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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  November 9, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the this is outside source. european union is accusing belarus the european union is accusing belarus of gangster style abuse and of luring migrants to its border. poland public prime minister is warning of an armed escalation. we know warning of an armed escalation. - know that this is a fully planned operation which aims to disrupt the sovereignty of our country. we know for sure that there is a search for weak spots happening on the border. at least to those of you were trying to cross from belarus and more countries are reacting to the situation. lithuania has declared a state of emergency on its border. the un says more than a dozen of its staff in ethiopia have been arrested. in government raids targeting ethnic people in to cry. 7
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tigray. it emerged one conservative mp earned almost £1 million for legal work including some spent in the caribbean. a nunber of updates on the situation on the poland—belarus border. the european commission is accusing the belarussian president alexander lu kashenko of �*gangster style abuse'. it says he is luring migrants to belarus with the false promise of easy entry into the eu. here's an eu spokesman. how the lukashenko regime conduct this operation, this very, very inhuman and unacceptable, and actually illegal operation, is that they reach out to potential clients, potential travellers, through seemingly official channels. belarussian consulates, belarussian embassies, travel agencies and other intermediaries which are issuing, for example, visas and telling them,
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"ok can you can come. and transport will be organised for you to go to the border." the flash point is this border crossing between poland and belarus. around 2,000 migrants are there. and in the past 2a hours, poland says there have been 300 attempts to illegally cross from belarus — which isn't a member of the eu — into poland — which is. many of the migrants are from the middle east. most are young men, though there are some women and children too. many don't have food or water. and they're coming up against this recently erected razor—wire fence. in addition, there are 12,000 polish troops too. overnight conditions were freezing. some migrant have died from hypothermia in recent weeks. migrants have told the bbc the belarussian authorities have taken their phones and are pushing them towards the border fence. while poland is trying
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to expel them. so the migrants are stranded here — near a polish border town seen here on the map. the area is under a state of emergency — so journalists and aid organisations have restricted assess. here's the bbc�*s nick beake, who is on the border. throughout the day, we watched dozens of reinforcements raced to this area. poland already has a force of 12,000 guarding its eastern border and is keeping aid agencies and journalists away. but we managed to make contact with some of those now trapped in the freezing forest. we feel so bad because nobody is helping us here, and we feel so hungry and thirsty. no water, no food, no help... like most here, aziz is kurdish and from iraq. that's all poland police. they don't let us get inside.
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a big tension in here. and so many families and little children arrived here. but getting nearer to where this crisis erupted is not possible as we soon found out. can we go further in, are we allowed to go further towards the border today7 no, no. poland, like neighbouring lithuania, has declared a state of emergency. this is as close as we can get to the poland — belarus border today. because beyond this checkpoint lies a part of the european union that the polish authorities do not want us to see for ourselves. they are dealing with this growing migrant crisis out of sight and on their own terms. lets recap on the events in the past 2a hours. on monday poland warned of a possible �*armed' escalation with belarus — accusing it of trying to provoke an incident.
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it released several videos as evidence. in this one, belarussian troops appear to be marching towards their border. you can make out their helmets just above the top of the barbed wire fence. and in this video, migrants used wire cuttors to break through the razor wire fence. they were held back by pepper spray. well poland accuses belarus of �*modern hybrid war�*. here's the polish prime minister. translation: we know that this is a fully planned operation - which aims to disrupt the sovereignty of our country. that's absolutely clear to us. we know for sure that there is a search for weak spots happening on the border. the concern is this. poland says 28,500 migrants have tried to cross from belarus since august. fellow eu counties latvia and lithuania have also seen a surge. lithuania has sent soldiers to its border region with belarus , because of reports 500 migrants are heading to the area. earlier the lithuanian parliament voted to allow its border guards to use �*mental coercion�* and proportionate physical violence to prevent migrants from entering. here�*s the european commission again
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on other measures europe is taking. president von der leyen spoke yesterday on the phone with the prime ministers of poland, lithuania and latvia to express the eu�*s solidarity and to discuss possible support measures. the president called on member states to approve extended sanctions against the belarussian authorities, and she also announced the exploration of measures against third country airlines that are active in human trafficking. so additional eu sanctions. it�*s allegation is this: belarussian president alexander lukashenko — is flying migrants to belarus — possibly from a number of countries including syria, iran and qatar and then directing them to the belarussian border with poland.
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the eu says president lukashenko is doing this in revenge against eu sanctions over human rights abuses during its crackdown on protests last year. president lukashenko denies this. he also denies provoking violence. here he is earlier. those are pictures from the border. he insists belarus is acting as a hospitable country. here�*s a belarusian journalist on whether that message is resonating in belarus. despite the lack of independent information because websites have been blocked, and independent media pushed out of the country, belarusian is inside the country actually see so many migrants on the streets who rough sleep, who dream about coming to the eu and who said that they have been brought to
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belarus with the support of those belarusian state agencies. tourism agencies. so people here that and people understand that belarus was never a route, never a destination for tourists from the middle east. so they understand that this crisis is artificial, and they actually accuse the regime of bringing these people to belarus and using them as a weapon, actually, against the eu in retaliation for sanctions and for pressure that the eu opposed to the regime. so i think there is generally this understanding. and even those people who are more loyal to lukashenko, they are also asking questions like what with these people do in the country if they are not able to cross the border? because they have to find accommodation. well — belarus says poland is refusing dialogue as a way out of the crisis.
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on that view, here�*s the director director of the think tank the minsk dialogue council on international relations. what we hear and response by the lukashenko government is that, already mentioned, first of all there has been no wheeling whatsoever on the eu side to enter the negotiation table and have these matters discussed. but also they say that while they continue performing all the security measures in the interest of the belarusian state, they are no longer in a position to ensure the security of the eu. and that's how they explain this overall flow of migration. they also say that they don't, basically come up provoke anything but when there is demand for those flights into the _ country, those flights take place. so that's the explanation we hear. again, and understand these are two incompatible narratives, and at some point, to be honest with you, i have this feeling that we simply need some adults in the room on both sides to start thinking a little bit strategically about things which might evolve even further, and if _ they do i think the crisis will become enormous.
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so that�*s the perspective from belarus. for the polish perspective, here�*s the deputy minister of foreign affairs. let�*s go back to the very beginning of this. richard traduce the sanctions after human rights abuses by lukashenko. we have the eu introduced sanctions on him, mr lukashenko and the physical establishment. on the very day mr lukashenko publicly announced that he will create a special artificial migration problem for poland as a neighbouring country but for the whole of the eu. of course there�*s always a place for this, but we first need to see any positives taken by the belarussian regime. there�*s hundreds of people in detention, no, the prisoners are not
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released. still human rights abuses going on. translation: if god forbid, we make any mistake, - if we take a wrong step, then it will instantly drag russia into this maelstrom and it�*s the largest nuclear—armed power. i am not a madman i understand very well what this could lead to. so, there is no valour here — grab an assault rifle and march to the polish border, by the way, a place where i used to serve as a border guard. no, surely not, we realise it, we know our place. but, igor we will not kneel down. this story is also playing out in neighbouring russia — a powerful ally of belarus. on that relationship, here�*s steve rosenberg in moscow. alexander lu kashenko and alexander lukashenko and vladimir putin had a telephone conversation earlier today, they talked about the
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micro crisis. what did they say? well the crime the out of that conversation gave very few clues. the minsk readout had a little bit more detail according to that. they both expressed concern about the lives of soldiers moving close to the polish and belarussian border. judging by what state tv has been saying here in russia, moscow is clearly supporting alexander lukashenko and the belarussian side. give interview today at two and editor in chief of a russian defence journal who was gushing in his praise of mr lukashenko and called him an outstanding politician, and gave mr lukashenko at the opportunity to put forward his view of the world. and how is he so often does he called black white and white to black because although for months now he has been accused by european
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leaders of weapon i think migration, he turned everything around in that interview and blamed european leaders for the current crisis. to the conflict in ethiopia. a number of developments. the united nations says more than a dozen of their local staff have been detained in the capital addis ababa. we don�*t know why — though last month seven senior un officials were expelled after being accused of meddling in ethiopia�*s affairs. it�*s released this statement to the bbc, saying their "security officers have visited the detained colleagues. diplomatic notes have also been sent to the minister of foreign affairs to request the immediate release of the detained personnel". also — here�*s copy that our diplomatic correspondent james landale has filed into the bbc newsroom. he says the uk�*s foreign office is advising british nationals to leave to country.
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the region at the centre of this conflict is tigray. the un s rosemary dicarlo says no aid trucks had reached the regional capital mekelle since mid october, despite millions urgently needing food aid. our senior africa correspondent, anne soyjoins me now from nairobi. what details do we have of the detention of these un staff? that has broken _ detention of these un staff? that has broken in _ detention of these un staff? that has broken in the _ detention of these un staff? twat has broken in the last couple of hours, and to the details we have so far are the ones that you have mentioned. but this is not happening in isolation. we have been following reports that have been coming from addis ababa and human rights organisations say they are seeing the rest of people who are thought
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to be targeted because of their ethnicity. ethiopians are being arrested because of the state of emergency declared in the country. and they are being held in undisclosed locations. i�*m not sure how many people have been arrested so far. those arrests of un staff in addis ababa are just the latest arrests along those lines. and some of our colleagues have been speaking to the police commander there who confirmed that there are events that have happened and he said that those that have been arrested have been arrested because of their links to prescribed groups which include the tigray people�*s liberation front. i5 tigray people's liberation front. is the african union getting involved with the eu or the us getting
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involved? ~ ., ., , , involved? what we have been seeing over the last — involved? what we have been seeing over the last 40 _ involved? what we have been seeing over the last 40 or _ involved? what we have been seeing over the last 40 or so _ involved? what we have been seeing over the last 40 or so hours - involved? what we have been seeing over the last 40 or so hours with - over the last 40 or so hours with the efforts led by the african union supported by other international players, the former president of nigeria is in the country, he has been meeting with the different leaders. he�*s met with government officials over the weekend. he held meetings with the leader of tpl f in tigray along with the humanitarian office there. today he has been in the on region committee not regional leaders they are. that effort is going on and he briefed the un security council saying that this window of opportunity to mediate and
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talk to the different sides that are not willing to meet face—to—face yet. not willing to meet face-to-face et. ~ , ., ., ., ~ yet. we believe that are, thank you ve much yet. we believe that are, thank you very much for— yet. we believe that are, thank you very much forjoining _ yet. we believe that are, thank you very much forjoining us _ yet. we believe that are, thank you very much forjoining us from - very much forjoining us from nairobi. 7 we believe that they are. apologies for the sound, it is a windy evening. let�*s turn to uk politics now — and the growing row over mps taking work outside parliament. a spokesman for the prime minister has said mps who don�*t serve their constituents and make themselves visible to the public are "not doing the job". well — one conservative mp, sir geoffrey cox earned almost £900,000 — that�*s about $1.2 million — from his second job as a lawyer — including advising on a corruption inquiry in the caribbean. ben wright reports. for some mps, onejob is not enough. this devon constituency is represented in parliament by the conservative mp sir geoffrey cox. his majority is huge,
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and so are the fees he charges as a lawyer. for work that takes them a long way from his voters. the purpose of elected office is to serve the public. it is not to enrich the officeholder. here is sir geoffrey injune representing the british virgin islands which is facing an inquiry into the way it is governed. the daily mail reported that the mp was also there for several weeks in april, voting remotely in the comments from the caribbean island. many mps did use proxy voting during the pandemic, but ministers were not rushing to sir geoffrey�*s defence today. ultimately, it�*s one for his voters to decide. i don�*t think it�*s for me to start making or prejudicing the... second guessing the judgments that they make. what�*s crucially important is transparency around any outside interests. what are you playing at? the former attorney general was a booming presence during the brexit debates. you are not children in the playground... but he has stayed silent today.
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over the last year, sir geoffrey earned almost £900,000 for his legal work. all of which has been properly declared and is allowed in the rules. but labour says borisjohnson should investigate. we are seeing more and more instances of behaviour that most people would view as beyond the pale, and a conservative prime minister who is refusing to take action. almost a week after number ten�*s botched attempt to change the way mps behaviour is investigated, the following continues to make grim reading for the government. the saga has put a spotlight on sleaze, standards and now second jobs. mps earn £82,000 a year, but some earn extra income as business consultants, doctors, lawyers and more. defenders of second jobs say it�*s a way of broadening parliament�*s expertise and enticing higher earners into politics, but others argue that the basic
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salary is more than enough. but aside from the cash, in devon it�*s the question of their mp�*s commitment to the job. absolutely outrageous. we need geoffrey back here in devon. we need him here now. it doesn�*t bother me if he has a second job as long as he does hisjob well. we've gone through all this - struggle, and to see him not be here for us it's quite hard. yeah, it's quite shocking, really. number ten does not want an outright ban on second jobs, but it has still to this focus on probity and politics and the work done by our mps. ben wright, bbc news. in england, it�*s no longer a legal requirement to wear a mask in indoor settings. but government policy hasn�*t changed on masks in hospitals. visitors and staff are expected to wear them. which is why borisjohnson�*s visit to hexham hospital.
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which is why borisjohnson�*s visit to hexham hospital on monday drew attention. the nurses he met, wore masks. the visitors in the hospital who saw him, wore masks. but for part of his visit, at least, the prime minister did not. here he is, meeting nurses who�*d worked through the pandemic. deputy prime minister, dominic raab was asked by bbc breakfast, what kind of message that sends out. i know the prime minister took the advice on the setting he was in, followed all the protocols and procedures that were applied there. and that�*s what everyone should do. but the prime minister didn�*t follow �*all the protocols and procedures that applied there�*. the policy at northumbria healthcare nhs foundation trust is clear. "anyone attending our hospitals and community settings must continue to wear a face covering at all times to protect patients, visitors and staff." "...please do not remove it unless advised to do so by a medical professional". dominic raab was read that policy on bbc breakfast — to which this was his reply. well, my understanding is that the prime minister was following all the guidance that was given to him and
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he was in the hospital and the different settings that he visited. the hospital meanwhile, responded to someone on twitter who asked "why didn�*t you tell the prime minister to wear a mask7". it replied... "please be assured that infection prevention and control remains an utmost priority.. which isn�*t quite the same as �*anyone attending our hospitals must continue to wear a face covering at all times�* — as its website says. this was the moment the prime minister was given a mask to put on. mask on! come on. thank you. mask on! come on! the prime minster says — before he enters a vaccination hub. for some though wearing a mask for some of the visit was not good enough. this is claire williams of the union unison. if you are the prime minister, it�*s important to show leadership and we think he should have worn a facemask. out of respect to the
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hospital staff who are really going above and beyond during the pandemic, and that message of being an effective way to keep people safe and reduce the transmission. to which number 10 says the prime minister followed the covid measures that were in place. though that doesn�*t precisely square with the hospital�*s own advice on its website. the broader point is that there remain increasingly political disagreements over the most responsible way to behave during this pandemic — and by not wearing a mask, the prime minister has become part of that debate. climate change is affecting the ocean�*s ability to absorb our carbon emissions, according to scientists who�*ve sent robots down to the seafloor up to five kilometres below the surface. the latest discovery by the uk—led "i—atlantic" project has revealed that, if global temperatures increase to levels predicted, the ocean might no longer be able to provide what is currently earth�*s largest long—term carbon store.
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our science correspondent victoria gill has more. diving to ocean depths of up to three and a half miles. this is the abyssal zone, where robotic explorers are taking samples from places no one has ever touched. a third of the carbon dioxide in our atmosphere dissolves in the surface of the ocean. when tiny marine plants and animals feed on carbon, it becomes part of a cycle that has made a deep ocean and its muddy floor earth�*s largest carbon store. in an aquarium like this you get a snippet of the life in the shallower parts of the ocean. on the deep ocean floor there are single—celled organisms we cannot even see and it is those that are responsible for locking away carbon in the deep. in experiments carried out in the equatorial atlantic about 500
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miles off west africa, researchers brought tubes of sea floor mud into their laboratories to test what happens to the carbon in the sediments as the temperature rises. we have to understand how this part of our planet will work in the future. this abyssal ocean which covers 60% of the planet, we find that under higher temperatures we can store less carbon in these places. the ecosystems are turning over the carbon faster. they are running at a higher temperature more quickly and are going to release more carbon in the future, and that is really worrying. we know more about the surface of the moon than we do about life at these extreme depths. and researchers say this latest finding isjust a glimpse of how our greenhouse gas emissions are transforming this huge and misunderstood habitat. working out how the deep ocean will be affected by climate change and how it could help us solve this very human made problem will require much deeper exploration. victoria gill, bbc news.
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and i will see you in a couple of minutes�* time. well, it�*s been a relatively mild day for the time of the year. not gloriously sunny by any means, but temperatures above the average, and it�*s going to stay like it for most of us tonight, not everywhere. in fact, further north, there is a chance of a touch of frost, but that�*s mostly around the glens of scotland, where the skies will clear through tonight. right now, there�*s a weather front that�*s slighting the uk almost in half. you can see it moving across wales, northern parts of england as well into the midlands, so thicker cloud here and some spits and spots of rain. this is where the weather front is. south of that, that�*s
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where the really mild air is. north of that, it�*s not desperately cold, but there�*s certainly chill in the air, and first thing in the morning, temperatures in glasgow will only be around four degrees, and that touch of frost there certainly possible across some central and northern parts of scotland. but belfast and newcastle should be around seven or eight degrees very early tomorrow morning. so, here�*s the forecast for tomorrow. the weather front�*s more or less in the same place, so that means fairly cloudy conditions for the bulk of wales and the southern two thirds, say, of england. and north of that, we�*ve got bright weather, nice weather for belfast, glasgow and aberdeen, but it will be a little bit colder here. here�*s thursday�*s weather map, and low pressure is approaching, but it�*s still way out to sea. high pressure is in charge of the weather, so that means light winds. could be a bit murky and cloudy first thing in the morning, but the day itself is looking mostly fine across the uk. here are the temperatures — still mild, 14 in london, double figures for glasgow, edinburgh and aberdeen as well, but here�*s that rain making its way into ireland thursday night and into friday. friday will be a pretty unsettled day. we�*re not entirely sure where and exactly how much rainfall there will be on friday
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because this position of the low is a little uncertain. could be a little bit further north, could be a bit further south, but i think the wind will be a feature on friday. these blobs of rain could shift in the following forecasts, but let�*s call it a mild day with stronger winds and the chance of rain almost anywhere. there�*ll some sunshine around as well, although it sounds a bit like i�*m sitting on the fence, but it is what it is. it�*s going to be an unsettled end to the week. the weekend�*s looking a little bit better. should be settled for saturday and sunday, and that settled weather should last into monday and tuesday as well. that�*s it from me.
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hello, i�*m ros atkins. this is outside source. the eu has accused belarus of "gangster—style abuse" and of luring migrants to its border. poland�*s prime minister has warned of an armed escalation. translation: we know this is a fully planned operation which aims to disrupt our country�*s sovereignty. we know there is a search for weeks box happening on the broader. at least 2,000 people are trying to cross from belarus, and more countries are reacting to the situation. lithuania has declared a state of emergency on its border. more than a dozen ethiopian staff have been arrested as the conflict there continues. a un expert says
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promises made so far at cop26 aren�*t enough to stop global warming. frankly, it�*s an elephant frankly, it's an elephant giving birth_ frankly, it's an elephant giving birth to — frankly, it's an elephant giving birth to her mouse. we need to think about— birth to her mouse. we need to think about whether that's good enough. the climate change summit is now well into its second week — but how much progress has really been made? despite a raft of pledges made by world leaders, new analysis shows the world is nowhere near its goal of limiting global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees. here�*s the un environment chief. at this point, when we look at what has come in in the additional pledges frankly, it�*s an elephant giving birth to a mouse.
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we need to think about whether that is good enough and whether we can stretch more. if you�*re having trouble visualising the scale of that, here�*s a picture of a mouse at the feet of an elephant. in its annual emissions gap report last month, the un environment programme had said that decarbonisation plans ahead of the summit put the world on track to warm 2.7c this century. remember, the goal is to keep warming to 1.5 degrees celsius in order to protect us from the worst effects of climate change. last week, the international energy agency had calculated that commitments made at the summit would limit the rise to 1.8 — not the goal, but not far off it. but now, the un is saying that even if we factor in current pledges, we will still see that number rise to 2.1. inger anderson is blaming it on lack of ambition. we said we needed it to be at a much greater level of ambition, four times higher if we wanted
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to land at two degrees, which we really do not, and it seven times higher if we wanted to land at 1.5. so, that was one report. another report that came out today has conflicting figures. the climate change tracker says greenhouse gas emissions in 2030 will still be twice as high as necessary to keep temperature rise below 1.5c. it calculates that the world is in fact heading towards 2.4c of warming by the end of the century. have a look at this graphic they have published. we are now in the green part of the thermometer. but even if the 2030 targets are fully implemented, temperatures will still go all the way up to the orange bit. that�*s because the projected carbon emissions until 2100 — you can see their trajectory in this graph — are this dark blue bit, while what we want is to be where the green line is — the reduction needed to reach the 1.5 degree limit. the report�*s title — "glasgow�*s one degree 2030
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credibility gap: net zero�*s lip service to climate action." here�*s our global science correspondent. the warning is that there's a credibility here at glasgow between what's being promised and what the reality is of what we're actually seeing. we're not doing enough to cut emissions, that's the short of it. so, lots of numbers there, but not a great outcome. the summit president remains cautiously optimistic. we are making progress at cop26, but we still_ we are making progress at cop26, but we still have _ we are making progress at cop26, but we still have a — we are making progress at cop26, but we still have a mountain _ we are making progress at cop26, but we still have a mountain to _ we are making progress at cop26, but we still have a mountain to climb- we still have a mountain to climb over— we still have a mountain to climb over the — we still have a mountain to climb over the next— we still have a mountain to climb over the next two _ we still have a mountain to climb over the next two days. - we still have a mountain to climb over the next two days. and - we still have a mountain to climb- over the next two days. and what has been collectively _ over the next two days. and what has been collectively committed - over the next two days. and what has been collectively committed to - over the next two days. and what has been collectively committed to goes i been collectively committed to goes some _ been collectively committed to goes some way, — been collectively committed to goes some way, but— been collectively committed to goes some way, but certainly— been collectively committed to goes some way, but certainly not - been collectively committed to goes some way, but certainly not all- been collectively committed to goes some way, but certainly not all the. some way, but certainly not all the way, _ some way, but certainly not all the way, to— some way, but certainly not all the way. to keeping _ some way, but certainly not all the way. to keeping 15— some way, but certainly not all the way, to keeping 1.5 within- some way, but certainly not all the way, to keeping 1.5 within reach. l way, to keeping 1.5 within reach. the gap — way, to keeping 1.5 within reach. the gap in — way, to keeping 1.5 within reach. the gap in ambition— way, to keeping 1.5 within reach. the gap in ambition has- way, to keeping 1.5 within reach. i the gap in ambition has narrowed. now the _ the gap in ambition has narrowed. now the world _ the gap in ambition has narrowed. now the world needs _ the gap in ambition has narrowed. now the world needs confidence . the gap in ambition has narrowed. . now the world needs confidence that we witt— now the world needs confidence that we will shift — now the world needs confidence that we will shift immediately _ now the world needs confidence that we will shift immediately into - we will shift immediately into implementation, _ we will shift immediately into implementation, that- we will shift immediately into implementation, that the - we will shift immediately into - implementation, that the pledges made _ implementation, that the pledges made here — implementation, that the pledges made here will— implementation, that the pledges made here will be _
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implementation, that the pledges made here will be delivered - implementation, that the pledges made here will be delivered and l implementation, that the pledgesl made here will be delivered and at the policies — made here will be delivered and at the policies and _ made here will be delivered and at the policies and investment - made here will be delivered and at the policies and investment will. the policies and investment will swiftly— the policies and investment will swiftly follow. _ the focus at the summit today was science and innovation, and astronaut tim peake was also there. every sunrise and sunset, we see this atmosphere just 16 km, every sunrise and sunset, we see this atmospherejust 16 km, and we realise that�*s what protects all life down here. and if we put things into that atmosphere, you see them covering entire continents. it doesn�*t have anywhere else to go. let�*s hear more from rebecca morelle, who spent her day in glasgow. one of the big focus is a science and innovation. we had a stark warning — and innovation. we had a stark warning from the uk's chief scientific adviser, sir patrick vattahce. _ scientific adviser, sir patrick vallance, who said the problem is much _ vallance, who said the problem is much bigger than covid. while science — much bigger than covid. while science can help us with some of the solutions. _ science can help us with some of the solutions, just like it did with coronavirus, it can't be the only
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thing _ coronavirus, it can't be the only thing we — coronavirus, it can't be the only thing. we need big changes. everything from the food we eat, to how we _ everything from the food we eat, to how we get — everything from the food we eat, to how we get around to how we heat our homes _ how we get around to how we heat our homes he _ how we get around to how we heat our homes. he says that green choices heed _ homes. he says that green choices heed to— homes. he says that green choices heed to be — homes. he says that green choices need to be the easy choices. he also said that _ need to be the easy choices. he also said that if— need to be the easy choices. he also said that if action isn't taken now, there _ said that if action isn't taken now, there will— said that if action isn't taken now, there will be some big problems in the future, — there will be some big problems in the future, and that's also been echoed — the future, and that's also been echoed by— the future, and that's also been echoed by a new analysis by the uk met office. it looked at the issue of heat _ met office. it looked at the issue of heat stress. this is where you -et of heat stress. this is where you get extreme temperatures and avidity. _ get extreme temperatures and avidity. extreme temperatures make you hot. _ avidity. extreme temperatures make you hot, but humidity means your body _ you hot, but humidity means your body cah't — you hot, but humidity means your body can't cool down because your sweats _ body can't cool down because your sweats can't evaporate, which causes your temperature to rise internally and all _ your temperature to rise internally and all calls —— causes all sorts of problems— and all calls —— causes all sorts of problems for the vulnerable. if the problem _ problems for the vulnerable. if the problem today, 68 million people around _ problem today, 68 million people around the world affected by, but if global— around the world affected by, but if global temperatures go above two celsius, _ global temperatures go above two celsius, that rises toi billion people _ celsius, that rises toi billion people if_ celsius, that rises toi billion people. if it goes about four degrees, _ people. if it goes about four degrees, then three and a half billion— degrees, then three and a half billion people will be exposed. that's— billion people will be exposed. that's a — billion people will be exposed. that's a great swathe of the world population. this is why scientists are saying —
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population. this is why scientists are saying keep temperatures low and the outcome of this conference is 'ust the outcome of this conference is just so— the outcome of this conference is just so important. it's it�*s experienced sea level that threaten the country. the effects are pronounced on the beaches in coasts. sea shells are reducing, but also because of— sea shells are reducing, but also because of climate _ sea shells are reducing, but also because of climate change. - sea shells are reducing, but also i because of climate change. climate change posed and increasing concentration of carbon dioxide. what happens is that sea shells are now becoming... l what happens is that sea shells are now becoming. . ._ now becoming... i used to come to mauritius a — now becoming... i used to come to mauritius a lot _ now becoming... i used to come to mauritius a lot and _ now becoming... i used to come to mauritius a lot and find _ now becoming... i used to come to mauritius a lot and find plenty - now becoming... i used to come to mauritius a lot and find plenty of. mauritius a lot and find plenty of shells here, but now there are less. how important are sea shells? lanthem
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how important are sea shells? when ou don't how important are sea shells? when you don't have _ how important are sea shells? when you don't have the _ how important are sea shells? when you don't have the seashells, - how important are sea shells? trawaw you don't have the seashells, you you don�*t have the seashells, you don�*t have the predator, and you have will other organisms that cause an imbalance. seashells are nice, they are important, they were used as money in africa, but they�*re also very important in terms of equilibrium. but it�*s quite hard to stop tourists, you can put them in your bag! sometimes it is sentimental, seashells are nice and they represent a little piece of a destination you enjoyed, that�*s the sad part about it but it is part of the ecosystem and of course, empty seashells sometimes are houses for other organisms which recognise them. look at them. but do not bring them home. thank you so much. thank you for this explanation on seashells.
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let�*s turn to afghanistan. thousands are desperate to find a way out of the country as the country faces rising poverty and hunger. the remote town of zaranj, close to the borders with both pakistan and iran, is a people smuggling hub. traffickers there have told the bbc their business has more than doubled since the taliban takeover, and that many of those leaving hope to eventually reach europe. secunder kermani reports. afghans are leaving in their thousands. smuggled out from this remote corner of the country, headed for the desert through pakistan into iran. no visas, no immigration, just people smugglers who pay a small fee to the taliban.
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most, desperate men hoping to find work. but there are whole families here, too. aren�*t you worried about going with all these young children? at times, it feels as if the whole of afghanistan is trying to find a way out. in this dusty car park, passengers wait to start a journey that will take more than a week. the economy is collapsing and few have faith in the new taliban government. at least 4,000 leave here every day, we�*re told. this is a deeply surreal sight, a huge people—smuggling hub, operating completely openly.
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the taliban say that rising poverty here means that it�*s not possible to stop all these people from trying to leave the country. they say all they can do is control how many people get into these trucks to make the journey a little safer. everyone wants to go to turkey or to europe? where do they want to go? the taliban are making money off this trade, around $10 per truck. but they say the economic crisis and freezing of international funding makes the flow of people unstoppable. all these people are travelling without visas.
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it�*s illegal. zaranj has long been a people—smuggling centre. over the previous government, corrupt officials were paid off. under the previous government, corrupt officials were paid off. now the trade is flourishing. aren�*t you exploiting these people, exploiting their misery7 at the border with iran, hundreds of afghans are deported back every day. but many more are setting off for the desert. we meet labourers, former soldiers, civil servants. they survived the war,
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but are fleeing its aftermath. secunder kermani, bbc news, zaranj. inafew in a few minutes, we will bring you the latest on the pandemic in europe. a man rescued from a cave in the breacon beacons after more than two days underground is said to be in "good spirits" despite multiple injuries. hywel griffith reports. pulling together to help one of their own. the rescuers own picture tell a story of teamwork in the most pulling together to help one of their own. the rescuers�* own picture tell a story of teamwork in the most just what they had achieved. the man they rescued was an experienced caver in his 40s. when he fell he broke bones in his leg and jaw,
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there was no way he could make his own way out. it�*s hard to fathom on the surface, but beneath us here are 37 miles worth of tunnels crisscrossing between the caves will there are only three ways in and out, and this tiny metal door is one of them. it was here that the caver entered as part of a group on saturday. they travelled around 500 metres when the cave investigator gave way on the road back was too narrow, so teams of rescuers had to carry him 3km towards the top entrance. manoeuvring the stretcher meant it took ten times longer than usual, clocking up 54 hours, the longest carry in uk caving history. if you can imagine lots of passages, some big, some small, chamber
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stacked on top of each other and overlapping each other. tom is one of the 300 volunteers who put in a shift and says one of the biggest challenges was taking a floating stretcher through a long, perilous section of water. it has lots of little cascades and waterfalls and also very deep potholes full of water. you would be out of your depth going into it and potentially having to swim across. and you had to carry a stretch over that? that�*s right. it�*s rare for cavers to be in the limelight and for these volunteers is knowing that others will come to their aid. —— the only reward. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our top story... the eu has accused belarus of �*gangster—style abuse�* and of luring migrants to attempt to cross its border with poland. europe now accounts for half of the world�*s new infections of covid, and russia
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is having particular challenges. in the last 24 hours, there was another record number of daily deaths there — over 1,200 died. this is happening after a week—long workplace shutdown designed to contain the virus. here�*s a government official. translation: the nonworking regime has now ended, but five regions have decided to prolong that measure. regional authorities have based that decision on recommendations of health officials. the fact that the virus is still spreading rapidly is in part connected to the relatively low vaccination rate in russia. 34% of the population have had both jabs. here�*s bbc russian�*s petr kozlov in moscow. today, the authorities still didn�*t push the population to do the mandatory vaccination. several categories which have to be
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vaccinated. but kremlin and the government are not still ready and have not decided to put the full vaccination in the country, and this is because of russian population, russians are quite a number of people against the vaccination. we see the autistics that it�*s quite popular. people are even buying the covid vaccine passports, but not doing the vaccination. other eastern european countries are also reporting record high figures. bulgaria, romania and ukraine have also recently registered highest daily death tolls, and again, this seems connected to vaccination rates. in ukraine, 18% of the population has been fully vaccinated, and the healthcare system is under pressure. here�*s jonah fisher. in ukraine�*s hospitals, the alarm bells are ringing.
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this latest record—breaking covid wave is filling the wards with patients, and the vast majority of them are unvaccinated. this doctor says she is fighting to save the life of a 40—year—old mother of three. three other members of her family are sick. all rejected the vaccine. fewer than one in five ukrainians are double jabbed — the product of deep—rooted scepticism of both doctors and the authorities. last week, hundreds gathered outside parliament to protest against vaccinations. vaccine is poison, it�*s poisoned. many people now died because they took vaccine. many people are alive now because they took the vaccine, too. no, it�*s not true, it�*s not true! you�*re a doctor.
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yes, i'm a doctor and neurologist. and you�*re against vaccination7 totally. why7 because it's not the way to not spread the infection. you must have a choice. right? with cases soaring, new restrictions have been introduced to try and force people to getjabbed. kyiv�*s now in what�*s known as the red zone which means if you want to travel on public transport, like this bus or on the metro, you have to be vaccinated and have to have the papers to prove it. in practice, there are lots of fake certificates around. we watched the police taking a very gentle approach to enforcing the rules. this woman has no proof of vaccination or covid test, but she�*s let off with a warning.
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so, that lady didn�*t have a vaccination certificate but you let her stay on the bus? "we�*re mostly here as a preventative measure", he says, "we can�*t really demand things from people". the tighter rules have led to queues at vaccination centres. ukraine is now desperately trying to catch up as the beds fill up and the number of covid deaths mount. jonah fisher, bbc news, kyiv. now, the first country to go back into lockdown in europe was latvia. you can see the spike in cases there from just over a week ago, and cases are still higher than at any other point during the pandemic. the lockdown will last until the 15th of november. it includes curfew between 8pm and 5am and the closure of non—essential shops. despie this, we�*re told many hospitals are operating
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at 80% of capacity. here�*s the head of the latvian medical association. actually, we have great challenges for our health system, but the problem is the health system has been underfinanced for many years. before this covid—19 crisis, there were big problems in the capacity of our health care system due to a lack of nurses and physicians. we are fighting with covid and now we have restrictions very seriously, till the 15th of november, but i think we all should focus. the vaccination is very important. there�*s no discussion about that. as we can see in vaccination we should still think
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about pre—hot hospital treatment and how we can monitor them let�*s turn to austria next, where cases have doubled in the past week. in response, the government has banned non—vaccinated people from restaurants, bars and theatres. that�*s led to queues like these to get vaccinated — dubbed the �*schnitzel—panik�*. that�*s a reference to the fear of not being able to go out to eat the national dish. here�*s more from bethany bell. for those people who are pro—vaccination and who don't want to see _ pro—vaccination and who don't want to see a _ pro—vaccination and who don't want to see a lockdown, they greeted these _ to see a lockdown, they greeted these measures as the ways of trying to stop _ these measures as the ways of trying to stop these numbers getting out of control— to stop these numbers getting out of control even more. other numbers, the freedom — control even more. other numbers, the freedom party, are calling for a demonstration and for people's rights _ demonstration and for people's rights for— demonstration and for people's rights for freedom and a lack of coercion— rights for freedom and a lack of coercion and pressure. so, it is that— coercion and pressure. so, it is that there _ coercion and pressure. so, it is that there are different feelings
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here in— that there are different feelings here in this society. i think what certainly— here in this society. i think what certainly concentrated is the way the numbers have increased dramatically over the last week or two. dramatically over the last week or two it— dramatically over the last week or two it was— dramatically over the last week or two. it was interesting to see this weekend — two. it was interesting to see this weekend that more people were going out to— weekend that more people were going out to be _ weekend that more people were going out to be vaccinated, many of them for a _ out to be vaccinated, many of them for a booster injection, but others getting _ for a booster injection, but others getting their first injections. an getting their first injections. important getting their first injections. jéw important policy decision in england, all public healthcare workers will now have to be double—vaccinated by april. already, around 90% of frontline workers are fully vaccinated. that�*s higher than the working—age population, which is 81%. but there are still 103,000 workers who are not vaccinated. here�*s the health secretary. for all those working in the nhs and social— for all those working in the nhs and social care _ for all those working in the nhs and social care will— for all those working in the nhs and social care will have _ for all those working in the nhs and social care will have to _ for all those working in the nhs and social care will have to be _ social care will have to be vaccinated. _ social care will have to be vaccinated. we _ social care will have to be vaccinated. we must - social care will have to be l vaccinated. we must avoid preventable _
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vaccinated. we must avoid preventable harm - vaccinated. we must avoid preventable harm and - vaccinated. we must avoid i preventable harm and protect patients— preventable harm and protect patients in— preventable harm and protect patients in the _ preventable harm and protect patients in the nhs, - preventable harm and protect patients in the nhs, protect i patients in the nhs, protect colleagues _ patients in the nhs, protect colleagues in _ patients in the nhs, protect colleagues in the _ patients in the nhs, protect colleagues in the nhs - patients in the nhs, protect colleagues in the nhs and l patients in the nhs, protectl colleagues in the nhs and of patients in the nhs, protect - colleagues in the nhs and of course, protect— colleagues in the nhs and of course, protect the _ colleagues in the nhs and of course, protect the nhs_ colleagues in the nhs and of course, protect the nhs itself. _ colleagues in the nhs and of course, protect the nhs itself. only- colleagues in the nhs and of course, protect the nhs itself. only those i protect the nhs itself. only those colleagues — protect the nhs itself. only those colleagues who _ protect the nhs itself. only those colleagues who can _ protect the nhs itself. only those colleagues who can show - protect the nhs itself. only those colleagues who can show that i protect the nhs itself. only thosel colleagues who can show that they are fully _ colleagues who can show that they are fully vaccinated _ colleagues who can show that they are fully vaccinated against - are fully vaccinated against covid-19 _ are fully vaccinated against covid—19 can— are fully vaccinated against covid—19 can be _ are fully vaccinated against covid—19 can be employedl are fully vaccinated against i covid—19 can be employed or are fully vaccinated against _ covid—19 can be employed or engaged in those _ covid—19 can be employed or engaged in those settings. _ covid—19 can be employed or engaged in those settings. there _ covid—19 can be employed or engaged in those settings. there will— covid—19 can be employed or engaged in those settings. there will be - in those settings. there will be two key exceptions _ in those settings. there will be two key exceptions. one _ in those settings. there will be two key exceptions. one for— in those settings. there will be two key exceptions. one for those i in those settings. there will be two key exceptions. one for those who| key exceptions. one for those who don't _ key exceptions. one for those who don't have — key exceptions. one for those who don't have face—to—face _ key exceptions. one for those who don't have face—to—face contact i key exceptions. one for those who i don't have face—to—face contact with patients, _ don't have face—to—face contact with patients, and — don't have face—to—face contact with patients, and the _ don't have face—to—face contact with patients, and the second, _ don't have face—to—face contact with patients, and the second, for- don't have face—to—face contact with patients, and the second, for thosel patients, and the second, for those who are _ patients, and the second, for those who are medically _ patients, and the second, for those who are medically exempt. - the health secretary also highlighted that other countries have introduced similar mandates. for example, healthcare workers must be double—vaccinated in germany, the us and france amongst others. here�*s our health correspondent, katharine da costa. and if we look at france in particular, he said that about 60% injuly particular, he said that about 60% in july have particular, he said that about 60% injuly have taken up the vaccine, and the increase to more than 99% by october after it was made mandatory. very few according to the french government had actually left the
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profession. so, what he was saying is that there is still more to do to convince people to take up the offer, to understand what, the hesitancy might be around, to support the staff. he made a point of saying that no member of staff should be scapegoated or shamed. but there has been criticism of the plan. here�*s the trade union unite. we're ina we're in a very different situation than _ we're in a very different situation than france. i think we should be comparing — than france. i think we should be comparing ourselves to our fellow nations _ comparing ourselves to our fellow nations in— comparing ourselves to our fellow nations in scotland, wales and northern— nations in scotland, wales and northern ireland. the world health organization itself doesn't recommend compulsory vaccination. what _ recommend compulsory vaccination. what we _ recommend compulsory vaccination. what we believe in is people should take the _ what we believe in is people should take the vaccine and the vaccine should _ take the vaccine and the vaccine should be — take the vaccine and the vaccine should be taken, and some vaccines are compulsory, but obviously, this is a new— are compulsory, but obviously, this is a new vaccine and some people still need — is a new vaccine and some people still need to be urged to take the vaccine — still need to be urged to take the vaccine i— still need to be urged to take the vaccine. i don't think it should be compulsory, and we should ramp up our efforts— compulsory, and we should ramp up our efforts to make sure people do take the _ our efforts to make sure people do take the vaccine. that our efforts to make sure people do take the vaccine.— take the vaccine. that in this addition of _ take the vaccine. that in this addition of outside - take the vaccine. that in this
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addition of outside source. | take the vaccine. that in this i addition of outside source. thank you very much indeed for watching. i�*ll see you tomorrow. well, it�*s been a relatively mild day for the time of the year. not gloriously sunny by any means, but temperatures above the average, and it�*s going to stay like it for most of us tonight, not everywhere. in fact, further north, there is a chance of a touch of frost, but that�*s mostly around the glens of scotland, where the skies will clear through tonight. right now, there�*s a weather front that�*s slighting the uk almost in half. you can see it moving across wales, northern parts of england as well into the midlands, so thicker cloud here and some spits and spots of rain. this is where the weather front is. south of that, that�*s where the really mild air is. north of that, it�*s not desperately cold, but there�*s certainly chill in the air, and first thing in the morning, temperatures in glasgow will only be around four degrees, and that touch of frost there certainly
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possible across some central and northern parts of scotland. but belfast and newcastle should be around seven or eight degrees very early tomorrow morning. so, here�*s the forecast for tomorrow. the weather front�*s more or less in the same place, so that means fairly cloudy conditions for the bulk of wales and the southern two thirds, say, of england. and north of that, we�*ve got bright weather, nice weather for belfast, glasgow and aberdeen, but it will be a little bit colder here. here�*s thursday�*s weather map, and low pressure is approaching, but it�*s still way out to sea. high pressure is in charge of the weather, so that means light winds. could be a bit murky and cloudy first thing in the morning, but the day itself is looking mostly fine across the uk. here are the temperatures — still mild, 14 in london, double figures for glasgow, edinburgh and aberdeen as well, but here�*s that rain making its way into ireland thursday night and into friday. friday will be a pretty unsettled day. we�*re not entirely sure where and exactly how much rainfall there will be on friday because this position of the
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low is a little uncertain. could be a little bit further north, could be a bit further south, but i think the wind will be a feature on friday. these blobs of rain could shift in the following forecasts, but let�*s call it a mild day with stronger winds and the chance of rain almost anywhere. there�*ll some sunshine around as well, although it sounds a bit like i�*m sitting on the fence, but it is what it is. it�*s going to be an unsettled end to the week. the weekend�*s looking a little bit better. should be settled for saturday and sunday, and that settled weather should last into monday and tuesday as well. that�*s it from me.
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this is bbc news. i�*m shaun ley. the headlines at 8pm — all nhs staff in england who see patients face—to—face will have to be fully vaccinated against covid by next spring. only those who have a medical exemption can say no. we must avoid preventable harm and protect patients in the nhs, protect colleagues in the nhs and, of course, protect the nhs itself. it is unethical to force anybody to have _ it is unethical to force anybody to have a _ it is unethical to force anybody to have a medical procedure and if i have _ have a medical procedure and if i have decided i am not going to have a medical— have decided i am not going to have a medical procedure, it should not be up _ a medical procedure, it should not be up to— a medical procedure, it should not be up to the government to force me to or say— be up to the government to force me to or say i'm — be up to the government to force me to or say i'm going to lose myjob. labour demands an inquiry into the government�*s former top law officer, who represents people in the west country and is earnings
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hundreds of thousands representing a government in the carribean.

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