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tv   Newsday  BBC News  November 9, 2021 12:00am-12:31am GMT

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after 600 days, the united states finally reopens its borders to much of the world population. borders to much of the world inundation-— borders to much of the world --oulation. �* , a, l,, population. airlines are hoping for many more _ population. airlines are hoping for many more scenes - population. airlines are hoping for many more scenes like - population. airlines are hoping for many more scenes like this in the coming weeks. it is a major milestone for separated families and it's a lifeline to the tourism industry at of the winter holiday season. barack obama urges _ winter holiday season. barack obama urges the _ winter holiday season. barack obama urges the young - winter holiday season. barackl obama urges the young people winter holiday season. barack - obama urges the young people of the road to stay angry over claimant as he speaks of the un summit in glasgow. the us rapper travis scott is facing multiple lawsuits after at least eight people were killed and hundreds injured in a crash
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at his texas festival. and the dress worn by amy winehouse during herfinal stage performance during her final stage performance sells during herfinal stage performance sells for 16 times its original estimate at an auction in la.— its original estimate at an auction in la. the prices were resent auction in la. the prices were present that _ auction in la. the prices were present that we've _ auction in la. the prices were present that we've gone - auction in la. the prices were present that we've gone from | present that we've gone from previous options for people like marilyn monroe, so she is just a global icon as marilyn monroe was. hello and welcome to the programme. after 600 days, the united states is finally reopened its borders to much of the worlds population as long as they are fully vaccinated.
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there have been emotional reunions forfamilies there have been emotional reunions for families and friends separated from the start of the pandemic. from new york. cheering that first embrace, that flood of relief. none of them could have predicted they'd spend such a long time apart. the international arrivals floor of new york's kennedy airport sprang to life with heart wrenching transatlantic reunions as passengers deplaned the first flights from london heathrow. and ran into the arms of loved ones. it's the best thing ever in the whole world. it's been so emotional and it has for millions of families all over the world but this is the best thing that's ever happened to me. sisters gill and louise haven't seen each other in two years. thank you so much. what are you guys going to do now? just keep hugging each other! not being able to touch my sister and them notj hugging my children has been the hardest part of it all. -
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so many like the matthews have missed out on precious moments they can never get back. so they've missed the birth of my son, so his three and a half months now, so finally they get to him. and they haven't seen him since he was crawling and now he is a fully working toddler with opinions and so it's going to be really fun for them to spend all this time with him. airlines are hoping for many more scenes like this in the coming weeks. it's a major milestone for separated families and it's a lifeline to the tourism industry right ahead of the winter holiday season. there is a much more, i think, pragmatic framework in place which is becoming more universal to allow travel to exist alongside the pandemic. the ban was symbolically lifted with a dual take—off between virgin atlantic and british airways. even with a watchful eye on covid case rises in europe, they're optimistic they can avoid any more turbulent family separations. nada tawfik, bbc news, new york.
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for more information on those travel rules in the united states and how they might affect you, just visit our website at bbc. another headline, the former us president says that the world has to step up now to tackle climate change before it is too late. speaking at the summit in glasgow he said wealthy countries need to work with island nations. adding that young people had a right to be frustrated. deeper floods. biggerfires. higher temperatures. climate change is being felt around the world, so the talks in glasgow are notjust about the future, they're about coping with a hotter and more hostile planet right now.
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pushing for an urgent response is the former us president barack obama. getting a rock star reception here and saying it's not too late. our planet has been wounded by our actions. those wounds won't be healed today or tomorrow or the next. but they can be healed. and addressing young activists, he appealed to them to keep up the pressure for change. the most important energy in this movement is coming from young people. applause. they have more at stake in this fight than anybody else. you are right to be frustrated. folks of my generation have not done enough to deal
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with a potentially cataclysmic problem that you now stand to inherit. many young people have suffered cataclysm already. a typhoon in the philippines eight years ago claimed 6000 lives, and one survivor, the daughter of a fisherman, fear is more violent weather to come. i have seen death myself, i've seen my family struggle. i still have so many dreams in this lifetime. i'm just 2a years old. i still want to have my family. i still want to have children. but i don't even know if they will have good future ahead of them. and with emotions running so high, activists here say even mr obama has broken a promise, to get climate aid to the poorest countries. we don't want to talk to him, what we need is action. he already knows what we want, he already knows what the people want and that is the us$100 billion pledge that he pledged in 2009 in copenhagen. more and more people are enduring the kind
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of extremes that scientists have long warned about as the planet heats up. so this is a chance to prevent a bad situation from getting worse. the british prime minister borisjohnson has been accused of running scared from a debate in parliament about the regulations that govern in peace. government attempts to change the system and set aside critical rulings against a former conservative mp caused outrage among the opposition parties and many tory mps. a court in singapore has been put on hold for the imminent execution of the malaysian drug smuggler campaigners say has limited mental capacity. he was scheduled to be home on wednesday for attempting to bring a small amount of heroin into singapore 12 months ago. poland has deployed extra troops along its eastern
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frontier with belarus and will close a major border crossing as it attempts to stop thousands of migrants trying to enter the country. worthless is belarus is trying to provoke a major confrontation by encouraging people to force their way across. belarus denies that. the new chairman of yorkshire county cricket club has said that the former captain azeem rafiq should be praised for his bravery and blowing the whistle on the racism he suffered as a player. lord patel has been drafted in through the greatest turmoil and its history also apologised to mister azeem rafiq. the player says he has hopes there will be change. us rapper travis scott is facing multiple lawsuits after what happened at his texas festival. 0ne injured concertgoer has accused scott
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and drake into inciting the crowd. scott has said he is working to help the families of the victims and the youngest of whom was just 1a. we can go straight to houston now to talk to tony, the representative of a number of concertgoers caught up a number of concertgoers caught up in the crush in a suit against both travis scott and drake and joins me now. it is wonderful to have you on newsday and i really appreciate the time given i know you must be extremely busy. you are representing a number of concertgoers throughout this ordeal. how are they feeling in the first instance after what must�*ve been an unimaginably horrifying experience? today, i met with my clients to go to the funeral homes and view their son's body. their son was crushed by the crowd,
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crushed so bad that he went into cardiac arrest, fell and then was trampled and so, obviously, they're not feeling very well at all. the other clients include an individual who suffered a compound fracture and was just released from the hospital today who will not walk for many, many months and various other types of injuries. this was an incident that should've never happened. it was foreseeable and we're hoping that we can do some things here in the united states and preps across the world with regard to how concerts are held, how they are planned, how they are organised so it never again.— so it never again. tony, i am 'ust so so it never again. tony, i am just so sorry _ so it never again. tony, i am just so sorry for _ so it never again. tony, i am just so sorry for the - just so sorry for the experiences that your clients have gone through and what is an unimaginable tragedy for people involved in this. can you talk, just the experiences that some of the might have had
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when they were in that crowd. caught up in that crush? first off, the planning _ caught up in that crush? first off, the planning was - caught up in that crush? first off, the planning wasjust - off, the planning wasjust terrible. even when the gates were opened in the afternoon, about two o'clock in the afternoon before the concerts that night, the participants in the concertgoers just crash the gates, crash the barriers and just went through. many people were not ticketed. many people were not ticketed. many people were not ticketed. many people were not supposed even be there. even before travis scott, this rapper, he went on the police chief indicated that the police chief indicated that the police chief indicated that the police there were concerned about security, concerned about mister scott inciting the crowd. the crowd was incredibly unruly. it is nine o'clock at night. the people who are near the front began to feel the crowd pushed forward and there nowhere for them to go. they
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can go right, they cannot go left and there was no way to go forward and there was slowly just squeezed to death and even after people were being carried away, mister scott continued to sing and continue to go through his set event after individuals rushed onto the stage and pleaded with the individuals who are running the concert to stop the concert, to help people because in some cases, people because in some cases, people were piled up eight to ten deep and it was terrific. many have said it was like being in hell.— being in hell. tony, i understand - being in hell. tony, i understand we - being in hell. tony, i understand we are l being in hell. tony, i. understand we are still being in hell. tony, i- understand we are still in the middle of trying to figure out where the investigation does go from here and those multiple lawsuits as well. what happens next with your case? em lawsuits as well. what happens next with your case? an autopsy has been done _ next with your case? an autopsy has been done on _ next with your case? an autopsy has been done on them - next with your case? an autopsy has been done on them from - has been done on them from washington state. his parents
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will escort his body back to washington to have a funeral and burial. the lawsuit has been filed, we will pursue the lawsuit aggressively and we suspect we will find all of the responsible parties and we are hoping for a sea change in the way the concerts are held in this particular entertainer, travis scott has been arrested on two separate occasions for inciting the crowd and encouraging people to pay no attention to security or police and that is what happened on this night. people were well aware of the entity that runs these types of concerts all of these types of concerts all of the united states is called live nation. they were the same concert entity that was involved in the las vegas shooting. there will be hundreds upon hundreds of people filing lawsuits, we have
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to make sure the people get treatment and are buried with respect and will continue to proceed. scott has said he intends to help the families of the victims and the investigation is ongoing. if you want to get in touch with me on any of the stress of you've seen so far on newsday, i am on twitter. snapping up some amy winehouse memorabilia. selling for millions at an auction.
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the bombastic establishment outside of donald trump testified the pollsters to take the keys to the oval office. i feel so great about the election results. i feel so great about the election results. i voted for him because _ election results. i voted for him because i _ election results. i voted for him because i feel- election results. i voted for him because i feel he - election results. i voted for him because i feel he cares about— him because i feel he cares about the country.- him because i feel he cares about the country. keeping the candidates _ about the country. keeping the candidates name _ about the country. keeping the candidates name always - about the country. keeping the candidates name always in - about the country. keeping the candidates name always in the| candidates name always in the public— candidates name always in the public eye _ candidates name always in the public eye that _ candidates name always in the public eye that counts. - candidates name always in the| public eye that counts. success or failure — public eye that counts. success or failure depends _ public eye that counts. success or failure depends not - public eye that counts. success or failure depends not only- public eye that counts. success or failure depends not only on. or failure depends not only on public— or failure depends not only on public display, _ or failure depends not only on public display, but _ or failure depends not only on public display, but on - or failure depends not only on public display, but on the - public display, but on the local— public display, but on the local campaign— public display, but on the i local campaign headquarters public display, but on the - local campaign headquarters and the heavy— local campaign headquarters and the heavy routine _ local campaign headquarters and the heavy routine work— local campaign headquarters and the heavy routine work of- local campaign headquarters and the heavy routine work of their . the heavy routine work of their women — the heavy routine work of their women volunteers. _ the heavy routine work of their women volunteers.— women volunteers. berliners from both — women volunteers. berliners from both east _ women volunteers. berliners from both east and _ women volunteers. berliners from both east and west - women volunteers. berliners i from both east and west danced around the liberated territory and with no blade to stop them, it was not long before the first attempts were they to destroy the structure itself. dominating the palestinian cause for so long has died. palestinian authority has declared a state of mourning. s after 17 years of discussion was meat with an outburst of jov- was meat with an outburst of joy. with ministers who long thought only grudgingly accepted among the ranks of clergy, suddenly felt welcome.
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this is newsday still on the bbc, our headlines. after 600 days, the united states is finally reopened its borders to much of the worlds population. barack obama urges the young people of the world to stay angry over climate as he speaks in the un summit in glasgow. after more than a year and a half, parts of australia has started to re—up into the world with fully vaccinated citizens now able to arrive in new south wales and victoria without quarantine. but it's not the same picture about the rest of the country. a number of states are taking a more cautious approach to reopening for submitting some australians cannot travel to the other side of the world and back, but won't be able to visit parts of their own country. discuss how
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things might play out between australia fractured state, we can cross and join professor martin who is an expert on politics and international relations. it is great to have you on the programme professor. the first instance, just talk us through the fact that australians can go overseas, some of them, but cannot travel to visit friends and relatives in their own country? to austria. _ in their own country? trr austria, there's too australians at the moment. to most popular states. the event covid—19 in the states and of experience lockdown associated with it and they're finally opening up to the road as well as to each other. and then there's other states, including my own in western australia which have not experienced covid—19 and there's some apprehension and some of the states to open up to other places and don't have any internal restrictions and they can do as they like, they are lockdown free and so, they are
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very nervous. the consequence of that has largely said that the covid—19 settings, domestically, rather than the national government and there is very different approaches. we found many leaders a couple months ago and they have interpreted it very differently. yet these very strange situations where you can travel overseas to new south wales, but you cannot travel to queensland despite the fact that most people live on the board and it's between new south wales and queensland. we are very big country and don't have many people living in the middle. so, the distances between some of our states as well.— distances between some of our states as well. yes indeed. how do ou states as well. yes indeed. how do you see _ states as well. yes indeed. how do you see this _ states as well. yes indeed. how do you see this lasting. - states as well. yes indeed. how do you see this lasting. as - states as well. yes indeed. how do you see this lasting. as you i do you see this lasting. as you described it, these two different australians. these two different countries in some
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respects? two different countries in some resects? m, two different countries in some resects? , ., , , respects? most states will be 0 enin: respects? most states will be opening up — respects? most states will be opening up before _ respects? most states will be opening up before christmasl respects? most states will be . opening up before christmas and we've got about another month and a half of these and here in western australia, we have to wait a bit longer and they're talking late february before opening up and that's most of her summer and when you're in the other states, the most popular states in australia and here in the west, there will be from them. it does look like they'll be changing any time soon and it's very high pressures have 90% of vaccinations before the change. yes, just briefly, what do you think of covid—19 for australian politics the way the separate states have approached theissue separate states have approached the issue of covid—19? separate states have approached the issue of covid-19?_ the issue of covid-19? politics is laruel the issue of covid-19? politics is largely been _ the issue of covid-19? politics is largely been dominated - the issue of covid-19? politics is largely been dominated for| is largely been dominated for decades by the national government and they've had a lot of power and authority but
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during covid—19, we have seen a state governments and territory governments can flex their muscles and implement policies of their own and that may well play out in the future as the federal governments wrangle an clash over policy settings. i feel they'll be a bit of a legacy. feel they'll be a bit of a lea . . ., feel they'll be a bit of a legacy-— feel they'll be a bit of a lea . . . feel they'll be a bit of a lea . ., . ., legacy. thank you so much for “oininr legacy. thank you so much for joining us _ legacy. thank you so much for joining us from _ legacy. thank you so much for joining us from the _ legacy. thank you so much for joining us from the university | joining us from the university in australia. millions of people in afghanistan are facing starvation and what is becoming the worst humanitarian crisis on earth. that is the warning from the united nations. the head of the world food programme since the country faces being turned into hell on earth following drought and withdrawal of us and allied troops.
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winter's coming, and it looks like being a bad one. the camels are on the move to warmer areas. we're heading west, out of kabul, through the taliban road blocks. it's not long before we reach the snow. in this district, food aid is being distributed. flour to make bread. everyone here knows that things are likely to get really bad in a few weeks. "there's a real possibly we'll be frozen this winter," this man tells me. these people are so poor they can't afford to buy food orfuel for heating. a humanitarian disaster could bring the taliban down, so they're cooperating with the international aid agencies, even if they don't like them. the head of the world food programme, visiting kabul, doesn't mince his words. the winter months are coming, we're coming out of a drought. the next six months are going to be catastrophic, it is going to be hell on earth.
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we reach bamiyan, an agricultural centre which has been hit by drought, like many other parts of afghanistan. and of course, there was an infamous taliban crime here. a couple of hundred yards along the cliff from the place where the statues of the buddhas used to stand, until the taliban destroyed them, a woman called fatima lives. she's a widow, raising her seven friendly, intelligent children on her own. before the taliban took over, she got by with occasional food aid and the money she and her eldest boy earned from weeding the fields and herding sheep. but the drought has put an end to all that and food aid doesn't reach here. within weeks, they could all be starving. some women sell their daughters for marriage, i say, would she? "if it was absolutely necessary to keep everyone alive", she answers, but she'd hate it. listening to all this,
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it was hard not think of your own family. imagine if this was your little girl or little boy or your grandchild, about to starve to death, you would do everything you possibly could. and when there's $400 trillion worth of wealth on the earth, shame on us that we let any child die from hunger. fatima's children leave for school, those who are allowed to go, like millions in this country, their lives are under real threat. the next few months will decide. under way and no further tighten the presidents crib on power and set the long—term ambitions. a key resolution celebrating the party's achievements in his 100 years of existence. jack is director
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at the centre of the study of contemporary china at the university of pennsylvania. this resolution will be the culmination of something he has been doing for several years now, to elevate him into the rarefied air of mao and deng. it is notjust the resolution of party history, and mao's was before 1949. but it is also going to be the occasion which was also going to be the occasion which will see the next party conference where xi jinping will begin his third term as top leader. professor, in terms of how popular xijinping is as a leader, both within the party and with the people, is it possible to say, given the strict control over media, in china? it certainly is hard to know but there are certainly signs of his popularity with a large area of the chinese population. this is a controlled media environment and in that
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environment, xijinping is achieving the kind of attention and adulation that we have not seen since mao. there certainly has been the attempt to raise xi jinping to the pantheon of the popular imagination of people all over the place and they have declared the leadership core and he has had his thought elevated on par thought elevated on par with mao and deng it's something that we have not seen in many years. the singer we re were this a month before her death at age 27. the director of the auction house stabilities we've got from previous auctions like marilyn monroe.
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the prices were present that we've gone from previous options for people like marilyn monroe, so she is just a global icon as marilyn monroe was. the train to keep the memory alive and trying to preserve her legacy. alive and trying to preserve her legacy-— her legacy. that is it rest, stay bbc _ her legacy. that is it rest, stay bbc news. _ hello. we have some pretty quiet weather to come across the uk in the next few days. but the end of the we could definitely offer is something rather more dramatic. for now though, it's about light winds and those wins for now though, it's about light winds and those winds coming in from the southwest or the west will bring some relatively mild air. this amber colour behind me showing air that's been pulled in quite a long way south across the atlantic indicating quite a warm feel actually to tuesday across parts of england and wales. you may have noticed some colder air to the far north of the uk, temperatures will struggle to get the double figures across northern most scotland with some squalid showers here. elsewhere, we are looking at i think at the low to mid teens, there will be some rain to the day for northern
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england and wales. but we should see practice guides north of the front for much of scotland and northern ireland and to the south across southern and eastern england. and in this front is set to stick around through wednesday and thursday, slowly making its way south across the uk. turning things quite murky, i think, across southern and eastern england into the small hours of wednesday, but it will stay very mild here. where is that slightly colder to sneaks further south whereas that slightly colder to sneaks further south into scotland into the small hours of wednesday, we could see a patchy frost inside some of the sheltered glens to the north. here's our front on wednesday, still lurking to the south of the uk. it's looking much clearer further north for scotland and northern ireland, there should be some sunshine, just the chance of a few scattered showers in the far north and west. some sunshine for northern england and wales and an improved picture on tuesday. whereas for southern and eastern counties of england, it will be much grayer, much gloomier and there's a chance some patchy rain on and off. and then for thursday, still the remnants of that
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weather front close to the south of the uk could mean some thicker cloud around here for a time and a little bit of rain and actually for thursday, we are largely focusing on a ridge of high pressure and a lot of fine weather and light winds. i think potentially some rain getting into northern ireland by the end of the day and the wind started to kick up and here's why. this area of low pressure looks like it's really deep to the end of the week and come swinging our way from the atlantic. quite a bit of uncertainty as to when and where exactly on friday that low will move in, but do keep it in the back of your mind as the potential for strong winds on friday.
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this is bbc news. we will have the headline at all the main news stories at the top of the hour as newsday continues straight after hardtalk. welcome to hardtalk. i'm stephen sackur. what do we go to the cinema for? well, for many, the answer seems to be escape. what other explanation could there be for the seemingly endless supply of franchise—friendly superhero films? my guest today makes films based on an entirely
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different premise. forfive decades, acclaimed british director mike leigh has

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