think we need it. _ scotland are so high that we don't think we need it. we _ scotland are so high that we don't think we need it. we are - scotland are so high that we don't think we need it. we are well- scotland are so high that we don't i think we need it. we are well above 90%~ _ think we need it. we are well above 90%~ thism — think we need it. we are well above 90%~ thism you _ think we need it. we are well above 90%. this... you cannot— think we need it. we are well above 90%. this... you cannot get- think we need it. we are well above 90%. this... you cannot get to - think we need it. we are well above 90%. this... you cannot get to 100| 90%. this... you cannot get to 100 because _ 90%. this... you cannot get to 100 because there _ 90%. this... you cannot get to 100 because there is _ 90%. this... you cannot get to 100 because there is a _ 90%. this... you cannot get to 100 because there is a bit _ 90%. this... you cannot get to 100 because there is a bit of— 90%. this... you cannot get to 100 because there is a bit of transitionl because there is a bit of transition in and _ because there is a bit of transition in and out — because there is a bit of transition in and out of— because there is a bit of transition in and out of professions - because there is a bit of transition in and out of professions and - because there is a bit of transition in and out of professions and youl in and out of professions and you -et in and out of professions and you get new— in and out of professions and you get new workers _ in and out of professions and you get new workers need _ in and out of professions and you get new workers need to - in and out of professions and you get new workers need to take - in and out of professions and you. get new workers need to take care in and out of professions and you - get new workers need to take care of it from _ get new workers need to take care of it from what — get new workers need to take care of it from what we — get new workers need to take care of it from what we don't _ get new workers need to take care of it from what we don't think _ get new workers need to take care of it from what we don't think this - get new workers need to take care of it from what we don't think this is - it from what we don't think this is what _ it from what we don't think this is what we — it from what we don't think this is what we should _ it from what we don't think this is what we should putting _ it from what we don't think this is what we should putting our- it from what we don't think this is i what we should putting our energies in scotland — what we should putting our energies in scotland. that _ what we should putting our energies in scotland. that does _ what we should putting our energies in scotland. that does not _ what we should putting our energies in scotland. that does not mean - what we should putting our energiesj in scotland. that does not mean you don't _ in scotland. that does not mean you don't need _ in scotland. that does not mean you don't need it— in scotland. that does not mean you don't need it in— in scotland. that does not mean you don't need it in france _ in scotland. that does not mean you don't need it in france with - in scotland. that does not mean you don't need it in france with the - don't need it in france with the rates _ don't need it in france with the rates were _ don't need it in france with the rates were 60% _ don't need it in france with the rates were 60% and _ don't need it in france with the rates were 60% and the - don't need it in france with the rates were 60% and the rates i don't need it in france with the . rates were 60% and the rates got don't need it in france with the - rates were 60% and the rates got up to the _ rates were 60% and the rates got up to the high— rates were 60% and the rates got up to the high '90s~ _ rates were 60% and the rates got up to the high '90s i_ rates were 60% and the rates got up to the high '905. ithink— rates were 60% and the rates got up to the high '905. i think if— rates were 60% and the rates got up to the high '90s. i think if my- rates were 60% and the rates got up to the high '90s. i think if my were l to the high '90s. i think if my were 60%. _ to the high '90s. i think if my were 60%, id _ to the high '90s. i think if my were 60%, i'd be — to the high '90s. i think if my were 60%, i'd be giving— to the high '90s. i think if my were 60%, i'd be giving different - to the high '90s. i think if my were| 60%, i'd be giving different advice, so i 60%, i'd be giving different advice, so i think— 60%, i'd be giving different advice, so i think it's — 60%, i'd be giving different advice, so i think it's probably— 60%, i'd be giving different advice, so i think it's probably right - 60%, i'd be giving different advice, so i think it's probably right for- so i think it's probably right for england — so i think it's probably right for england iht— so i think it's probably right for england i'm in— so i think it's probably right for england. i'm in no— so i think it's probably right for england. i'm in no position - so i think it's probably right for england. i'm in no position to. england. i'm in no position to suggest — england. i'm in no position to suggest otherwise _ england. i'm in no position to suggest otherwise but - england. i'm in no position to suggest otherwise but in- england. i'm in no position to- suggest otherwise but in scotland, out advice — suggest otherwise but in scotland, out advice to — suggest otherwise but in scotland, out advice to our— suggest otherwise but in scotland, out advice to our ministers - suggest otherwise but in scotland, out advice to our ministers for- suggest otherwise but in scotland, j out advice to our ministers for now has been _ out advice to our ministers for now has been not — out advice to our ministers for now has been not to— out advice to our ministers for now has been not to make _ out advice to our ministers for now has been not to make this- out advice to our ministers for now . has been not to make this mandatory. two interesting — has been not to make this mandatory. two interesting things _ has been not to make this mandatory. two interesting things you _ has been not to make this mandatory. two interesting things you say - two interesting things you say there. in a sense, you think this is kind of a factor of other issues about overall vaccination numbers in the population, is one issue in particular the other issue is let's be honest, it's winter, nobody wants an exodus of staff from the health
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service or social care in the middle of winter. , . . service or social care in the middle of winter. . ., , , ., of winter. the pandemic has been a series of balances. _ of winter. the pandemic has been a series of balances. it's _ of winter. the pandemic has been a series of balances. it's been - of winter. the pandemic has been a series of balances. it's been a - series of balances. it's been a balance — series of balances. it's been a balance between— series of balances. it's been a balance between economic i series of balances. it's been a i balance between economic arm series of balances. it's been a - balance between economic arm and health— balance between economic arm and health harm — balance between economic arm and health harm and _ balance between economic arm and health harm and it's— balance between economic arm and health harm and it's a _ balance between economic arm and health harm and it's a balance - health harm and it's a balance between — health harm and it's a balance between workforce _ health harm and it's a balance between workforce and - health harm and it's a balance between workforce and tryingl health harm and it's a balance . between workforce and trying to health harm and it's a balance - between workforce and trying to keep everybody _ between workforce and trying to keep everybody as — between workforce and trying to keep everybody as it — between workforce and trying to keep everybody as it can. _ between workforce and trying to keep everybody as it can. please _ everybody as it can. please misunderstand _ everybody as it can. please misunderstand me - everybody as it can. please misunderstand me here. ii everybody as it can. please . misunderstand me here. lam everybody as it can. please - misunderstand me here. lam pretty much _ misunderstand me here. lam pretty much the _ misunderstand me here. lam pretty much the biggest _ misunderstand me here. lam pretty much the biggest vaccine _ misunderstand me here. lam pretty much the biggest vaccine advocate i much the biggest vaccine advocate you could — much the biggest vaccine advocate you could have _ much the biggest vaccine advocate you could have on— much the biggest vaccine advocate you could have on your— much the biggest vaccine advocate i you could have on your programme. myself— you could have on your programme. myself and — you could have on your programme. myself and many, _ you could have on your programme. myself and many, many— you could have on your programme. myself and many, many others - you could have on your programme. myself and many, many others who| myself and many, many others who have tried _ myself and many, many others who have tried to — myself and many, many others who have tried to find _ myself and many, many others who have tried to find a _ myself and many, many others who have tried to find a way— myself and many, many others who have tried to find a way this - have tried to find a way this pandemic, _ have tried to find a way this pandemic, i_ have tried to find a way this pandemic, i think— have tried to find a way this pandemic, i think is - have tried to find a way this pandemic, i think is the - have tried to find a way this i pandemic, i think is the safest have tried to find a way this - pandemic, i think is the safest and most _ pandemic, i think is the safest and most straightforward _ pandemic, i think is the safest and most straightforward and - pandemic, i think is the safest and most straightforward and the - pandemic, i think is the safest and most straightforward and the best| most straightforward and the best way to _ most straightforward and the best way to protect _ most straightforward and the best way to protect you. _ most straightforward and the best way to protect you, me _ most straightforward and the best way to protect you, me and - most straightforward and the best way to protect you, me and the i most straightforward and the best - way to protect you, me and the whole population _ way to protect you, me and the whole population. now. _ way to protect you, me and the whole population. now, but— way to protect you, me and the whole population. now, but we _ way to protect you, me and the whole population. now, but we do— way to protect you, me and the whole population. now, but we do with - way to protect you, me and the whole population. now, but we do with that| population. now, but we do with that vaccine _ population. now, but we do with that vaccine and _ population. now, but we do with that vaccine and the — population. now, but we do with that vaccine and the groups _ population. now, but we do with that vaccine and the groups we _ population. now, but we do with that vaccine and the groups we should - vaccine and the groups we should target _ vaccine and the groups we should target with— vaccine and the groups we should target with our— vaccine and the groups we should target with our communication, l vaccine and the groups we should i target with our communication, with our energies. — target with our communication, with our energies, that— target with our communication, with our energies, that vary _ target with our communication, with our energies, that vary from - target with our communication, with our energies, that vary from country to country— our energies, that vary from country to country so — our energies, that vary from country to country so i'm _ our energies, that vary from country to country so i'm a _ our energies, that vary from country to country so i'm a little _ our energies, that vary from country to country so i'm a little bit - to country so i'm a little bit worried _ to country so i'm a little bit worried about _ to country so i'm a little bit worried about the - to country so i'm a little bit worried about the 18 - to country so i'm a little bit worried about the 18 have i to country so i'm a little bitj worried about the 18 have a 29-year-old _ worried about the 18 have a 29—year—old group - worried about the 18 have a 29—year—old group for- worried about the 18 have a . 29—year—old group for instance worried about the 18 have a - 29—year—old group for instance in scotland — 29—year—old group for instance in scotland that _ 29—year—old group for instance in scotland that think _ 29—year—old group for instance in scotland that think they're - scotland that think they're invincible. _ scotland that think they're invincible. so _ scotland that think they're invincible. so i— scotland that think they're invincible. so i am - scotland that think they're invincible. so i am very. scotland that think they're . invincible. so i am very keen scotland that think they're - invincible. so i am very keen to get their— invincible. so i am very keen to get their numbers— invincible. so i am very keen to get their numbers up. _ invincible. so i am very keen to get their numbers up. the _ invincible. so i am very keen to get their numbers up. the teenagers. invincible. so i am very keen to get . their numbers up. the teenagers who have just _ their numbers up. the teenagers who have just come — their numbers up. the teenagers who have just come forward _ their numbers up. the teenagers who have just come forward and _ their numbers up. the teenagers who have just come forward and huge - have just come forward and huge numbers— have just come forward and huge numbers in— have just come forward and huge numbers in scotland _ have just come forward and huge numbers in scotland and - have just come forward and huge numbers in scotland and across i have just come forward and huge . numbers in scotland and across the whole _ numbers in scotland and across the whole of _ numbers in scotland and across the
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whole of the — numbers in scotland and across the whole of the uk, _ numbers in scotland and across the whole of the uk, they— numbers in scotland and across the whole of the uk, they have - numbers in scotland and across the whole of the uk, they have gone i numbers in scotland and across the j whole of the uk, they have gone so well, _ whole of the uk, they have gone so well, much — whole of the uk, they have gone so well, much better— whole of the uk, they have gone so well, much better than— whole of the uk, they have gone so well, much better than i— whole of the uk, they have gone so well, much better than i expected i whole of the uk, they have gone so. well, much better than i expected so it's about _ well, much better than i expected so it's about getting _ well, much better than i expected so it's about getting all— well, much better than i expected so it's about getting all those _ well, much better than i expected so it's about getting all those groups i it's about getting all those groups managed — it's about getting all those groups managed and _ it's about getting all those groups managed and vaccinated - it's about getting all those groups managed and vaccinated because | it's about getting all those groups - managed and vaccinated because that is the _ managed and vaccinated because that is the way— managed and vaccinated because that is the way to— managed and vaccinated because that is the way to get _ managed and vaccinated because that is the way to get to _ managed and vaccinated because that is the way to get to the _ managed and vaccinated because that is the way to get to the winter, - managed and vaccinated because that is the way to get to the winter, no - is the way to get to the winter, no question — is the way to get to the winter, no cuestion. ~ ., is the way to get to the winter, no cuestion. ~ . ., ,., .., question. what about the ethical cuestion? question. what about the ethical question? not _ question. what about the ethical question? not exhibit _ question. what about the ethical question? not exhibit two - question. what about the ethical| question? not exhibit two wales, scotland, ireland, england orthe question? not exhibit two wales, scotland, ireland, england or the uk generally. the question posed in the report by that gpa and let's leave aside the question whether having had covid—19 quite recently is enough to justify not having a vaccination on medical grounds were her argument was quite straightforward. no government should be able to tell me as a citizen that i must have a vaccination. what is your thought on that as an ethical question? is a that as an ethical question? is a really interesting _ that as an ethical question? is a really interesting question. first of all— really interesting question. first of all i _ really interesting question. first of all i can— really interesting question. first of all i can get— really interesting question. first of all i can get rid _ really interesting question. first of all i can get rid of— really interesting question. first of all i can get rid of the - really interesting question. first of all i can get rid of the actual. of all i can get rid of the actual community— of all i can get rid of the actual community versus _ of all i can get rid of the actual community versus vaccine - of all i can get rid of the actual- community versus vaccine immunity pretty— community versus vaccine immunity pretty quickly — community versus vaccine immunity pretty quickly. there _ community versus vaccine immunity pretty quickly. there is _ community versus vaccine immunity pretty quickly. there is not- community versus vaccine immunity pretty quickly. there is not any- pretty quickly. there is not any different — pretty quickly. there is not any different. you _ pretty quickly. there is not any different. you don't _ pretty quickly. there is not any different. you don't get - pretty quickly. there is not any different. you don't get a - pretty quickly. there is not any. different. you don't get a certain type of— different. you don't get a certain type of antibody— different. you don't get a certain type of antibody because - different. you don't get a certain type of antibody because you - different. you don't get a certain. type of antibody because you have the disease — type of antibody because you have the disease or— type of antibody because you have the disease or at— type of antibody because you have the disease or at the _ type of antibody because you have the disease or at the vaccine. - type of antibody because you have j the disease or at the vaccine. with the disease or at the vaccine. with the vaccine — the disease or at the vaccine. with the vaccine does _ the disease or at the vaccine. with the vaccine does is _ the disease or at the vaccine. with the vaccine does is it— the disease or at the vaccine. with the vaccine does is it elongates. the vaccine does is it elongates your— the vaccine does is it elongates your immunity_ the vaccine does is it elongates your immunity so _ the vaccine does is it elongates your immunity so if— the vaccine does is it elongates your immunity so if you - the vaccine does is it elongates your immunity so if you had - the vaccine does is it elongates| your immunity so if you had the vaccine, — your immunity so if you had the vaccine, you _ your immunity so if you had the vaccine, you should _ your immunity so if you had the vaccine, you should get - your immunity so if you had the vaccine, you should get the - your immunity so if you had the - vaccine, you should get the vaccine. no question — vaccine, you should get the vaccine. no question all— vaccine, you should get the vaccine. no question, all research _ vaccine, you should get the vaccine. no question, all research so - vaccine, you should get the vaccine. no question, all research so she - no question, all research so she should _ no question, all research so she should do— no question, all research so she should do that. _ no question, all research so she should do that. the _ no question, all research so she should do that. the ethics- no question, all research so she should do that. the ethics are l
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no question, all research so she should do that. the ethics are it| no question, all research so she i should do that. the ethics are it is a bit _ should do that. the ethics are it is a bit awkward _ should do that. the ethics are it is a bit awkward and _ should do that. the ethics are it is a bit awkward and that's _ should do that. the ethics are it is a bit awkward and that's what - should do that. the ethics are it is| a bit awkward and that's what wish we should — a bit awkward and that's what wish we should suggest— a bit awkward and that's what wish we should suggest this _ a bit awkward and that's what wish we should suggest this is - a bit awkward and that's what wish we should suggest this is finally i a bit awkward and that's what wish we should suggest this is finally a i we should suggest this is finally a policy— we should suggest this is finally a policy decision _ we should suggest this is finally a policy decision we _ we should suggest this is finally a policy decision we would - we should suggest this is finally a policy decision we would give - policy decision we would give ethical— policy decision we would give ethical advice _ policy decision we would give ethical advice and _ policy decision we would give ethical advice and medical. policy decision we would give - ethical advice and medical advice to politicians _ ethical advice and medical advice to politicians to — ethical advice and medical advice to politicians to make _ ethical advice and medical advice to politicians to make that _ ethical advice and medical advice to politicians to make that choice. - ethical advice and medical advice to politicians to make that choice. i. politicians to make that choice. i wasjust— politicians to make that choice. i wasjust of— politicians to make that choice. i wasjust of a _ politicians to make that choice. i was just of a size _ politicians to make that choice. i was just of a size that _ politicians to make that choice. i was just of a size that we - politicians to make that choice. i was just of a size that we make i was just of a size that we make choices— was just of a size that we make choices like _ was just of a size that we make choices like that _ was just of a size that we make choices like that all _ was just of a size that we make choices like that all the - was just of a size that we make choices like that all the time. l choices like that all the time. fluoridation— choices like that all the time. fluoridation of— choices like that all the time. fluoridation of water, - choices like that all the time. | fluoridation of water, chlorine choices like that all the time. . fluoridation of water, chlorine in your— fluoridation of water, chlorine in your water— fluoridation of water, chlorine in your water to _ fluoridation of water, chlorine in your water to make _ fluoridation of water, chlorine in your water to make it _ fluoridation of water, chlorine in your water to make it clean. - fluoridation of water, chlorine in i your water to make it clean. there are interventions _ your water to make it clean. there are interventions that _ your water to make it clean. there are interventions that we - your water to make it clean. there are interventions that we do - your water to make it clean. there are interventions that we do as - your water to make it clean. there are interventions that we do as a l are interventions that we do as a society— are interventions that we do as a society that _ are interventions that we do as a society that we _ are interventions that we do as a society that we choose _ are interventions that we do as a society that we choose to - are interventions that we do as a society that we choose to do - are interventions that we do as a society that we choose to do fori are interventions that we do as a i society that we choose to do for the whole _ society that we choose to do for the whole population. _ society that we choose to do for the whole population. the _ society that we choose to do for the whole population. the public- society that we choose to do for the whole population. the public healthj whole population. the public health is. whole population. the public health is and _ whole population. the public health is and one — whole population. the public health is and one of— whole population. the public health is. and one of the _ whole population. the public health is. and one of the things _ whole population. the public health is. and one of the things we - whole population. the public health is. and one of the things we have . is. and one of the things we have had to— is. and one of the things we have had to learn— is. and one of the things we have had to learn is— is. and one of the things we have had to learn is we _ is. and one of the things we have had to learn is we have _ is. and one of the things we have had to learn is we have got - is. and one of the things we have had to learn is we have got to - is. and one of the things we havej had to learn is we have got to the pandemic— had to learn is we have got to the pandemic and _ had to learn is we have got to the pandemic and the _ had to learn is we have got to the pandemic and the difference - had to learn is we have got to the - pandemic and the difference between my health _ pandemic and the difference between my health and — pandemic and the difference between my health and everybody's _ pandemic and the difference between my health and everybody's help. - pandemic and the difference between my health and everybody's help. and| my health and everybody's help. and meet wearing — my health and everybody's help. and meet wearing a — my health and everybody's help. and meet wearing a face _ my health and everybody's help. and meet wearing a face covering - my health and everybody's help. and meet wearing a face covering or- my health and everybody's help. and meet wearing a face covering or youl meet wearing a face covering or you washing _ meet wearing a face covering or you washing your— meet wearing a face covering or you washing your hands _ meet wearing a face covering or you washing your hands is— meet wearing a face covering or you washing your hands is not— meet wearing a face covering or you washing your hands is notjust - meet wearing a face covering or you| washing your hands is notjust about you or— washing your hands is notjust about you or i. _ washing your hands is notjust about you or i. is _ washing your hands is notjust about you or i. is about— washing your hands is notjust about you or i, is about the _ washing your hands is notjust about you or i, is about the whole - you or i, is about the whole population— you or i, is about the whole population and _ you or i, is about the whole population and the - you or i, is about the whole population and the way- you or i, is about the whole - population and the way through a pandemic— population and the way through a pandemic is— population and the way through a pandemic is to _ population and the way through a pandemic is to help _ population and the way through a pandemic is to help each - population and the way through a pandemic is to help each other. population and the way through a i pandemic is to help each other and vaccination — pandemic is to help each other and vaccination is — pandemic is to help each other and vaccination is part— pandemic is to help each other and vaccination is part of— pandemic is to help each other and vaccination is part of that. - pandemic is to help each other and vaccination is part of that. i- pandemic is to help each other and vaccination is part of that. i wouldl vaccination is part of that. i would say responsibility— vaccination is part of that. i would say responsibility as _ vaccination is part of that. i would say responsibility as citizens - vaccination is part of that. i would say responsibility as citizens to i say responsibility as citizens to try and — say responsibility as citizens to try and help _ say responsibility as citizens to try and help us _ say responsibility as citizens to try and help us get _ say responsibility as citizens to try and help us get through - say responsibility as citizens toj try and help us get through the other— try and help us get through the other side _ try and help us get through the other side of— try and help us get through the other side of this _ try and help us get through the other side of this weather - try and help us get through the other side of this weather we l try and help us get through the i other side of this weather we are try and help us get through the - other side of this weather we are 85 or 15 _ other side of this weather we are 85 or 15. ., ~ other side of this weather we are 85 or 15. . ,, i. ., ., other side of this weather we are 85 or15. . ,, ., ., �*, or 15. thank you for that. let's look a bit _ or 15. thank you for that. let's look a bit about _ or 15. thank you for that. let's look a bit about scotland - or 15. thank you for that. let's look a bit about scotland and i look a bit about scotland and infection rates because one of the things reported today is death
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exceeding 1,000 a week for the first time since early september. concerns obviously about going through the winter. there is a reasonably good news and bad news and numbers we are sitting at the moment. 0ne news and bad news and numbers we are sitting at the moment. one of the good bits so far is piercing still not the surge of admissions to hospital that presumably always is something that must be on your mind constantly during this pandemic. it's about the equation from cases to hospitalisations _ it's about the equation from cases to hospitalisations to _ it's about the equation from cases to hospitalisations to intensive - to hospitalisations to intensive care and — to hospitalisations to intensive care and forgive _ to hospitalisations to intensive care and forgive the _ to hospitalisations to intensive care and forgive the shorthandj to hospitalisations to intensive . care and forgive the shorthand to death _ care and forgive the shorthand to death. just — care and forgive the shorthand to death. just let _ care and forgive the shorthand to death. just let me _ care and forgive the shorthand to death. just let me just _ care and forgive the shorthand to death. just let me just to - care and forgive the shorthand toi death. just let me just to reassure your viewers, _ death. just let me just to reassure your viewers, the _ death. just let me just to reassure your viewers, the 1,000 _ death. just let me just to reassure your viewers, the 1,000 a - death. just let me just to reassure your viewers, the 1,000 a week. death. just let me just to reassure your viewers, the 1,000 a week is| your viewers, the 1,000 a week is the whole — your viewers, the 1,000 a week is the whole of— your viewers, the 1,000 a week is the whole of the _ your viewers, the 1,000 a week is the whole of the uk _ your viewers, the 1,000 a week is the whole of the uk and _ your viewers, the 1,000 a week is the whole of the uk and not - your viewers, the 1,000 a week is the whole of the uk and not just l the whole of the uk and notjust scotland — the whole of the uk and notjust scotland. that _ the whole of the uk and notjust scotland. that would _ the whole of the uk and notjust scotland. that would really - the whole of the uk and notjust scotland. that would really give | the whole of the uk and not just . scotland. that would really give me cause _ scotland. that would really give me cause for— scotland. that would really give me cause for concern. _ scotland. that would really give me cause for concern. but _ scotland. that would really give me cause for concern. but just - scotland. that would really give me cause for concern. but just to - scotland. that would really give me cause for concern. but just to put . cause for concern. butjust to put it in perspective. _ cause for concern. butjust to put it in perspective. we _ cause for concern. butjust to put it in perspective. we have - cause for concern. butjust to put it in perspective. we have got- cause for concern. but just to put i it in perspective. we have got about one tenth _ it in perspective. we have got about one tenth of— it in perspective. we have got about one tenth of that _ it in perspective. we have got about one tenth of that and _ it in perspective. we have got about one tenth of that and that's - it in perspective. we have got about one tenth of that and that's about. one tenth of that and that's about i’ili'it one tenth of that and that's about right for— one tenth of that and that's about right for scotland _ one tenth of that and that's about right for scotland by— one tenth of that and that's about right for scotland by the - one tenth of that and that's about i right for scotland by the population size and _ right for scotland by the population size and that's _ right for scotland by the population size and that's too _ right for scotland by the population size and that's too many. _ right for scotland by the population size and that's too many. we - right for scotland by the population size and that's too many. we have i size and that's too many. we have been _ size and that's too many. we have been stuck — size and that's too many. we have been stuck at _ size and that's too many. we have been stuck at around _ size and that's too many. we have been stuck at around 2,500 - size and that's too many. we have been stuck at around 2,500 cases| size and that's too many. we have i been stuck at around 2,500 cases a day for— been stuck at around 2,500 cases a day for three — been stuck at around 2,500 cases a day for three weeks _ been stuck at around 2,500 cases a day for three weeks now _ been stuck at around 2,500 cases a day for three weeks now and - been stuck at around 2,500 cases a day for three weeks now and we - day for three weeks now and we sometimes _ day for three weeks now and we sometimes get _ day for three weeks now and we sometimes get 3,000 - day for three weeks now and we sometimes get 3,000 and - day for three weeks now and we - sometimes get 3,000 and sometimes 1,900 _ sometimes get 3,000 and sometimes 1,900 but— sometimes get 3,000 and sometimes 1,900 but on— sometimes get 3,000 and sometimes 1,900 but on average _ sometimes get 3,000 and sometimes 1,900 but on average is— sometimes get 3,000 and sometimes 1,900 but on average is about - sometimes get 3,000 and sometimes 1,900 but on average is about 2,500 i 1,900 but on average is about 2,500 cases—
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1,900 but on average is about 2,500 cases a _ 1,900 but on average is about 2,500 cases a day — 1,900 but on average is about 2,500 cases a day it — 1,900 but on average is about 2,500 cases a day. it would _ 1,900 but on average is about 2,500 cases a day. it would seem - 1,900 but on average is about 2,500 cases a day. it would seem that - 1,900 but on average is about 2,500 cases a day. it would seem that our, j cases a day. it would seem that our, the art _ cases a day. it would seem that our, the art number— cases a day. it would seem that our, the art number from _ cases a day. it would seem that our, the art number from ebony- cases a day. it would seem that our, the art number from ebony on- cases a day. it would seem that our, the art number from ebony on two . the art number from ebony on two months _ the art number from ebony on two months ago. — the art number from ebony on two months ago. it— the art number from ebony on two months ago, it seems _ the art number from ebony on two months ago, it seems that - the art number from ebony on two| months ago, it seems that number the art number from ebony on two i months ago, it seems that number is one it _ months ago, it seems that number is one it roughly~ — months ago, it seems that number is one it roughly~ so _ months ago, it seems that number is one it roughly. so 2,500 _ months ago, it seems that number is one it roughly. so 2,500 people - months ago, it seems that number is one it roughly. so 2,500 people are i one it roughly. so 2,500 people are giving _ one it roughly. so 2,500 people are giving it— one it roughly. so 2,500 people are giving it to — one it roughly. so 2,500 people are giving it to another _ one it roughly. so 2,500 people are giving it to another 2,500 _ one it roughly. so 2,500 people are giving it to another 2,500 so - one it roughly. so 2,500 people are giving it to another 2,500 so i- giving it to another 2,500 so i would — giving it to another 2,500 so i would really _ giving it to another 2,500 so i would really like _ giving it to another 2,500 so i would really like either- giving it to another 2,500 so i would really like either that. giving it to another 2,500 so i- would really like either that number to come _ would really like either that number to come down— would really like either that number to come down so _ would really like either that number to come down so the _ would really like either that number to come down so the number- would really like either that number to come down so the number it - would really like either that number. to come down so the number it would come _ to come down so the number it would come down _ to come down so the number it would come down or— to come down so the number it would come down or but _ to come down so the number it would come down or but also _ to come down so the number it would come down or but also to _ to come down so the number it would come down or but also to get - to come down so the number it would come down or but also to get the - come down or but also to get the right— come down or but also to get the right down— come down or but also to get the right down to _ come down or but also to get the right down to 100 _ come down or but also to get the right down to 100 because - come down or but also to get the right down to 100 because if - come down or but also to get the right down to 100 because if youi right down to 100 because if you have _ right down to 100 because if you have 100, — right down to 100 because if you have 100, and _ right down to 100 because if you have 100, and the _ right down to 100 because if you have 100, and the art _ right down to 100 because if you have 100, and the art number. right down to 100 because if you have 100, and the art number isj right down to 100 because if you - have 100, and the art number is one you'll— have 100, and the art number is one you'll have _ have 100, and the art number is one you'll have another— have 100, and the art number is one you'll have another hunter— have 100, and the art number is one you'll have another hunter the - have 100, and the art number is one you'll have another hunter the next. you'll have another hunter the next day and _ you'll have another hunter the next day and that's _ you'll have another hunter the next day and that's much _ you'll have another hunter the next day and that's much easier- you'll have another hunter the next day and that's much easier to - day and that's much easier to manage _ day and that's much easier to manage so _ day and that's much easier to manage so we _ day and that's much easier to manage. so we are _ day and that's much easier to manage. so we are on- day and that's much easier to manage. so we are on 90 - day and that's much easier to - manage. so we are on 90 admission today— manage. so we are on 90 admission today roughly. — manage. so we are on 90 admission today roughly, about _ manage. so we are on 90 admission today roughly, about 20 _ manage. so we are on 90 admission today roughly, about 20 or - manage. so we are on 90 admission today roughly, about 20 or 30 - manage. so we are on 90 admissionl today roughly, about 20 or 30 deaths a day _ today roughly, about 20 or 30 deaths a day and _ today roughly, about 20 or 30 deaths a day and we — today roughly, about 20 or 30 deaths a day and we are _ today roughly, about 20 or 30 deaths a day and we are heading _ today roughly, about 20 or 30 deaths a day and we are heading into - a day and we are heading into winter~ — a day and we are heading into winter~ we _ a day and we are heading into winter. we are _ a day and we are heading into winter. we are only— a day and we are heading into winter. we are only in- a day and we are heading into winter. we are only in early. winter. we are only in early november— winter. we are only in early novemberand _ winter. we are only in early november and glasgow- winter. we are only in early november and glasgow is. winter. we are only in early. november and glasgow is not winter. we are only in early- november and glasgow is not doing well but _ november and glasgow is not doing well but it's — november and glasgow is not doing well but it's not— november and glasgow is not doing well but it's not yet _ november and glasgow is not doing well but it's not yet glasgow - november and glasgow is not doing well but it's not yet glasgow winterl well but it's not yet glasgow winter weather~ _ well but it's not yet glasgow winter weather~ so — well but it's not yet glasgow winter weather. so that's _ well but it's not yet glasgow winter weather. so that's coming. - well but it's not yet glasgow winter weather. so that's coming. so - well but it's not yet glasgow winter weather. so that's coming. so flu l well but it's not yet glasgow winter| weather. so that's coming. so flu is coming _ weather. so that's coming. so flu is coming and — weather. so that's coming. so flu is coming and we _ weather. so that's coming. so flu is coming and we need _ weather. so that's coming. so flu is coming and we need to— weather. so that's coming. so flu is coming and we need to try- weather. so that's coming. so flu is coming and we need to try and - weather. so that's coming. so flu is coming and we need to try and getl coming and we need to try and get those _ coming and we need to try and get those numbers— coming and we need to try and get those numbers that _ coming and we need to try and get those numbers that and _ coming and we need to try and get those numbers that and that's - coming and we need to try and get those numbers that and that's why the deputy— those numbers that and that's why the deputy first— those numbers that and that's why the deputy first minister— those numbers that and that's why the deputy first minister in- the deputy first minister in scotland _ the deputy first minister in scotland today _ the deputy first minister in scotland today told - the deputy first minister in scotland today told the - the deputy first minister in- scotland today told the parliament that although _ scotland today told the parliament that although there _ scotland today told the parliament that although there are _ scotland today told the parliament that although there are no - scotland today told the parliament that although there are no plans . that although there are no plans yet, that although there are no plans yet. there — that although there are no plans yet. there has— that although there are no plans yet, there has to _ that although there are no plans yet, there has to be _ that although there are no plans yet, there has to be a _ that although there are no plans yet, there has to be a scheme . yet, there has to be a scheme available _ yet, there has to be a scheme available. also _ yet, there has to be a scheme available. also have _ yet, there has to be a scheme available. also have to - yet, there has to be a scheme available. also have to be - yet, there has to be a scheme available. also have to be a l yet, there has to be a scheme - available. also have to be a forward .ear available. also have to be a forward gear and _ available. also have to be a forward gear and i_ available. also have to be a forward gear and i look— available. also have to be a forward gear and i look forward _ available. also have to be a forward gear and i look forward to— available. also have to be a forward gear and i look forward to it - available. also have to be a forward gear and i look forward to it with . gear and i look forward to it with her have — gear and i look forward to it with her have to _ gear and i look forward to it with her have to be _ gear and i look forward to it with her have to be a _ gear and i look forward to it with her have to be a recipe - gear and i look forward to it with her have to be a recipe for- gear and i look forward to it with her have to be a recipe for goingj her have to be a recipe for going backwards — her have to be a recipe for going backwards if _ her have to be a recipe for going backwards if we _ her have to be a recipe for going backwards if we have _ her have to be a recipe for going backwards if we have to -
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her have to be a recipe for going backwards if we have to advise l her have to be a recipe for goingl backwards if we have to advise to her have to be a recipe for going - backwards if we have to advise to do that _ backwards if we have to advise to do that. , ., , , , that. refill you must be fully concerned — that. refill you must be fully concerned about _ that. refill you must be fully concerned about cop - that. refill you must be fully concerned about cop and - that. refill you must be fully concerned about cop and its| concerned about cop and its potential for infection and the spread of covid—19. potential for infection and the spread of covid-19._ potential for infection and the spread of covid-19. after the day there today _ spread of covid-19. after the day there today and _ spread of covid-19. after the day there today and i _ spread of covid-19. after the day there today and i was _ spread of covid-19. after the day there today and i was in - spread of covid-19. after the day there today and i was in the - spread of covid-19. after the day there today and i was in the blue | there today and i was in the blue zone _ there today and i was in the blue zone because _ there today and i was in the blue zone because it— there today and i was in the blue zone because it was _ there today and i was in the blue zone because it was health - there today and i was in the blue zone because it was health a - zone because it was health a investment— zone because it was health a investment spent— zone because it was health a investment spent today - zone because it was health a - investment spent today discussing what cop— investment spent today discussing what cop should _ investment spent today discussing what cop should talk _ investment spent today discussing what cop should talk about - investment spent today discussing what cop should talk about whichl investment spent today discussing i what cop should talk about which is climate _ what cop should talk about which is climate change _ what cop should talk about which is climate change and _ what cop should talk about which is climate change and health - climate change and health contribution _ climate change and health contribution and _ climate change and health contribution and the - climate change and health contribution and the harm| climate change and health - contribution and the harm climate change _ contribution and the harm climate change causes _ contribution and the harm climate change causes health— contribution and the harm climate change causes health and - contribution and the harm climate change causes health and that. contribution and the harm climatei change causes health and that was contribution and the harm climate . change causes health and that was a terrific— change causes health and that was a terrific break — change causes health and that was a terrific break from _ change causes health and that was a terrific break from some _ change causes health and that was a terrific break from some of- change causes health and that was a terrific break from some of the - terrific break from some of the covid-i9 — terrific break from some of the covid—19 thing. _ terrific break from some of the covid—19 thing. also _ terrific break from some of the covid—19 thing. also being - terrific break from some of the covid—19 thing. also being on. terrific break from some of the . covid—19 thing. also being on the for giving — covid—19 thing. also being on the for giving it— covid—19 thing. also being on the for giving it covid—19 _ covid—19 thing. also being on the for giving it covid—19 safe - covid—19 thing. also being on the for giving it covid—19 safe i- covid—19 thing. also being on the for giving it covid—19 safe i can. for giving it covid—19 safe i can tell you — for giving it covid—19 safe i can tell you that _ for giving it covid—19 safe i can tell you that the _ for giving it covid—19 safe i can tell you that the numbers - for giving it covid—19 safe i can tell you that the numbers of. tell you that the numbers of positives _ tell you that the numbers of positives are _ tell you that the numbers of positives are very, - tell you that the numbers of positives are very, very- tell you that the numbers of. positives are very, very small tell you that the numbers of - positives are very, very small so i'm positives are very, very small so i'm really— positives are very, very small so i'm really pleased _ positives are very, very small so i'm really pleased with - positives are very, very small so i'm really pleased with how - positives are very, very small so i'm really pleased with how the i i'm really pleased with how the mitigations— i'm really pleased with how the mitigations have _ i'm really pleased with how the mitigations have gone - i'm really pleased with how the mitigations have gone in - i'm really pleased with how the mitigations have gone in the i i'm really pleased with how the i mitigations have gone in the first eight _ mitigations have gone in the first eight or— mitigations have gone in the first eight or nine _ mitigations have gone in the first eight or nine days _ mitigations have gone in the first eight or nine days was _ mitigations have gone in the first eight or nine days was still- mitigations have gone in the first eight or nine days was still a - mitigations have gone in the first eight or nine days was still a few| eight or nine days was still a few days— eight or nine days was still a few days to — eight or nine days was still a few days to go — eight or nine days was still a few days to go i_ eight or nine days was still a few days to go iget— eight or nine days was still a few days to go. i get to _ eight or nine days was still a few days to go. i get to the - eight or nine days was still a few. days to go. i get to the conference centre _ days to go. i get to the conference centre for— days to go. i get to the conference centre for my _ days to go. i get to the conference centre for my living _ days to go. i get to the conference centre for my living room - days to go. i get to the conference centre for my living room window, | days to go. i get to the conference . centre for my living room window, so i centre for my living room window, so i have _ centre for my living room window, so i have a _ centre for my living room window, so i have a bird's— centre for my living room window, so i have a bird's eye _ centre for my living room window, so i have a bird's eye view— centre for my living room window, so i have a bird's eye view of— centre for my living room window, so i have a bird's eye view of that - i have a bird's eye view of that conference _ i have a bird's eye view of that conference centre _ i have a bird's eye view of that conference centre and - i have a bird's eye view of that conference centre and so - i have a bird's eye view of that conference centre and so far, i i have a bird's eye view of that i conference centre and so far, so good _ conference centre and so far, so ood, . ., conference centre and so far, so good. jason leach, national clinical written for the _ good. jason leach, national clinical written for the nhs _ good. jason leach, national clinical written for the nhs in _ good. jason leach, national clinical written for the nhs in scotland, - written for the nhs in scotland, they give very much for talking to us on bbc is always a pleasure to have you on the programme. and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered
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in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30pm and 11:30pm this evening in the papers. our guestsjoining me tonight are natalie fahy, senior editor of the nottingham post, derby telegraph and lincolnshire echo, and rachel watson, deputy political editor of the scottish daily mail. so doubtless she has a view on cop26 and glasgow. the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk show there were more than 33,117 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means, on average, there were 34,148 new cases reported per day in the last week. 262 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week, 166 related deaths were recorded every day. and more than 10.5 million people have received their boosterjab.
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labour has called on the prime minister to launch an investigation into a conservative mp who earned almost £900,000 through jobs outside parliament. sir geoffrey cox racked up the wage bill as a lawyer, including a spell working in the caribbean to advise on a corruption inquiry. sir geoffrey has not broken any rules, but downing street said mps who don't serve their constituents and make themselves visible to the public are "not doing the job". our political correspondent ben wright reports. for some mps, onejob is not enough. this devon constituency is represented in parliament by the conservative mp sir geoffrey cox. his majority is huge, and so are the fees he charges as a lawyer. for work that takes him a long way from his voters.
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the purpose of elected office is to serve the public. it is not to enrich the officeholder. here is sir geoffrey injune representing the british virgin islands, which is facing an inquiry into the way it's governed. the daily mail reported that the mp was also there for several weeks in april, voting remotely in the commons from the caribbean island. many mps did use proxy voting during the pandemic, but ministers weren't rushing to sir geoffrey's defence today. ultimately, it's one for his voters to decide. i don't think it's for me to start making or prejudicing the... second—guessing the judgments that they make. what's crucially important is transparency around any outside interests. what are you playing at? the former attorney general was a booming presence during the brexit debates. you are not children in the playground... but he has stayed silent today. over the last year, sir geoffrey earned almost £900,000 for his legal work.
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all of which has been properly declared and is allowed in the rules. but labour says borisjohnson should investigate. we're seeing more and more instances of behaviour that l most people would view as beyond the pale - and a conservative prime minister who is refusing to take action. - almost a week after number ten's botched attempt to change the way mps' behaviour is investigated, the fallout continues to make grim reading for the government. the saga has put a spotlight on sleaze, standards and now second jobs. mps earn £82,000 a year, but some earn extra income as business consultants, doctors, lawyers and more. defenders of second jobs say it's a way of broadening parliament's expertise and enticing higher—earners into politics, but others argue that the basic salary is more than enough. but aside from the cash, in devon, there's the question of their mp's commitment to the job.
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absolutely outrageous. we need geoffrey back here in devon. we need him here now. it doesn't bother me if he has a second job as long as he does hisjob well. we've gone through all this - struggle, and to see him not be here for us, it's quite hard. yeah, it's quite shocking, really. number ten does not want an outright ban on second jobs, but it has stoked this focus on probity in politics and the work done by our mps. ben wright, bbc news. we will discuss lobbying in the question of second jobs for mps with an organisation that campaigns for political standards coming up in 8:30pm so stay with us. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's tulsen. good evening. we start with the latest in the yorkshire county cricket crisis as they look to deal with the allegations of institutional racism. tonight, they've confirmed head coach andrew gale has been suspended pending a disciplinary hearing over a historic social media post,
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and director of cricket martyn moxon is absent from work with a stress—related illness. lord patel, the new chair at yorkshire, says he hopes to have a process in place by the end of the week for whistle—blowers to come forward to share any other instances of discrimination. tabassum bhatti, who is now 37, signed a contract at yorkshire at the age of 1a. he has told the bbc about his experience. it's become clear that it's been going on for a long time, and, yes, it has been brushed under the carpet. like i said, i was there in 1998. there were incidents prior to me being there, and there's been things happening in the last 20 years up to the present. so, i think that's pretty clear that it has been overlooked. hopefully the select committee can try and identify and come down on yorkshire.
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everything one is still treading on 999 everything one is still treading on egg shells to be honest with you. what would be one of the things you want to see? how strong do they need to be in terms of what they do? they need to come down, i don't know. beenin been in for a year, been in for two years. let this sink in a little bit. we have been suffering for 20 plus years. maybe a taste of their own medicine. i don't want to be cynical, but maybe people at the club need to experience a bit of what we as a community have experienced for a long time. on the eve of their t20 world cup semifinal against new zealand, a repeat of the 50—over final in 2019, england's liam livingston said the team can cope without openerjason roy, who misses the match through injury. frankly we have great depth in our sguad _ frankly we have great depth in our squad. whoever comes it will bring a
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lot of— squad. whoever comes it will bring a lot of experience and skill to our team _ lot of experience and skill to our team it's — lot of experience and skill to our team it's a _ lot of experience and skill to our team. it's a massive shame for jason — team. it's a massive shame for jason he — team. it's a massive shame for jason. he has been pretty devastated over the _ jason. he has been pretty devastated over the last couple of days but the mood _ over the last couple of days but the mood in _ over the last couple of days but the mood in the camp is really good. the boys are _ mood in the camp is really good. the boys are really relaxed and we have a great _ boys are really relaxed and we have a great opportunity over the next couple _ a great opportunity over the next couple of — a great opportunity over the next couple of days to try and work our way into _ couple of days to try and work our way into a — couple of days to try and work our way into a world cup final. but it's 220 cricket. — way into a world cup final. but it's 220 cricket, very comfortable and we have a _ 220 cricket, very comfortable and we have a great — 220 cricket, very comfortable and we have a great opportunity and it's all about— have a great opportunity and it's all about the lads embracing that opportunity. to football, and chelsea thrashed swiss champions servette 7—0 in the women's champions league. they're top of their group for at least a few hours as wolfsburg playjuventus later. the blues, who led 6—0 at half—time, showed the gulf in quality between the sides with some impressive attacking play. fran kirby scored twice, and so did sam kerr. melanie leupolz, jessie fleming and guro reiten also got on the scoresheet. on the day news broke that she's set to announce a new coach, us open champion emma raducanu found herself bowing out in the round of 16 in austria.
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the top seed lost the first set 6—1 to china's wang xinyu before winning a tiebreak to level the match at a set apiece. the 18—year—old briton required a medical time—out in the deciding set before she eventually fell to the world number 106, who won out 7—5 to progress, while raducanu will now look towards working with torben beltz in preparation for next season. andy murray is through to the second round of the stockholm open after beating norwegian qualifier viktor durasovic in straight sets. he breezed through the first set 6—1 and eventually took the second 7—6 after a long tiebreak. murray now faces top—seeded italianjannik sinner tomorrow. and i am doing pretty well and you are as always splendid in that lovely type. you old smoothie. thank you very much. all the elements come
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for free as the eye but he did not hear me sneeze. peers have urged the government to deliver on pledges to reduce the amount of sewage being dumped into rivers as the house of lords passed the final stage of the environment bill. ministers will gain the power to act against poorly—performing water companies. but there are warnings the new law doesn't include proper timetables or targets for discharge reduction. an international group of scientists has warned that the world is still heading for dangerously high global temperatures by the end of the century, even if countries stick to their promises made in glasgow at the cop26 summit. the aim is to keep global temperature rises below 1.5 degrees, but the researchers say it will be impossible to reach that goal based on the pledges that have been made so far. from glasgow, here's our science editor david shukman. this is what the talks are all about — keeping the planet safe to live on. and when astronaut tim peake filmed this view, he was really struck
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by what we keep adding to the air and what that is doing to the climate, so he's come to the conference in glasgow to spell out the dangers. every sunrise and sunset, we see earth's atmosphere, just 16 kilometres thick, and you realise that's it, that's what protects all life down here on the planet. and if we put things into that atmosphere, for example, wildfires, you see them covering entire continents, and the smoke disperses, and that's when you really appreciate that it doesn't have anywhere else to go. you know, we're all on this one planet together. but the challenge here at this massive gathering is to get delegates from nearly 200 countries to agree on what to do, to try to slow down the pace of climate change. so, after ten days of talking, what's actually been achieved in terms of heading off the risk of the planet getting hotter? well, just before the conference started, we were on course for an increase of 2.7 degrees celsius, a really dangerous prospect. now, if everyone keeps the promises they've made in recent days,
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that's come down to something like 1.8 degrees celsius, but it all depends on everyone keeping their word, and even if they do, that's still above the target of 1.5 degrees, so the problem is far from sorted. we don't have much time. we want to stay under 1.5, and we already see the climate changing, so now we need to invest, we need to protect, we cannot kick this can down the road. it is not something we can do in 2030, 2050, we need to do it in 2021 and 2022. new extremes of temperature are proving hazardous in many regions already, and a study by met office scientists warns that a billion people could be affected by a combination of rising heat and humidity. working outdoors could become almost impossible. so, for some, climate change is about survival, including the tiny island nations of the pacific. the realities of climate change... this government minister in tuvalu recorded a video appeal for help.
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we cannot wait for speeches when the sea is rising - around us all the time. he's banking on the next few days of negotiations coming up with a way to make the world less threatening. david shukman, bbc news, in glasgow. the mother of a ten—year—old boy who was killed by a dog has paid tribute to her "beautiful" and "sweet" son. jack lis died yesterday afternoon while visiting a friend's house in caerphilly. the dog has since been destroyed. tomos morgan reports. a heartbreaking note, a close—knit community torn apart after hearing that ten—year—old jack lis was killed by a dog on monday. in a facebook post, his mother wrote today...
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it's understood jack was visiting a friend who didn't injuries after school last night when the attack took place. neighbours here have described the event as both tragic and upsetting. when i was out there i felt really shaky and scared, because i saw the body, they put the white sheet over him. we heard the gunshots when they shot the dog, and we started shaking. i was there and really scared. the kids, they were screaming, i they were crying, they were just, as you can imagine, l they were hysterical, absolutely hysterical. police have confirmed that jack and his friend were alone with no adult present when the attack took place yesterday afternoon, and that the dog itself was owned by those that lived in this property. there are prohibited dogs that are not allowed within the uk. it is an offence to possess them, and should that be one of those
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dogs then we will be taking action. obviously there are offences potentially willful or neglectful act that could have been committed. 2a hours later, there has been a police presence all day, as they continue their investigation into what led to the death of young jack lis. tomos morgan, bbc news, caerphilly. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. hello. the weather the rest of the day for most of us isn't looking too bad generally speaking. there's a fair bit of cloud around across some western and northern areas. this is also bringing some spits and spots of rain. but we've also had some sunshine earlier on, for example across east anglia and the east midlands. but i think across much of england, second half of the day, generally cloudy. here's that damp weather across wales, maybe the north west of england. north of that, there are a few showers, but the skies are going to be generally clear through the course of this evening and overnight, so it's going to be quite cold in scotland. certainly a touch of frost
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in the glens, but where we've got the cloud, where we've got this weather front basically across england and wales, it is going to be a very mild night, a bit like last night. so, tomorrow, and this is the weather front, a slow—moving weather front, is still over across the southern third of the country. and, here, mild, 15 degrees in london. but in the north, i think the odd shower, but much brighter overall. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... all nhs staff in england who see patients face—to—face will have to be fully vaccinated against covid by next spring. only those who have a medical exemption can say no. labour demands an enquiry into the government's former top law officer, who represents people in the west country and is earnings hundreds of thousands representing a government in the carribean. the mother of 10—year—old jack lis — killed by a dog in south wales —
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pays tribute to her "beautiful, sweet son." "let us in" — police guard the eu's polish border as thousands of migrants try to get in. the eu blames the president of belarus saying he has an "inhuman, gangster—style approach". the british government has urged all uk nationals in ethiopia to leave, as the conflict worsens. and england striker marcus rashford collects his mbe for his campaign against food poverty, dedicating his honour to mum. let's return to the story on conservative mp geoffrey cox, who earned almost £900,000 through jobs outside parliament. politicians are allowed to have second jobs outside westminster, but the work they do has come under the spotlight since ex—tory mp owen paterson broke lobbying rules when working as a consultant. labour has called on the prime minister to launch an investigation into sir geoffrey's second job.
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let's speak now to dr susan hawley, executive director of spotlight on corruption, an anti—corruption charity that monitors the uk s enforcement of its laws. what have you made of the debate this week was mcpeak that it has been an extraordinary week in politics, one of the fastest moving. it has been fast—moving for a while but really genuinely have and i think we started last week in really quite a dark moment when it looked
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like someone who had it be justly breached lobbying rules as an mp was going to be protected by the government by rewriting the rules of the week and we are in a very different situation where there is this genuine public debate about what kind of outside interests mp should be allowed to have, should they be allowed second jobs, how much should they be allowed to earn, who should they be allowed to work for and i think that's a really important public debate so i think it's really welcome and there is a shift that has happened and we need to make the most of this opportunity for there to be a full cross—party review about how those outside interests are managed, are they transparent enough, is it enough to just declare that you were acting on behalf of someone else or do we need someone to make stronger safeguards? because, at the end of the day, mps are public service and they got to represent the public interest and we need to know that they are not representing private interest when they are voting in parliament on laws and policies. 30
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they are voting in parliament on laws and policies.— they are voting in parliament on laws and policies. 30 years ago we had the original— laws and policies. 30 years ago we had the original sleaze _ laws and policies. 30 years ago we had the original sleaze allegations| had the original sleaze allegations and that was, obviously, they did a lot of damage to the then conservative government underjohn major. he has been saying in the last few days how uncomfortable he is at what the government was proposing to do last week but in terms of individual cases in this country are lots of people, whether or not they are in politics, will look at some of the objective measures, things like the index on corruption that is maintained internationally and they will say well, actually, this in's record is pretty good. we are not regarded as a country where people get large sums of money put in their back pocket and planning applications go through big pockets big contracts are awarded and things are built where they shouldn't be which is commonplace in a lot of other countries. we are not thought to be a place where politicians are basically corrupted as a class. what is the scale in yourjudgment of the problem may be not so much the problem may be not so much the problem is the risk that you think we want. i
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problem is the risk that you think we want. ~' ., , . , we want. i think the top ethics in this country _ we want. i think the top ethics in this country are _ we want. i think the top ethics in this country are writing _ we want. i think the top ethics in this country are writing in - we want. i think the top ethics in | this country are writing in sending a very serious warning that there is a very serious warning that there is a real risk that the uk could slide into corruption and we have seen a whole host of political scandals from cash for access, cash for honours, contracts for mates around covid—19 contracts, and there is a real danger here and sirjohn major said it is well that we are increasingly looking like a corrupt country and i think that there is a remit white makes of it and went about but because you mention the top anti—corruption tsar, you mean lloyd evans, presumably? i mean the ethics are rather than the anti—corruption tsar, lord evans he was formerly head of m15. that anti-corruption tsar, lord evans he was formerly head of m15. that you are clarifying _ was formerly head of m15. that you are clarifying that. _ was formerly head of m15. that you are clarifying that. not _ was formerly head of m15. that you are clarifying that. not a _ are clarifying that. not a politician, _ are clarifying that. not a politician, an _ are clarifying that. not a i politician, an independent. are clarifying that. not a - politician, an independent. and are clarifying that. not a _ politician, an independent. and what he had to say — politician, an independent. and what he had to say was _ politician, an independent. and what he had to say was a _ politician, an independent. and what he had to say was a concern - politician, an independent. and what he had to say was a concern about i politician, an independent. and what he had to say was a concern about a | he had to say was a concern about a slide. the quote from john major last week was he was worried it was
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the politically corrupt approach to government which, again, to be clear is not saying individuals are corrupt, he is not, kind of, saying this individual, the prime minister or anyone is anyone else is corrupt. he is worried about i suppose what lord evans is worried about, erosion of standards and expectations. is that the sort of thing you think is the slippery slope to slope? i think this is absolutely _ the slippery slope to slope? i think this is absolutely a _ the slippery slope to slope? i think this is absolutely a slippery - the slippery slope to slope? i think this is absolutely a slippery slope l this is absolutely a slippery slope and the risk is that you have the sense growing that politicians don't think they have to live by the rules so why should anyone else? anyone you talk to in countries that are very, very corrupt say that is the beginning where it becomes normalised. if they can get away with, you know, doing what they want and breaking rules, why can't anyone else? so i think there's a danger that it provides the social fabric here and that is very risky for increasing corruption. i think the other thing i'd like to say is that,
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you know, actually the whole match other really strong democracy is independent regulators in what was really damaging about last week's attack on the independent regulator was it looked like it was trying to undermine that and we need independent regulators. in fact, lord evans himself said we need strong independent regulators. we need several of the standard regulators to be given better power is independent regulators what was really damaging about last week's attack on the independent regulator was it looked like it was trying to undermine that and we need independent regulators. in fact, lord evans himself said we need strong independent regulators. we need several of the standards regulators to be given better powers put in legislation and the good news is there is a plan of action to clean it up on that plan of action was actually presented to government just days before the patterssen scandal broke and it was presented by lord evans and the veal risk is if the government ignores that because what we need is a significant upgrade of the standards regime in the uk to make sure we don't slide into corruption.- don't slide into corruption. doctor susan, executive _ don't slide into corruption. doctor susan, executive director - don't slide into corruption. doctor susan, executive director of - susan, executive director of spotlight on corruption the charity. thank you very much a being with us. fascinating subject and i hope will speak again about it.
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a government spokesperson said, "as the prime minister has said, paid lobbying and paid advocacy by ministers and mps is absolutely wrong."all elected officials must abide by the rules of conduct, as the public have a right to expect." abroad now, and the government has urged all uk nationals in ethiopia to leave the country — amid fears the conflict there is worsening. the year—long conflict in northern ethiopia between the government and tigrayan forces has intensified in recent weeks. the uk government says there are fears rebel forces could reach the capital, addis ababa. our deputy africa editor anne soy has been giving us the latest from neighbouring kenya. we've been hearing from the uk minister for africa, vicky ford, who said the situation is escalating and it could change very quickly, and therefore that's the reason the foreign office is urging britons who are in ethiopia to leave whilst commercial flights are still available, because if the situation changes you know, in circumstances
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of conflict, it could be difficult for people to use commercial means to leave the country. and therefore, that is the basis for the advice. they say the situation is unpredictable. we hadn't really heard from the front line over the last 48 hours. a couple of days ago, the rebels, the groups that have been fighting against the government announced that they had taken towns that are about 250 miles north of the capital. that's the closest they have been to the capital. and that's really brought to fall the fears that they could march to the capital. the humanitarian situation further north in tigray where this conflict started is quite dire. the united nations says about seven million people are in urgent need of humanitarian aid. there hasn't been any aid flowing there since mid—october. 400,000 people are facing famine—like conditions, so they need that help urgently.
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and therefore, the tigre people's liberation front, which is from that region, from tigray, has been saying that they're keen to come and control the routes and reopen them. they are accusing the government of putting in place a blockade that has blocked that aid from going up north. however, over the weekend, there were huge rallies organised by the government, people who are in support of the government, who came out to say, you know, accusing international media of saying that the situation in the capital is bad, saying, "look, we have come out here in tens of thousands to show the capital is fine. and so the situation is very, very unpredictable as we speak.
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at least 2,000 migrants are now gathered in freezing temperatures in belarus on the border with poland as they try to reach the european union. the polish prime minister has accused russia of masterminding the unprecedented wave of migrants — many of them from the middle east — who are crossing through belarus to the border — saying it's an attempt to destabilise the eu. but both moscow and belarus deny orchestrating the crisis. from the border here's our europe correspondent nick beake. 0n the edge of the european union, a new, desperate migrant camp has just emerged. 0n the left, those who have come to belarus and now made their way to the border with poland. 0n the right, barbed wire and lines of troops stopping them from crossing. throughout the day we watched dozens of reinforcements
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raised to this area. throughout the day we watched dozens of reinforcements race to this area. poland already has a force of 12,000 guarding its eastern border and is keeping aid agencies and journalists away. but we managed to make contact with some of those now trapped in the freezing forest. we feel bad because nobody else is here and we are so hungry and thirsty, no water, no food, no help. like most here, aziz is kurdish, and from iraq. so many families and little children who are here. poland has vowed to defend its — and the eu's — borders, and accuses belarus of using civilians as weapons in retaliation for sanctions. translation: we know that this is a fully planned operation - which aims to disrupt - the sovereignty of our country. which aims to disrupt the sovereignty of our country. that's absolutely clear to us. we know for sure that there is a search for weak spots happening on the border. but getting any nearer to where this crisis has erupted is not possible, as we soon found out. can we go further in? are we allowed to go further
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towards the border today? no, no. poland, like neighbouring lithuania, has declared a state of emergency. well, this is the closest we can get to the poland—belarus border today, because beyond this checkpoint lies a part of the european union that the polish authorities do not want us to see for ourselves. they are dealing with this growing migrant crisis, out of sight and on their own terms. the european union is backing poland and calling for tighter sanctions on belarus, which continues to deny it is creating this chaos. tonight, its president said he didn't want an armed confrontation, but claimed that any escalation would bring in its ally, russia. translation: it would immediately i involve russia in this whirlpool i and they are the largest nuclear power. -
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the united nations is calling for calm, but the politics are bitter and the situation on the ground increasingly desperate. nick beake, bbc news, and the polish—belarussian border. climate change is affecting the ocean's ability to absorb our carbon emissions — according to scientists who've sent robots down to the sea floor up to three and a half miles below the surface. the latest discovery by the uk—led i—atlantic project has revealed that — if global temperatures increase to levels predicted — the ocean might no longer be able to provide what is currently earth s largest long—term carbon store. our science correspondent victoria gill has more. diving to ocean depths of up to three—and—a—half miles. this is the abyssal zone, where robotic explorers are taking samples from places no—one has ever touched. a third of the carbon dioxide in our atmosphere dissolves in the surface of the ocean.
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when tiny marine plants and animals feed on that carbon it becomes part of a cycle that's made the deep ocean and its muddy floor earth's largest carbon store. in an aquarium like this you get a snippet of the life in the shallower parts of the ocean, but in the deep ocean floor there are single—celled organisms that we can't even see, and it's those that are responsible for locking away carbon in the deep. in experiments carried out in the equatorial atlantic, about 500 miles off the coast of west africa, researchers brought tubes of sea floor mud into their ocean laboratories to test what happens to the carbon that's contained in the sediments as the temperature rises. so, we have to understand how this part of our planet will work in the future. this abyssal ocean which covers 60%
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of the planet, we find that under higher temperatures we can store less carbon in these places. the ecosystems are turning over the carbon faster. they're running at a higher temperature more quickly and they're going to release more carbon in the future, and that's really worrying. we know more about the surface of the moon than we do about life at these extreme depths, and researchers say this latest finding isjust a glimpse of how our greenhouse gas emissions are transforming this huge and misunderstood habitat. working out how the deep ocean will be affected by climate change and how it could help us to solve this very human—made problem will require much deeper exploration. victoria gill, bbc news. it is 13 minutes to nine. let's take a look at the headlines on bbc news. all nhs staff in england who see patients face—to—face will have to be fully vaccinated against covid by next spring. only those who have a medical exemption can say no. labour demands an enquiry into the government's
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former top law officer, who represents people in the west country and is earnings hundreds of thousands of pounds representing a government in the carribean. the mother of 10—year—old jack lis — killed by a dog in south wales — pays tribute to her "beautiful, sweet son" rolls—royce has secured over £400 million from the uk government and a consortium of private investors to develop a new range of small nuclear reactors which ministers hope will eventually create up to 40,000 newjobs in the uk. but critics say the focus should be on renewable technology that exists now — not on projects that will take a decade to deliver. our business editor simonjack reports. building new nuclear reactors is an enormous undertaking. hinkley point in somerset is europe's largest construction project. it will provide enough energy for six million homes when it's finished in 2025. a decade and over £20 billion from start to finish. for a tenth of that price,
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you can have one of these. the size of a football stadium — tiny by nuclear standards — but capable of powering one million homes. always on, it's the perfect complement to intermittent wind power — according to rolls—royce, who secured the cash to develop them. because of the sheer amount of electricity, zero—carbon electricity required, we are absolutely convinced that nuclear needs to be part of that jigsaw, and it needs to be a flexible and economic solution like the small reactors which will provide a complement to those renewables. the government sees the project as creating jobs and world—leading technology that could be exported around a world in need of low—carbon energy. there will be a whole range ofjobs, relating to not only building the small modular reactors, but, in time, running them, nuclear skills.
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i'll be meeting apprentices later today, young people in their late teens who really see a future, a long—term future in a well—paid industry. this is where the uk currently gets its energy. as you can see, nuclear there is a 16% behind wind and gas, but still pretty substantial. but that share is expected to fall as all the uk's current operating nuclear plants are due to be decommissioned by 2035. there's only one new one under construction at hinkley point in somerset, with another one at sizewell being considered right now. sceptics agree the need to decriminalise is urgent, but say renewable energy is available here and now and is already cheaper than nuclear, which has a history of overpromising and under—delivering. we don't know that this design, which will take three years to produce, will work, we don't know if it will be approved by the nuclear regulators, we don't know what the electricity from it will cost and whether that can compete with electricity from renewables. the 400 million announced today is only enough to get a design approved.
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the construction and location of these baby reactors is not yet decided. but one thing most energy experts agree on, big or small, it will be hard to get to net zero without nuclear. simon jack, bbc news. we had the breaking news last night, fantastic news that the we had the breaking news last night, fantastic news that the man we had the breaking news last night, fantastic news that the man who we had the breaking news last night, fantastic news that the man who had been stuck underground in the brecon beacons had been rescued and was on his way to hospital. a man rescued from a cave in the breacon beacons after more than two days underground is said to be in "good spirits" despite multiple injuries. around 300 people were involved in the operation to bring him out on a stretcher from what is one of the deepest cave systems in the uk. it took them more than 54 hours. hywel griffith reports.
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pulling together to help one of their own. the rescuers own picture tell a story of teamwork in the most challenging conditions. today, as they cleared up, a chance to realise just what they had achieved. we look after each other and we are an extended family, effectively. we look after each other and we are an extended family, effectively. we don't know each other, all of us. we are like a big family, but if one of us is in trouble, no matter where it is, we'll go and help. the man they rescued was an experienced caver in his 405. when he fell he broke bones in his leg and jaw. there was no way he could make his own way out. are 37 miles worth of tunnels crisscrossing between the caves. there are only three ways in and out, and this tiny metal door is one of them, an entrance to a hidden world. it was here at cwm dwr that the caver entered as part of a group on saturday.
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they travelled around 500 metres when the caveer fell from a ledge that gave way. the road back was too narrow, so teams of rescuers had to carry him 3km towards the top entrance. manoeuvring the stretcher meant it took ten times longer than usual, clocking up 54 hours — the longest carry in uk caving history. if you can imagine lots of passages, some big, some small, chambers, but they're all kind of stacked on top of each other and overlapping each other. tom is one of the 300 volunteers who put in a shift and says one of the biggest challenges was taking a floating structure through a long, perilous section of water. it has lots of little cascades and waterfalls and also very deep potholes full of water. you would be out of your depth if you went into it and potentially have to swim across. and you had to carry a stretcher over that? that's right.
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it's rare for cavers to be in the limelight. for these volunteers, the only reward is knowing that others will come to their aid. hywel griffith, bbc news. a study of nearly 90,000 people suggests that those who go to sleep between 10pm and 11pm have a lower risk of stroke or heart attack than people with other bedtimes. the team, from from the bio—medical database uk biobank, say more research is needed to understand why. dr rebecca robbins is a sleep scientist from harvard medical schooland she's been telling us more about this report into sleeping patterns. what the authors found is when they looked at objective recordings of sleep, and that's a strength over self—report, of course, so they had a huge amount of objective sleep data, and they took their sleep onset time and then looked at incident cardiovascular disease — so, new cases of cardiovascular disease — and they found a very strong association. when you compare those falling asleep between 10 and 10:59pm at night, comparing that group to individuals who were falling asleep either before then or after that time. and they found the real risk area, the highest risk for incident
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cardiovascular disease, or future cardiovascular disease, were those falling asleep in, kind of, the wee hours of the morning, so 12 o'clock in the morning or earlier in the morning — or later, depending on which way you're thinking about it. and the authors were very thoughtful about controlling for other things in the model — gender, age. they also did a sensitivity analysis, looking at other other sleep variables like sleep duration. looking at other other sleep variables like sleep duration. and so all of those things give us good confidence in these results, but i have to mention that this is an associational study, so we can't say from the study that we should all go out and start that we should all go out and start to, you know, adjust our sleep schedules to be between 10 and 10:59pm. but, as the authors state, future research is really vitally needed to understand in more of a direct way whether these different bedtimes really do matter in a cause and effect way. that was doctor rebecca robins.
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the manchester united and england player, marcus rashford, has been awarded an mbe for his campaign to support vulnerable children. the footballer has been recognised for his work to support pupils on free school meals during the pandemic. the 24—year—old dedicated his mbe to his mother. from windsor, danjohnson reports. from wythenshawe to windsor castle, football pitch to palace lawn, changing government policy along the way. his influence has grown — and 50's his recognition. things like this help push what i'm actually doing in the right direction, because it makes people more aware of what i'm doing. you know, it puts you on a pedestal and people start to listen to people when you're on a pedestal. mr marcus rashford. for services to vulnerable children in the united kingdom during covid—19. the duke of cambridge, president of the football association, said he was pleased to be back hosting an investiture ceremony in person for the first time since the pandemic. so what did they talk about? what else? we were speaking about football, actually. we were just speaking about the euros and how good it was to see everybody come together
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and support the team. during the pandemic, he campaigned to extend free school meal vouchers for poorer children through the summer holidays, but he's still highlighting issues like poverty and homelessness. we're nowhere near where we want to be, where i feel that we coulde deserve to be, but you know, we've just got to keep sticking at it and keep going. he's a young man, just 24, who has achieved a huge amount already and promises there is more to come on the pitch and off it. danjohnson, bbc news, at windsor castle. now it's time for a look at the weather with thomasz. well, it's been a relatively mild day for the time of the year. not gloriously sunny by any means, but temperatures above the average, and it's going to stay like it for most of us tonight, not everywhere. in fact, further north, there is a chance of a touch of frost, but that's mostly around the glens of scotland, where the skies will clear through tonight. right now, there's a weather
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front that's slighting the uk almost in half. you can see it moving across wales, northern parts of england as well into the midlands, so thicker cloud here and some spits and spots of rain. this is where the weather front is. south of that, that's where the really mild air is. north of that, it's not desperately cold, but there's certainly chill in the air, and first thing in the morning, temperatures in glasgow will only be around four degrees, and that touch of frost there certainly possible across some central and northern parts of scotland. but belfast and newcastle should be around seven or eight degrees very early tomorrow morning. so, here's the forecast for tomorrow. the weather front�*s more or less in the same place, so that means fairly cloudy conditions for the bulk of wales and the southern two thirds, say, of england. and north of that, we've got bright weather, nice weather for belfast, glasgow and aberdeen, but it will be
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a little bit colder here. here's thursday's weather map, and low pressure is approaching, but it's still way out to sea. high pressure is in charge of the weather, so that means light winds. could be a bit murky and cloudy first thing in the morning, but the day itself is looking mostly fine across the uk. here are the temperatures — still mild, 14 in london, double figures for glasgow, edinburgh and aberdeen as well, but here's that rain making its way into ireland thursday night and into friday. friday will be a pretty unsettled day. we're not entirely sure where and exactly how much rainfall there will be on friday because this position of the low is a little uncertain. could be a little bit further north, could be a bit further south, but i think the wind will be a feature on friday. these blobs of rain could shift in the following forecasts, but let's call it a mild day with stronger winds and the chance of rain almost anywhere. there'll some sunshine around as well, although it sounds a bit like i'm sitting on the fence, but it is what it is. it's going to be an unsettled end to the week. the weekend's looking a little bit better. should be settled for saturday and sunday, and that settled weather should last into monday and tuesday as well. that's it from me.
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this is bbc news. i'm christian fraser. a sobering assessment from the experts on the pledges made at the climate summit — they don't go nearly far enough. analysts calculate that the world will still be emitting almost twice as much as it should be by 2030 if we are to keep the global temperature rise to a safe level. that will bring misery to millions of people who are at risk in developing nations. we'll speak to the prime minister of antigua and barbuda, who represents the small island states. the us congress has sent a 20—strong delegation to the summit as it tries to repair some of the damage of the past four years. but will the divisive politics in washington hamper the ambition to lead? and to complete our look at what the summit has delivered so far, we are going to talk trees.
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will glasgow reverse the deforestation that continues apace?

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