Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 9, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

10:00 am
this is bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the uk government is set to announce that all front line staff in the national health service in england will have to be fully vaccinated against covid—19 by next spring. it is good news in terms of being able to ensure that we protect staff, patients and visitors from nhs members of staff having infections. what is your reaction, particularly if you work in the nhs? the policy is already in place in italy, france and germany. should you be forced to get the vaccine if you have not already? fleeing poverty — the number of afghans leaving the country had
10:01 am
more than doubled since the taliban takeover. rescued — after two days trapped underground an injured caver is brought to safety, he's said to be in good spirits. a lesbian couple who say nhs fertility treatment in england discriminates against them because they're gay launch a landmark legal case against theirlocal fertility service. ultimately it comes down to the fact there is an unfair financial burden being put on the lgbtq+ community, relating to the eligibility criteria placed on us as opposed to heterosexual couples. a new study finds it's notjust how long you sleep for but when you go
10:02 am
hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the uk government is to compel front line nhs staff in england to be fully vaccinated against coronavirus. an official announcement is expected later today, and workers will have until spring to get double jabbed. unions argue it should not be forced. staff working in care homes were instructed earlier this year to become fully vaccinated — their deadline is on thursday. here's our health editor, hugh pym. compulsory vaccination against covid for staff in adult social care is already being implemented in england. there's a deadline later this week for care workers to comply, apart from those deemed to be exempt. it's understood that, later today, the government will announce that the policy will be extended to staff in patient—facing roles in the nhs in england. they'll be required as a condition of deployment in those posts to be double—jabbed by next spring, unless there are medical reasons for exemption. the deadline has been set
10:03 am
to allow for the gap between first and second doses. around 90% of nhs staff in england have already been vaccinated against covid. the health secretary, sajid javid, said last month that he was leaning towards compulsoryjabs for nhs staff and the main issue was patient safety. as a doctor, i take it for granted that i have to be vaccinated against hepatitis b so i do not put my patients at risk of an incurable illness which could cause cirrhosis of the liver cancer, i had been required to do that the entire 36 years i have been a doctor, it is not entirely new. health leaders say they see the benefits of the policy, though some have expressed reservations, arguing that there is a risk some staff might quit at a time of concerns about staffing gaps. there are still somewhere i think between 80,000 and 90,000 nhs staff who have not been vaccinated and it is really important we work hard with them over the next few months before the deadline to try to get as
10:04 am
many as possible vaccinated so we do not face a cliff edge of effectively members of staff leaving. the health union unison has argued that the key to convincing hesitant staff should be persuasion, not force. decisions on the issue are devolved and it's possible that the other uk nations will take a different route to england. hugh pym, bbc news. a man is being assessed in hospital after being injured in a cave complex in south wales. the caver spent more than 50 hours trapped underground after he fell at the site in the brecon beacons. more than 200 people from around the uk worked in shifts to bring him to safety. 0ur wales correspondent, hywel griffith, sent this report from the scene. mission accomplished. after more than two days of painstaking, exhausting work, relief all round. together, these volunteers carried the casualty through an underground assault course of boulders,
10:05 am
streams and ledges, the longest stretcher carry ever by a british cave rescue team. it is absolutely amazing. the cooperation, the professionalism. everybody dealt with it. the controllers, down to the grunts on the sharp end, it was just amazing. it's the biggest rescue any of us have done, i hope will ever do. the casualty is an experienced caver in his 40s. on saturday, he fell and suffered multiple injuries, but could talk to his rescuers throughout. when you consider how long he has been in the cave, how long he has been in the stretcher, he is doing very well indeed. so he's been talking to the medics along the way and they have been having a conversation, but we are waiting for them to come out, now. this is what draws enthusiasts here. a sculpted subterranean world, in places almost 300 metres deep. it attracts cavers from across the uk. after 50 hours underground
10:06 am
and the efforts of 250 volunteers, the casualty is now safe and on their way to hospital. bringing this rescue operation to a successful conclusion. for the volunteers, days of endeavour and years of training have tonight brought their reward. let's hear more from two of the men right at the sharp end of the rescue effort, paultaylorand right at the sharp end of the rescue effort, paul taylor and steve thomas. it effort, paul taylor and steve thomas. ., , , effort, paul taylor and steve thomas. , , ., thomas. it was absolutely brilliant, the resnonse. _ thomas. it was absolutely brilliant, the response, over— thomas. it was absolutely brilliant, the response, over the _ thomas. it was absolutely brilliant, the response, over the days - thomas. it was absolutely brilliant, the response, over the days that i thomas. it was absolutely brilliant, the response, over the days that it| the response, over the days that it took. a massive team effort by everybody and not one person complain. the geyser underground had to up with some pretty hard conditions, lying on the water to get the stretcher over various
10:07 am
sections, no complaints from anybody, came out of the cave, rested, and won the request was, can you go back in?— you go back in? yes. it was brilliant- — you go back in? yes. it was brilliant. how— you go back in? yes. it was brilliant. how is _ you go back in? yes. it was brilliant. how is the - you go back in? yes. it was brilliant. how is the man? | you go back in? yes. it was. brilliant. how is the man? can you go back in? yes. it was- brilliant. how is the man? can you tell us about the nature of his injuries? tell us about the nature of his in'uries? ~ ., ., ., ., , injuries? we have not had any u dates injuries? we have not had any updates as — injuries? we have not had any updates as far _ injuries? we have not had any updates as far as _ injuries? we have not had any updates as far as i'm - injuries? we have not had any updates as far as i'm aware, l injuries? we have not had any i updates as far as i'm aware, we injuries? we have not had any - updates as far as i'm aware, we know he is _ updates as far as i'm aware, we know he is ok _ updates as far as i'm aware, we know he is ok he — updates as far as i'm aware, we know he is ok he is— updates as far as i'm aware, we know he is ok. he is a strong character, we he is 0k. he is a strong character, we always— he is ok. he is a strong character, we always knew that. we have heard he is 0k. _ we always knew that. we have heard he is 0k. be — we always knew that. we have heard he is ok, he will be all right, eventually. he is ok, he will be all right, eventually-— he is ok, he will be all right, eventuall . . , , , , ., eventually. he was pretty bashed and battered, eventually. he was pretty bashed and battered. you — eventually. he was pretty bashed and battered, you know? _ eventually. he was pretty bashed and battered, you know? he _ eventually. he was pretty bashed and battered, you know? he was - eventually. he was pretty bashed and battered, you know? he was an - battered, you know? he was an exoerienced _ battered, you know? he was an experienced caver, _ battered, you know? he was an experienced caver, he - battered, you know? he was an experienced caver, he is - battered, you know? he was an experienced caver, he is an - experienced caver, he is an experienced caver, he is an experienced and fed caver, we are told. i have seen messages saying this gentleman should pay for the 250 people who helped rescue him, what do you say to people who suggest that?— what do you say to people who su: est that? , ., , suggest that? there is no bill, we are all volunteers, _ suggest that? there is no bill, we are all volunteers, i _ suggest that? there is no bill, we are all volunteers, i don't - suggest that? there is no bill, we are all volunteers, i don't quite i are all volunteers, i don't quite understand that comment. it is a
10:08 am
team _ understand that comment. it is a team of— understand that comment. it is a team of people willing to give up their time — team of people willing to give up theirtime and team of people willing to give up their time and expertise, and we do, regularly, _ their time and expertise, and we do, regularly, there is never a charge. we are _ regularly, there is never a charge. we are there to do it, it is a specialist _ we are there to do it, it is a specialist thing and we are good at it but— specialist thing and we are good at it but we _ specialist thing and we are good at it but we do it our own time. he is a fellow caver. — it but we do it our own time. he is a fellow caver, we _ it but we do it our own time. he is a fellow caver, we do _ it but we do it our own time. he is a fellow caver, we do rescue - it but we do it our own time. he: 3 a fellow caver, we do rescue because god forbid, there might be the day somebody needs to get us. that god forbid, there might be the day somebody needs to get us.- somebody needs to get us. that is wh we somebody needs to get us. that is why we do — somebody needs to get us. that is why we do it- _ somebody needs to get us. that is why we do it- i— somebody needs to get us. that is why we do it. i think _ somebody needs to get us. that is why we do it. i think i _ somebody needs to get us. that is why we do it. i think i am - somebody needs to get us. that is why we do it. i think i am right- somebody needs to get us. that is why we do it. i think i am right in i why we do it. i think i am right in hearing that members of south transmit wales cave rescue team were involved in rescuing the boys in the cave in thailand. how does this operation compared to that? completely different. it is in a welsh — completely different. it is in a welsh mountain, for a start. it is so much — welsh mountain, for a start. it is so much easier to coordinate something i close because we are all on the _ something i close because we are all on the same land mass, it was literally— on the same land mass, it was literally putting out the call and people — literally putting out the call and people jumping in cars.
10:09 am
literally putting out the call and peoplejumping in cars. not literally putting out the call and people jumping in cars. people “umping in cars. not flying off people jumping in cars. not flying off around the _ people jumping in cars. not flying off around the world. _ people jumping in cars. not flying off around the world. it _ people jumping in cars. not flying off around the world. it was - off around the world. it was manageable, _ off around the world. it was manageable, managed - off around the world. it was manageable, managed by. off around the world. it was l manageable, managed by the off around the world. it was - manageable, managed by the team throughout. the evacuation flights out of afghanistan may have largely stopped, but with rising poverty levels, thousands are still desperate to find a way out. the remote town of zaranj, close to the borders of both pakistan and iran, is a people smuggling hub. traffickers there have told the bbc their business has more than doubled since the taliban takeover, and that many of those leaving hope to eventually reach europe. secunder kermani reports. afghans are leaving in their thousands. smuggled out from this remote corner of the country. headed for the desert through pakistan into iran. no visas, no immigration, just people traffickers who pay a small fee to the taliban. most, desperate men
10:10 am
hoping to find work. but there are whole families here too. aren't you worried about going with all these young children? at times, it feels as if the whole of afghanistan is trying to find a way out. in this dusty car park, passengers wait to start a journey that will take more than a week. the economy is collapsing and few have faith in the new taliban government. at least 4,000 leave here every day, we are told. this is a deeply surreal sight, a huge people smuggling hub, operating completely openly. the taliban said that rising poverty here means it is not possible
10:11 am
to stop all these people from trying to leave the country. they say all they can do is control how many people get into these trucks to make the journey a little safer. everyone wants to go to turkey or to europe? why do they want to go? the taliban are making money off this trade. around $10 per truck. but they say the economic crisis and freezing of international funding makes the flow of people unstoppable. all these people are travelling without visas. it is illegal.
10:12 am
zaranj has long been a people smuggling centre. over the previous government, corrupt officials were paid off. now the trade is flourishing. aren't you exploiting these people, exploiting their misery? at the border with iran, hundreds of afghans are deported back every day. but many more are setting off for the desert stop we meet labourers, former soldiers, civil servants. they survived the war but are fleeing its aftermath.
10:13 am
secunder kermani, bbc news. the world bank has indicated that it's unlikely to resume direct aid to afghanistan after suspending financing when the taliban took over. on monday the world food programme warned that millions of people could face starvation within weeks, unless the world steps in to help. the bbc�*s world affairs editor, john simpson is in bamiyan, in central afghanistan. i think what we are seeing is a fairly elaborate dance between the international community and the government here, trying the outside world, the world bank, being the latest example, trying to force the taliban to be different in the way they govern, less extreme, less conservative. but the fact is it is like a dance where the music certainly caught up with things and it is going faster and faster. i
10:14 am
suspect we are getting fairly close to some kind of... perhaps a change of attitude by the taliban. i don't have any information about age, it is very hard to get inside the taliban but there is a taliban delegation going to pakistan led tomorrow —— tomorrow led by its foreign minister and i think there is at least a possibility that the taliban will tell the pakistanis that they will change their attitude towards women in education, for instance, and if they do that, that could start to unlock some of the really quite hostile attitudes of the outside world. this is only guesswork on my part but i think it must at least be a possibility. poland says it has blocked an attempt by thousands of migrants to breach its border with belarus en masse. it's also closing a major border crossing as a growing number of migrants —
10:15 am
mostly from the middle east — have set up camp nearby. belarus denies poland's accusations that it's trying to provoke a confrontation by encouraging people to force their way across. aru na iyengar reports. as temperatures drop below freezing, migrants from the middle east and africa try to keep warm on the border between belarus and poland, gateway to the eu. it follows angry scenes on monday as hundreds of migrants attacked poland's barbed wire fence, put there to keep them out. poland accuses belarus of orchestrating scenes like this in revenge for western sanctions on minsk over human rights abuses. the us has also weighed in. the united states strongly condemns the lukashenko regime's political exploitation and coercion of vulnerable people, and the regime's callous and inhumane facilitation of irregular
10:16 am
migration flows across its borders. but the belarusian president denies encouraging them and blames the west for its inhumane treatment of migrants at the border. under international law, poland has to assist anyone seeking asylum, even if they arrived illegally. but for many here, the destination is not poland but beyond. we're not going to poland, we are go to germany. germany is life. no poland! baby cries. germany is now calling for collective action from eu countries. nato has added its voice, accusing belarus of using these people as political pawns. poland is closing its border crossing with belarus here at kuznica. it's also approved plans to build a wall, replacing the razor wire in a bid to stem this human tide. aruna iyengar, bbc news. for the latest, our correspondent adam easton in the polish capital, warsaw.
10:17 am
the director of the national security office has said this morning it was estimated that yesterday there was up to 4000 migrants gathering near the border in belarus. we don't know where they came from, there are reports that some of them were iraqi kurds but thatis some of them were iraqi kurds but that is not verified at the moment, but what we know is that several hundred of those 7000 camped sides of the razor wire fence. 0vernight there were campfires, they set up tents and they are still there this morning and polish officials say that overnight the expected mass making macro of the border did not materialise, it was a relatively calm night, some isolated incidents, a rock was thrown at a police car, but at the moment it is still a very tense situation at the border. the headlines on bbc news...
10:18 am
the government's set to announce that all front—line nhs staff in england will have to be fully vaccinated against covid 19 by next spring. fleeing poverty — the number of afghans leaving the country had more than doubled since the taliban takeover rescued: after two days trapped underground an injured caver is brought to safety — he's said to be in good spirits. the rescue operation involved 250 people. the anger — both outside and inside parliament — over the uk government's attempt to change the rules on mps' conduct shows no sign of dying down. and today there are fresh claims about mps' second jobs — and the eye—watering sums being earned by some. the labour party chair anneliese dodds is writing to borisjohnson, saying the issue is "a question of leadership" for the prime minister. let's speak to our political correspondent, nick eardley. the opposition parties are trying to
10:19 am
keep the momentum up sleaze issue? they are indeed, and it is not really look like going away at the moment. it has moved from being a story initially about the conduct of one mp, 0wen paterson, who has not stood down, to the government's attempt to rewrite the rules and it has now become a wider question about the priorities of some mps. the big story this morning is geoffrey cox, you might remember him when he was attorney general, the big, booming voice during the brexit debates on the legality of some of the things the government was doing. he advises a law firm and as part of his work for them has been advising the british virgin islands as well. as part of that work earlier this year, back in april, he was based at the british virgin islands for a number of weeks. that was during a time when parliament was not sitting completely so people could vote by
10:20 am
proxy so he was taking part in votes in parliament without being in the uk. we have been looking through the record this morning, it looks like geoffrey cox has not taken part in many debates at all over the last 18 months, there is only one he participated in and it has become this awkward question for the government about the priority of some conservative mps, the question was put to the deputy prime minister dominic raab on the radio this morning and he was not that comfortable defending said geoffrey cox. i comfortable defending said geoffrey cox. ., , ., comfortable defending said geoffrey cox. ~' , . , . , cox. i think it is a perfectly reasonable _ cox. i think it is a perfectly reasonable challenge - cox. i think it is a perfectly reasonable challenge but l cox. i think it is a perfectly i reasonable challenge but one for cox. i think it is a perfectly - reasonable challenge but one for his voters _ reasonable challenge but one for his voters to _ reasonable challenge but one for his voters to decide. i do not think it is for— voters to decide. i do not think it is for me — voters to decide. i do not think it is for me to _ voters to decide. i do not think it is for me to start making or prejudicing or second—guessing the judgments they make, what is crucially— judgments they make, what is crucially important is transparency around _ crucially important is transparency around outside interests and ultimately voters will decide at the ballot _ ultimately voters will decide at the ballot boxes, which they do for jeffrey — ballot boxes, which they do for jeffrey and they do for me. it was
10:21 am
not uuite jeffrey and they do for me. it was rrot quite a _ jeffrey and they do for me. it was not quite a full _ jeffrey and they do for me. it was not quite a full throated - jeffrey and they do for me. it was not quite a full throated defence l not quite a full throated defence from dominic raab of sir geoffrey cox. it does not look like sarkar geoffrey cox has broken any rules that there has been no response so no so far, but the story keeps rolling on and becoming increasingly awkward for the government, four mps who do second jobs and there are those questions over the balance between mps who have their role as members of parliament and representing the constituents and those outside jobs that many have, and the question with sir geoffrey cox is whether he has basically neglected hisjob cox is whether he has basically neglected his job as an mp to spend more time being a lawyer? advice like you, nick eardley. —— thank you, nick eardley. police say a ten—year—old boy has died after being attacked by a dog in south wales.
10:22 am
0ur wales correspondent tomas morgan is in caerphilly and gave me this update. we spoke to some of the residents that live here in penyrheol on the outskirts of caerphilly this morning, clearly very upset at the news that a ten—year—old living on this street here died tragically yesterday after being attacked by a dog. when paramedics arrived the boy was pronounced dead at the scene. police are continuing their investigation, gwent police, into what happened. we expect an update on the investigation within the next hour or two so we'll be giving you that as soon as we get it. we have heard from some of the neighbours here this morning who had suggested, these are unconfirmed reports, that the boy was not a resident of the household where he died, he had gone with a friend yesterday after school, but that is still to be verified at the moment. what we will look to find out from police is further detail on the incident. residents on the street suggested
10:23 am
happened inside the house after school had come to an end at about 3:55pm yesterday. as sooner we get that statement we will be bringing it to you later this morning. travis scott is facing multiple lawsuits after at least eight people were killed and hundreds injured in a crush at his texas festival astroworld. 0ne injured concertgoer has accused scott and surprise performer drake of inciting the crowd, and is seeking $1 million in damages. neither have commented on the lawsuits. scott has said he is working to help the families of the victims — the youngest was just 14. mark lobel reports. sobbing. too much to bear after losing his brother in the concert crush. you go to a concert to have fun, you don't go to a concert to die. he died saving his fianc e.
10:24 am
she was getting hurt, hit left and right. he saved her. she was admitted to the hospital. it cost him his life. 21—year—old axel acosta was another of the eight people who died that night. the computer scientist travelled alone to attend his first music festival. now, leaving behind a family, devastated. he wanted to provide for his family. he really cares about, he was the first grandkid, he was the oldest one. he always take care of his other cousins and nieces. the crush began around a quarter past nine during travis scott's headline performance in texas on friday night. panic spread fast as thousands were injured. for some of those attending, this two—day outdoor event tragically would be their last.
10:25 am
the rapper drake was also on stage at the time of the tragedy and has issued this statement. "my heart is broken for the families and friends of those who lost their lives and for anyone who is suffering. i will continue to pray for all of them and will be of service in any way i can." ijust wanted to send out prayers to the ones that was lost last night. travis scott says he is working to help the families of the victims. but several festival goers are suing him, drake and the promoters for damages. all of whom have not yet commented on the lawsuits. attention is turning to what happened to turn this concert into a crime scene. lawyers are already poring over footage as families seekjustice. i ask you, does that look safe? does that look organised, well—run?
10:26 am
the way the concert was set up, planned, organised and the way things were happening, were handled, once there was a problem, it boggles the mind. alongside multiple civil lawsuits is a police investigation. it's emerged that safety concerns were raised by houston's police chief moments before the concert with travis scott. amidst the hurt, though, is an expressed hope amongst the families of the victims that these daths will not be in vain by helping improve how concerts like these are managed around the world. mark lobel, bbc news. a singapore court has paused the execution of a malaysian man convicted of drug smuggling — after he tested positive for covid—19. nagaenthran dharmalingam was due to be hanged on wednesday morning and his execution was stayed
10:27 am
until further notice. he was arrested in april 2009 for trafficking around 43 grammes of pure heroin, and his lawyers had launched a last—minute appeal against the execution arguing that he has limited mental capacity. earlier, i spoke to our correspondent nick marsh in singapore about the halting of his execution. nagaenthran dharmalingam was due to be executed tomorrow, barring a last—ditch appeal schedule today. just moments before that appeal was due to start we had confirmation of this positive covid—19 case, meaning the appeal will be delayed, we don't know when it is due to resume. presumably when he fully recovers. if he loses that appeal the execution will go ahead as scheduled, but this is so controversial here in singapore due to claims of intellectual disability. nagaenthran dharmalingam
10:28 am
jo was assessed by a psychiatrist who gave him an iq score of 69, below 70 is generally considered as indicating a form of intellectual disability, and that was the central thrust of the defence case. government says he is sound mind, he knew what he was doing and could tell right from wrong, that is what the prosecution is arguing. in terms of what he is accused of giving, trafficking 42 g of pure heroin strapped to his fly into singapore, contravening singapore's zero—tolerance drug laws. a couple in california has started legal action — after a fertility clinic mixed up their embryo with that of another set of parents. it meant two women carried each other�*s child through pregnancy and birth. it happened to daphna and alexander cardinale — who began to suspect they had been given the wrong child soon after their daughter was born. dna tests confirmed it — and it was only later that the children were swapped back
10:29 am
and reunited with their rightful parents. daphna and alexander have been talking to mireya villareal from cbs news — take a listen. when was the point when you said, something it's not right? i had when was the point when you said, something it's not right?— something it's not right? i had a weird cut something it's not right? i had a weird gut reaction _ something it's not right? i had a weird gut reaction when - something it's not right? i had a weird gut reaction when she i something it's not right? i had aj weird gut reaction when she was born. it wasn't anything logical, it was just like born. it wasn't anything logical, it wasjust like an born. it wasn't anything logical, it was just like an instinct. born. it wasn't anything logical, it wasjust like an instinct.— wasjust like an instinct. when i found out _ wasjust like an instinct. when i found out she _ wasjust like an instinct. when i found out she wasn't _ wasjust like an instinct. when i found out she wasn't mine... i l found out she wasn't mine... i poured — found out she wasn't mine... i poured more love into her, i don't know _ poured more love into her, i don't know. maybe i wasjust poured more love into her, i don't know. maybe i was just clinging to her. know. maybe i was just clinging to her~ but _ know. maybe i was just clinging to her~ but i— know. maybe i was just clinging to her. but i wasjust so scared i was going _ her. but i wasjust so scared i was going to _ her. but i wasjust so scared i was going to lose her, which i ultimately did. we going to lose her, which i ultimately did.— going to lose her, which i ultimately did. going to lose her, which i ultimatel did. ~ ., ., , ., ., ultimately did. we had to play a lot of catch-up- _ ultimately did. we had to play a lot of catch-up- we — ultimately did. we had to play a lot of catch-up. we can't _ ultimately did. we had to play a lot of catch-up. we can't sleep - ultimately did. we had to play a lot of catch-up. we can't sleep at i ultimately did. we had to play a lot| of catch-up. we can't sleep at night of catch—up. we can't sleep at night knowing this is happening and nobody is doing anything or talking about her. daphna and alexander
10:30 am
cardinale, telling their story to cbs news. we should tell you — the other couple concerned don't want to be identified — but are also taking part in the lawsuit. the babies were swapped in january of last year — and as far as we know, both are doing well. rolls royce has secured the funding it needs to push forward with a project to develop a new generation of small nuclear plants. a quarter of a billion pounds of private investment will be added to 210 million pounds of government money. this will allow the enginering fim to work on designs for the reactors, which it hopes will be supplying low carbon energy to millions of homes by the end of the decade. the british government's chief scientific adviser has warned that climate change is a far bigger — and potentially deadlier — problem than coronavirus. sir patrick vallance believes combatting global warming will require a combination of technology and behavioural change. of course, coronavirus has been devastating. it has affected people right the way across the globe. but it will settle down and it will go back to being a seasonal
10:31 am
disease of some sort, most likely. this is something that's getting worse over a very long period and without concerted, long—term action, it will continue to get worse. the headlines on bbc news... the government's set to announce that all front—line nhs staff in england will have to be fully vaccinated against covid 19 by next spring. rescued after two days trapped underground — an injured caver is brought to safety — the rescue operation involved 250 volunteers. the number of afghans fleeing the country due to poverty had more than doubled since the taliban takeover a lesbian couple who say nhs fertility treatment in england discriminates against them because they're gay launch a landmark legal case against their local fertility service. a new study finds it's notjust how long you sleep for but when you go to bed that has an impact
10:32 am
on your health. the government is to compel all front line nhs staff in england to be fully vaccinated against coronavirus. whitehall sources have indicated the deadline will be next spring. an official announcement is expected later today, and workers will have until spring to be double jabbed. 0ur health editor has been reporting this since 7am this morning. let's speak now with helga pile, deputy head of health at unison. what is your reaction? good morning. i think we are really concerned that the government has not listened to what many people told them during the consultation. which is potentially the fact they are reaching for a sledgehammer on this, using the law, is going to do more harm than good. we have over 90% of
10:33 am
staff who have already had the vaccine. and the methods that we have been working with employers on have been working with employers on have been working with employers on have been really successful in terms of persuasion, in terms of giving people reassurance, making sure they know if they have a reaction, they can have time off, that has worked really well. but now, we potentially risk undoing some of that by compelling people. it's going to take a lot of operational effort to put this into practice, ready for the spring and at the moment, the nhs is on its knees and there isn't the capacity to deal with this. we are really concerned that this could cause a lot of damage. what cause a lot of damage. what about rotectin: cause a lot of damage. what about protecting patients? _ cause a lot of damage. what about protecting patients? let _ cause a lot of damage. what about protecting patients? let me i cause a lot of damage. what about protecting patients? let me read l protecting patients? let me read you this e—mail from protecting patients? let me read you this e—mailfrom louise he says, of course they should be fully charged, i've been through hell and back, diagnosed with bladder cancer, major surgery. i am double chapped and i still have to have a coronavirus test and isolation before going to hospital. i am test and isolation before going to hospital. iam protecting test and isolation before going to hospital. i am protecting them but he was protecting me? staff go home
10:34 am
after shift to the kids, they go shopping, to the pub, on holiday, they come into work to look after patients like me, how was this keeping me safe?— patients like me, how was this keeping me safe? that is fair, isn't it? absolutely. _ keeping me safe? that is fair, isn't it? absolutely, and _ keeping me safe? that is fair, isn't it? absolutely, and we _ keeping me safe? that is fair, isn't it? absolutely, and we all- keeping me safe? that is fair, isn't it? absolutely, and we all want i it? absolutely, and we all want everyone who can take the vaccine to take it, that's absolutely clear thatis take it, that's absolutely clear that is the right thing that should happen. but what we do not know from the government today is with around 7% of staff who have not so far been vaccinated, they cannot tell us how many of those are medically examined, they cannot tell us how many of those are off sick with covid 19 so there is not any evidence really as to what the size of this is and how far we can get beyond where we are already. so we are really keen that people take the vaccine and get the information to support them to do that but it's really important as well that this policy does not mean that people let their eye off the ball in terms of
10:35 am
their eye off the ball in terms of the measures of protection needed. we know that people can still contract coronavirus that they are vaccinated, we still need absolute vigilance on ppe and we are keen as well alongside this, the vaccination programme that should be robust testing for stab as well, there is a real danger that byjust reaching real danger that by just reaching for this real danger that byjust reaching for this big stick, people think they have solved it and they relax and other measures, and we all want to see patients kept as safe as they can be. ., _ , to see patients kept as safe as they canbe. ., , to see patients kept as safe as they canbe. ., can be. you say there is only about 7% of i can be. you say there is only about 7% of i don't _ can be. you say there is only about 7% of i don't know— can be. you say there is only about 7% of i don't know if— can be. you say there is only about 7% of i don't know if it's _ can be. you say there is only about 7% of i don't know if it's all - 7% of i don't know if it's all nhs staff or front line 7% of i don't know if it's all nhs staff orfront line nhs 7% of i don't know if it's all nhs staff or front line nhs staff who have not received the jab. that i understand is still about 80,000 — 90,000 people. ithink understand is still about 80,000 — 90,000 people. i think i am correct in saying, that is an awful lot of people. the vaccination programme has been running for pretty much a year, almost. iam not has been running for pretty much a year, almost. i am not sure what other conversations sensitive conversations, art still to be had
10:36 am
with those who have not had the jab. well, there's a few things to remember. this is a huge work force, every day, there are new people starting so it's not as if we are talking about a static workforce from a year ago, we have lots of turnover, people coming in. clearly, as well, there are nhs staff who are medically exempt, there are many nhs staff right now who either have covid 19 or recovering, and cannot have the vaccine so... stand covid 19 or recovering, and cannot have the vaccine so. . ._ covid 19 or recovering, and cannot have the vaccine so... and there are vaccine hesitant _ have the vaccine so... and there are vaccine hesitant nhs _ have the vaccine so... and there are vaccine hesitant nhs staff. - vaccine hesitant nhs staff. there are vaccine _ vaccine hesitant nhs staff. there are vaccine hesitant _ vaccine hesitant nhs staff. there are vaccine hesitant nhs - vaccine hesitant nhs staff. there are vaccine hesitant nhs staff- vaccine hesitant nhs staff. there are vaccine hesitant nhs staff in | are vaccine hesitant nhs staff in probably small numbers, i think. hagar probably small numbers, ithink. how do ou probably small numbers, ithink. how do you know? — probably small numbers, ithink. how do you know? because _ probably small numbers, ithink. how do you know? because the _ probably small numbers, ithink. how do you know? because the numbers | probably small numbers, ithink. how. do you know? because the numbers are already small — do you know? because the numbers are already small in — do you know? because the numbers are already small in terms _ do you know? because the numbers are already small in terms of _ do you know? because the numbers are already small in terms of who _ already small in terms of who has not taken it up, what we are hearing in terms of employers is what is really successful as making sure people have their concerns addressed and have that time to talk those through with peers. that is working
10:37 am
really well. i think we really need to persist with that. the issue that we are seeing in the care sector right now is when you do reach for the sledgehammer, you do tend to have a perverse effect which is people start to leave and that has devastating consequences as well. but it also, sorry to interrupt, it is true to say it led to a rise in care workers who had not been vaccinated becoming vaccinated. the osition vaccinated becoming vaccinated. tie: position in vaccinated becoming vaccinated. tts: position in care vaccinated becoming vaccinated. t"ts: position in care has vaccinated becoming vaccinated. t'ts: position in care has increased vaccinated becoming vaccinated. tts: position in care has increased in terms of the number of vaccinations but as i say, in the nhs, we are well over 90% already. so we are really clear that that needs to continue, we need to keep putting the effort into making sure that people get the support they need but we really need to be careful about the unforeseen consequences. staff morale right now, everything they had been through for so long, being expected to continue with the
10:38 am
staffing levels, the 100,000 vacancies, i think staff feel actually the government is really quick to reach for a big stick on this issue. but it's been absolutely inactive and silent on some of the things they are asking for which israel effort and action on the staffing situation which means they are not safe and patients are not safe either. are not safe and patients are not safe either-— are not safe and patients are not safe either. thank you for talking to us. the congressional investigation into the assault on the us capitol building in washington dc injanuary has made a formal demand for six more allies of donald trump to give evidence. they include the former national security adviser, michael flynn, and john eastman — a lawyerfor mr trump. they will be asked about their role in talks about how to overturn joe biden's victory — held at a so—called "war room" in a hotel in the city. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes has more. some seniorfigures, some familiar names, some not so familiar,
10:39 am
they were all within the inner circle of donald trump at that crucial time, exactly a year or year ago, after the election, before the inauguration ofjoe biden and crucially in the days before january the 6th. and the insurrection of the capitol. and they, to put it broadly, the accusation appears to be involved in spreading misinformation about the election so you've got people like jason miller who was an adviser to the president on his campaign, actually, the 2016 campaign as well. we've got michael flynn, a former national security adviser who around that time famously went on television and talked about essentially bringing in the troops, bringing in martial law to rerun the election in some states. i think perhaps the most interesting of the six isjohn eastman who is a lawyer, a law professor, who wrote a couple of memos that the committee seems to be interested in, essentially laying out a game plan for the president, for donald trump, to try to get him to stay
10:40 am
in the white house, a strategy that involved arguing that mike pence, the then vice president, had within his power the ability to essentially deny the result of the election in certain states which bigger picture, would ultimately deny joe biden the presidency. clearly that did not happen and what the committee wants to know is who were they talking to? what were they saying? they supposedly, at least some of them, met in what has been described as a war room in a washington hotel, what were they talking about and crucially, did they have links with the groups that ended up in the violent storming of the capitol? the eu is expected to remove ukraine from its list of covid safe countries later on tuesday, following a sustained increase in cases. ukraine s covid statistics currently make grim reading. less than one in five ukrainians are double vaccinated ? that s the lowest rate in europe — and today, the health ministry has reported a record daily high of 833
10:41 am
coronavirus—related deaths. from kyiv, here s our correspondentjonah fisher. in ukraine's hospitals, the alarm bells are ringing. this latest record—breaking covid wave is filling the wards with patients, and the vast majority of them are unvaccinated. this doctor says she is fighting to save the life of a 40—year—old mother of three. three other members of her family are sick. all rejected the vaccine. fewer than one in five ukrainians are double jabbed — the product of deep—rooted scepticism of both doctors and the authorities. last week, hundreds gathered outside parliament to protest against vaccinations. vaccine is poison, it's poisoned. many people now died
10:42 am
because they took vaccine. many people are alive now because they took the vaccine, too. no, it's not true, it's not true! you're a doctor. yes, i'm a doctor and neurologist. and you're against vaccination? totally. why? because it's not the way to not spread the infection. you must have a choice. right? with cases soaring, new restrictions have been introduced to try and force people to getjabbed. kyiv�*s now in what's known as the red zone which means if you want to travel on public transport, like this bus or on the metro, you have to be vaccinated and have to have the papers to prove it. in practice, there are lots of fake certificates around. we watched the police taking a very gentle approach to enforcing the rules.
10:43 am
this woman has no proof of vaccination or covid test but she's let off with a warning. so that lady didn't have a vaccination certificate but you let her stay on the bus? "we're mostly here as a preventative measure", he says, "we can't really demand things from people". the tighter rules have led to queues at vaccination centres. ukraine is now desperately trying to catch up as the beds fill up and the number of covid deaths mount. jonah fisher, bbc news, kyiv. a couple are launching a landmark legal test case against how the nhs offer fertility treatment in england, arguing it discriminates against lgbt+ families. 34 year old megan bacon—evans and her wife whitney, who's 33, claim their local clinical commissioning group in frimley is penalising them financially because they are gay rather than straight. i spoke to them both earlier.
10:44 am
ultimately it comes down to the fact there is an unfair financial burden being put on the lgbtq+ community relating to the _ eligibility criteria placed on us as opposed to heterosexual couples in order to meet the same level of requirements where you can receive free nhs funding of ivf depending on what your local clinical commissioning group gives you, that is different too, but there is a clear difference in the fact that for a heterosexual couple, the criteria is two years of unprotected sex, no evidence and no cost, whereas for a same—sex female couple, in our case it is 12 rounds of artificial insemination which could cost almost £50,000. which is an extraordinary amount of money. and you say clearly that is discrimination? yes, ultimately we would like to just have an equal claim, essentially, that is what we are fighting for, just to
10:45 am
have the same rights and opportunities as a heterosexual couple. we feel in the eyes of the law we can equally be married and be seen as wife and wife, but it does not go as far as being seen as equal in terms of creating a family. what would an equal playing field look like? i think it would be recognised that no matter how much we try, unfortunately we cannot create a family together, so even though it might not be medical infertility, it is de facto infertility and so _ essentially in the first instance it would be potentially artificial insemination being provided by the nhs in order to meet the same level of requirements as heterosexual couples before needing funding for ivf, that would be the ultimate solution. but right now we are just asking for recognition of this discrimination. so that i understand accurately,
10:46 am
you are saying you would require artificial insemination on the nhs, and if that does not lead to pregnancy, then you would be eligible for ivf on the nhs? i think that would be the ultimate goal, at the moment it is placing that barrier on the lgbtq+ community where many people cannot simply afford to meet that criteria. it is essentially a gay tax. it is an unfair financial burden. we have heard from so many people that they had spent a fortune and maybe had three or four rounds and they may have had unsuccessful pregnancies and they do not have the means to go on, we have heard stories from many of our followers, this issue does notjust affect us, it affects the whole community. even if you know you have an infertility issue, for example, they will often still need you to self fund the required amount of artificial insemination.
10:47 am
understood. what would you say to those who might say, listening to you, you are not infertile, this is not a fertility issue? it is still a fertility issue, technically. it is also about the fundamental right that everyone deserves to have a family and the provision has been provided for one section of society but not another. in response to all of this, the nhs frimley clinical commissioning group said: the fertility services we provide are based on nice guidance. while we can t comment on individual cases we will fully engage with any legal proceedings. the headlines on bbc news... the government's set to announce that all front—line nhs staff in england will have to be fully vaccinated against covid 19 by next spring. fleeing poverty —
10:48 am
the number of afghans leaving the country had more than doubled since the taliban takeover rescued after two days trapped underground an injured caver is brought to safety — he's said to be in good spirits the republic of mauritius is at the forefront of climate change. the country has experienced tropical cyclones, flash floods, droughts and rising sea—levels that are threatening the country's population, and biodiversity — the effects are particularluy pronounced on the beaches and coasts. nora fakim has more. seashells are reducing because you have some degradation of the marine environment linked to local activities but also because of climate change. in fact, climate change caused an increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, acidification of the ocean and what happens is seashells
10:49 am
are now becoming thinner and thinner and they have problems producing their shells. when i was younger, i used to come to mauritius a lot and i used to find plenty of shells here but now, there are less. how important are seashells? when you do not have seashells, you do not have predators and you have other organisms which start to proliferate and it causes an imbalance of the ecosystem in the tropical islands and around the world. seashells are nice, they are important in our hearts, they were used as money in africa in the past but they are also very important in terms of equilibrium, stability of the ecosystem. what is the government doing to protect the seashells in mauritius? we have a law called the fisheries and marine resources act passed in 2007. there was also a regulation passed a little bit before in 2006 which prevents people from collecting seashells in mauritius. but it's quite hard to stop tourists, you can put them in your bag! sometimes it is sentimental, seashells are nice and they represent a little piece of a destination you enjoyed, that's the sad part about it
10:50 am
but it is part of the ecosystem and of course, empty seashells sometimes are houses for other organisms which recognise them. look at them. but do not bring them home. thank you so much. thank you for this explanation on seashells. nora fakim — with that report from mauritius. could the construction industry be about to get a little greener? a group of major construction companies in the uk has signed a pledge agreeing to do something about the issue of pallet waste — that's those wooden, frame boxes that are used to carry heavy materials around. at the moment, they are used once and thrown away, but that could be about to change — our reporter dougal shaw went to a building site in south london to find out more. wherever you see building works, you are likely to spot these — wooden pallets. and here is why they are useful.
10:51 am
they allow bulky items to be easily transported. the uk construction industry gets through about 18 million of them each year, and the vast majority are used only once. so when we get pallets, we will store them on site and effectively put them in the skips. what we want to move towards, though, is material reuse, where the pallets are being reused over and over again. all of those single use pallets require thousands of hectares of trees to be harvested each year and, of course, manufacturing, transporting and disposing of them creates a significant carbon footprint. so could these colourful pallets be part of the solution? they don't look too different, but they are designed to be stronger so they can be used multiple times. a group of major construction companies — including bam, who run this site in dartford, london — have signed a pledge to address the issue of pallet waste and try a new system devised by a former pallet manufacturer. today, it's very much a linear model of distribute and discard at the end, so we are looking to create a circular solution. so this isn't exactly brand—new technology. why has it taken so long to implement this?
10:52 am
there hasn't been the focus on this as an industry. a deposit system means the extra cost of these pallets is passed down the supply chain. the hope is that each one can be used at least half a dozen times. used ones are returned to a local hub for repair and redistribution. there is a benefit point where the additional materials that are being used to manufacture the stronger product to allow it to be reused finally are balanced off by the avoidance of the material use on the single use. the new pallet system is due to take off on building sites early next year. dougal shaw, bbc news. tens of thousands of ceramic poppies which were first displayed at the tower of london, are being given a permanent home in manchester. the original exhibition drew millions of visitors when it marked the centenary of world war one. mairead smyth reports.
10:53 am
almost 13,000 ceramic poppies now in their permanent place. the wave and weeping window together in a new display at imperial war museum. these were among nearly 900,000 poppies that made up the blood swept lands and seas of red installation at the tower of london in 2014. each poppy representing a life lost among the british and colonial forces on the front line of world war i. poppies are something we naturally associate with conflict, and that has its roots in the first world war. and we think of that conflict as one of devastation and destruction. but poppies were actually one of the few sources of brightness and colour in these devastated landscapes on the western front. more than five million people visited the original artwork marking the centenary of the war.
10:54 am
the sections were exhibited around the country, including at st george's hall in liverpool and the silk mill in derby. the wave and the weeping window were bought for the nation in 2015 and donated to imperial war museum's permanent collection three years later. from the beginning to now, it's always needed to be, for me, a beautiful sight to see. and then you dive into it with the story behind it of the death and the destruction and people's sacrifice, what they fought for, and we still do. today, the sections are combined in a new design. poppies will open to the public tomorrow. water companies have been warned they will face "consequences" if they don't reduce the flow of raw sewage being released into england's rivers. it comes after mps voted to accept a government amendment imposing tougher restrictions on the practice. ministers hope it will end a row between the commons
10:55 am
and the lords over the issue. but some campaigners say the new rules don't go far enough. a study of nearly 90,000 people suggests that those who go to sleep between 10 and 11 pm have a lower risk of stroke or heart attack than people with other bedtimes. the team behind the uk biobank work believe synchronising sleep to match our internal body clock may explain the link. researchers say more work is needed to understand the findings. thank you for your e—mails about the coronavirus vaccine being made mandatory for front line nhs staff in england. frank says there should be no compulsion for anyone to have the vaccine. alex says i will be worried about the lack of common sense on the part of front line staff who refused to have a jab. and david says that the government had any sense they would have made it
10:56 am
mandatory months ago for anybody failing to respond to their invitation to be vaccinated, to remain indoors, at home, for the duration of the pandemic. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol hello again. it's been a mild start to the day and it is going to be a mild day generally, notjust today but over the next few days, especially across england and wales. we are pulling in a west—south—westerly breeze, gusty winds across the far north of scotland and we've got two weather fronts both producing a fair bit of cloud, and this one producing some rain as it slowly slips southwards. the cloud ahead of it building, but staying largely dry and sunny across the far south of england, with one or two showers. for northern ireland and scotland we've got a mixture of sunshine and showers, some of the showers could be sharp, and gusty winds across the far north, gusting 40 or 50 mph. temperatures ten to about 15 degrees. as we go through the evening and overnight, our weatherfront continues to slip southwards
10:57 am
with all its cloud, some hill fog. there'll still be some showers across scotland and northern ireland, and still windy across the far north, but where cloud remains broken in the sheltered glens it will be cold enough in the north—east of scotland for a touch of frost. for england and for wales, comparatively milder. as we head through the course of tomorrow we still do have a weather front draped across southern areas and still windy across the far north of scotland, still gusting 40 or 50 mph. to the north of our weather front we are looking at a mixture of sunshine and showers, areas of cloud at times and on the weather front itself you can see all the cloud around, some patchy light rain, some hill fog with it as well. temperatures ten to about 15 degrees. we've got a weather front which is approaching the outer hebrides later on in the day during the course of wednesday and into thursday. so if we take a look at that, we still have the remnants of our first weather front in the south, here is the second one, that's going to be slipping southwards, and we've got this little ridge of high pressure trying to build in. so on thursday, quite a bit of cloud still across england and wales
10:58 am
with our weak weather front, some brightness coming through, and our other weather front sinking south doing a similar theme, because remember they are bumping into the higher pressure. so thursday is fairly settled, but we've got an area of low pressure coming in from the atlantic. that looks like it's going to bring in some wet and windy weather from the west by the end of thursday. now, there is still some uncertainty about the exact timing and track of that but we think at the moment it is going to be windy during the course of friday, gales with exposure and some rain, but things settle down for the weekend.
10:59 am
11:00 am
this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 11. the government is set to announce that all front—line staff in the nhs in england will have to be fully vaccinated against covid—19 by next spring. health bodies have welcomed the move but unions warn it could have a negative impact. it is good news in terms of being able to ensure that we protect staff, patients and visitors from nhs members of staff having infections. potentially the fact that they are reaching — potentially the fact that they are reaching for a sledgehammer on this using _ reaching for a sledgehammer on this using the _ reaching for a sledgehammer on this using the law is potentially going to do— using the law is potentially going to do more harm than good.
11:01 am
rescued after two days trapped underground, an injured caver is brought to safety — he's said to be in good spirits. fleeing poverty — the number of afghans leaving the country had more than doubled since the taliban takeover. a new study finds it's not just how long you sleep for but when you go to bed that has an impact on your health. we'll tell you when scientists think you should go to bed and talk to a cardiac nurse. coming up in the next hour — eight years after they first drew millions of us to the tower of london, ceramic poppies have found a new permanent home in the imperial war museum in trafford, near manchester. the bbc understands the government is to compel frontline nhs staff in england to be fully vaccinated against the coronavirus.
11:02 am
an official announcement is expected later today, and workers will have until spring, to be double—jabbed. unions argue it should not be forced. staff working in care homes, were instructed earlier this year, to become fully vaccinated — their deadline is on thursday. here's our health editor, hugh pym. compulsory vaccination against covid for staff in adult social care is already being implemented in england. there's a deadline later this week for care workers to comply, apart from those deemed to be exempt. it's understood that later today the government will announce that the policy will be extended to staff in patient—facing roles in the nhs in england. they'll be required as a condition of deployment in those posts to be double—jabbed by next spring, unless there are medical reasons for exemption. the deadline has been set to allow for the gap between first and second doses. around 90% of nhs staff in england have already been
11:03 am
vaccinated against covid. the health secretary, sajid javid, said last month that he was leaning towards compulsoryjabs for nhs staff and the main issue was patient safety. as a doctor, i take it for granted that i have to be vaccinated against hepatitis b so i do not put my patients at risk of an incurable illness which could cause cirrhosis of the liver cancer, —— illness which could cause cirrhosis or liver cancer, i have been required to do that the entire 36 years i have been a doctor, it is not entirely new. health leaders say they see the benefits of the policy, though some have expressed reservations, arguing that there is a risk some staff might quit at a time of concerns about staffing gaps. there are still somewhere i think between 80,000 and 90,000 nhs staff who have not been vaccinated and it is really important we work hard
11:04 am
with them over the next few months before the deadline comes in to try to get as many as possible vaccinated so we do not face a cliff edge of effectively members of staff leaving. the health union unison has argued that the key to convincing hesitant staff should be persuasion, not force. decisions on the issue are devolved and it's possible that the other uk nations will take a different route to england. hugh pym, bbc news. helga pile is deputy head of health at unison, the uk's largest health union — she warns the government's approach could be damaging. we are we a re really we are really concerned that the government hasn't listened to what many people told them during the consultation which is potentially fact they are reaching for a sledgehammer in this using the law is going to do more harm than good. we've got over 90% of staff who have already had the vaccine and the methods we have been working with employers on have been really successful in terms of persuasion, in terms of giving people reassurance, making sure they know that if they do have a reaction they
11:05 am
can have time off, that has worked really well but no we potentially risk undoing some of that by compelling people. it is going to take a lot of operational effort to put this into practice ready for the spring and at the moment the nhs is on its knees and thejustice and the capacity to deal with us, so we are really concerned that this could cause a lot of damage. our health correspondent, nick triggle, is here. there are still a lot of questions, the tone that the government is set to take and the approach as well. so we are likely to get more details letter today. we are, we expect a statement in the house of commons this afternoon that will set out the details of what this policy will actually involve. 0ne details of what this policy will actually involve. one of the questions is what constitutes front line staff? when the original vaccination programme started rolling out, front line staff, there was a wider definition than you
11:06 am
would expect. some administration and back office staff who come through and spend time in hospital wards were classified as front line staff. we are yet to hear what that definition is. also whether it would apply to gps and their staff because they are not directly employed by they are not directly employed by the nhs so that could make a difference. and of course as unison were arguing that there needs to be a lot of support and i put in place to get those staff who remain unvaccinated to come forward. and when you talk to people running the vaccination companies this is often there is not one single overriding reason people are hesitant about vaccination and are only convinced by individual conversation one at a time and that has to they say, continue in the next three months before what we think will be a spring deadline for this otherwise the staffing shortages in the nhs could increase and that in itself could increase and that in itself could increase and that in itself could increase concerns about safety to patients if you do not have
11:07 am
enough staff on the wards, that is a real problem. this thursday we see the deadline for care home staff as well. that was announced several months ago. when that was announced, vaccination rates and care staff were around 80%. for nhs staff at the moment is over 90% so they are starting from a higher base. what we have seen with care staff since that policy was announced, a gradual increase and the figures from a couple of weeks back suggest over 90% of care staff are double vaccinated. but there have been reports care staff have been leaving the sector and going to work in otherjobs. and of course, come thursday, people will be watching very closely what happens to the care sector because the vacancies and staffing shortages in the care sector are even worse than in the nhs. that is why this policy is controversial. we have heard a lot
11:08 am
from hospital managers. there is a lot of logic to it but there are also risks. we expect to hearfrom the health secretary later today. let's talk more about those compulsoryjabs for care home staff in england — already from thursday, staff in england, will need to be vaccinated against the coronavirus if they're to be allowed to work — unless they have a medical exemption. well, the national care association is worried about staff shortages — and has asked for a delay to the deadline. i'm nowjoined by neil russell who's the chair of pj care which runs three care homes housing 185 residents . do you know what will happen on thursday? do you know what will happen on thursda ? .., do you know what will happen on thursda ? .. ., do you know what will happen on thursda ? ., , . ., thursday? the care home sector will lose somewhere _ thursday? the care home sector will lose somewhere between _ thursday? the care home sector will lose somewhere between 50000 i
11:09 am
thursday? the care home sector will| lose somewhere between 50000 and 60,000 staff. they will give the notice and work their notice periods and they are staff that don't want to be vaccinated and across the sector we have spent an awful lot of time trying to persuade people but we have to understand many people believe it is their personal right, their choice, and their minds are not going to be changed, they do not want to be vaccinated, so unfortunately we are going to lose a large number of people across the sector. d0 large number of people across the sector. ~ ., , large number of people across the sector. ~' ., , , large number of people across the sector. ~ ., , , ., �* sector. do we know why they don't want to be — sector. do we know why they don't want to be vaccinated, _ sector. do we know why they don't want to be vaccinated, what i sector. do we know why they don't want to be vaccinated, what our i want to be vaccinated, what our staff tell you?— staff tell you? there is a whole variety of _ staff tell you? there is a whole variety of reasons. _ staff tell you? there is a whole variety of reasons. for- staff tell you? there is a whole variety of reasons. for some i staff tell you? there is a whole i variety of reasons. for some they don't believe in vaccines in general so they won't have any kind of vaccination. 0thers, so they won't have any kind of vaccination. others, they are still fearful and concerned that the vaccine has not been tested enough despite all the data we are having
11:10 am
to dig up and show them and demonstrate the safety and despite the fact most of their colleagues have been safely vaccinated. some are waiting and say they want to wait another year or so to make sure it is safe. and some of us we have health conditions that mean they are at risk if they do have the vaccine and they are trying to go through that exemption process which is proving very complicated. for those who have made _ proving very complicated. for those who have made the _ proving very complicated. for those who have made the choice - proving very complicated. for those who have made the choice not i proving very complicated. for those who have made the choice not of i proving very complicated. for those | who have made the choice not of the vaccine, do they accept the consequences?— vaccine, do they accept the consequences? vaccine, do they accept the conseauences? ~ ., , , vaccine, do they accept the conseauences? ., , , . consequences? most of them, yes. we have made it — consequences? most of them, yes. we have made it very _ consequences? most of them, yes. we have made it very clear _ consequences? most of them, yes. we have made it very clear to _ consequences? most of them, yes. we have made it very clear to them - consequences? most of them, yes. we have made it very clear to them that i have made it very clear to them that they are not allowed in the building, the law dictates they are not allowed to enter the building from thursday if they have not been vaccinated. the have spent the last few weeks looking for other work. many have gone to work for the nhs. i have a member of staff who started
11:11 am
what in our local hospital working in accident and emergency in a couple of weeks so they will have to go through again. what couple of weeks so they will have to go through again-— go through again. what is recruitment _ go through again. what is recruitment like - go through again. what is recruitment like for i go through again. what is recruitment like for you i go through again. what is| recruitment like for you to go through again. what is - recruitment like for you to replace staff that have left? might recruitment has been challenging at best for a long time.— recruitment has been challenging at best for a long time. brexit removed a lane best for a long time. brexit removed a large corps — best for a long time. brexit removed a large corps of— best for a long time. brexit removed a large corps of staff _ best for a long time. brexit removed a large corps of staff and _ a large corps of staff and subsequent to that with the pandemic and the pressures that many care staff have been under, all care staff have been under, all care staff have been under, all care staff have been under last couple of years, many are looking for a less pressurised workplace, a workplace where they can have less pressure and less responsibility and potentially more overall money at the same time. so recruitment is challenging. we are quite fortunate, we can afford to pay the real living wage. that makes a difference. tit
11:12 am
wage. that makes a difference. in terms of what residents and families feel, being around staff members who are not vaccinated, what is that like for you? obviously, they have rights as well, they want to be kept safe. it rights as well, they want to be kept safe. ., , rights as well, they want to be kept safe. . , ,., _ , safe. it varies. obviously, they want to be _ safe. it varies. obviously, they want to be kept _ safe. it varies. obviously, they want to be kept safe _ safe. it varies. obviously, they want to be kept safe but i safe. it varies. obviously, they want to be kept safe but they l safe. it varies. obviously, they i want to be kept safe but they have seen the measures we have put in place to protect them and protect families when they come in and we have had very few covid cases over the last 12 months no resonant die of —— no resident died from covid over the last 12 months. we have members of staff who have been with us for many years who the residents love and they don't want to lose them and having to replace those long serving members of staff with
11:13 am
people that our residents do not know, concerned about that as well. so it is difficult. there is a balance, they are worried about losing staff and also worried about vaccination but we have family members and residents who are also unvaccinated because they don't want to be vaccinated so they understand it. ~ ., to be vaccinated so they understand it. . ., ., ., to be vaccinated so they understand it. ~ . ., ., ., to be vaccinated so they understand it. we are waiting to find out about the nhs front— it. we are waiting to find out about the nhs front line _ it. we are waiting to find out about the nhs front line staff. _ it. we are waiting to find out about| the nhs front line staff. obviously, the nhs front line staff. 0bviously, care homes work very closely with nhs trusts and staff. what do you make of that? what you think about this policy? t make of that? what you think about this oli ? ., , this policy? i have mixed feelings about it. this policy? i have mixed feelings about it- it _ this policy? i have mixed feelings about it. it makes _ this policy? i have mixed feelings about it. it makes sense. - this policy? i have mixed feelings about it. it makes sense. if i this policy? i have mixed feelings| about it. it makes sense. if you're going to introduce mandatory vaccination for the health sector, you need to be across the whole health sector so it makes sense to introduce it for social care, care home care and the nhs. what we have
11:14 am
to understand is there will always be people who will not be vaccinated so the nhs now has to prepare to go through what we have gone through over the past few months losing staff. we have already lost a large number of staff who have chosen to leave and head of thursday that will happen in the nhs. we have to prepare for that and there is a risk. the fact that care homes are not going to have as many staff, we will not be able to care for as many people come next week, that will cause a problem for us because the are discharging to care home beds and beds will not be available. come april, if they are losing more staff they will be able to care for less people as well. they will be able to care for less people as well-— they will be able to care for less --eole as well. . ,, i. , . people as well. thank you very much for our people as well. thank you very much for your thoughts _ people as well. thank you very much for your thoughts on _ people as well. thank you very much for your thoughts on today's - people as well. thank you very much for your thoughts on today's news. i for your thoughts on today's news. thank you.
11:15 am
breaking news about the ten—year—old boy who died after a dog attacked in wales yesterday. he has been named by gwent police. we have had reaction from gwent police who have said there can condolences and thoughts are with his family and everyone affected. we note the emergency services were called to the address in caerphilly yesterday and jack was sadly died at the scene and the animal was put down by firearms officers. a man is being assessed in hospital after being injured
11:16 am
in a cave complex in south wales. the caver spent more than 50 hours trapped underground after he fell at the site in the brecon beacons. more than 200 people from around the uk, worked in shifts to bring him to safety. 0ur wales correspondent, hywel griffith, sent this report from the scene. mission accomplished. after more than two days of painstaking, exhausting work, relief all round. together, these volunteers carried the casualty through an underground assault course of boulders, streams and ledges, the longest stretcher carry ever by a british cave rescue team. it is absolutely amazing. the cooperation, the professionalism. everybody dealt with it. the controllers, down to the grunts on the sharp end, it was just amazing. it's the biggest rescue any of us have ever done, i hope will ever do. the casualty is an experienced caver in his 40s. on saturday, he fell and suffered multiple injuries, but could talk to his rescuers throughout. when you consider how long he has been in the cave,
11:17 am
how long he has been in a stretcher, he is doing very well indeed. so he's been talking to the medics along the way and they have been having a conversation, but we are waiting for them to come out now. this is what draws enthusiasts here. a sculpted subterranean world, in places almost 300 metres deep. it attracts cavers from across the uk. after 50 hours underground and the efforts of 250 volunteers, the casualty is now safe and on their way to hospital, bringing this rescue operation to a successful conclusion. for the volunteers, days of endeavour and years of training have tonight brought their reward. the anger— both outside and inside parliament — over the uk government's attempt to change the rules on mps' conduct — shows no sign of dying down. and today there are fresh claims about mps' second jobs — and the eye watering sums
11:18 am
being earned by some. the labour party chair anneliese dodds is writing to borisjohnson — prime minister. let's speak to our political correspondent, pete saull. this issue continues to slow ball. —— snowball. there were allegations about 0wen patterson who was found guilty of paid lobbying and then there was a debate and a stopping of the suspension and then a u—turn and then a lengthy emergency debate in then a lengthy emergency debate in the house of commons yesterday talking more widely about the issue
11:19 am
of mp behaviour and the standards behaviour. this morning the focus is on second jobs. many mps are allowed to do it but not allowed to use their position and contact they might have in government to benefit the organisation they might work for. today we're talking about sir geoffrey cox, former attorney general and he on the side is a very well—paid barrister. he has done that many years and and hundreds of thousands of pounds. no suggestion that he has broken the rules and terms of lobbying back to the report this morning says he spent a significant part of the year from spring onwards in the british virgin islands working on behalf of the government there doing paid lawyer work and getting some pretty eye watering sums and this morning the deputy prime minister dominic raab
11:20 am
was asked for his thoughts. i think it is a perfectly reasonable challenge but one for his voters to decide. i do not think it is for me to start making or prejudicing or second—guessing the judgments they make, what is crucially important is transparency around outside interests and ultimately voters will decide at the ballot boxes, which they do for— geoffrey and they do for me. we are trying to get to sir geoffrey cox today and we have been told he is neither in his constituency in devon or westminster and lots of questions about whether he is a part—time mp are his mainjob as a lawyer and is that representing his constituency? annelise dodds, the chairwoman of the labour party has this morning written to the prime minister asking whether geoffrey cox is a caribbean based barrister or a
11:21 am
conservative mp. we are told, as i say, he is overseas at the moment and we are yet to get a formal response to this from the government, although no real suggestion here that he has broken the rules, it isjust suggestion here that he has broken the rules, it is just not a particularly good luck. an mp who harassed a woman because she was jealous of her relationship with her partner will have her appeal against her conviction heard in march. claudia webbe was given a ten—week sentence, suspended for two years, at westminster magistrates court last week. webbe, a former labour mp for leicester east who is now an independent, was convicted of one charge of harassment. the appeal hearing is expected to last up to three days. the evacuation flights out of afghanistan have largely stopped — but with rising poverty levels — thousands are still desperate to find a way out. the remote town of zaranj, close to the borders of both pakistan and iran,
11:22 am
is a people smuggling hub. traffickers there, have told the bbc their business has more than doubled since the taliban takeover — and that many of those leaving, hope to eventually reach europe. secunder kermani reports. afghans are leaving in their thousands. smuggled out from this remote corner of the country. headed for the desert through pakistan into iran. no visas, no immigration, just people traffickers who pay a small fee to the taliban. most, desperate men hoping to find work. but there are whole families here too. aren't you worried about going with all these young children?
11:23 am
at times, it feels as if the whole of afghanistan is trying to find a way out. in this dusty car park, passengers wait to start a journey that will take more than a week. the economy is collapsing and few have faith in the new taliban government. at least 4,000 leave here every day, we are told. this is a deeply surreal sight, a huge people smuggling hub, operating completely openly. the taliban said that rising poverty here means it is not possible to stop all these people from trying to leave the country. they say all they can do is control how many people get into these trucks to make the journey a little safer.
11:24 am
the taliban are making money off this trade. around $10 per truck. but they say the economic crisis and freezing of international funding makes the flow of people unstoppable. all these people are travelling without visas. it is illegal. zaranj has long been a people—smuggling centre. under the previous government, corrupt officials were paid off.
11:25 am
now the trade is flourishing. aren't you exploiting these people, exploiting their misery? at the border with iran, hundreds of afghans are deported back every day. but many more are setting off for the desert. we meet labourers, former soldiers, civil servants. they survived the war but are fleeing its aftermath. secunder kermani, bbc news. a new met office study, is warning that the number of people affected by extreme heat stress, could increase nearly 15—fold,
11:26 am
with a 2 celsius rise in global temperatures. that would mean one billion people, living in places with potentially fatally high temperatures and humidity levels. the government's chief scientific adviser has warned that climate change is a far bigger — and potentially deadlier — problem than the coronavirus. sir patrick vallance believes combatting global warming, will require a combination of technology and behavioural change. of course, coronavirus has been devastating. it has affected people right the way across the globe. but it will settle down and it will go back to being a seasonal disease of some sort, most likely. this is something that's getting worse over a very long period and without concerted, long—term action, it will continue to get worse. at the cop26 climate summit — which is now into its second week in glasgow — it's science and innovation day.
11:27 am
joining me now is ani dasgupta, ceo of the �*world resources institute' which is a global research, non—profit organisation, established to focus on seven areas — including, food, forests, water, energy, cities, climate and ocean. thank you forjoining us. you are in the heart of things there. what are your top take a ways from the summit so far? ., «a your top take a ways from the summit so far? . ~', ., your top take a ways from the summit so far? . ., ., so far? thanks for having me. i think the _ so far? thanks for having me. i think the summit _ so far? thanks for having me. i think the summit so _ so far? thanks for having me. i think the summit so far, i so far? thanks for having me. i think the summit so far, a i so far? thanks for having me. i think the summit so far, a lot l so far? thanks for having me. i | think the summit so far, a lot of positive things have already happened but the main event, the actual agreement, the second week of negotiation that is what is heating up. we are hearing from negotiators they are grinding it through. i am cautiously optimistic something good will come out. the good things that have happened are in methane where hundreds of countries have come
11:28 am
together, and in deforestation over a hundred countries in several countries have agreed to get out of call over a defined period and the uk is two of the 45 countries regarding agriculture and trillions of dollars of financial asset owners have pledged to decarbonise their assets by 2050. these are all very positive signs but the main agreement of how we collectively as countries decarbonise our world is still to be agreed and i am cautiously optimistic. do still to be agreed and i am cautiously optimistic. do you think, bein: cautiously optimistic. do you think, being honest _ cautiously optimistic. do you think, being honest about _ cautiously optimistic. do you think, being honest about this, _ cautiously optimistic. do you think, being honest about this, because i cautiously optimistic. do you think, | being honest about this, because we are talking global challenge they are talking global challenge they are of immense proportions, do you think leaders, countries, actually no how to start tackling climate change? t no how to start tackling climate chance? ., , no how to start tackling climate chance? ~ , . , change? i think this conference is uuite change? i think this conference is quite different _ change? i think this conference is quite different from _ change? i think this conference is quite different from paris. - change? i think this conference is quite different from paris. not i change? i think this conference is quite different from paris. not a l quite different from paris. not a single country is debating for the
11:29 am
need to —— whether they need to do something or not. in paris people were still debating. not a single country is actually saying that. more and more countries have more ambitious climate plans which is a good sign. the question is not what to do but how to get it done. i think the community knows one of the main thing we have to focus on and there are a lot of things to be learned still in agriculture for example. 30% of our emissions come from food and agricultural system and then is to be more focus on adaptation. but it is not true we don't know what to do. there is enough scientific evidence of not just what are the problems but the ways to get started. what just what are the problems but the ways to get started.— ways to get started. what other tools? the _ ways to get started. what other tools? the governor's - ways to get started. what other tools? the governor's of- ways to get started. what other. tools? the governor's of energy, ways to get started. what other i tools? the governor's of energy, for examle. tools? the governor's of energy, for example- it — tools? the governor's of energy, for example- it is _ tools? the governor's of energy, for example. it is not _ tools? the governor's of energy, for example. it is not rocket _ tools? the governor's of energy, for example. it is not rocket science i example. it is not rocket science what needs to be done. there are difficult decisions to be made of countries getting out of coal and carbon. the good news is that except
11:30 am
to countries in the world, if you wanted to produce energy today renewables are a cheaper way to go. we have to decarbonise transportation and this is one sector where actually electric cars zoomed out in the last two years but when electric car sales have increased more people have bought cars today there are 1 million cars in the world and if we didn't do anything three elgin cars in the world by 2050. if all the cars are electric we will still not get to 1.5 degrees so there are things we need to do in one way and things we need to do in one way and things we need to do in one way and things we need to reduce and behave differently and how we do things so i don't want any of your audience to say that we don't know what to do. it is true a lot of things are harder to do like decarbonising tea or cement and a lot of good work is going on but there is enough agreement of the path forward and all the countries were talking about of the first steps to be taken.
11:31 am
you are watching bbc news, let's catch up with the weather. 0ver you are watching bbc news, let's catch up with the weather. over the next few days the weather will be mild for the time of year. most of us will have light winds. the exception to that is across the far north of scotland where we will have gusts between 40 and 50 mph. a couple of weather front sinking southwards, bringing rain, cloud, and showers in the north. in between, brighter skies, and showers in the north. in between, brighterskies, some between, brighter skies, some sunshine, between, brighterskies, some sunshine, temperatures between ten and 16 degrees. through this evening and 16 degrees. through this evening and overnight, we continue with the weather front sinking south in england and wales. a weather front in the north producing showers but there will be clear skies and in some sheltered glens temperatures will fall low enough for a touch of frost. generally speaking for england and wales, it'll be another mild night. tomorrow we have a weather front across the south producing cloud and spots of rain. in the north, looking at sunshine and showers, at times areas of cloud, still gusty winds on the far
11:32 am
north of scotland, with highs between nine and 15. hello this is bbc news. the headlines. the government's set to announce that all front—line nhs staff in england will have to be fully vaccinated against covid 19 by next spring. rescued after two days trapped underground an injured caver is brought to safety — the rescue operation involved 250 volunteers. police name the 10—year—old boy who was killed by a dog in south wales as jack lis. he was pronounced dead at the scene at a house in caerphilly. the number of afghans fleeing the country due to poverty had more than doubled since the taliban takeover. a new study finds it's not just how long you sleep for but when you go to bed that has
11:33 am
an impact on your health. sport and for a full round up, let's go to the bbc sport centre. good morning. england cricketer liam livingstone says the yorkshire racsim scandal has been very troubling for the t20 side competing at the cricket world cup. it comes as the club investigates a new allegation of racism this time from a former academy player, following those made by the former player azeem rafiq. new club chairman lord patel apologised to rafiq, admitting the subsequent investigation had been badly handled. this is what he had to say. it's been travelling for the team but it is an opportunity for the group because we are proud of the diversity within our squad. everybody�*s background, we celebrate them, and i think it is a great opportunity for those at the top of the game to force that change, and i
11:34 am
think that is a great opportunity for us as a group to lead the way and hopefully that filters down into county cricket and grassroots cricket. and bbc news will be speaking to cindy butts, the chair of the independent commision for equity in cricket shoirtly. the new zealand captain kane williamson believes england still have the strength to cope without openerjason roy who misses the match tomorrow through injury, in what is a repeat of the dramatic 50 over final two years ago. jasonis jason is a big playerfor england, and has been playing really nicely, getting the team off to a good start. the depth in the england side is one of their strengths. we will try and plan accordingly to the best of our ability. we largely want to focus on the sort of cricket we want to play as a group and keep developing on that as we have been doing throughout this tournament.
11:35 am
in football, steven gerrard remains on a high lost of potential managers to replace dean smith at aston villa. the rangers boss has impressed the club's hierarchy in his first proper job in management with the scottish club. villa hope to have someone in place by for the next home game with brighton following the up coming international break. smith's one of two departures over the weekend, the other daniel farque at norwich, coming after securing the club's first league win of the season. in a statement issued today he said he leaves the club with pride, following two promotions to teh premier league. —— following two promotions to the premier league. chelsea can go top of their group with a win against swiss side servette in the women's champions league tonight. chelsea travel to geneva to face a side which is yet to score a goal in the competition and boss emma hayes says her team is looking forward to the game. we can't control outcomes but we can
11:36 am
control the type of performance. i know our team really enjoy the pressure, they enjoy the expectation. ijust pressure, they enjoy the expectation. i just think we are looking forward to being against a new opponent and picking up things we can learn from it. you may be aware of the row in modern pentathlon, with the governing body deciding to remove the horseriding discipline and replace it with another sport for the 2028 olympics. they say it's been under consideration for some time but events at the tokyo games, when one horse refused to perform, are likely to have sped up the process. there's been strong opposition from pentathletes — team gb's 0lympic championjoe choong is one of almost 700 athletes to sign a petition, in an attempt to save the sport. we wa nt we want to be given the chance to save our sport, to save the riding by addressing the problem is not just amputating the problem completely. i really think without the history, and the impact the
11:37 am
sport has had over the olympic period, without the same five sport it is just a trap we will fall into by replacing horse riding, and that trap will end with us losing our position in the olympics, and be the end of the sport at the same time. that's all the sport for now. a former academy player said he was abused. this is the latest allegation of racism against the club following azeem rafiq's account. he said the experience got him close to taking his own life.
11:38 am
the england and wales cricket board set up the commission for equity in cricket to look at the race, gender, and class, and it is due to report next year. cindy butts joins us now. buttsjoins us now. what butts joins us now. what is your reaction? t butts joins us now. what is your reaction? ., butts joins us now. what is your reaction? . ., reaction? i am horrified. the commission _ reaction? i am horrified. the commission has _ reaction? i am horrified. the commission has been - reaction? i am horrified. the i commission has been following the case since our inception in spring. we've been following it more closely of late and we have been very concerned. 0ne, of late and we have been very concerned. one, the way he has been treated, and certainly the way in which the whole affair has been handled. azeem rafiq has been incredibly brave in stepping forward and speaking out about his experiences. at great expense to both himself and his family. he really has ta ken both himself and his family. he really has taken on the authorities
11:39 am
single—handedly. i have nothing but admiration for him but, yes, we are extremely concerned. i met with azeem rafiq. i plan to meet with him and others as part of our work. i would like a copy of the report from ecb. and i will be writing to lord patel, as well. we ecb. and i will be writing to lord patel, as well.— ecb. and i will be writing to lord patel, as well. we will get to that re ort in patel, as well. we will get to that report in a — patel, as well. we will get to that report in a moment _ patel, as well. we will get to that report in a moment because i patel, as well. we will get to that| report in a moment because there patel, as well. we will get to that i report in a moment because there are a couple of factors worth discussing. how big a problem is race in english cricket? your report is ongoing. as we said, you release that next year. when you see the latest allegation, you do start to question how big this issue is. indeed. but i can't say how big it is. our indeed. but i can't say how big it is. 0urwork indeed. but i can't say how big it is. our work has onlyjust begun. we are opening up more evidence today. we encourage people to come forward
11:40 am
with their testimonies and their stories and whether they have suffered discrimination on account of their race, gender or class. we want to hearfrom of their race, gender or class. we want to hear from those people in order to try to determine what is going on in cricket, what is the state of the our people able to progress through the game to the elite levels. what are peoples experiences of the talent pathway. that's what we are asking people to come forward with so we can determine what the reality in cricket is like today and be able to tell that story honestly, arrive at solutions, and offer recommendations. , , ., solutions, and offer recommendations. ,, ., recommendations. the issue of race, it isn't “ust recommendations. the issue of race, it isn't just about _ recommendations. the issue of race, it isn'tjust about cricket. _ recommendations. the issue of race, it isn'tjust about cricket. it _ it isn'tjust about cricket. it extends to all parts of society. if somebody is going to come forward. yes, azeem rafiq was praised as being a whistle—blower, but how do you protect these people? because
11:41 am
anybody who isn't white knows that even mentioning the subject of race can work against you. you even mentioning the sub'ect of race can work against you._ can work against you. you are quite riuht. can work against you. you are quite right- people _ can work against you. you are quite right. people will— can work against you. you are quite right. people will be _ can work against you. you are quite right. people will be fearful - can work against you. you are quite right. people will be fearful to i right. people will be fearful to talk about experiences. there might be fear of reprisal. people could come to us anonymously. people can come to us anonymously. people can come to us confidentially. we will honour that. we will make sure they aren't identifiable in our final report, and i would hope that people would also have confidence in the fact that we are a truly independent body. we will decide what we say. we have decided what we look at. we have decided what we look at. we have developed our own terms of reference, so i hope people would gain confidence from that. tit reference, so i hope people would gain confidence from that.- gain confidence from that. in the case of azeem — gain confidence from that. in the case of azeem rafiq, _ gain confidence from that. in the case of azeem rafiq, obviously i gain confidence from that. in the i case of azeem rafiq, obviously the club settled, but in terms of the final report, i don't think that will be made public, why not? look,
11:42 am
as i said earlier, _ will be made public, why not? look, as i said earlier, i— will be made public, why not? look, as i said earlier, i have _ will be made public, why not? look, as i said earlier, i have written i will be made public, why not? look, as i said earlier, i have written to i as i said earlier, i have written to the ecb requesting a copy of the report. i've not heard back from them. i'm expecting to hear back imminently. i will be writing to yorkshire because the report on what —— and what is in that report matters to this commission. these are the issues we will be looking at whether it is discrimination, how complaints and discipline matters are dealt with. this is the very stuff of our commission. i will be pushing hard in orderfor the commission to be able to see that report, reflect on it, and make lasting, practical recommendations that can help to deliver the change that can help to deliver the change that this game desperately, desperately needs.- that this game desperately, desperately needs. cindy butts, thank ou desperately needs. cindy butts, thank you for— desperately needs. cindy butts, thank you forjoining _ desperately needs. cindy butts, thank you forjoining us - desperately needs. cindy butts, thank you forjoining us this i thank you forjoining us this morning on bbc news. we have some breaking news.
11:43 am
the government has moved the writ for the shropshire north by—election in the commons. the seat is vacant after the resignation of the former conservative cabinet minister owen paterson, who quit after he was found to have broken commons lobbying rules. the by—election is expected to be held on december 16. us rapper travis scott is facing multiple lawsuits after at least eight people were killed and hundreds injured in a crush at his texas festival astroworld. one injured concertgoer has accused scott and surprise performer drake of inciting the crowd, and is seeking one million dollars in damages. neither have commented on the lawsuits. scott has said he is working to help the families of the victims — the youngest was just iii. mark lobel reports. sobbing.
11:44 am
too much to bear after losing his brother in the concert crush. you go to a concert to have fun, you don't go to a concert to die. he died saving his fiancee. she was getting hurt, hit left and right. he saved her. she was admitted to the hospital. it cost him his life. 21—year—old axel acosta was another of the eight people who died that night. the computer scientist travelled alone to attend his first music festival. now, leaving behind a family, devastated. he wanted to provide for his family. he really cares about, he was the first grandkid, he was the oldest one. he always take care of his other cousins and nieces. the crush began around a quarter
11:45 am
past nine during travis scott's headline performance in texas on friday night. panic spread fast as thousands were injured. for some of those attending, this two—day outdoor event tragically would be their last. the rapper drake was also on stage at the time of the tragedy and has issued this statement. "my heart is broken for the families and friends of those who lost their lives and for anyone who is suffering. i will continue to pray for all of them and will be of service in any way i can." ijust wanted to send out prayers to the ones that was lost last night. travis scott says he is working to help the families of the victims. but several festival goers are suing him, drake and the promoters for damages. all of whom have not yet commented on the lawsuits. attention is turning to what happened to turn this concert into a crime scene.
11:46 am
lawyers are already poring over footage as families seekjustice. i ask you, does that look safe? does that look organised, well—run? the way the concert was set up, planned, organised and the way things were happening, were handled, once there was a problem, it boggles the mind. alongside multiple civil lawsuits is a police investigation. it's emerged that safety concerns were raised by houston's police chief moments before the concert with travis scott. amidst the hurt, though, is an expressed hope amongst the families of the victims that these deaths will not be in vain by helping improve how concerts like these are managed around the world. mark lobel, bbc news. a study of nearly 90,000 people
11:47 am
suggests that those who go to sleep between ten and eleven pm have a lower risk of stroke or heart attack than people with other bedtimes. the team, from from the bio—medical database uk biobank, say more research is needed to understand why. joining me now is chloe macarthur, senior cardiac nurse at the british heart foundation. thank you forjoining us today. what is the science behind sleep and a healthy heart?— is the science behind sleep and a health heart? ., ., ~ healthy heart? good morning, thank ou for healthy heart? good morning, thank you for having _ healthy heart? good morning, thank you for having me. _ healthy heart? good morning, thank you for having me. we _ healthy heart? good morning, thank you for having me. we know- healthy heart? good morning, thank you for having me. we know that - you for having me. we know that sleep is important for our overall health as well as our heart health. sleep influences biological processes like our blood pressure, information, and glucose metabolism. these are important factors when we are thinking about heart and circulatory disease. to get good quality sleep means we will be
11:48 am
managing that risk a lot better. the study suggests somewhere between ten and 11 is the best time to go just when we are thinking about heart health. most adults are going to need between seven and nine hours sleep. need between seven and nine hours slee -. ~ . need between seven and nine hours sleer ., ., ,, , need between seven and nine hours slee.~ ., , ., sleep. what happens when we are asleep that _ sleep. what happens when we are asleep that helps _ sleep. what happens when we are asleep that helps to _ sleep. what happens when we are asleep that helps to maintain - sleep. what happens when we are asleep that helps to maintain a i asleep that helps to maintain a healthy heart?— asleep that helps to maintain a healthy heart? asleep that helps to maintain a health heart? , ,, , ~ healthy heart? these processes like our blood pressure _ healthy heart? these processes like our blood pressure drops _ healthy heart? these processes like our blood pressure drops when - healthy heart? these processes like our blood pressure drops when we | healthy heart? these processes like l our blood pressure drops when we are asleep. it can help with inflammation, which is particularly important for coronary artery disease, so a build—up of fatty substances in our arteries. it's these processes that are really important to manage, and why it is so important to get good quality sleep, good duration of sleep, so these processes can go under way to help reduce our risk of heart disease and circuitry disease in the future. i disease and circuitry disease in the future. ~' ., . disease and circuitry disease in the future. ~ ., ., disease and circuitry disease in the future. ,, ., . . future. i know that you will have worked shifts _ future. i know that you will have worked shifts as _ future. i know that you will have worked shifts as a _ future. i know that you will have worked shifts as a nurse. -- - worked shifts as a nurse. —— circular
11:49 am
how does that help you? it is difficult. chuckles it goes against the rhythm we have, which is our body clock, really, and it is important for keeping those processes going. shiftwork is troublesome when it comes to keeping a good sleep pattern. it is an underresearched area. we need more research into why this happens, why it is important for our heart health, and what we might be able to do for people who might be... might not be able to keep sleep patterns quite as well, such as shift workers. quite as well, such as shift workers-— quite as well, such as shift workers. �* , . ., ., ., workers. as a general rule, how do ou kee workers. as a general rule, how do you keep your— workers. as a general rule, how do you keep your heart _ workers. as a general rule, how do you keep your heart healthy? - workers. as a general rule, how do you keep your heart healthy? so... when we are _ you keep your heart healthy? so... when we are thinking _ you keep your heart healthy? so... when we are thinking about - you keep your heart healthy? sr when we are thinking about heart health, lifestyle has a huge part to play, and sleep is a part of that.
11:50 am
this needs to include things like a healthy balanced diet, regular physical activity, and managing any habits such as smoking or drinking too much alcohol. it's also important to know your numbers, such as your blood pressure and your cholesterol. if anybody is wondering about any of this, the nhs offers a health check for those over a0. and they may be able to reach out to their gps. , ' , , , their gps. there is different types of slee - , their gps. there is different types of sleep. isn't _ their gps. there is different types of sleep, isn't there? _ their gps. there is different types of sleep, isn't there? broken - their gps. there is different types l of sleep, isn't there? broken sleep, new parent sleep... sleep apnoea, of course, as well, so any guide on that? if you have concerns, what is the advice?— the advice? so... yes, sleep is multidimensional, _ the advice? so... yes, sleep is multidimensional, really, - the advice? so... yes, sleep is multidimensional, really, it- the advice? so... yes, sleep is. multidimensional, really, it isn't just about the time we go to, it's about the length of sleep, if we are disrupted, if the quality of that sleep... good sleep hygiene, such as regularly going to bed, winding down
11:51 am
before bed, as well, these can help maintain better sleep habits. but if you have any concerns over your sleep, if it isn't getting better over time, do reach out to your gp and have a discussion with them. thank you very much. could the construction industry be about to get a little greener? a group of major construction companies in the uk has signed a pledge agreeing to do something about the issue of pallet waste — that's those wooden, frame boxes that are used to carry heavy materials around. at the moment they are used once and thrown away, but that could be about to change — our reporter dougal shaw went to a building site in south london to find out more. wherever you see building works, you are likely to spot these — wooden pallets. and here is why they are useful. they allow bulky items to be easily transported. the uk construction industry gets through about 18 million of them each year, and the vast majority
11:52 am
are used only once. so when we get pallets, we will store them on site and effectively put them in the skips. what we want to move towards, though, is material reuse, where the pallets are being reused over and over again. all of those single use pallets require thousands of hectares of trees to be harvested each year and, of course, manufacturing, transporting and disposing of them creates a significant carbon footprint. so, could these colourful pallets be part of the solution? they don't look too different, but they are designed to be stronger so they can be used multiple times. a group of major construction companies — including bam, who run this site in dartford, london — have signed a pledge to address the issue of pallet waste and try a new system devised by a former pallet manufacturer. today, it's very much a linear model of distribute and discard at the end, so we are looking to create a circular solution. so this isn't exactly brand—new technology. why has it taken so long to implement this? there hasn't been the focus
11:53 am
on this as an industry. a deposit system means the extra cost of these pallets is passed down the supply chain. the hope is that each one can be used at least half a dozen times. used ones are returned to a local hub for repair and redistribution. there is a benefit point where the additional materials that are being used to manufacture the stronger product to allow it to be reused finally are balanced off by the avoidance of the material use on the single use. the new pallet system is due to take off on building sites early next year. dougal shaw, bbc news. diamonds which once belonged to france's last queen marie antoinette are up for auction in geneva today ? as well as jewels from the russian tsar�*s family. the pieces are expected to fetch record prices. imogen foulkes reports from geneva.
11:54 am
a pairof a pair of bracelets containing 112 diamonds. they once graced the arm of marie antoinette. when the revolution began, france's last queen managed to save herjewels, smuggling them out with her daughter. she could not save herself. tonight, more than two centuries after her death, the bracelets will go to the highest bidder. blue blooded or commoner. but for house much —— how much? price—wise? i don't think you can put a price on history. how much is someone willing to pay for something from the last queen of france. it is a piece of history that has remained within those families for more than 200 years and that is exceptionally rare to find and especiallyjewels of such great quality. rare to find and especially “ewels of such great qualityh rare to find and especially “ewels of such great quality. there is more ro al of such great quality. there is more royaliewellery. _ of such great quality. there is more royaliewellery. a — of such great quality. there is more royaljewellery, a huge _ of such great quality. there is more royaljewellery, a huge sapphire - of such great quality. there is more| royaljewellery, a huge sapphire and diamond brooch with matching earrings once owned by grand duchess
11:55 am
maria pavlova. thesejewels were smuggled out of bolshevik saint petersburg hidden in a newspaper. the duchess died in exile in france. finally, there is a rainbow of rare modern diamonds, pink, orange, and yellow, but the stars of this week's auctions are the historicjewels. with their message that perhaps while diamonds are forever those who wear them, while diamonds are forever those who wearthem, however while diamonds are forever those who wear them, however ground, are not. there were collective casts by the women in the gallery and groans from the men. chuckles now, the weather. skies like this for many of us for the rest of the day. a little bit of rain around but generally speaking it'll stay dry for most. and it is relatively mild out there. it was a mild night last
11:56 am
night and this coming night will be mild across england and wales. this is the weather front, to the south thatis is the weather front, to the south that is where the mild air is, to the north, that is where we have the colder north atlantic air but it is drier and brighter. colder north atlantic air but it is drierand brighter. for colder north atlantic air but it is drier and brighter. for scotland, northern ireland, and the far north of england, brighter skies and clearer skies into the evening hours, whereas in the south, often cloudy without breaks of rain. that is how it will stay for the evening and overnight across wales and most of england. overcast, bits and pieces of drizzle, the rain will come and go, 15 degrees by day, maybe 11 degrees by night, so not much of a drop. whereas in scotland, around three degrees in aberdeen with a touch of frost out in the glens. here is the weather front and the forecast for tomorrow, it doesn't move much towards the south, it wants to slide along itself. we keep the cloudy skies and the little pieces of rain, very mild again, 15 degrees, but for the lake district
11:57 am
and northern ireland, central scotland, some sunshine around. here is the weather map for thursday. this is what we call a ridge of high pressure. generally that brings settled conditions. i think light winds, some sunshine around, the winds, some sunshine around, the wind is coming from the south and the north there, in between not much going on. i think it'll be a fine day for many of us. 11 degrees in glasgow, 1a degrees in london. then things start to change us we had to friday. low pressure swings in. lots of wind and rain. this low could shoot north, it could be a bit further south, so exactly where these blobs of rain will be on friday is difficult to say for any one location but the broad message is there will be low pressure in the vicinity of the uk so things will be generally unsettled but even with low pressure we can sometimes get some decent weather. we could see some decent weather. we could see some dry conditions in birmingham at least in the middle of the day on friday. the outlook for the rest of
11:58 am
the week and into the weekend, overall it stays pretty mild. goodbye.
11:59 am
12:00 pm
he this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at midday: the government is set to announce that all front—line staff in the nhs in england will have to be fully vaccinated against coronavirus by next spring. health bodies welcome the move but unions warn it could have a negative impact. it is good news in terms of being able to ensure that we protect staff, patients and visitors from nhs members of staff having infections. potentially the fact that they are reaching for a sledgehammer on this using the law is going to do more harm than good. gwent police have named a ten—year—old boy who was killed by a dog in caerphilly as jack lis. he was at a friend's house
12:01 pm
when he was attacked and died at the scene. rescued after two days trapped underground — an injured caver is brought to safety. 250 people took part in the rescue effort. a new study finds it's not just how long you sleep for but when you go to bed that has an impact on your health. we'll tell you when scientists think you should go to bed and talk to a cardiac nurse. coming up in the next hour — eight years after they first drew millions of us to the tower of london, ceramic poppies have found a new permanent home in the imperial war museum in trafford, near manchester.
12:02 pm
the bbc understands the government is to compel frontline, nhs staff in england, to be fully vaccinated against the coronavirus. an official announcement is expected later today, and workers will have until spring, to be double—jabbed. unions argue it should not be forced. staff working in care homes, were instructed earlier this year, to become fully vaccinated — their deadline is on thursday. here's our health editor, hugh pym. compulsory vaccination against covid for staff in adult social care is already being implemented in england. there's a deadline later this week for care workers to comply, apart from those deemed to be exempt. it's understood that later today the government will announce that the policy will be extended to staff in patient—facing roles in the nhs in england. they'll be required as a condition of deployment in those posts to be double—jabbed by next spring, unless there are medical
12:03 pm
reasons for exemption. the deadline has been set to allow for the gap between first and second doses. around 90% of nhs staff in england have already been vaccinated against covid. the health secretary, sajid javid, said last month that he was leaning towards compulsoryjabs for nhs staff and the main issue was patient safety. as a doctor, i take it for granted that i have to be vaccinated against hepatitis b so i do not put my patients at risk of an incurable illness which could cause cirrhosis or liver cancer, i have been required to do that for the entire 36 years i have been a doctor, it is not entirely new. health leaders say they see the benefits of the policy, though some have expressed reservations, arguing that there is a risk some staff might quit at a time of concerns about staffing gaps. there are still somewhere i think between 80,000 and 90,000 nhs staff who have not been vaccinated and it is really important we work hard with them over the next few months before the deadline comes in to try to get as
12:04 pm
many as possible vaccinated so we do not face a cliff edge of effectively members of staff leaving. the health union unison has argued that the key to convincing hesitant staff should be persuasion, not force. decisions on the issue are devolved and it's possible that the other uk nations will take a different route to england. hugh pym, bbc news. let's speak now with matthew taylor, chief executive of the nhs confederation. is just the right thing to do for the nhs? the government has been signalling its intention no the best thing to do is to persuade our staff to get vaccinated, the very small number that hasn't and we will do that. and having a monetary deadline
12:05 pm
may be helpful for leaders as they try to make sure they don't if pie and persuade those people who have not yet been vaccinated. it will be important we monitor the situation and do ensure that we are aware of any risk there might be when we get to april that we are going to lose staff and that we do everything we can, particularly to reach out to those groups where the vaccination take—up has not been as high as we might want. take-up has not been as high as we might want-— might want. how big is the risk staff might _ might want. how big is the risk staff might leave? _ might want. how big is the risk staff might leave? when - might want. how big is the risk staff might leave? when you . might want. how big is the risk i staff might leave? when you say vaccination _ staff might leave? when you say vaccination is _ staff might leave? when you say vaccination is mandatory - staff might leave? when you say vaccination is mandatory and - staff might leave? when you sayj vaccination is mandatory and you have many people who any reason do not want to be vaccinated that as a rest and a health service when staffing is the biggest single challenge we face now as we go into an extremely difficult winter. what we need to do is work very hard to minimise the number of people who reach the april deadline and face that kind of dilemma. we will
12:06 pm
continue to do that and we have to do the combination we have successfully done the vaccination in the country as a whole which is a really clear message we are getting from the centre which is what we are getting today and then really reach out to those groups who may for one reason or another have more vaccine resistance. it reason or another have more vaccine resistance. , , , ., resistance. it is interesting you have to persuade _ resistance. it is interesting you have to persuade staff- resistance. it is interesting you have to persuade staff to - resistance. it is interesting you have to persuade staff to get i have to persuade staff to get vaccines because with gp staff, we heard an example in a report that they get vaccinations. new nhs staff not except they are protecting their patients as well as the college? the vast majority _ patients as well as the college? tue: vast majority do. patients as well as the college? the vast majority do. as _ patients as well as the college? the vast majority do. as well— patients as well as the college? the vast majority do. as well as - patients as well as the college? the vast majority do. as well as their i vast majority do. as well as their colleagues- _ vast majority do. as well as their colleagues. there _ vast majority do. as well as their colleagues. there are _ vast majority do. as well as their colleagues. there are a - vast majority do. as well as their colleagues. there are a small. colleagues. there are a small minority who _ colleagues. there are a small minority who do _ colleagues. there are a small minority who do not - colleagues. there are a small minority who do not and - colleagues. there are a small minority who do not and it - colleagues. there are a small. minority who do not and it may colleagues. there are a small - minority who do not and it may be up because of medical conditions are like the rest of the population there may be some people who have
12:07 pm
formed fears about vaccination that are not soundly based. yes, having a deadline will help, i think, ensure we get as many people as possible across the line but as we have done with the vaccination programme in general we need to reach out and understand why people have that hesitancy and to overcome it. in terms of reaching out, you mentioned certain groups. there are statistics that show nhs staff have higher vaccination levels than the general british population but that original discrepancies when it comes to nhs trust. dorset county council has a figure of 9a.6% vaccination but meanwhile bedford, luton and dunstable trust is only 79.9%. what do you understand is going on there? i think what we are seeing in the nhs is exactly what we are seeing in the country at large. there are certain groups, disadvantaged
12:08 pm
groups, certain black and ethnic minority groups who for one reason or another have greater concerns about the vaccine and for whom we have to work harder, just as we have done with the national programme, to reach out and identify people who are trusted by members of those communities. it is not always best to say you have to do something because it is being insisted on, it is often better to say do it because i have done it and i am part of your community and you can trust me. so we have to use all those techniques we have to use all those techniques we have to use all those techniques we have used more generally to get through to those people so that we can get to this deadline with as few as possible people, as few as possible people find themselves facing a dilemma between getting vaccinated are losing theirjob. thank you very much indeed. —— or losing theirjob. we will find out when that deadline is and there is speculation it could be april of next year. that should be coming up in an announcement from the health
12:09 pm
secretary within the next year. —— hour. helga pile is deputy head of health at unison— the uk's largest health union — she warns that the government's approach could be damaging. we are really concerned that the government hasn't listened to what many people told them during the consultation which is potentially they are reaching for a sledgehammer in this using the law is going to do more harm than good. we've got over 90% of staff who have already had the vaccine and the methods we have been working with employers on have been really successful in terms of persuasion, in terms of giving people reassurance, making sure they know that if they do have a reaction they can have time off, that has worked really well but now we potentially risk undoing some of that by compelling people. it is going to take a lot of operational effort to put this into practice
12:10 pm
ready for the spring on its knees and there just isn't the capacity to deal with us, so we are really concerned that this could cause a lot of damage. so what can we expect this afternoon? we heard more from our health correspondent nick triggle we expect a statement this afternoon that will highlight what this involves. there are still a lot of questions, the tone that the government is set to take and the approach as well. so we are likely to get more details later today. we are, we expect a statement in the house of commons this afternoon that will set out the details of what this policy
12:11 pm
will actually involve. one of the questions is what constitutes front line staff? when the original vaccination programme started rolling out, front line staff, there was a wider definition than you would expect. some administration and back office staff who come through and spend time in hospital wards were classified as front line staff. we are yet to hear what that definition is. also whether it would apply to gps and their staff because they are not directly employed by the nhs so that could make a difference. and of course as unison were arguing that there needs to be a lot of support and i put in place to get those staff who remain unvaccinated to come forward. and when you talk to people running the vaccination companies this is often there is not one single overriding reason people are hesitant about vaccination and are only convinced continue in the next few months before what we think will be a spring deadline for this otherwise the staffing shortages in the nhs could increase and that in itself could increase concerns about safety to patients if you do not have enough staff on the wards, that is a real problem. this thursday we see the deadline for care home staff as well. when that was announced, vaccination rates in care staff for nhs staff at the moment it's
12:12 pm
over 90% so they are starting from a higher base. what we have seen with care staff since that policy was announced, a gradual increase and the figures from a couple of weeks back suggest over 90% of care staff are double vaccinated. but there have been reports care staff have been leaving the sector and going to work in otherjobs. and of course, come thursday, people will be watching very closely what happens to the care sector because the vacancies and staffing shortages in the care sector are even worse than in the nhs. that is why this policy is controversial. we have heard a lot from hospital managers. there is a lot of logic to it but there are police have named the ten—year—old boy killed in a dog attack in south wales yesterday as jack lis. emergency services were called to an address in caerphilly — but jack was pronounced dead at the scene. the animal was put down by firearms officers. a new met office study is warning that the number of people affected by extreme heat stress,
12:13 pm
could increase nearly 15—fold, with a 2 celsius rise in global temperatures. that would mean one billion people, living in places with potentially fatally high temperatures and humidity levels. the governments chief scientific adviser has warned that climate change is a far bigger — and potentially deadlier — problem than the coronavirus. sir patrick vallance believes combatting global warming, will require a combination of technology and behavioural change. of course, coronavirus has been devastating. it has affected people right the way across the globe. but it will settle down and it will go back to being a seasonal disease of some sort, most likely. this is something that's getting worse over a very long period and without concerted, long—term action, it will continue to get worse.
12:14 pm
an mp who harassed a woman because she was jealous of her relationship with her partner will have her appeal against her conviction heard in march. claudia webbe was given a 10—week sentence, suspended for two years, at westminster magistrates court last week. webbe, a former labour mp for leicester east who is now an independent, was convicted of one charge of harassment. the anger — both outside and inside parliament — over the uk government's attempt to change the rules on mps' conductshows no sign of dying down. and the eye watering sums being earned by some. the labour party chair anneliese dodds is writing to borisjohnson — saying the issue is "a question of leadership" for the prime minister. let's speak to our political correspondent, pete saull. this debate continues to rumble on after the emergency meeting last night when the covenant admitted it
12:15 pm
made a mistake in the owen patterson case, the vote that stopped his suspension temporarily then the u—turn on that and questions about the wider standards process. as you say, today the focus is now on the wider question of mps second jobs. what a few work on the side and a lot of it isn't particularly highly paid. some do things you might say a pretty beneficial to their roles as mps, they work on the front line in hospitals and in some cases the accident and emergency doctors in the houses of parliament who have worked through the pandemic. when it comes through the consultancy work when it comes to owen patterson, in his case he was fun to not only take the money from companies but uses possession as an mp to benefit those two firms and has broken the rules. today the focus is on one of his conservative colleagues, former attorney general sir geoffrey cox
12:16 pm
who you might remember for his booming voice during the brexit debate. at one point he said this parliament was a disgrace. you might say that his actions today, are certainly some of his political opponents would suggest he is not casting parliament in the best light because it is on the front page of the daily mail this morning he spent certainly a few weeks if not longer in the british virgin islands earlier this year in the caribbean doing paid work as a lawyer on behalf of the british virgin islands government. that work we are told is ongoing and he has been paid some pretty eye watering sums, hundreds of thousands of homes that work. this morning the business secretary, kwasi kwarteng, who has been visiting a nuclear research centre in sheffield was asked about this. there have also been a number of mps
12:17 pm
having expertise in a number of doctors in the house but i'm not here to talk about that, i'm here to talk aboutjobs, a0,000 jobs and new technology and a massive opportunities.— opportunities. perhaps understandably - opportunities. perhaps understandably the - opportunities. perhaps - understandably the business secretary not really wanting to talk aboutjobs some of his conservative colleagues might do outside westminster. the voting record of geoffrey cox, the number of times that he has voted he has done by proxy which is the case for a lot of mps during the pandemic, a lot of them staying in their constituencies rather than going to westminster. he has only spoken once in parliament since the start of the pandemic and the labour party have written to the prime minister asked him whether geoffrey cox is a caribbean based barrister or a conservative mp, what exactly is his priority here? we have been trying to get hold of sir geoffrey cox today and we are told he is actually at the moment
12:18 pm
overseas or neither at his constituency in devon are at westminster but we have had a statement in the past few minutes that says sir geoffrey has been working with the companies since a global counsel since september 2020 and is a leading qc his huge depth of expertise experience in domestic and international. no suggesting whether this adds further fuel to the fire of these allegations of sleaze directed at the prime minister and the conservative party in recent days. we'rejoined now by duncan hames — he is a former lib dem mp — but is now director of policy at transparency international uk.
12:19 pm
you probably know the rules. our mps allowed second jobs? yes. you probably know the rules. our mps allowed second jobs?— allowed second “obs? yes, they are but they — allowed second jobs? yes, they are but they are not _ allowed second jobs? yes, they are but they are not allowed _ allowed second jobs? yes, they are but they are not allowed to do - allowed second jobs? yes, they are but they are not allowed to do paid | but they are not allowed to do paid advocacy, that is to say you shouldn't get an advantage tiering in government or parliament through the work of an mp that you are paying for, and that is the rule by which owen patterson was the subject of a report by the standards committee last week and it means that many mps are struggling to navigate that rule without getting into difficulties you have been describing in your packjust now. tt describing in your packjust now. if you can bear with me we have had some reaction from a spokesperson for the prime minister. this is what he says. the prime minister does not back an outright ban on second jobs as i believe was said in the house yesterday, a ban on second jobs or
12:20 pm
catch those who still work in roles such as doctors and nurses. that is fair enough, what do you make of that? i fair enough, what do you make of that? 4' .,, fair enough, what do you make of that? 4' ~ , ., ., that? i think those mps who do shifts in the — that? i think those mps who do shifts in the nhs _ that? i think those mps who do shifts in the nhs will— that? i think those mps who do shifts in the nhs will be - that? i think those mps who do shifts in the nhs will be very i shifts in the nhs will be very annoyed by their efforts are being used to excuse other mps doing very different work indeed. we don't call for an outright ban, we recognise there some advantage to parliament but clearly mps have got past the stage where the mine the public confidence. we ask the require to seek prior approvalfor confidence. we ask the require to seek prior approval for these roles from an independent body and be able to satisfy people that the work they are undertaking is not one that brings about a conflict of interest and is contrary to serving the public, which fundamentally is what
12:21 pm
they are there to do. t5 public, which fundamentally is what they are there to do.— they are there to do. is that not with the standards _ they are there to do. is that not with the standards committee l they are there to do. is that not - with the standards committee does at the moment, is that not their role now? , ., now? there is no pre-application discussion- _ now? there is no pre-application discussion. former _ now? there is no pre-application discussion. former government i discussion. former government ministers have to go to the advisory committee on business appointments and have their proposed work after leaving government checked and to receive advice on any conflicts of interest it might generate but mps don't, they simply declare after the event what work we have been doing, and it is not enough simply to declare your conflict—of—interest. good integrity principles require that you manage those conflicts of interests, you prevent those from affecting your daily work and clearly mps have had some difficulty with this. owen patterson said he thought he was allowed to do this right because he could see how it might be in public the standards
12:22 pm
committee disagreed. aha, might be in public the standards committee disagreed. b. bit might be in public the standards committee disagreed. a bit more cominu committee disagreed. a bit more coming from _ committee disagreed. a bit more coming from number _ committee disagreed. a bit more coming from number ten. - committee disagreed. a bit more coming from number ten. this i committee disagreed. a bit more| coming from number ten. this via committee disagreed. a bit more - coming from number ten. this via the prime minister spokesman, saying that we recognise the strong views on this particular point and have listened to those again yesterday afternoon. we are going to table a motion tonight and next week to formalise the change of approach by unpicking the amendment. duncan, do you think the government, number ten is surprised by the reaction to this? we heard kwasi kwarteng saying he didn't want to talk about it but most of the country wants to talk about it. t most of the country wants to talk about it. .. most of the country wants to talk about it. ~' ., about it. i think the government will struggle _ about it. i think the government will struggle with _ about it. i think the government will struggle with it _ about it. i think the government will struggle with it until - about it. i think the government will struggle with it until it - about it. i think the government will struggle with it until it gets | will struggle with it until it gets to grips with the situation. i don't think since the mps expenses scandal 12 years ago we had a moment like this and they can just brush it under the carpet. one lesson they should learn from last week as they need to respect the independence of arrangements put in place to uphold
12:23 pm
standards in public life and themselves as a group of politicians they have really offended the public and force them to backtrack so quickly at the end of last week. there were 3a recommendations from lord evans, the chairman of the independent committee on standards independent committee on standards in public life last week and had to make these arrangements much more robust and independent from interference by politicians and i think the best way forward for the government would be to embrace those recommendations and ensure we have watchdogs that can do the job that we need them to do and that mps are very clear about rules that the need to follow and don't get into the difficulties that we currently read about. we have got to have changed if the government wants people to move on. . ~' if the government wants people to move on. ., ~ ,., if the government wants people to move on. . ~ ,. y if the government wants people to move on. ., ~ y., , .
12:24 pm
the government has begun the process for electing a successor to the former conservative mp owen paterson — who quit last week after being found to have broken commons lobbying rules. the by—election in shropshire north is expected to be held on december 16th. the move was announced to mps by the government chief whip, mark spencer. a study of nearly 90, 000 people suggests that those who go to sleep between ten and eleven pm have a lower risk of stroke or heart attack than people with other bedtimes. the team, from from the bio—medical database uk biobank, say more research is needed to understand why. joining me now is author of the study dr david plans, who is a senior lecturer
12:25 pm
in organisational neuroscience why in organisational neuroscience that sweet spot bet 11? why that sweet spot between ten and 11? we why that sweet spot between ten and 11? ~ , , ,., , ., 11? we used the sensors and smartphones _ 11? we used the sensors and smartphones to _ 11? we used the sensors and smartphones to do - 11? we used the sensors and smartphones to do research | 11? we used the sensors and - smartphones to do research and we were interested in the study to look at longer term rest using data to understand where we could predict things important to health issues. we found that people at ten and 11pm there is a low risk of developing heart disease over time compared to earlier or later bedtimes and this could be for a number of reasons. what we are guessing as when the clock is misaligned between behaviour and the actual logistics of going to sleep, that increases inflammation and impairs glucose regulation. tt
12:26 pm
inflammation and impairs glucose reuulation. ,., inflammation and impairs glucose reuulation. ., ., regulation. if you can't eat that window of _ regulation. if you can't eat that window of between _ regulation. if you can't eat that window of between ten - regulation. if you can't eat that window of between ten and - regulation. if you can't eat that window of between ten and 11, | window of between ten and 11, are there other things you can do to mitigate the growing threat and risk to your heart health?— to your heart health? absolutely. unless you _ to your heart health? absolutely. unless you are _ to your heart health? absolutely. unless you are a _ to your heart health? absolutely. unless you are a shift _ to your heart health? absolutely. unless you are a shift worker- to your heart health? absolutely. unless you are a shift worker for| unless you are a shift worker for some reason you can't actually sleep at night, we have evolved to be daytime creatures. we actually have ocular receptors to look for light and difficult to sleep a little too late you can sleep longer and wake up late you can sleep longer and wake up later so what you can do is make sure you get some daylight when you wake up, this works forjet lag as well and in fact disruption to the clock seems to be just like jet lag so the thing that works best is no matter how late you go to sleep is to try and get some light as soon as you wake up. to try and get some light as soon as you wake up-— to try and get some light as soon as you wake up-_ to try and get some light as soon as you wake up. was anything about the stud that you wake up. was anything about the study that surprised _ you wake up. was anything about the study that surprised you _ you wake up. was anything about the
12:27 pm
study that surprised you in _ you wake up. was anything about the study that surprised you in terms - you wake up. was anything about the study that surprised you in terms of l study that surprised you in terms of the conclusions and results you were not expecting? aha, the conclusions and results you were not exoeeting?_ not expecting? a few unexpected thin . s. not expecting? a few unexpected things- the _ not expecting? a few unexpected things. the association _ not expecting? a few unexpected things. the association itself- not expecting? a few unexpected things. the association itself was| things. the association itself was in away unexpected because when you remove all those factors from cardiovascular disease like cholesterol and other factors, there is a stronger association than we believe before between the circadian clock and health overall. when you look at the amount of people we looked at in the uk biobank. the other surprising finding was the incidence of that risk was higher in women but it is difficult and we only phoned —— have found an observation and are only gas is the age group were looking at a3 to 79 years that postmenopausal issues may
12:28 pm
influence cardiovascular disease and there are clearly differences in the endocrine system. you there are clearly differences in the endocrine system.— endocrine system. you have a neuroscience _ endocrine system. you have a neuroscience background. - endocrine system. you have a| neuroscience background. you endocrine system. you have a - neuroscience background. you are a senior lecturer there. neuroscience background. you are a senior lecturerthere. i neuroscience background. you are a senior lecturer there. i wonder if you could extend the connection between lack of sleep about sleep, your neural networks, and what that does with your heart.— does with your heart. because the circadian clock _ does with your heart. because the circadian clock has _ does with your heart. because the circadian clock has an _ does with your heart. because the circadian clock has an enormous i circadian clock has an enormous influence and is controlled by the central nervous system has an influence on the tournaments never system and that regulates reaction to stress and office legal reaction to stress and office legal reaction to stress and office legal reaction to stress mediates how healthy you are in general but also stress can affect cardiovascular health in general so when circadian disruption happens —— disruption happens that increases inflammation and that impaired glucose regulation both
12:29 pm
have an effect on the tournaments never system which means you are more affected by stress than you otherwise would be a natural ability to recover quickly from stress obviously makes you more susceptible to cardiovascular disease in general. to cardiovascular disease in reneral. . .. to cardiovascular disease in reneral. . ~' , ., , to cardiovascular disease in reneral. . ~' , . to cardiovascular disease in reneral. . , . general. thank you very much. thank ou. what are you thinking about this sensuous lid? —— what are you thinking about this and your sleep? my my goodness, our body clocks are all over the place. you get up at half past three or 11 or two, forget it. this is what we have in the weather front right now, a lot of cloud across northern and western parts of
12:30 pm
the uk, bits and pieces of rain around lancashire and wales but you can see the mail they are still there. in the north, through this evening, this is a weather front and essentially stays across the southern third of the country so mild conditions here through some fleeting rain, 11 degrees overnight but the skies are clear and we have fresher, colder atlantic area and the north saw temperatures will be around three degrees in aberdeen and probably a touch of frost and the glens of scotland. tomorrow broadly the same, cloudy conditions and the more southern areas with cloud and bits and pieces of drizzle in the north a bit brighter. so it is how it is looking today.
12:31 pm
this hello this is bbc news. the government's set to announce that all front—line nhs staff in england will have to be fully vaccinated against covid 19 by next spring. it's good news in terms of making sure we can protect staff, patients, and visitors from nhs members of staff. , . , ., staff. they are using the law, that'll do _ staff. they are using the law, that'll do more _ staff. they are using the law, that'll do more harm - staff. they are using the law, that'll do more harm than - staff. they are using the law, i that'll do more harm than good. rescued after two days trapped underground an injured caver is brought to safety — the rescue operation involved 250 volunteers.
12:32 pm
police name the 10—year—old boy who was killed by a dog in south wales as jack lis — he was pronounced dead at the scene at a house in caerphilly a new study finds it's not just how long you sleep for but when you go to bed that has an impact on your health. coming up in the next hour — eight years after they first drew millions of us to the tower of london, ceramic poppies have found a new permanent home in the imperial war museum in trafford manchester. let's pick up on one of those stories — because a former academy player at yorkshire county cricket club has said he was racially abused there as a 16—year—old. irfan amjad claims a member of staff used a term referencing his pakistani heritage to criticise his batting style. it is the latest allegation of racism against the club, following azeem rafiq's account of the discrimination he experienced, which he says left him close to taking his own life.
12:33 pm
the commission has been following the azeem rafiq case since its inception and we have been following it more closely of late. we've been very concerned. one, the way it's been treated, and the way the affair has been handled. —— he has been treated. azeem rafiq has been really brave in stepping forward and speaking out about his experiences at great expense to both himself and his family. he really has taken on the authorities single—handedly, and i have nothing but admiration for him, but, yes, we are extremely concerned. i have met with azeem rafiq and i hope to meet with him
12:34 pm
and others concerned as part of our work and i will be requesting a copy of the report from the ecb and will be doing so shortly, writing to lord patel at yorkshire. we be doing so shortly, writing to lord patel at yorkshire.— patel at yorkshire. we will get to that report _ patel at yorkshire. we will get to that report in _ patel at yorkshire. we will get to that report in a _ patel at yorkshire. we will get to that report in a moment - patel at yorkshire. we will get to that report in a moment because | that report in a moment because there are a couple of factors worth discussing. just how big a problem is race in english cricket? your report is ongoing. you released that next year —— you release that next year. when you are seeing the latest allegation from irfan amjad, you question how big this issue is, don't you?— question how big this issue is, don't ou? ., ., don't you? indeed. i cannot say how bi it is don't you? indeed. i cannot say how big it is because _ don't you? indeed. i cannot say how big it is because our— don't you? indeed. i cannot say how big it is because our work _ don't you? indeed. i cannot say how big it is because our work has - big it is because our work has only just begun. we are encouraging as many people as possible to come forward with their testimonies, their stories, whether they have suffered from discrimination on account of their race, gender or class. we want to hear from those
12:35 pm
people in order to try to determine what's going on in cricket. what is the state of the culture. how do people... are people able to progress through the game to the elite levels. what are peoples experiences of the talent pathway. that's what we are asking people to come forward with so that we can determine what the reality in cricket is like today and be able to tell that story honestly and arrive at solutions and recommendations. with the issue of race, it isn't just about cricket, it extends to all parts of society. if somebody is going to come forward, azeem rafiq was praised for being a whistle—blower, but how do you protect these people? because anybody who isn't white and knows that even mentioning the subject of race can work against you. you that even mentioning the sub'ect of race can work against youh race can work against you. you are uuite race can work against you. you are quite right- — race can work against you. you are quite right- also. _ race can work against you. you are quite right. also, people _
12:36 pm
race can work against you. you are quite right. also, people will- race can work against you. you are quite right. also, people will be i quite right. also, people will be fearful to talk about any experience of discrimination. there may be people afraid of reprisal. i can say that people can come to us anonymously, they can come to us confidentially, and we will honour that. we will make sure they aren't identifiable in our final report, and i would hope that people would also have confidence in the fact that we are a truly independent body. we will decide what we say. we have decided what we look at. we've developed our own terms of reference. so i hope people would gain confidence from that. in the case of azeem — gain confidence from that. in the case of azeem rafiq, _ gain confidence from that. in the case of azeem rafiq, the - gain confidence from that. in the case of azeem rafiq, the club i case of azeem rafiq, the club settled, obviously, but in terms of the final report, that won't be made public, why not? b5 t the final report, that won't be made public. why not?— public, why not? as i said earlier, i written to _ public, why not? as i said earlier, i written to the _ public, why not? as i said earlier, | written to the ecb _ public, why not? as i said earlier, i written to the ecb requesting . public, why not? as i said earlier, i written to the ecb requesting a i i written to the ecb requesting a copy of the report. i expect to hear
12:37 pm
back from them imminently. i will be writing to yorkshire. the report and what is in that report really matters to this commission. we will be looking at it, whether it is discrimination, how complaints and discipline matters are dealt with. this is the very stuff of our commission. so i will be pushing very hard in orderfor the commission to see that report, reflect on it, and make lasting, practical recommendations that can help to deliver the change that this game desperately, desperately need. that was cindy buts, the chairman for the commission for equity in cricket. —— cindy butts. a man is being assessed in hospital after being injured in a cave complex in south wales. the caver spent more than 50 hours
12:38 pm
trapped underground after he fell at the site in the brecon beacons. more than 200 people from around the uk, worked in shifts to bring him to safety. our wales correspondent, hywel griffith, sent this report from the scene. mission accomplished. after more than two days of painstaking, exhausting work, relief all round. together, these volunteers carried the casualty through an underground assault course of boulders, streams and ledges, the longest stretcher carry ever by a british cave rescue team. it is absolutely amazing. the cooperation, the professionalism. everybody dealt with it. the controllers, down to the grunts on the sharp end, it was just amazing. it's the biggest rescue any of us have ever done, i hope will ever do. the casualty is an experienced caver in his a0s. on saturday, he fell and suffered multiple injuries, but could talk to his rescuers throughout.
12:39 pm
when you consider how long he has been in the cave, how long he has been in a stretcher, he is doing very well indeed. so he's been talking to the medics along the way and they have been having a conversation, but we are waiting for them to come out now. this is what draws enthusiasts here. a sculpted subterranean world, in places almost 300 metres deep. it attracts cavers from across the uk. after 50 hours underground and the efforts of 250 volunteers, the casualty is now safe and on their way to hospital, bringing this rescue operation to a successful conclusion. for the volunteers, days of endeavour and years of training have tonight brought their reward. paul taylor from the gloucester cave rescue group, who was involved in the rescue, described the scale of the operation. it was absolutely
12:40 pm
a brilliant, response, over the days that it took. a massive team effort by everybody and not one person complain. —— a massive team effort by everybody and not one person complained. the guys underground had to up with some pretty hard conditions, lying on the water to get the stretcher over various sections, no complaints from anybody, came out of the cave, rested, and when the request was, can you go back in? yes, we'll go back in. it was brilliant. water companies have been warned they will face "consequences" if they don't reduce the flow of raw sewage being released into england's rivers. it comes after mps voted to accept a government amendment imposing tougher restrictions on the practice. ministers hope it will end a row between the commons and the lords over the issue. but some campaigners say the new rules don't go far enough. the un refugee agency has expressed concern about hundreds of migrants camped out near the belarus
12:41 pm
border with poland. poland says it has blocked an attempt by thousands of migrants to breach its border with belarus. it's also closing a major border crossing. a growing number of migrants — mostly from the middle east — have set up camp nearby. belarus denies poland's accusations that it's trying to provoke a confrontation by encouraging people to force their way across. aru na iyengar reports. as temperatures drop below freezing, migrants from the middle east and africa try to keep warm on the border between belarus and poland, gateway to the eu. it follows angry scenes on monday as hundreds of migrants attacked poland's barbed wire fence, put there to keep them out. poland accuses belarus of orchestrating scenes like this in revenge for western sanctions on minsk over human rights abuses. the us has also weighed in. the united states strongly
12:42 pm
condemns the lukashenko regime's political exploitation and coercion of vulnerable people, and the regime's callous and inhumane facilitation of irregular migration flows across its borders. but the belarusian president denies encouraging them and blames the west for its inhumane treatment of migrants at the border. under international law, poland has to assist anyone seeking asylum, even if they arrived illegally. but for many here, the destination is not poland but beyond. we're not going to poland, we are go to germany. germany is life. no poland! baby cries. germany is now calling for collective action from eu countries. nato has added its voice, accusing belarus of using these people as political pawns. poland is closing its border crossing with belarus here at kuznica. it's also approved plans to build a wall, replacing the razor wire in a bid to stem this human tide.
12:43 pm
aruna iyengar, bbc news. us rapper travis scott is facing multiple lawsuits after at least eight people were killed and hundreds injured in a crush at his texas festival astroworld. one injured concertgoer has accused scott and surprise performer drake of inciting the crowd, and is seeking one million dollars in damages. neither have commented on the lawsuits. scott has said he is working to help the families of the victims — the youngest was just 1a. mark lobel reports. sobbing. too much to bear after losing his brother in the concert crush. you go to a concert to have fun, you don't go to a concert to die. he died saving his fiancee. she was getting hurt, hit left and right. he saved her. she was admitted to the hospital. it cost him his life.
12:44 pm
21—year—old axel acosta was another of the eight people who died that night. the computer scientist travelled alone to attend his first music festival. now, leaving behind a family, devastated. he wanted to provide for his family. he really cares about, he was the first grandkid, he was the oldest one. he always take care of his other cousins and nieces. the crush began around a quarter past nine during travis scott's headline performance in texas on friday night. panic spread fast as thousands were injured. for some of those attending, this two—day outdoor event tragically would be their last. the rapper drake was also on stage at the time of the tragedy and has issued this statement.
12:45 pm
"my heart is broken for the families and friends of those who lost their lives and for anyone who is suffering. i will continue to pray for all of them and will be of service in any way i can." ijust wanted to send out prayers to the ones that was lost last night. travis scott says he is working to help the families of the victims. but several festival goers are suing him, drake and the promoters for damages. all of whom have not yet commented on the lawsuits. attention is turning to what happened to turn this concert into a crime scene. lawyers are already poring over footage as families seekjustice. i ask you, does that look safe? does that look organised, well—run? the way the concert was set up, planned, organised and the way things were happening, were handled, once there
12:46 pm
was a problem, it boggles the mind. alongside multiple civil lawsuits is a police investigation. it's emerged that safety concerns were raised by houston's police chief moments before the concert with travis scott. amidst the hurt, though, is an expressed hope amongst the families of the victims that these deaths will not be in vain by helping improve how concerts like these are managed around the world. mark lobel, bbc news. the eu is expected to remove ukraine from its list of covid—safe countries later following a sustained increase in cases. ukraine s fewer than 1 in 5 ukrainians are double vaccinated ? that s the lowest rate in europe — and today, the health ministry has reported a record daily high of 833 coronavirus—related deaths. from kyiv here s our correspondentjonah fisher.
12:47 pm
in ukraine's hospitals, the alarm bells are ringing. this latest record—breaking covid wave is filling the wards with patients, and the vast majority of them are unvaccinated. this doctor says she is fighting to save the life of a a0—year—old mother of three. three other members of her family are sick. all rejected the vaccine. fewer than one in five ukrainians are double jabbed — the product of deep—rooted scepticism of both doctors and the authorities. last week, hundreds gathered outside parliament to protest against vaccinations. vaccine is poison, it's poisoned. many people now died because they took vaccine. many people are alive now because they took the vaccine, too.
12:48 pm
no, it's not true, it's not true! you're a doctor. yes, i'm a doctor and neurologist. and you're against vaccination? totally. why? because it's not the way to not spread the infection. you must have a choice. right? with cases soaring, new restrictions have been introduced to try and force people to getjabbed. kyiv�*s now in what's known as the red zone which means if you want to travel on public transport, like this bus or on the metro, you have to be vaccinated and have to have the papers to prove it. in practice, there are lots of fake certificates around. we watched the police taking a very gentle approach to enforcing the rules. this woman has no proof
12:49 pm
of vaccination or covid test but she's let off with a warning. so that lady didn't have a vaccination certificate but you let her stay on the bus? "we're mostly here as a preventative measure", he says, "we can't really demand things from people". the tighter rules have led to queues at vaccination centres. ukraine is now desperately trying to catch up as the beds fill up and the number of covid deaths mount. jonah fisher, bbc news, kyiv. a singapore court has paused the execution of a malaysian man convicted of drug smuggling — after he tested positive for covid19. nagaenthran dharmalingam was due to be hanged on wednesday morning and his execution was stayed until further notice. he was arrested in april 2009 for trafficking around a3 grammes of pure heroin, and his lawyers had launched a last—min appeal against the execution arguing that he has limited mental capacity.
12:50 pm
earlier, i spoke to our correspondent nick marsh in singapore about the halting of his execution. nagaenthran dharmalingam was due to be executed tomorrow, barring a last—ditch appeal schedule today. —— barring a last—ditch appeal scheduled today. just moments before that appeal was due to start we had confirmation of this positive covid—19 case, meaning the appeal will be delayed, we don't know when it is due to resume. presumably when he fully recovers. if he loses that appeal the execution will go ahead as scheduled, but this is so controversial here in singapore due to claims of intellectual disability. nagaenthran dharmalingam was assessed by a psychiatrist who gave him an iq score of 69, below 70 is generally considered as indicating a form of intellectual disability, and that was the central thrust
12:51 pm
of the defence case. the government says he is of sound mind, he knew what he was doing and could tell right from wrong, that is what the prosecution is arguing. in terms of what he is accused of doing, that wa of pure heroin strapped to his thigh into singapore, contravening singapore's zero—tolerance drug laws. could trains be the solution to the problems caused by the lorry driver shortage we've been hearing about? more rail freight services are being laid on in the run—up to christmas. our business correspondent nina warhurst visited a depot in peterborough to find out more. good morning from gb railfreight. this is the third biggest rail freight company in the country. containers like this are sent all around the uk, coming in from the continent,
12:52 pm
and the idea is that the further and faster they go via the railway is the less need there is for hgv drivers, so already we are seeing extra services being laid on in order to secure a.5 million bottles of wine in time for christmas. tesco are upping their rail freight use from 65,000 containers per year to 95,000 by the end of 2021. and by doing that they say they will save literally tens of millions of road miles because it is betterfor emissions. so, each train like this, it is estimated, takes 60 hgv lorries off the road, making sure there is about one eighth of the emissions of air travel and about a third of the emissions of road travel. there are issues in terms of infrastructure and logistics. let's speak to stuart who works here. good morning. tell me about the increased demand you've seen as we come out of covid and because of this shortage of drivers.
12:53 pm
post—covid we have seen a 25% demand in what we need. trains are running fuller, longer, and more frequent all the way across the network. so, you're needed more but when it comes to the infrastructure you are competing for space on the railway lines, especially with increased passenger numbers. how does that work? we are an open access operator, so we compete with every operator, passenger orfreight. we applied for pathing scheduling, through the peak, and we get access. so you think they can both work in tandem as we see an increase going on the rails from the roads? absolutely. a bit like with hgv drivers it takes time, doesn't it, to train up drivers and make sure you have the talent coming through? it does take up time. we pre—empted that curve a little bit, we have a state—of—the—art building behind us that is new to gb railfreight. it's got a purpose—built training facility. next year, through 2022, we've got quite a considerable number of drivers and ground staff being promoted through the business to fill those gaps.
12:54 pm
so, you think this is the future forfreight? absolutely the future for freight. so many agendas, whether it be the green agenda the carbon neutral agenda, more capacity. and the good news is these extra services have already begun. just yesterday around 6a3,000 bottles of wine made their way from the thames estuary up to the midlands using these extra services which have been put on, so the hope is that long—term as we go out of this period, with the struggle to retain people as hgv drivers may be it will be tipped onto the railways instead. tens of thousands of ceramic poppies which were first displayed at the tower of london, are being given a permanent home in manchester. the original exhibition drew millions of visitors when it marked the centenary of world war one. mairead smyth reports. almost 13,000 ceramic poppies now in their permanent place. the wave and weeping window
12:55 pm
together in a new display at imperial war museum. these were among nearly 900,000 poppies that made up the blood swept lands and seas of red installation at the tower of london in 201a. each poppy representing a life lost among the british and colonial forces on the front line of world war i. poppies are something we naturally associate with conflict, and that has its roots in the first world war. and we think of that conflict as one of devastation and destruction. but poppies were actually one of the few sources of brightness and colour in these devastated landscapes on the western front. more than five million people visited the original artwork marking the centenary of the war.
12:56 pm
the sections were exhibited around the country, including at st george's hall in liverpool and the silk mill in derby. the wave and the weeping window were bought for the nation in 2015 and donated to imperial war museum's permanent collection three years later. from the beginning to now, it's always needed to be, for me, a beautiful sight to see. and then you dive into it with the story behind it of the death and the destruction and people's sacrifice, what they fought for, and we still do. today, the sections are combined in a new design. poppies will open to the public tomorrow. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. skies like this for many of us for the rest of the day. a little bit of rain around but generally speaking it'll stay dry for most. and it is relatively mild out there.
12:57 pm
it was a mild night last night and this coming night will be mild across england and wales. this is the weather front, to the south that is where the milder air is, to the north, that is where we have the colder north atlantic air but it is drier and brighter. for scotland, northern ireland, and the far north of england, brighter skies or clearer skies into the evening hours, whereas in the south, often cloudy without breaks of rain. that is how it will stay through the evening and overnight across wales and most of england. overcast, bits and pieces of drizzle, the rain will come and go, 15 degrees by day, maybe 11 degrees by night, so not much of a drop. whereas in scotland, around three degrees in aberdeen with a touch of frost out in the glens. here is the weather front and the forecast for tomorrow, it doesn't move much towards the south, it wants to slide along itself. we keep the cloudy skies and the little pieces of rain, very mild again, 15 degrees,
12:58 pm
but for the lake district and northern ireland, central scotland, some sunshine around. here is the weather map for thursday. this is what we call a ridge of high pressure. generally that brings settled conditions. i think light winds, some sunshine around, the wind is coming from the south and the north there, in between not much going on. i think it'll be a fine day for many of us. 11 degrees in glasgow, 1a degrees in london. then things start to change us we had to friday. —— then things start to change as we had to friday. low pressure swings in. lots of wind and rain. this low could shoot north, it could be a bit further south, so exactly where these blobs of rain will be on friday is difficult to say for any one location but the broad message is there will be low pressure in the vicinity of the uk so things will be generally unsettled but even with low pressure we can sometimes get some decent weather. we could see some dry conditions in birmingham at least in the middle of the day on friday. the outlook for the rest of the week
12:59 pm
and into the weekend, overall it stays pretty mild. goodbye.
1:00 pm
all frontline nhs staff in england will have to be fully vaccinated against covid—19 by next spring, unless they're medically exempt. the government will confirm the move this afternoon — it's thought up to 100,000 staff have not yet had a jab. it's good news in terms of being able to ensure that we protect staff, patients and visitors from nhs members of staff having infections. but health unions say people should be persuaded to get vaccinated, not forced. we'll be asking what's behind the decision. also this lunchtime... the mother of the ten—year—old boy killed by a dog in south wales pays tribute to her beautiful sweet son. neighbours describe the scene in the street after the attack.
1:01 pm
i seen the body of the...

34 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on