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tv   Newsday  BBC News  November 8, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm GMT

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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore. the headlines. after 600 days, the united states has finally reopened its borders to much of the worlds population.— of the worlds population. airlines 0 en for of the worlds population. airlines open for more — of the worlds population. airlines open for more scenes _ of the worlds population. airlines open for more scenes like - of the worlds population. airlines open for more scenes like this i of the worlds population. airlines open for more scenes like this in | open for more scenes like this in the coming weeks. it is a major milestone for separated families in the lifeline to the tourism industry read ahead of the winter holiday season. �* ~ ., , _, season. brock obama urges the young eo - le season. brock obama urges the young --eole of season. brock obama urges the young peeple of the — season. brock obama urges the young people of the world _ season. brock obama urges the young people of the world to _ season. brock obama urges the young people of the world to stay _ season. brock obama urges the young people of the world to stay angry - people of the world to stay angry over climate as he speaks at the summit in glasgow. we will tell you why a meeting of china's communist
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party elite is happening behind closed doors that could be crucial in shaping the countries future. in english crickets race row, apologising to the player who complained about his treatment. sevenin seven in the morning in singapore and heading towards evening in the united states. the first foreign travellers have arrived at the airport. after 600 days, the united states has finally reopened its borders to much of the worlds population as long as they are fully vaccinated. there have been
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emotional reunions from family and friends separated since the start of the pandemic. cheering that first embrace, that flood of relief. none of them could have predicted they'd spend such a long time apart. the international arrivals floor of new york's kennedy airport sprang to life with heart wrenching transatlantic reunions as passengers deplaned the first flights from london heathrow. and ran into the arms of loved ones. it's the best thing ever in the whole world. it's been so emotional and it has for millions of families all over the world but this is the best thing that's ever happened to me. sisters gill and louise haven't seen each other in two years. thank you so much. what are you guys going to do now? just keep hugging each other! not being able to touch my sister - and them not hugging my children has been the hardest part of it all. so many like the matthews have missed out on precious moments
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they can never get back. so they've missed the birth of my son, so his three and a half months now, so finally they get to him. and they haven't seen him since he was crawling and now he is a fully working toddler with opinions and so it's going to be really fun for them to spend all this time with him. airlines are hoping for many more scenes like this in the coming weeks. it's a major milestone for separated families and it's a lifeline to the tourism industry right ahead of the winter holiday season. there is a much more, i think, pragmatic framework in place which is becoming more universal to allow travel to exist alongside the pandemic. the ban was symbolically lifted with a dual take—off between virgin atlantic and british airways. even with a watchful eye on covid case rises in europe, they're optimistic they can avoid any more turbulent family separations. heart—warming images and scenes of reunions at the airport. a travel
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consultant and former communications director for virgin atlantic in euros *. hejoins me director for virgin atlantic in euros *. he joins me from director for virgin atlantic in euros *. hejoins me from london director for virgin atlantic in euros *. he joins me from london to talk about what the reopening of these borders mean notjust for the travel industry, but for all of us. great to have you on newsday today. let me start by asking, our travel already seeing the impact of the band lifting? it is already seeing the impact of the band lifting?— band lifting? it is a positive im act band lifting? it is a positive impact with _ band lifting? it is a positive impact with booking - band lifting? it is a positive - impact with booking substantial as competence come back, there seem restrictions rolled back, taken away in countries around the world, not just the us and when you see borders reopening, you know that you can book and the airlines especially those in europe have seen a bumper batch of bookings is that confidence returns. it has been a very important moment, this.
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notwithstanding the optimism that you have described, it is still quite challenging, isn't it to start travelling. lots of revelations, different forms to fill out, different forms to fill out, different testing regimes. is the best way to improve the travel experience if you were to start travelling again?— travel experience if you were to start travelling again? there are still far too _ start travelling again? there are still far too many _ start travelling again? there are still far too many complex - start travelling again? there are still far too many complex rules| start travelling again? there are l still far too many complex rules in place, online forms that you have to fill in, things tojeff to check before you travel to a country as well as check when you come back to your own country and you cannot carry on with these sorts of measures. they have to start rolling back to protect their economies some of the rollback borders, the economies improve, this is a start travelling again. leisure travellers start seeing families again and that is what we really have to see happen. overthe is what we really have to see happen. over the next few months there's going to be vital to see borders continuing to reopen, otherwise that confidence would
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disappear again in the airlines, hotels, tourism boards will benefit from borders reopening will be going backwards and no one wants to see that all. ., backwards and no one wants to see that all. . ., . ., . ., that all. paul, how concerned are ou that all. paul, how concerned are you about — that all. paul, how concerned are you about rising _ that all. paul, how concerned are you about rising covid-19 - that all. paul, how concerned are you about rising covid-19 cases l that all. paul, how concerned are i you about rising covid-19 cases that you about rising covid—i9 cases that are opening up and then travellers being caught up in lockdowns or social distancing restrictions, for instance? i social distancing restrictions, for instance? ~ ., ,. . instance? i think through science and medicines _ instance? i think through science and medicines now, _ instance? i think through science and medicines now, they - instance? i think through science and medicines now, they can - instance? i think through science i and medicines now, they can reduce the severe covid—i9 cases. seeing the severe covid—i9 cases. seeing the share prices of many of the firms rise when major scientific companies and medical firms announce new treatments that you're starting to see come through. so, reducing medication improve rapidly and as they improve, then in fact, people start to travel much more competently and they will be seriously infected by covid—i9. there are still some tragic deaths
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which rise but the medication is getting better and as a result, travel is becoming more confident for so many people, especially business travellers. the agency. thank you _ business travellers. the agency. thank you so — business travellers. the agency. thank you so much _ business travellers. the agency. thank you so much for— business travellers. the agency. thank you so much forjoining i business travellers. the agency. | thank you so much forjoining us business travellers. the agency. . thank you so much forjoining us on newsday. for more information on those travel rules in the united states and how they might affect you, just visit our website at bbc dot comports news or download the bbc news app. there are lists of approved vaccines and other inflammations that may be useful for you as you do make about some of those travel plans. another headline, barack obama says the road has to step up now to tackle climate change before it is too late. speaking at the summit in glasgow, wealthy countries need to talk about island nations. and they have a right to be frustrated.
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deeper floods. biggerfires. higher temperatures. climate change is being felt around the world, so the talks in glasgow are not just about the future, they're about coping with a hotter and more hostile planet right now. pushing for an urgent response is the former us president barack obama. getting a rock star reception here and saying it's not too late. our planet has been wounded by our actions. those wounds won't be healed today or tomorrow or the next. but they can be healed. and addressing young activists, he appealed to them to keep up the pressure for change. the most important energy
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in this movement is coming from young people. applause. they have more at stake in this fight than anybody else. you are right to be frustrated. folks of my generation have not done enough to deal with a potentially cataclysmic problem that you now stand to inherit. many young people have suffered cataclysm already. a typhoon in the philippines eight years ago claimed 6000 lives, and one survivor, the daughter of a fisherman, fear is more violent weather to come. i have seen death myself, i've seen my family struggle. i still have so many dreams in this lifetime. i'm just 2a years old. i still want to have my family. i still want to have children. but i don't even know if they will have good future ahead of them. and with emotions running so high, activists here say even mr obama has broken a promise,
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to get climate aid to the poorest countries. we don't want to talk to him, what we need is action. he already knows what we want, he already knows what the people want and that is the us$100 billion pledge that he pledged in 2009 in copenhagen. more and more people are enduring the kind of extremes that scientists have long warned about as the planet heats up. so this is a chance to prevent a bad situation from getting worse. some bus services have been suspended after a second bus was hijacked in the space of the week. for masked men ordered the driver and passengers of the vehicle and said to the light. politicians from all sides condemned those behind the attack. more than 250 people in the uk have applied to give evidence to
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a parliamentary inquiry into historical forced adoptions. submissions to the inquiry which will examine why thousands of pregnant women were pressured into giving their babies in postwar years simply because they were not married, close this week. and man has been rescued after spending two daysin has been rescued after spending two days in a cave in the beacons and wells. he had been caving when he was injured and was unable to escape. he has since been lifted to the surface on a stretcher and taken to hospital with multiple injuries. accused of running scared, government attempts to change the system and set aside a critical ruling against a former conservative mp caused outrage among opposition parties and many tory mps. our
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political editor has much of the debate. what really lurks underneath? is it always clear to see? for politicians, for parliament, what's right and wrong? a senior tory quit last week after breaking the rules. his party caused outrage when it tried to save him. but is the prime minister ready to reflect or to show regret? to be clear, prime minister, you're not going to apologise for the way you acted last week? look, i think it's very important that we get this right, and we are going to make every effort to get it right. we are going to hold mps to account. i think also...and mps, as i said last week, should not break the rules. it's been a sombre moment. the tories were accused of trying to rig the rules for one of their own. and the speaker used today to warn it must never happen again. what i don't want is another dark week like last week. i want to make sure the public have faith in parliamentarians and faith
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in the house of commons. mps are not allowed to talk directly to the government for firms that are paying them wages. owen paterson was found to have broken that rule, and that's why this has all blown up. but they are allowed to do work on top of the dayjob of being a constituency mp. even being a government minister is technically a second job. but they must publish anything extra that they earn over £100 in a register, and there is huge variation in the things they do, from shifts in a&e, to offering legal advice, to more commonly writing articles for the papers. but only a few dozen, out of more than 600 mps, are earning extra enormous amounts — in the tens of thousands of pounds. but many tories are worried about the perception. the prime minister may not have made time to turn up or wanted to say sorry, but... i would like first and foremost to express my regret and that of my ministerial colleagues over
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the mistake made last week. leader of the opposition... yet borisjohnson�*s no—show gave the opposition another reason to keep on pushing. instead of clearing up his mess, he's left his side knee—deep in it. instead of leading from the front, he's cowered away. he is not a serious leader, and the joke isn't funny any more. the snp has even complained to the police about claims of cash for honours. i have now asked the metropolitan police to investigate the activities of the conservative party and the awarding of places in the house of lords. and watch how the prime minister's colleagues blamed for the mess over owen paterson squirm. a former tory chief whip called for an apology. politics, mr speaker, is a team game. and if the team captain gets it wrong then i think he should come and apologise to the public and to this house.
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that's the right thing to do in terms of demonstrating leadership. and it's given new tory mps a taste for rebelling, even if they are full of regret. breaking the whip is not a straightforward thing to do. it churns you up beforehand and it leaves you a little shell—shocked afterwards. perhaps next time it will be easier. laughter. borisjohnson might have got back to london too late for the start of the debate, but he can't pretend the conversation about money and politics isn't taking place. well, if you want to get in touch with me on anything you have seen on newsday so far, the route that she described in her report, i am on twitter. i am looking forward to hearing from you. you're watching newsday on bbc. the county crickets as the investigation into racism at
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the club was badly handled and seismic change is needed. the bombastic establishment outside of donald trump is defined the pollsters to take the keys to the oval office. pollsters to take the keys to the oval office-— pollsters to take the keys to the oval office. feel great about the results. i genuinely _ oval office. feel great about the results. i genuinely believe - oval office. feel great about the results. i genuinely believe he i results. i genuinely believe he cares for the _ results. i genuinely believe he cares for the countries. - results. i genuinely believe he i cares for the countries. keeping results. i genuinely believe he - cares for the countries. keeping it in the _ cares for the countries. keeping it in the public eye that counts. success — in the public eye that counts. success or— in the public eye that counts. success or failure depends not only on public— success or failure depends not only on public display, but on the local campaign — on public display, but on the local campaign headquarters and the heavy routine _ campaign headquarters and the heavy routine work of their women volunteers. routine work of their women volunteers— routine work of their women volunteers. �* , ~ ., , volunteers. berliners linked hands and danced _ volunteers. berliners linked hands and danced around _ volunteers. berliners linked hands and danced around the _ volunteers. berliners linked hands and danced around the liberated i and danced around the liberated territory — and danced around the liberated territory and _ and danced around the liberated territory. and with _ and danced around the liberated territory. and with no _ and danced around the liberated territory. and with no one - and danced around the liberated territory. and with no one to - and danced around the liberated. territory. and with no one to stop them, _ territory. and with no one to stop them, it— territory. and with no one to stop them, it wasnt— territory. and with no one to stop them, it wasn't long _ territory. and with no one to stop them, it wasn't long before - territory. and with no one to stop them, it wasn't long before the i them, it wasn't long before the first attempts _ them, it wasn't long before the first attempts were _ them, it wasn't long before the first attempts were made - them, it wasn't long before the first attempts were made to i them, it wasn't long before the - first attempts were made to destroy the structure — first attempts were made to destroy the structure itself. _ first attempts were made to destroy the structure itself.— the structure itself. dominating the palestinian cause _ the structure itself. dominating the palestinian cause for— the structure itself. dominating the palestinian cause for so _ the structure itself. dominating the palestinian cause for so long - the structure itself. dominating the palestinian cause for so long has i palestinian cause for so long has died. palestinian authorities have declared a state of morning. bitter
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declared a state of morning. after 17 ears declared a state of morning. after 17 years of — declared a state of morning. after 17 years of discussion, _ declared a state of morning. after 17 years of discussion, the - declared a state of morning. he 17 years of discussion, the the result was greeted with an outburst ofjoy. only felt grudgingly accepted by the clergy, suddenly felt welcome. this is newsday on the bbc. in singapore. our headlines. after 600 days, the united states is finally reopened its borders to much of the worlds population. barack obama urges the young people of the world to stay angry over climate as he speaks of the un summit in glasgow. no further tighten the presidents grip on power. a key resolution celebrating the parties achievements
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in its 100 years of existence. it's only the third time a resolution has been tabled. the third passed under mile in 1945 which help have been used before it seized power. in 1981, so the regime adopt economic reforms and recognise the mistakes of before. xijinping will not criticise his predecessors, but it can offer clues on how far he is prepared to go on issues like taiwan, for instance. that spring in the professor, the director of the center for contemporary china at the university of pennsylvania. great to have you on the programme. the first instance, i would like to start by asking you, the whole point of this is to elevate xi jinping to the hybrid status of the other figures
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in chinese history. will he be able to achieve that? this in chinese history. will he be able to achieve that?— to achieve that? this resolution will be the _ to achieve that? this resolution will be the culmination - to achieve that? this resolution will be the culmination of - to achieve that? this resolution - will be the culmination of something he has been doing for several years now, to elevate him into the rarefied air of mao at deng. it is notjust rarefied air of mao at deng. it is not just the rarefied air of mao at deng. it is notjust the resolution of party history, and mao was before 1949. but it was also going to be the occasion which was also going to be the occasion which will see the next party conference where xi jinping will begin his third term as top leader. ., , ,., , will begin his third term as top leader. ., , , ., ., leader. professor, in terms of how -o - ular it leader. professor, in terms of how popular it xi _ leader. professor, in terms of how popular it xi jinping _ leader. professor, in terms of how popular it xi jinping is _ leader. professor, in terms of how popular it xi jinping is as _ leader. professor, in terms of how popular it xi jinping is as a - popular it xi jinping is as a leader, both within the party and with the people, it's impossible to say, given the strict control over media, in china? it say, given the strict control over media, in china?— media, in china? it certainly is hard to know _ media, in china? it certainly is hard to know but _ media, in china? it certainly is hard to know but there - media, in china? it certainly is hard to know but there are - media, in china? it certainly is - hard to know but there are certainly signs of his popularity with a large area of the chinese population. this
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is a controlled media environment and in that environment, xijinping is achieving the kind of attention and adulation is that we have not seen since mao. there certainly has been the attempt to raise xi jinping to the pantheon of the popular imagination see of people all over the place and they have declared the leadership core and he has had his area elevated on par with mao a deng it's something that we have not seen in many years. and in others are not so happy about it. many are not happy with xijinping's so happy about it. many are not happy with xi jinping's leadership of the turning away from reforms of the limits on their autonomy and their influence and of course, there are people who might like to have a larger role in chinese politics among the people who are being overshadowed by him as an increasingly dominant leader. fine overshadowed by him as an increasingly dominant leader. one of the big topics — increasingly dominant leader. one of the big topics or _ increasingly dominant leader. one of the big topics or the _ increasingly dominant leader. one of the big topics or the big _ increasingly dominant leader. one of the big topics or the big focal- the big topics or the big focal points for xijinping has been
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the big topics or the big focal points for xi jinping has been the issue of taiwan. how do you see him dealing with taiwan going forward. there has been some speculation that will be mentioned in the pronouncements coming out, the 61, the last big one before then is ideology and political undertakings but the taiwan issue is out there we have seen it become a focus of increasing friction the last month orso increasing friction the last month or so and i think they're very clearly laid out the idea that china's patients is not infinite on this issue and the problem cannot be left over from generation to generation. that is what lies behind some of the stronger shows of force there's a belief plausible that xi jinping sees taiwan as a legacy issue the way hong kong and macau were legacy issues for deng. but there is no prospect for peaceful reunification is acceptable to the taiwanese, especially after the model that xi jinping wanted to
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apply to taiwan went so badly in hong kong. apply to taiwan went so badly in hong kong-— apply to taiwan went so badly in hon: kona. . ~' . ., hong kong. thank you so much for “oininr us hong kong. thank you so much for joining us on _ hong kong. thank you so much for joining us on newsday. _ let's ta ke let's take a look at some of the other stores in the headlines. the pakistani government says it agreed to cease with local taliban militants which was confirmed by the taliban pakistan group that says the cause would last for a month. it's fight of carried out hundreds of suicide bomb attacks in pakistan, including the shooting of the nobel peace prize winner. a court in singapore has been put on hold, the execution of a malaysian drug smuggler who is said to have limited mental capacity. he was scheduled to be home on wednesday for attempting to bring a small amount of heroin into singapore 12 years ago. the new head of the club has
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apologised to the former captain azeem rafiq after his experiences of racism at the club. they said the investigation into his allegations after which no one was disciplined had been badly handled. last week, several members of the clubs board quit over its handling of the case. our sports editor reports. headingley has witnessed some of the greatest revivals in english cricket history but leading yorkshire out of an unprecedented racism crisis could surpass them all. and having been installed as the club's new chairman, lord kamlesh patel today told a press conference that the county must learn lessons. after 158 years we are ready to change, we are ready to accept the past and we are ready to become a club which people can trust to do the right thing. a report found former player azeem rafiq was a victim of racial harassment and bullying at yorkshire but the club took no action against anyone, sparking outrage. today it settled a separate employment tribunal with the spinner
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with no gagging order imposed. i thank azeem rafiq for his bravery in speaking out. azeem is a whistle—blower and should be praised as such. and he should never have been put through this and i would like to apologise to him. what happens to you must never happen again. yorkshire are setting up an independent whistle—blowing hotline for other victims of discrimination to come forward and, after criticism over a lack of transparency, have also released the report to those with a legal interest in it. have you had a chance to look through the full report and if so, what did you think of what you found in it? what i have seen so far does make me feel uncomfortable that the process wasn't as well complete as it should have been. today in dubai, ahead of the semifinals of the t20 world cup,
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one of england's senior players and a proud muslim gave this response to the crisis. he came marching into the room and looked _ he came marching into the room and looked into— he came marching into the room and looked into my— he came marching into the room and looked into my eyes _ he came marching into the room and looked into my eyes and _ he came marching into the room and looked into my eyes and he - he came marching into the room and looked into my eyes and he said - looked into my eyes and he said those _ looked into my eyes and he said those of— looked into my eyes and he said those of typical— looked into my eyes and he said those of typical expletive - looked into my eyes and he said those of typical expletive shot, i those of typical expletive shot, wasn't — those of typical expletive shot, wasn't it? _ those of typical expletive shot, wasn't it? i_ those of typical expletive shot, wasn't it? i didn't _ those of typical expletive shot, wasn't it? i didn't know- those of typical expletive shot, wasn't it? i didn't know how. those of typical expletive shot, wasn't it? i didn't know how to| wasn't it? i didn't know how to respond — wasn't it? i didn't know how to respond as— wasn't it? i didn't know how to respond as the _ wasn't it? i didn't know how to respond as the first _ wasn't it? i didn't know how to respond as the first time - wasn't it? i didn't know how to respond as the first time i - wasn't it? i didn't know how to respond as the first time i had | respond as the first time i had been directly— respond as the first time i had been directly racially _ respond as the first time i had been directly racially insulted _ respond as the first time i had been directly racially insulted to - respond as the first time i had been directly racially insulted to my - directly racially insulted to my face — having become engulfed by a crisis that has rocked the cricketing world, yorkshire will be desperately hoping that this marks the first day on the road to recovery but with more damaging revelations set to come, regaining trust, along with sponsors and the right to host international matches here, will be no easy task. dan roan, bbc news, headingley.
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that's all the time we have. thank you forjoining us and to stay with bbc news. hello. we have some pretty quiet weather across the uk for the next few days. hello. some pretty quiet weather across the uk for the next few days. largely light winds and some mild air covering us, pulling in from the west or southwest. temperatures across england and wales in double figures to start the day will get into the mid teens come the afternoon for the best of the sunshine to the far south, east some rain across northern england and wales, the cloud certainly more interactive throughout the day. sunny spells for scotland and northern ireland with showers to the far and west and quite a chilly feel torn away and loic. for wednesday and thursday we are still looking at largely light winds and favourably mild wind directions.
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some rain to the south of the uk potentially on wednesday but nothing particular he it's thursday into friday that we are going to be all eyes on the atlantic to watch the slow coming in. slightly courted to sneaks for the south the small hours of wednesday, we could see a patch of frost and some of the areas to the north. here's our friend some of the areas to the north. here's ourfriend on some of the areas to the north. here's our friend on wednesday, still lurking to the south of the uk and looking much clearerfurther north, scotland and northern ireland, this to be some sunshine in the case of the few scattered showers in the far north and west. some sunshine from northern england and england and wales, and improve picture on tuesday was the southern and eastern counties in england will be much grayer, gloomier it is a chance of some patchy rain cordoned off. forthursday, chance of some patchy rain cordoned off. for thursday, still the remnants of that weather front close
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to the south of the uk with thicker cloud for a time and a little bit of rain and a lot of fine weather and light winds. i think potentially some rain getting in to the end of the day and the winston to pick up and here is why. this area of low pressure looks it would deepen and become swimming or way in quite a bit of uncertainty as to when and where exactly on friday that low will move in but to bend the back your mind after quiet week at the potential for strong winds on friday.
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this is bbc news, the headlines... the united states has reopened its land and air borders to travellers from much of the world, 20 months after a ban was first imposed because of the pandemic. fully vaccinated visitors will be allowed in. the former us president, barack obama, has told the cop 20 six summit that the world isn't doing anywhere near enough to fight climate change. he called on people to pressure governments and companies to take stronger action. the british prime minister has been accused of running scared from a parliamentary debate about the rules that govern mps. it follows the furore over the government's handling of a former minister, found guilty of breaking lobbying rules. the new head of yorkshire county cricket club has apologised to former captain azeem rafiq after his experiences of racism at the club. lord kamlesh patel said the club's investigation into the allegations were badly handled and seismic change is needed.

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