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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 8, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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the united states has reopened its land and air borders to travellers from much of the world, 20 months after a ban was first imposed because of the pandemic. fully vaccinated visitors will be allowed in. the former us president, barack obama, has told the cop 20 six summit that the world isn't doing anywhere near enough to fight climate change. he called on people to pressure governments and companies to take stronger action. the british prime minister has been accused of running scared from a parliamentary debate about the rules that govern mps. it follows the furore over the government's handling of a former minister, found guilty of breaking lobbying rules. the new head of yorkshire county cricket club has apologised to former captain azeem rafiq after his experiences of racism at the club. lord kamlesh patel said the club's investigation into the allegations were badly handled and seismic change is needed.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me arejonathan walker, political editor of the birmingham post and mail and sam lister, deputy political editor of the daily express. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... several of the papers have the mp standards row on the front page. the guardian splashes on keir starmer�*s criticism of borisjohnson. the times has a slightly different take they lead with criticism of the prime minister by tory mps, calling for him to apologise and show leadership. the independent highlights borisjohnson�*s absence from the commons during today's debate the metro has the same story their headline "i'm a prime minister get me out of here!" the daily mail leads
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with the behaviour of the mp geoffrey cox saying he had a lucrativejob in the british virgin islands. the financial times has barack obama's comments at cop26 saying young people should continue to be angry about climate change. the telegraph has figures suggesting as many as 11 thousand people may have died from covid caught while in hospitalfor other things. while the sun splashes on a backstage row at strictly between katya jones and adam peaty. there we go. we will come back to that a little later. jonathan, do want to kick us off? let's begin with that story mentioned on the front of theguardian. keir starmer is remarked that borisjohnson is leading the tories through the sewer. , , ., .,
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sewer. this is to do with the resignation _ sewer. this is to do with the resignation of _ sewer. this is to do with the resignation of owen - sewer. this is to do with the i resignation of owen patterson, sewer. this is to do with the - resignation of owen patterson, the conservative mp who an inquiry found he had been lobbying on behalf of businesses that also employed him as a consultant. the prime minister tried to help mister patterson, ordered mps to vote against suspending him from the house of commons. it backfired rather horribly and 8pm didn't you turn clearly keir starmer thinks this is... summer using strong language saying the prime minister is leading the party through the sewers. really put the pressure on him. there was a debate in the house today in which apm failed to turn up to. the prime minister. with the added sense that the prime minister is running from the prime minister is running from the issue. i think his decision not to was a mistake it will be seen as a mistake in the future. the guardian story has a really interesting line because they link
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this affair to a possible inquiry into who paid or how the refurbishment of the prime ministers downing street flat was paid for. and they have keir starmer suggesting that actually mister johnson had an ulterior motive for trying to interfere with the systems in place in parliament for investigating mps that he was trying investigating mps that he was trying in some way to interfere over possible inquiry into his own finances and his own, the fact that he borrowed money from the conservative party for a short period. the guardian moving the story on and possibly opening up a new very adult line of inquiry for the prime minister.— new very adult line of inquiry for the prime minister. sam, i suppose is not surprising _ the prime minister. sam, i suppose is not surprising that _ the prime minister. sam, i suppose is not surprising that labour - the prime minister. sam, i suppose is not surprising that labour would i is not surprising that labour would go so hard this because 30 years ago now it was the shadow of sleaze that did it forjohn majors government. absolutely. that tories lee's label,
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people _ absolutely. that tories lee's label, people still remember today, that is what the _ people still remember today, that is what the public associate with that will be _ what the public associate with that will be a _ what the public associate with that will be a worry for number ten if this taci— will be a worry for number ten if this tact starts to stick. i think what _ this tact starts to stick. i think what you — this tact starts to stick. i think what you see there is keir starmer making _ what you see there is keir starmer making hey— what you see there is keir starmer making hey while he's got the opportunity to do. as we've also seen _ opportunity to do. as we've also seen conservative mp seven unhappy with the _ seen conservative mp seven unhappy with the way this is all been handled~ _ with the way this is all been handled. and they are feeling forced into a _ handled. and they are feeling forced into a vote _ handled. and they are feeling forced into a vote that they didn't actually— into a vote that they didn't actually want to take part in. those that didn't — actually want to take part in. those that didn't actually rebelled and spoken— that didn't actually rebelled and spoken out today to say boris johnson — spoken out today to say boris johnson should have turned up to commons — johnson should have turned up to commons today, apologises up instead stephen _ commons today, apologises up instead stephen barclay appeared on behalf of the _ stephen barclay appeared on behalf of the government. he talked about regret— of the government. he talked about regret at— of the government. he talked about regret at the way he did been handled — regret at the way he did been handled but did it go as far as a full apology. handled but did it go as far as a fullapology. i handled but did it go as far as a full apology. i think
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dissatisfaction on the backbenchers tonight _ dissatisfaction on the backbenchers tonight. we dissatisfaction on the backbenchers toniaht. ~ , tonight. we will stay with the sub'ect tonight. we will stay with the subject from _ tonight. we will stay with the subject from your _ tonight. we will stay with the subject from your own - tonight. we will stay with the subject from your own paper| tonight. we will stay with the i subject from your own paper at tonight. we will stay with the - subject from your own paper at the absence of borisjohnson and the absence of borisjohnson and the absence of borisjohnson and the absence of an apology. is that causing real unease between tory mps do you think? i causing real unease between tory mps do you think?— do you think? i think they are upset about the whole _ do you think? i think they are upset about the whole debacle. _ do you think? i think they are upset about the whole debacle. just - do you think? i think they are upset about the whole debacle. just from | about the whole debacle. just from start to _ about the whole debacle. just from start to finish, just the way it's been _ start to finish, just the way it's been handled, they are very upset about— been handled, they are very upset about it _ been handled, they are very upset about it i— been handled, they are very upset about it. i think you'll find certainly— about it. i think you'll find certainly was some of the 2019 take that they— certainly was some of the 2019 take that they were already feeling a little _ that they were already feeling a little bit — that they were already feeling a little bit on certain about things are playing out with the government and the _ are playing out with the government and the fact that they felt very hurt by— and the fact that they felt very hurt by numberten and the fact that they felt very hurt by number ten away from this issue _ hurt by number ten away from this issue that — hurt by number ten away from this issue that they got things they got to get— issue that they got things they got to get on— issue that they got things they got to get on with it and do in order to keep— to get on with it and do in order to keep their— to get on with it and do in order to keep their seats next time around. not purely— keep their seats next time around. not purely for self interest reason but they— not purely for self interest reason but they want to get on to make progress in their constituencies, they want— progress in their constituencies, they want to get on with this
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levelling up agenda. and they struggled to get in contact with number— struggled to get in contact with number ten, struggled to get in contact with numberten, they struggled to get in contact with number ten, they traditional channels— number ten, they traditional channels of backbenchers deal with number _ channels of backbenchers deal with number ten of getting their views heard _ number ten of getting their views heard have all been cut off a little bit. heard have all been cut off a little bit there's — heard have all been cut off a little bit. there's been quite a lot of frustration _ bit. there's been quite a lot of frustration anyway. so when you have this on— frustration anyway. so when you have this on top— frustration anyway. so when you have this on top of that they really are not the _ this on top of that they really are not the happiest bunch at the moment _ not the happiest bunch at the moment. i not the happiest bunch at the moment. ., not the happiest bunch at the moment. . ., , a , not the happiest bunch at the moment. . ., , , , moment. i wanted to pick this up with jonathan. _ moment. i wanted to pick this up with jonathan. in _ moment. i wanted to pick this up with jonathan. in terms - moment. i wanted to pick this up with jonathan. in terms of- moment. i wanted to pick this up with jonathan. in terms of what l moment. i wanted to pick this up i with jonathan. in terms of what they are saying, is there... do you think there's a generational question here between the tories and those that have been around for quite a long time? i think of people like we'd say in the cotswold and the mps around that leave here kind of central england, utica people up in some of the constituencies around birmingham who have been mps for a long time and who have gotten used to way of working. and the new
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people on their own benches are coming in insane actually, times of change. i coming in insane actually, times of chance. ~' coming in insane actually, times of chance. ~ ., ., , coming in insane actually, times of chance. ~ . ., , change. i think sam made a very good oint. the change. i think sam made a very good point. the newer— change. i think sam made a very good point. the newer mps _ change. i think sam made a very good point. the newer mps they _ change. i think sam made a very good point. the newer mps they know - change. i think sam made a very good point. the newer mps they know they | point. the newer mps they know they can't take their seats for granted. they can't take it for granted that there are places that onlyjust started voting party in the first five maybe ten years. they have to show that they're delivering for the constituencies. there is talk about the northern mps when you talk about the northern mps when you talk about the intake. there is a research group which is a sort of trade union of northern mps that have got together to really push for the north and push for investments of the north. what you're actually seeing in the west midlands area is mps forming their own similar group. they haven't officially launched it yet but it's mps particularly in the backcountry area are forming their own sort of midlands group of conservative mps to push investments in the region. and they are talking
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about often smaller scale projects such as the new rail owner but a local rail line and that sort of thing. they know that they need to show that they are delivering otherwise they are going to get kicked out. i otherwise they are going to get kicked out-— kicked out. i was 'ust going to brin: us kicked out. i was 'ust going to bring us to _ kicked out. i wasjust going to bring us to touching _ kicked out. i wasjust going to bring us to touching on - kicked out. i wasjust going to bring us to touching on the i kicked out. i wasjust going to i bring us to touching on the front of the sun. we've dealt with the sun front page which is not the main story but it is on the front page. a little column on the left of the front page which is 12 mps coin in 3.5 million. we got a print out. i was looking at the story most is on the inside. but it is quite striking. the top earner in 2019 was sir geoffrey cox. not surprisingly, we knew he was very successful barrister put up for 100,000 pounds of year with a law firm whiles health secretary savage javits of year with a law firm whiles health secretary savagejavits while he was backbencher and he raked in
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366,000 during what's described as only a brief spell on the backbenchers. mil only a brief spell on the backbenchers. �* , ~ , backbenchers. all these mps will insist that they _ backbenchers. all these mps will insist that they are _ backbenchers. all these mps will insist that they are working i backbenchers. all these mps will insist that they are working very | insist that they are working very hard _ insist that they are working very hard for— insist that they are working very hard for their constituents and their— hard for their constituents and their outside activities don't stay in the _ their outside activities don't stay in the way— their outside activities don't stay in the way or take away from the constituency work. it's hard to certain — constituency work. it's hard to certain if— constituency work. it's hard to certain if that really can be true. they— certain if that really can be true. they pay— certain if that really can be true. they pay huge sums of money, eye watering _ they pay huge sums of money, eye watering sums of money that some of us can't _ watering sums of money that some of us can't imagine ever being paid. and they— us can't imagine ever being paid. and they must be putting in some hours _ and they must be putting in some hours of— and they must be putting in some hours of work into achieving those sums~ _ hours of work into achieving those sums it _ hours of work into achieving those sums. it doesn't give people confidence in the mp5. i think people — confidence in the mp5. i think people really hate to see it, to put this crudely, mps at paid huge sellers — this crudely, mps at paid huge sellers are ready. some people would say of— sellers are ready. some people would say of the _ sellers are ready. some people would say of the tape to the top of my head _ say of the tape to the top of my head ethic— say of the tape to the top of my head ethic it's about £83,000. some people _ head ethic it's about £83,000. some people will— head ethic it's about £83,000. some people will say will maybe mps
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should — people will say will maybe mps should be paid more, it's very important _ should be paid more, it's very importantjob. if you are the head teacher— importantjob. if you are the head teacher of— importantjob. if you are the head teacher of a — importantjob. if you are the head teacher of a major school you might be paid _ teacher of a major school you might be paid more than that. perhaps mps should _ be paid more than that. perhaps mps should get— be paid more than that. perhaps mps should get paid a bit more. when people _ should get paid a bit more. when people see these huge sums of money ithink— people see these huge sums of money i think it _ people see these huge sums of money i think it makes people feel their mps are — i think it makes people feel their mps are living on a different planet to the _ mps are living on a different planet to the rest— mps are living on a different planet to the rest of us. the mps are living on a different planet to the rest of us.— to the rest of us. the sun calls them the _ to the rest of us. the sun calls them the dirty _ to the rest of us. the sun calls them the dirty dozen. - to the rest of us. the sun calls them the dirty dozen. doesn't| to the rest of us. the sun calls i them the dirty dozen. doesn't say they've done anything dirty or wrong and certainly nothing that breaches the rules but it's very difficult if you're a constituent of one of these mps and you want to go along on a friday constituency surgery and then you realise there is a want that week and the reason is because they has happen to be on the other side of the world doing paid business you might resent out of bed.— might resent out of bed. absolutely for su- er might resent out of bed. absolutely for supper as _ might resent out of bed. absolutely for supper as john _ might resent out of bed. absolutely for supper as john says _ might resent out of bed. absolutely for supper as john says it's - might resent out of bed. absolutely for supper as john says it's really i for supper asjohn says it's really hard for us mere mortals who don't have those sums no disrespect but certainly my case, nobody�*s make it out of money. it's ridiculous. it's
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just a different kind of stratosphere. the issue then is what do you do about that? and there are various different options talked about endlessly, do you just say no second jobs. obviously there are doctors and nurses since some wouldn't want them stop doing that for that with her consultancy, we heard sir ed davies... figs for that with her consultancy, we heard sir ed davies. . ._ for that with her consultancy, we heard sir ed davies... as one of the sons dirty dozen. — heard sir ed davies... as one of the sons dirty dozen, as _ heard sir ed davies... as one of the sons dirty dozen, as they _ heard sir ed davies. .. as one of the sons dirty dozen, as they call- heard sir ed davies... as one of the sons dirty dozen, as they call it. i sons dirty dozen, as they call it. yeah, he's earning quite a tiny sound. he it's personal circumstances. he's a carer, he's had a son with disabilities and he wants to earn money to pay for care and protect his long—term future. you always get these different reasons that make it more difficult to come up with a hard and fast rule. you'd give mps a pay rise? not many people can still pay them
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already what they earned now. and what would be the cut off point? to use editor the head teacher salary or who do you pay the salary to? will bad actually saw people coming into politics? there are so many issues to be considered when you're reforming the system. in the debate today, it was a nonbinding debate. it meant nothing essentially. that doesn't mean it's not important because obviously it's very important to aired today but didn't actually change anything. the top and bottom of it is mps cannot agree on what to do next. whether the system needs reforming and how you would then do that. i system needs reforming and how you would then do that.— would then do that. i was going to move the to _ would then do that. i was going to move the to the _ would then do that. i was going to move the to the ft, _ would then do that. i was going to move the to the ft, the _ would then do that. i was going to i move the to the ft, the obama story. people are interested, worth mentioning that martin bell the four mps after neil hamilton hello was forced out by the voters in a sleaze
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allegation scandal for the payments he received back in 1997. he's written an opinion, which is on the inside of the ft tomorrow. if you're registered you'll find that online as well. sam, talk to us about, here's a face from the past, barack obama. addressing the climate summit on a brief visit. will brush over his carbon footprint. it on a brief visit. will brush over his carbon footprint.— his carbon footprint. it was interesting _ his carbon footprint. it was interesting because - his carbon footprint. it was interesting because barack his carbon footprint. it was - interesting because barack obama his carbon footprint. it was _ interesting because barack obama was talking... he was really addressing his views to young climate change activists and saying you are really important in driving change forward. and essentially stay angry, keep at this. but he talked about how people of his generation actually have failed to do enough to tackle climate change. a bit of a vehicle
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port, really. and certain climate change activists outside were interviews there are actually quite angry at him they were saying actually you say these nice speeches but actually you made a pledge, i think it was back in 2009 to give money to poorer countries for climate change and that never materialised in full. and they are pretty angry about that. they are pretty angry about that. they are pretty frustrated. you pretty angry about that. they are pretty frustrated.— pretty angry about that. they are pretty frustrated. you have some s math pretty frustrated. you have some sympathy because _ pretty frustrated. you have some sympathy because in _ pretty frustrated. you have some sympathy because in a _ pretty frustrated. you have some sympathy because in a sense i pretty frustrated. you have some sympathy because in a sense it's| pretty frustrated. you have some l sympathy because in a sense it's a bit like the queen said, they talk but they don't do. and in a sense there is barack obama got theirs john kerry the us climate envoy and was barack obama as secretary of state along with hillary clinton and they will both the people, not their fault it wasn't continued but they were... the government was part of
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the stage of resistance to cough up the stage of resistance to cough up the money that soon perhaps due to political opposition. jonathan, what you make of a? fine political opposition. jonathan, what you make of a?— you make of a? one thing that you see from obama _ you make of a? one thing that you see from obama speaking - you make of a? one thing that you see from obama speaking is i you make of a? one thing that you see from obama speaking is that l you make of a? one thing that you | see from obama speaking is that he is an amazingly charismatic politician. you see other people today, _ politician. you see other people today, i— politician. you see other people today, i don't mean any disrespect today, i don't mean any disrespect tojoe _ today, i don't mean any disrespect tojoe biden, any of the politicians we have _ tojoe biden, any of the politicians we have in— tojoe biden, any of the politicians we have in our country but once in a while _ we have in our country but once in a while you _ we have in our country but once in a while you have somebody who comes along _ while you have somebody who comes along who _ while you have somebody who comes along who is a real star and he's -ot along who is a real star and he's got star— along who is a real star and he's got star power. he could use it perhaps — got star power. he could use it perhaps to _ got star power. he could use it perhaps to really push this issue to become _ perhaps to really push this issue to become sort of evangelist for fighting — become sort of evangelist for fighting climate change. as you said. _ fighting climate change. as you said, people are pointed out that actually— said, people are pointed out that actually when he was in office his record _ actually when he was in office his record wasn't necessarily that good. but you _ record wasn't necessarily that good. but you need somebody who's going to make the _ but you need somebody who's going to make the argument because it's hard being _ make the argument because it's hard being honest and perhaps people think— being honest and perhaps people think i'm — being honest and perhaps people think i'm making excuses, you need somebody— think i'm making excuses, you need somebody in power and you need
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somebody— somebody in power and you need somebody to make the argument to say we need _ somebody to make the argument to say we need to— somebody to make the argument to say we need to do something about this for the _ we need to do something about this for the sake of ourselves, for us older— for the sake of ourselves, for us older people to and also for young people _ older people to and also for young people. and he's been doing that very eloquently. and i think it's quite _ very eloquently. and i think it's quite important that there is somebody of his stature who is making — somebody of his stature who is making that argument.- somebody of his stature who is making that argument. good point. we haven't gotten — making that argument. good point. we haven't gotten very _ making that argument. good point. we haven't gotten very long _ making that argument. good point. we haven't gotten very long left. _ making that argument. good point. we haven't gotten very long left. one i haven't gotten very long left. one story each and then the chance to comment on the last story. so your story is the front of the telegraph was a freedom of information request, quite interesting figures. the telegraph have discovered all 11,000 _ the telegraph have discovered all 11,000 people have caught covid and died after— 11,000 people have caught covid and died after being admitted to hospital. it appears that people had contracted the disease in hospital and this— contracted the disease in hospital and this is— contracted the disease in hospital and this is clearly quite shocking. it's and this is clearly quite shocking. it's a _ and this is clearly quite shocking. it's a brilliant piece of reporting by the — it's a brilliant piece of reporting by the telegraph which use the freedom — by the telegraph which use the freedom of information request to -et freedom of information request to get this— freedom of information request to get this information. the question that people will be asking which i'm not sure _ that people will be asking which i'm not sure this story white addresses
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is, does _ not sure this story white addresses is, does this show some sort of failing — is, does this show some sort of failing on— is, does this show some sort of failing on the part of hospitals themselves or does it more show that themselves or does it more show that the whole _ themselves or does it more show that the whole system wasn't really set ”p the whole system wasn't really set up to _ the whole system wasn't really set up to deal— the whole system wasn't really set up to deal with covid cases? at the hospital— up to deal with covid cases? at the hospital didn't have enough beds for example _ hospital didn't have enough beds for example, they weren't able to isolate — example, they weren't able to isolate and test patients properly. the next — isolate and test patients properly. the next question has to be how did this happen — the next question has to be how did this happen why did this happen. the telegraph— this happen why did this happen. the telegraph are telling us that it did happen— telegraph are telling us that it did happen in— telegraph are telling us that it did happen in the first place is quite shocking — happen in the first place is quite shockina. , , ., shocking. useful figures that work for the public _ shocking. useful figures that work for the public inquiry _ shocking. useful figures that work for the public inquiry when - shocking. useful figures that work for the public inquiry when he i shocking. useful figures that work| for the public inquiry when he gets under way. for the public inquiry when he gets underway. sam, for the public inquiry when he gets under way. sam, you get the short straw. northern ireland wrote a call. explain that to us in a minute. this is on page two of the times. i’iiii minute. this is on page two of the times. �* ., , , , minute. this is on page two of the times. ., ,, times. i'll do my best. essentially the union community _ times. i'll do my best. essentially the union community across i times. i'll do my best. essentially the union community across a i the union community across a unionist community there is essentially zero support for the northern ireland protocol. the progressive party today said as a consequence for the frustration over
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the protocol which regulates how... it was set up to ensure it wasn't a hard irish border, it's created other problems and we see the result of that today. in the progressive unionist party have now said they withdraw support from the good friday agreement. which obviously the peace agreement. the irish prime minister has warned against falling into a self fulfilling prophecy and obviously deep concern in dublin, belfast london and brussels and the uk government and the eu will be continuing talks to stop this going further. d0 continuing talks to stop this going further. , ., , , further. do you get the sense in west minister _ further. do you get the sense in west minister that _ further. do you get the sense in west minister that people i further. do you get the sense in west minister that people sort i further. do you get the sense in| west minister that people sort of think almost that we are at that point already and if it weren't for the cop summit not wanting to overshadow that the government might have brought in this emergency clause and effectively suspended protocol by now? the
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clause and effectively suspended protocol by now?— clause and effectively suspended protocol by now? the brexit minister has made clear— protocol by now? the brexit minister has made clear that _ protocol by now? the brexit minister has made clear that their _ protocol by now? the brexit minister has made clear that their conditionsl has made clear that their conditions have already been met for article 16 to be triggered. they did want to do that unless forced to end so obviously negotiations continue. hopefully i won't come to that. that is the last resort if this can be resolved. is the last resort if this can be resolved-— is the last resort if this can be resolved. . . ., . . . ~ , ., resolved. sam and jonathan thank you both very much- _ resolved. sam and jonathan thank you both very much. sorry _ resolved. sam and jonathan thank you both very much. sorry we _ resolved. sam and jonathan thank you both very much. sorry we are - resolved. sam and jonathan thank you both very much. sorry we are out i both very much. sorry we are out of time. the only sorry we haven't mentioned is starting to appear online. mail online of get a good piece on it. he's alive and in good spirits wasn't nice to hear some good news. thank you very much. we will see you again thanks very much for your company. will see you again thanks very much foryour company. sort will see you again thanks very much for your company. sort and whether and then newsday. hello there this is the latest
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from the bbc sports centre. let's get some more on the crisis surrounding yorkshire county cricket club the new chair says azeem rafiq should be praised for his bravery. the new chair says azeem rafiq and said the player should never have been put through the racism scandal that has engulfed the club. lord patel was speaking for the first time since being appointed on friday. our sports editor dan roan reports. headingley has witnessed some of the greatest revivals in english cricket history but leading yorkshire out of an unprecedented racism crisis could surpass them all. and having been installed as the club's new chairman, lord kamlesh patel today told a press conference that the county must learn lessons. after hundred and 50 years were ready to accept the past and were ready to accept the past and were ready to accept the past and were ready to become a club which people can trust to do the right thing. azeem rafiq sparking outrage. tatiana;r azeem rafiq sparking outrage. today settled a separate _ azeem rafiq sparking outrage. today settled a separate employment tribunal with the spinner with no tagging order imposed. i
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tribunal with the spinner with no tagging order imposed.- tribunal with the spinner with no tagging order imposed. i thank azeem rafi for his tagging order imposed. i thank azeem rafiq for his bravery _ tagging order imposed. i thank azeem rafiq for his bravery and _ tagging order imposed. i thank azeem rafiq for his bravery and speaking i rafiq for his bravery and speaking out. azeem rafiq is a whistle—blower and should be praised as such. and should another happen. i like to apologise. and what happened to you should never happen again.— should never happen again. yorkshire settin: u- a should never happen again. yorkshire setting up a whistle-blower— should never happen again. yorkshire setting up a whistle-blower hotline i setting up a whistle—blower hotline for others to come forward. and after criticism for a lack of transparency have also released a report to those with the legal interest in it. have you had a chance to look to the full report and if so what did you found in it? what i've seen so far does make me feel uncomfortable. that's why it needs seismic change.— feel uncomfortable. that's why it needs seismic change. today in a statement _ needs seismic change. today in a statement rafik _ needs seismic change. today in a statement rafik said... _
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in the latest allegations hit the club a former yorkshire academy players told the bbc that went 16 he was subjected to basic language by a member of staff. he was subjected to basic language by a member of staff.— was subjected to basic language by a member of staff. l was subjected to basic language by a member of staff. he came marching... into the member of staff. he came marching... into the room — member of staff. he came marching... into the room l — member of staff. he came marching... into the room i didn't _ member of staff. he came marching... into the room i didn't how _ member of staff. he came marching... into the room i didn't how to _ member of staff. he came marching... into the room i didn't how to react. i into the room i didn't how to react. it was the first time i'd ever been racially insulted directly to my face. in racially insulted directly to my face. ., , ., racially insulted directly to my face. . , . ., face. in a statement yorkshire said... haven't become engulfed yorkshire help desperately hoping that this marks the first day in the road to recovery. but with more damaging revelations set to come regaining trust along with sponsors and the right to host international matches there will be no easy task.
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bad news for england are jason roy has been ruled out of the t20 world cup due to injury. rory retired during england's group game on saturday and a scan revealed he had torn his cath. james vince will replace them for the semifinal against wednesday said it was gutted to be ruled out that he will stay on to support the team. to football now and former bournemouth manager eddie howe has been confirmed as newcastle's new head coach. the club announced the news on social media loving the chance for a play on his name. howe succeeds steve bruce, who left the club by mutual consent, following the saudi backed takeover of the club last month. and here is eddie howe in the stands, watching newcastle earn a crucial point at brighton at the weekend he's sat next to the club's new co owner amanda staveley. they are 19th in the table, five points from safety after 11 games. the bbc�*s chief football writer phil mcnulty. arsenal's emile smith rowe has been called up to the senior england men s squad for the first time as marcus rashford,
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james ward prowse, mason mount and luke shaw pulled out with injury and illness. smith rowe was due to join the under 21's squad but has now met the rest of the squad at st george's park as gareth southgate's men begin preparations for their world cup qualifiers against albania and san marino. former barcelona midfielder xavi hernandez has been officially unveiled as the club's new coach six years after he left the club. barca usually reserve pitch presentations for their biggest signings. but he's the first coach to be given the honour, in front of 10,000 fans who chanted his name on monday. he rejoins a side struggling in midtable, in huge debt, and they haven't been champions of europe since he left. you may have seen the row in modern pentathlon, with the governing body deciding to remove the horseriding discipline. and replace it with another sport for 2028. in part a reaction to events at the tokyo games, when one horse in particular refused to perform for a leading rider. there's been strong opposition from pentathletes, who want to preserve their sport. team gb�*s olympic championjoe
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choong is one of almost 700 athletes, to sign a petition, calling for the president of the international union to stand down. sport, to save writing by addressing the problems notjust navigating the problem completely. and so moving forward with like, considering the lack of consultation and the historic lack of consultation over the past 28 years we think the best way to move forward is to remove him from office and start a new path forward with the athletes are involved in the decision—making for the sport. that's all the sport for now. hello. we have some pretty quiet weather
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across the uk for the next few days. will bring melt relatively mild air and the colour behind me showing going a long way south across the atlantic indicating quite a warm fail actually to tuesday across parts of england and wales. you may have noticed some colder air to the far north of the uk, temperatures will struggle to get into double figures across multimodal scotland, some squally shows here. elsewhere we are looking at the low to mid teens. there will be submitted to the day for northern england and wales. but we should see bright discounts to the north and the front of an much of scotland and northern ireland and to the south across southern and eastern england. this friend is set to stick around through wednesday and thursday. slowly making its way south across the uk. turning things quite murky across southern and eastern england into the small hours of wednesday but it will stay very mild here. where is that slightly cold airjust
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speaks for the south into scotland, into the small hours of wednesday we could see a patchy fraud and some unsheltered lands to the north. wednesday still looking to the south of the uk. it's looking much clearer for the north, scotland and northern ireland there should be sunshine just the chance of a few scattered showers in the far north and west. some sunshine for northern england and wales and improve picture on tuesday. southern and eastern counties of england it will be much grayer, much gloomier and there's a chance of some patchy rain on and off. forthursday chance of some patchy rain on and off. for thursday till the remnants off. for thursday till the remnants of that weather front close to the south of the uk. could be thicker cloud here for a time, a little bit of rain but actually for thursday we are largely focusing on a ridge of high pressure, a lot of fine weather and light winds. i think potentially some rain getting into northern ireland by the end of the day and the wind started to kick out. and here's why. this area of low pressure looks like it could really deepen for the end of the week and
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come swinging our way in the atlantic. quite a bit of uncertainty as to when and where exactly on friday that low will move in. at the moment just friday that low will move in. at the momentjust keep in the back of your mind after quiet week there is the potential for strong winds on friday.
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after 600 days, the united states finally reopens its borders to much of the world population. borders to much of the world population-— borders to much of the world --oulation. �* , ., .,, population. airlines are hoping for many more _ population. airlines are hoping for many more scenes - population. airlines are hoping for many more scenes like i population. airlines are hoping for many more scenes like this in the coming weeks. it is a major milestone for separated families and it's a lifeline to the tourism industry at of the winter holiday season. barack obama urges _ winter holiday season. barack obama urges the _ winter holiday season. barack obama urges the young i winter holiday season. barack. obama urges the young people winter holiday season. barack i obama urges the young people of the road to stay angry over claimant as he speaks of the un summit in glasgow. the us rapper travis scott is facing multiple lawsuits after at least eight people were killed and hundreds injured in a crash
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at his texas festival.

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