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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 8, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news i'm ben brown. the headlines at 2pm. calls for an independent inquiry into corruption in government, as mps debate parliamentary standards. it follows attempts to overturn owen paterson's suspension for breaking lobbying rules. the prime minister says he takes the issue very seriously we are going to make every effort to get it right and we are going to hold mps to account. relief for airlines as the us opens its borders to fully vaccinated travellers, for the first time in over a year and a half. a dire warning from afghanistan. millions face starvation due to famine, unless the international community, offers help.
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the next six months are going to be catastrophic it's going to be hell. rescuers have reached a man who fell while caving in the brecon beacons two days ago. we have a special report on why some anti—vaccination campaigners are being accused of bullying and harassment outside schools. i'm simon king in the flood plain of the river don which two years ago was flooded and flooded the village fishlake. i'v e i've been talking to people about how we can adapt to climate change. mps will hold an emergency debate about parliamentary standards today, as the government continues to face criticism over
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allegations of sleaze. ministers have been criticised for trying to change the standards body that polices the conduct of mps after it found the former cabinet minister, owen paterson, guilty of breaking lobbying rules. today's debate is being led by the liberal democrats, who are proposing an independent inquiry into corruption allegations against the government and stricter punishments for mps who break the rules. while the prime minister won't be present at the debate, he has said this afternoon that he takes the issue very seriously. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, has the very latest. the rules for politicians at westminster are under scrutiny again. what's right and what's wrong. what's allowed and what's not. the prime minister in northumberland this morning after a week where the government was forced to back down from its attempt to overhaul the system. what we want to do, and i, frankly,
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you know, i don't think we will make every effort to get this right. we will hold mps to account. like i said last week, mps should not break the rules. mps on all sides agree at least some change is needed. if you end up with, um, corruption in the british political system, you can't achieve change. and lm _ and i can't quite factor into my head why some people can't see that corruption is a problem. the government have driven a coach and horses through the standards i process, which is agreed on a - cross—party and on a house basis. and i thought it was really important that mps had i the opportunity to really- vent their frustrations at that and also look at where we go next. owen paterson's case prompted this debate. the former minister was found to have broken the rules by approaching ministers and officials on behalf of companies who were paying him.
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the government tried to block his suspension and change the system, but u—turned after a backlash. and mr paterson resigned as an mp. another minister dismissed this as a storm in a teacup. others say it's proof the wider system needs to change and that mps shouldn't be enforcing their own rules. well, we have a panel of formerjudges that deal with sexual harassment and bullying complaints against mps, and i think we should have a similar small panel of former high courtjudges that can deal with all complaints against mps. i think it's wrong for mps, like me, to bejudging other colleagues in the house of commons. this afternoon's debate will be a chance for labour to pile pressure on the government over its handling of owen paterson's case. and for mps on all sides to air their views and let off steam about the standards they have to live up to. and the way the rules are enforced. but don't expect much to change in the short term, at least. from the outside, it might seem like politicians
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arguing amongst themselves, but some here make the case ata at a remembrance event this afternoon, the speaker said he was determined for things to change. i don't want another dark week like last week, i want to make sure people have faith in parliamentarians and faith in the house of commons. today's debate will be painful, but the one thing is, it's got to cleanse the house and move forward. from the outside, it might seem like politicians arguing amongst themselves, but some here make the case parliament's integrity is at stake. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. let's talk to our political correspondent, ben wright. allegations of sleaze and corruption against the government, how damaging will this be for the prime minister who won't be at the debate this afternoon?—
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who won't be at the debate this afternoon? , ., ,., ., , afternoon? these are potentially damauuin afternoon? these are potentially damaging accusations, _ afternoon? these are potentially damaging accusations, lapping l afternoon? these are potentially| damaging accusations, lapping at afternoon? these are potentially - damaging accusations, lapping at the door of downing street. because there is a perception that it was trying, numberten, last week trying, number ten, last week to sort of fiddle with the rules, play around with the standard structure a potentially lengthy suspension, but has angered so many, opposition parties and tory government last week conflated the two questions. one about having standards system could be changed, the appeals process could be... could be modified this specific case of owen paterson. that is what has caused so much anger. it was interesting this morning speaker, so lindsay hoyle, as you heard, called it a very dark week for parliament. this was a very difficult moment for the government and, i think, difficult moment for the government and, ithink, numberten are difficult moment for the government and, i think, number ten are aware of the damage that this will have caused them. i think we're to hear a
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lot of the arguments has been coming their way and the fact that ministers have repeatedly in the commons this afternoon.- ministers have repeatedly in the commons this afternoon. then, thank ou. for weston—super—mare, and the pm's anti—corruption champion. thank you very much for being with us. your colleague george eustice said all of this was a storm in a teacup, do you agree? i said all of this was a storm in a teacup, do you agree?- said all of this was a storm in a teacup, do you agree? i think i'm closer to the _ teacup, do you agree? i think i'm closer to the speaker, _ teacup, do you agree? i think i'm closer to the speaker, lindsay . closer to the speaker, lindsay hoyle, saying this is something which absolutely has to be fixed. it's a problem notjust for any government or individual mp, it is a problem for parliament that democracy as a whole. something which we ignore at our peril and we need to take seriously, as the prime minister was saying earlier on in your clip today. last week this vote was, too, as critics see it, to rip up was, too, as critics see it, to rip up the rule book, rewrite the rule book, to protect owen paterson
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comedy prime minister's mate. find comedy prime minister's mate. and ou, the comedy prime minister's mate. and you, the anti—corruption champion of the prime minister, you voted for that, didn't you?— the prime minister, you voted for that, didn't you? well, yes. if the vote had been _ that, didn't you? well, yes. if the vote had been to _ that, didn't you? well, yes. if the vote had been to do _ that, didn't you? well, yes. if the vote had been to do as _ that, didn't you? well, yes. if the vote had been to do as you - that, didn't you? well, yes. if the vote had been to do as you just i vote had been to do as you just described, i wouldn't have voted that way but of course that is not for the amendment said. the amendment was really clear that it was trying to make the whole system changes to sort out the appeals process, putting background to this. and it was very true that owen paterson had to face justice in the old system. you could sit under the new system. but he was not going to evade it the way. we new system. but he was not going to evade it the way.— evade it the way. we had with them and... it evade it the way. we had with them and--- it was— evade it the way. we had with them and... it was not _ evade it the way. we had with them and... it was not voting _ evade it the way. we had with them and... it was not voting as - evade it the way. we had with them and... it was not voting as you - evade it the way. we had with them and... it was not voting as you just| and... it was not voting as you just described. we had this amendment is two years after the prime minister took office. is it a coincidence that we have this amendment to change the rule book, to change the whole process, at the same time that owen paterson was facing a 30 day
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suspension from the house of commons? is that a pure coincidence? i don't think so. this is the first time that there has been a serious level of concern voiced about what is actually a very long standing subtle questions about how well the system works. truth? subtle questions about how well the system work-— subtle questions about how well the system works-— system works. why didn't the government _ system works. why didn't the government to _ system works. why didn't the government to do _ system works. why didn't the government to do something| system works. why didn't the - government to do something about it before? in government to do something about it before? .,. government to do something about it before? .. ., ., before? in fact, we have had successive — before? in fact, we have had successive governments - before? in fact, we have had successive governments that before? in fact, we have had - successive governments that didn't. first proposed back in 2003, multiple government since then. if you have time a case has come up where someone said on the second, they were claiming that there is a real risk of a problem being created. whether or not there was all there wasn't, this is the first time that it has been raised specifically. you are much to safe but this has been an ongoing question since 2000. wouldn't it have been better if it was sorted out long before these sort of things are always better done truly rather fun in the battle which is what i'm afraid we had last week? —— better
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done cooly. afraid we had last week? -- better done mow-— afraid we had last week? -- better done cooly. keir starmer says boris johnson is leading _ done cooly. keir starmer says boris johnson is leading his _ done cooly. keir starmer says boris johnson is leading his troops - johnson is leading his troops through the sewer and up to his neck you are one of the truth he led through the sewer.— you are one of the truth he led through the sewer. what i'm trying to do today — through the sewer. what i'm trying to do today in _ through the sewer. what i'm trying to do today in the _ through the sewer. what i'm trying to do today in the debate - through the sewer. what i'm trying to do today in the debate is, - through the sewer. what i'm trying to do today in the debate is, i - to do today in the debate is, i hope, the first step back is to contribute, and i'm sure the people what to do the same, to save how can change the rules and sort out the poster offer we more important, so people know that britain's democracy if anyone can do. nothing can ever be perfect, everyone understands that. we want to make sure, the flaws system and we should do it pre—emptively wherever we can. we pre-emptively wherever we can. we had to pre—emptively wherever we can. we had to backlash after that vote and big government u—turn, do you now regret the way you voted in that vote? ., ., , ., ., ., vote? no, i was voting for an improvement _ vote? no, i was voting for an improvement to _ vote? no, i was voting for an improvement to the - vote? no, i was voting for an improvement to the system | vote? no, i was voting for an i improvement to the system and vote? no, i was voting for an - improvement to the system and the improvement to the system and the improvement to the system and the improvement to the system is the thing that will keep our politics
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clean. it is essential. you had a kick from alberto costa earlier on today saying we need to make sure we have a proper appeals process and awkwardly if you have a problem with the appeals process, no one else gets to vote on whether or not their disciplinary proceedings at work should then be applied. you have a disciplinary process, an appeal if you need it, tribunal, something like that and then the result is decided. you don't get to vote on it afterward, your colleague. why should mps have that right? it doesn't seem right to me and it is a conflict of interest.— conflict of interest. speaking of conflict of interest. speaking of conflict of interest. speaking of conflict of interest, _ conflict of interest. speaking of conflict of interest, let's - conflict of interest. speaking of conflict of interest, let's talk i conflict of interest, let's talk about the sunday times story yesterday which said 15 of the last 16 conservative party treasurer, i6 conservative party treasurer, your party treasurer, have been offered a seat in the house of lords having donated more than 3 million to the party and the next party chairman said the most telling line is that once you pay your £3 million, you get your peerage. what
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are you going to do about that as the prime minister anti—corruption champion? i’m the prime minister anti-corruption chamion? �* ., ., �* the prime minister anti-corruption chamion? ., ., �* , champion? i'm afraid i didn't see the sunday _ champion? i'm afraid i didn't see the sunday times _ champion? i'm afraid i didn't see the sunday times piece - champion? i'm afraid i didn't see the sunday times piece left, - the sunday times piece left, so i can't comment on the detail of it. you don't read the sunday newspapers? i didn't read that piece. apologies, we didn't warn you in advance you wanted to talk about it so i didn't look at it. figs in advance you wanted to talk about it so i didn't look at it.— it so i didn't look at it. as an anti-corruption _ it so i didn't look at it. as an anti-corruption champion, i it so i didn't look at it. as an anti-corruption champion, a | it so i didn't look at it. as an - anti-corruption champion, a major anti—corruption champion, a major story in a major newspaper about corruption, i would story in a major newspaper about corruption, iwould have story in a major newspaper about corruption, i would have thought that would have been right on your radar. ., ., radar. indeed and i will get to it in due course. _ radar. indeed and i will get to it in due course. there _ radar. indeed and i will get to it in due course. there is - radar. indeed and i will get to it in due course. there is this - radar. indeed and i will get to it i in due course. there is this debate this afternoon, which i was very, very important. forgive me for not having precisely this piece to put me on the spot in you, if that is true that 15 of the last 16 of the conservative party pull treasurer is offered a seat at the house of lords, having donated £3 million to the party, what would you think? you
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just said if that is true, i would need to go and look at the answer. the question which i think we all want to if if anybody the lord, are the because of which are justified or not. what hopeful is are the people who are being appointed to whatever it is, how they got the qualifications and the ability to do thejob? if someone is donating qualifications and the ability to do the job? if someone is donating vast amounts to charity and a very small, to a party, labour party or conservative party, is a very different position. [30 conservative party, is a very different position.— different position. do you understand _ different position. do you understand why - different position. do you understand why voters i different position. do you | understand why voters are different position. do you - understand why voters are fair look at parliament, and the house of commons, the house of lords, the conservative party, safe, "seems". sleaze —— they say. i’zfe conservative party, safe, "seems". sleaze -- they say.—
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sleaze -- they say. i've heard repeatedly — sleaze -- they say. i've heard repeatedly to _ sleaze -- they say. i've heard repeatedly to make _ sleaze -- they say. i've heard repeatedly to make the - sleaze -- they say. i've heardi repeatedly to make the house sleaze -- they say. i've heard i repeatedly to make the house of sleaze -- they say. i've heard - repeatedly to make the house of a democratically elected chamber which solves the problem you describe —— i have voted repeatedly. the reason i came on the programme today was not a book about an individual sunday times or in other news, articles's that they can say i hope we can turn this around. we need to start changing the system we want to inaudible to inaudible the united states has reopened its borders to fully vaccinated travellers from dozens of countries, including the uk, for the first time since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. ministers here, say the resumption of flights to the us, is �*momentous'. our transport correspondent, caroline davies, is at heathrow for us this afternoon.
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well, there's been excitement, balloons and flag—waving, at least by the airlines here at heathrow. this is a major part of the puzzle for international travel. piece by piece, the world has started to reopen again and the us route to the uk is a major long—haul destination, and this is the first time it has meaningfully opened up for uk citizens in more than 600 days. preparing for the big send—off. almost 20 months ago, the us banned the majority of travellers coming from the uk. from first thing this morning, that changed if you're double jabbed and have a negative covid test. it means families separated by the atlantic and restrictions can reunite, including sarah, who was travelling to see her daughter, chloe, for the first time in two years. it's been so difficult because, obviously, we've been worried about everybody staying healthy, and things happen in families, where you need to be together. that's what, you know, family is all about. and not be able to, you know, console each other or keep each
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other company or whatever or hug each other when we want a good cry, but we'll do it today, so i can't wait to walk through that door and see her there. before the pandemic, the us was the fourth most popular destination for uk travellers. among the crowds were those taking work trips and holiday—makers who had held out hope for months. we've had this booked and we moved it a couple of times and we were so happy. when we heard it was opening on the 8th, we said to virgin, "put us on the eighth," first flight there. i work for a company in north carolina. i've joined a different team and it will be greatly able to see them face—to—face rather than on teams calls. in the week that cop26 focuses on transport it's not ideal timing to be celebrating the return of a major long haulflight route. but british airways and virgin atlantic say they are pushing to be more sustainable. we've both set targets for net zero by 2050 but action must start today and now. we're both flying a50s, which are the most efficient planes out there for long—haul travel. we will be embarking on offsetting and committing to the development
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of sustainable aviation fuel. but we are also seeing exciting innovations coming along in the form of hydrogen technology that we also expect to be part of the solution. so aviation has a good story to tell. to celebrate the return, ba and virgin coordinated their first two flights to take off simultaneously. more than 600 days later, travelled to the us is off the ground. more than 600 days later, travel to the us is off the ground. the airlines say there is major pent—up demand for these flights. however, this does also raise questions about the future of business travel. the world has changed during the course of the pandemic, with people a lot more used to video calls. many companies are more concerned about their carbon footprint. will business travel return in the same way it used to operate? people in england eligible for covid booster vaccinations are now able to book an appointment up to a month in advance. it's hoped the change to the booking system will speed up the roll—out of boosterjabs. more than ten million people across the uk have already had their top—up vaccine.
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the government rejects calls for a public inquiry into corruption, after it tried to change the sytem that found one of its mps guilty of breaking lobbying rules. the uk government promises £290 million to help poorer nations cope with climate change. and the world food programme warns that millions in afghanistan will die if the international community doesn't help. campaigners say the fossil fuel industry has the largest number of delegates at the cop26 climate summit in glasgow. the organisation, global witness, claims 500 people with links to fossil fuels are at the conference. cop—26 is now in it's second week, with an address expected today, from the former us president, barack obama. our science editor, david shukman, is in glasgow.
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well, the big question here is can this event put the world on a path that avoids the most dangerous rises in temperature? and the key element of that is to use less fossil fuel, particularly coal, but oil and gas, as well, because when you burn them, you release carbon dioxide that hangs around in the atmosphere for a century, at least. and the accumulation of that gas in the atmosphere over the last century or two is, scientists say, what's driving up global temperatures, leading to more extremes of weather, rise in sea level, melting of the ice caps, challenges to food supply, a great long list of all the most damaging effects of climate change. so, the logic is — if you want to avoid dangerous situations in the future you've got to fossil fuels as soon as possible, and certainly the work the scientists have done shows that you really need to be halving global emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases by the end
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of this decade. and, as things stand, those emissions are rising rather than falling. but that's what the science has laid out and that's why there's such a battleground here between the different groups of different parties — the companies, the different countries that may be big fossil fuel producers and those who say our lives are on the line with climate change. former us president obama is addressing cop 26. he is he is saying we are falling short. read he is saying we are falling short. rea ., ., , , he is saying we are falling short. rea ., , i.” he is saying we are falling short. rea ., , _,, , read over the last six years, is what has _ read over the last six years, is what has happened. _ read over the last six years, is what has happened. today, i read over the last six years, is i what has happened. today, more read over the last six years, is - what has happened. today, more than one fifth the largest companies have set net zero emission targets not just because it is the right thing to do for the environment but, in many cases, because it makes sense for their bottom line. more than 700
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cities in more than 50 countries have pledged to cut their emissions in half by the end of the decade and reaching zero by 2015. about one third of the global banking sector has agreed to align their work with the paris agreement. so, that's meaningful. now, back in the united states, of course, some of our progress stalled when my successor decided to unilaterally pull out of the paris agreement in his first year of office. i wasn't real happy about that. and, yet, the determination of our state and local governments, along with the regulations and investment that my administration had already put in place, allowed our country to keep moving forward, despite
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hostility from the white house. the $90 billion investment that we made in 2009 helped to jump—start the clean energy industry in the united states and markets adapted. and so did consumers. and even when the trump administration rolled back admission emissions requirements for all two metres along with regulatory changes and efficiency standards for many businesses chose to stay the course. they kept reducing emissions. they continually transition to electric vehicles and energy—saving appliances. —— continue to be transition. people had been rolling and didn't stop. meanwhile, science and technology continues to advance. today, the price of solar and wind energy has dropped to the point where, in some places, clean energy is cheaper than fossil fuels. places, clean energy is cheaper than fossilfuels. around places, clean energy is cheaper than fossil fuels. around the world,
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scientists and entrepreneurs are integrating abundant renewable energy, more powerful batteries, breakthroughs infield fields like synthetic biology, to invent a better future it is healthier synthetic biology, to invent a betterfuture it is healthier and more affordable. that's all good news for the planet. it is also good news for the planet. it is also good news for the planet. it is also good news for people looking for a job. in the us alone, more than 3 million people now work in clean energy related jobs. that is more than the number of people currently employed by the entire fossil fuel industry. so, despite four years of active hostility towards climate science coming from the very top of our federal government, the american people managed to still meet our original commitment under the paris agreement. not only that, but the rest the world stage in. and, now,
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with president biden and his administration rejoining the agreement, the us government is, once again, engaged and prepared to take a leadership role. and everybody who has been watching john kerry run around here knows that we take that role seriously. as the world's second largest emitter of greenhouse gases, the us has to lead. we have enormous responsibilities. and, obviously, we still have a lot of work to do. but, last week, congress passed president biden weir ipod is an infrastructure bill that will, among other things, create manufacturing... present died in's infrastructure bill. and wind turbines and batteries and electric vehicles and build out of the first national charging station so families can cross the us into
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electric vehicles. i am confident that the version of president biden's build back better built passed through congress in the next few weeks. —— build back better bill. that legislation will devote over $1 trillion to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by over1 billion metric tonnes by the end of the decade. at least ten times more than any legislation previously passed by congress. along the way, it will reduce consumer energy costs. it will invest in clean energy economy. it will create hundreds of thousands ofjobs and it will set the united states on course to meet its new climate targets, achieving a 50%— 52% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions below 2005 levels by 2030. so, the us is back. and moving more
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boldly, the us is not alone earlier this year, the uk government our hosts, announced a plan to cut emissions by almost 80% by 2035 summer, the european union put themselves on a path to carbon neutrality by 2050 —— this summer. korea passed a carbon neutrality act in september required for government to cut greenhouse gas emissions 35% or more by 2030. the canadian government has laid out a path to carbon neutrality by 2050 with milestones to hit along the way. so, paris showed the world that progress is possible, created a framework, important work was done by and important work was done by and important work was done by and important work has been done here.
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but if the good news. —— was done by. —— that is the good news. now for the bad news. we are nowhere near where we need to be at. for starters, despite the progress that paris represented, most countries have failed to meet the action plans may set six years ago. and the consequences of not moving fast enough other, more apparent all the time. last month, a study found that 85% of the global population has experienced weather events that were more severe because of climate change. stronger storms, more severe because of climate change. strongerstorms, longer heat waves, more intense flooding, crippling drought. half of the world are becoming more dangerous to live in, triggering new migration patterns and worsening conflict around the globe. it is one of the reasons why the us pentagon and other us agencies have said that
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climate change poses a national security threat for the us and everyone else. but not only did we not hit all of the targets that were pledged in paris, remember, paris was only supposed to be a beginning, not an end point of ourjoint effort to control climate change. back in 2015, we knew that even if the commitments made as part of the paris agreement were fully met we would still fall short of our goal of keeping global temperature increases below 1.5 celsius studio: there of former president obama of united states, talking about climate change in glasgow, cop26. saying more needs to be done collectively and individually. the new chairman of yorkshire county cricket club is holding a press conference at headlingley this afternoon.
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last week, there were several high profile resignations at the club, following that botched inquiry into accusations of racism towards former player, azeem rafiq. i'v e i've been appointed with a clear remit of righting the wrongs of the past. and making sure that this club is an inclusive home wiring players of the future. —— inclusive home for aspiring players. there have been complaints of racial discrimination and the handling of this cricket club over the past 18 months. it has rocked the sporting world but, let me be clear from the outset, racism and any form of discrimination, is not banter. it is to acceptable. my
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heart goes out to anyone who has experienced racism or discrimination or abuse of any kind. this has been be painful and difficult period for yorkshire county cricket club and all those associated with it. i thank azeem rafiq for his bravery in speaking out. azeem if a whistle—blower should be praised as such. —— is a whistle—blower. he should never have been put through this. and i would like to apologise for him. we are sorry for what you and yourfamily for him. we are sorry for what you and your family experienced. and the way in which we have handled this. what happel did that happen to you must never happen again to anyone —— what happened to you.
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as an outsider coming into this situation, it is clear to me that we handle this situation badly in the investigation was flawed. we handle this situation badly in the investigation was flawed. we need to learn from our _ investigation was flawed. we need to learn from our mistakes _ investigation was flawed. we need to learn from our mistakes and - investigation was flawed. we need to learn from our mistakes and ensure l learn from our mistakes and ensure the right people in place and ensure we do better. not only in terms of the vote issues of racism or discrimination but also how as a club we deal with any issues that arise going forward —— root issues. clearly there is a problem. and i have been appointed to see if this club is institutionally look downright racist and how we can address that. part of my role will be to examine and be clear about whatever�*s have been made in the handling of azeem rafiq's complaints, both in terms of the investigation and the actions declared following it and how we can from them. another part of my role
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will be to examine the report that looks at several specific instances of alleged racism but for me not necessarily the totality of the issue and i am determined to look at the pattern of behaviours which could suggest institutional racism within the club. how this manifests itself and what we can do about it. but, clearly, this is a complex issue. a complex situation and it won't be easy. while some strides have been made in the area of racism across the world of sports, this episode highlights a huge amount of work needs to be done. there is a clear need for urgent and seismic change starting from within. and i am determined to lead this club to a
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better and more positive future. maybe i should just say if you words about myself. i'm a proud yorkshireman. growing up in bradford having left kenyon with my family at the age of one and i have experienced racial abuse throughout my life and some of my earliest childhood memories are of overt and painful racism. —— having left kenyon. it is an experience that i think i have shared with a few of you in the past before. —— kenya. when i was a child, i was a really fast runner. it's slimmer than i am now. why was i really fast runner? because almost every other weekend or every weekend a local group of skinheads would like to go out and
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engage in tacky bashing bashing. you had to run you got beaten up. —— pakistani bashing. it is fairly obvious like words like the shorter form of pakistani can never be acceptable in any context. i was a pretty scrawny kid but i became captain of the school cricket team and that gave me a different standing. i didn't get beaten up anymore. and thanks to my pe teacher i went on to play the bradford league and other leagues around yorkshire. i loved the game and i believe in sports is a real driving force for good for bringing us together in uniting us. that is the light i want to bring back here. in my professional career, probably
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because of my experiences, i've been motivated to help people, other people. whether in social work as a social worker or working with good drug users having set up many drug services across the country and here in yorkshire with people who have mental health challenges in particular with prisoners, rehabilitated prisoners. my whole life has been about organisational change and tackling injustice. i have been fortunate also to have worked on the england and wales cricket board and my focus there was good governance and good stewardship. also working with colleagues across the world of cricket i helped to produce, as many of you will know, the south asian action plan to increase engagement and participation in our game. i spent a lot of years doing that. so it is sad where we have come to at
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the moment and i need to deal with that. but so, throughout my working life i have thought against discrimination, including a major five year government project on tackling institutional racism in mental health care. i fundamentally believe we have good people fighting for change. from all of our members to our thousands of volunteers to the players, to the staff, to the support staff, i am sure together we can educate and inspire young people and communities to be the very best they can be. inclusiveness, i suppose, once the my blood. inclusiveness for everybody. yorkshire is my home and i want to make yorkshire county cricket club a
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place that everyone from all backgrounds. in the last few days, literally two and a half days, i have spent much of my time speaking to as many people as possible connected to this great club. this club should be the pinnacle of english cricket and is a proud yorkshireman myself it pains me to see it in this situation. i fundamentally believe there should be a period of proof and reconciliation to get to the bottom of our culture and our processes, to learn from our mistakes and re—establish trust. i think trust is a very much used word but my experience once it is shaken or broken it is very hard to regain. trust and transparency were the
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keywords for my tenure. i am —— will be the keywords for my tenure. i'm committed to showing the club is wholly inclusive and actively anti—racist and anti—discriminatory from this point onwards. a club we can be proud of his people of yorkshire and as a nation of cricket lovers. i do ask the space and time to listen and learn in order that i can create a change that has impact, thatis can create a change that has impact, that is long lasting, and that is authentic. it is essential that my first undertaking as chair is to listen to those who have experienced racism, experience discrimination, experienced abuse, and to ensure their guidance is central, their guidance is central, to how you move forward as a club. i urge others to come forward to share their
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experience. yorkshire is county cricket club should be a club for everyone in yorkshire and we are ready to listen, we are ready to believe and we are ready to change. i suppose what i have been speaking about is i am acutely aware of the need for action is notjust simply words. i've only been in the role for 72 hours at best. so i asked for patience as i get to grips with the scale of the situation. i've had hundreds of messages from people from the world of cricket and beyond following my appointment. i want to thank them for their support and their heartfelt encouragement and i apologise that i haven't managed to respond to each and every one of you but i will day. there are many actions that we've taken since i was appointed on friday. i want to
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announce that we've made the first vital step on what will be a long journey for this club. we settled the employment tribunal case, the legal proceedings of azeem rafiq. absolutely no restrictions have been placed on azeem and what he can or cannot say about his experiences. the settlement does not involve a nondisclosure agreement. the club was wrong to have asked azeem to agree to indie game that passed and he rightly refused and we have apologised unreservedly for previously making that demand. i offer means azeem would be free to speak about his experiences publicly. he is free to answer any questions that are put to him when he once and that includes the select
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committee hearing that is scheduled for the 16th of november —— when he wants. second, as i said, we need to listen. i have asked for an independent whistle—blowing hotline to be set up as quickly as possible. i want to ate a safe space for people to come forward with their disclosures. i have instructed for this to be set up quickly and will report on progress by the end of this week. we want anyone who may have suffered issues to come forward and have noticed that some people who have come forward recently appear to have felt unable to step forward in azeem �*s case. this hotline will provide us with important data as to where the specific problems lie so that we can begin to make improvements which are
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desperately needed. its independence will allow any of those who felt silenced or intimidated to come forward in a safe place. third, i will be commissioning a specialist independent review of processes and procedures and diversity and inclusion, including discrimination against those with protected characteristics. gender, race, religion, disability. we need to look at our processes and proceedings on how we report incidents of racism, abuse, discrimination or bullying of any kind, informed by what has happened here over the past 18 months. our fans, the cricketing world and the wider public need to trust that we are fit for purpose and we can deal with issues in a fair and a transparent way. my aim is to work
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together with a range of stakeholders to do this and this will be part of my future action plan. fourth, in the spirit of transparency and in light of the investigation is now under way, i have shared the full report with relevant parties who have legal interests in this matter. azeem �*s lawyers, the england and wales cricket board, the equality and human rights commission and the chair of the culture media and sport select committee. one thing that has really disturbed me this weekend, and i am deeply troubled by it. i am deeply troubled to have learnt over the weekend that some current staff have been harassed and even received death threats. i categorically condemn this. and i hope and i have
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and i have will be seeking to make and i have will be seeking to make an appointment at the earliest opportunity with the chief constable of west yorkshire to discuss this further. nobody should feel discriminated against or abused and that includes the staff at headingley. i can confirm that i have had discussions, meetings with england and wales cricket board about restoration of international cricket. we will have to demonstrate that we have addressing the root causes of the issues and that we are leading change before having any concrete conversations on that. on top of this, clearly the withdrawal of sponsors and international cricket has caused a financial hiatus. i have appointed... the managing director of morrisons who is a member of the board here as our
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chair of auditand is a member of the board here as our chair of audit and risk committee and both trevor and i will be having conversations with sponsors in the coming days. finally, there is much more to be done which will become clear to me in the coming days. i'm happy to answer questions but please be aware that i may not have answers for everything. i'm determined to make this club the beating heart of english cricket again. after 158 years, we are ready to change, we are ready to accept, the past, and we are ready to become a club which people can trust to do the right thing. thank you. i'm happy to take some questions. reporter tell
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me, you can from a seismic change. your predecessor roger hutton last week who put much of the blame on your chief executive here and the directive cricket for not exerting the findings of the report and for being part of the culture stuck in the past that he spoke about. how can you regain trust with both the gentleman stood on the board? as i said, i have been here for less than 72 hours. i said i would listen and that means listening to everybody. i will look at what has gone on, what has happened, it will seek independent, you know, help on that, and i will make the right decisions. in the coming days, once i've assessed the evidence. you know, my whole life is about look at the evidence, listen to people and then make the right decision. and if
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then make the right decision. and if i ma , then make the right decision. and if i may. you — then make the right decision. and if i may. you shed _ then make the right decision. and if i may, you shed the _ then make the right decision. and if i may, you shed the report. - then make the right decision. and if i may, you shed the report. eddie . i may, you shed the report. eddie had a chance _ i may, you shed the report. eddie had a chance look— i may, you shed the report. eddie had a chance look through - i may, you shed the report. eddie had a chance look through the full report— had a chance look through the full report and — had a chance look through the full report and if— had a chance look through the full report and if so _ had a chance look through the full report and if so what _ had a chance look through the full report and if so what did - had a chance look through the full report and if so what did you - had a chance look through the fulli report and if so what did you think about— report and if so what did you think about what— report and if so what did you think about what you _ report and if so what did you think about what you found _ report and if so what did you think about what you found in _ report and if so what did you think about what you found in it? - report and if so what did you think about what you found in it? just i about what you found in it? just might— about what you found in it? just might have _ about what you found in it? just might have you _ about what you found in it? just might have you had _ about what you found in it? just might have you had a _ about what you found in it? just might have you had a chance? i| about what you found in it? just - might have you had a chance? [will might have you had a chance? i will be honest. — might have you had a chance? i will be honest. i— might have you had a chance? i will be honest, i have _ might have you had a chance? i will be honest, i have not _ might have you had a chance? be honest, i have not managed to beatin be honest, i have not managed to beat in the manner in which i want to do, quietly with several hours and read and digest it and understand it. but what i have seen so far does make me feel uncomfortable, makes me feel... that the process wasn't as well completed as it should have been. and, as i said, i think, as it should have been. and, as i said, ithink, you know, there was as it should have been. and, as i said, i think, you know, there was a way of looking at individuals and people, as opposed to looking at the bigger picture, the system. what did all that had up to? what does that mean on a systemic basis? so think
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you know, i do meet might need... that is what's needed seismic change. they met when you publish that report this week was make —— wallet, you published its report this week? _ wallet, you published its report this week? -- _ wallet, you published its report this week? —— will— wallet, you published its report this week? —— will you - wallet, you published its report this week? —— will you publish. wallet, you published its report i this week? —— will you publish this report? _ this week? —— will you publish this report? i— this week? -- will you publish this reort? , ., ., report? i believe that the england and wales cricket _ report? i believe that the england and wales cricket board - report? i believe that the england and wales cricket board of - report? i believe that the england and wales cricket board of call i and wales cricket board of call should have it as our governing body, azeem rafiq's lawyers should have it, they have a legal interest in the report. but have it, they have a legal interest in the report-— have it, they have a legal interest in the report. but when you publish it? ithinkthat_ in the report. but when you publish it? i think that giving _ in the report. but when you publish it? i think that giving it _ in the report. but when you publish it? i think that giving it to - in the report. but when you publish it? i think that giving it to the - it? i think that giving it to the --eole it? i think that giving it to the people who — it? i think that giving it to the people who have _ it? i think that giving it to the people who have a _ it? i think that giving it to the people who have a legal- it? i think that giving it to the i people who have a legal interest it? i think that giving it to the - people who have a legal interest it would be important for them to be able to read it and reflect on it and make decisions before ijust go and make decisions before ijust go and publish it. you and make decisions before i 'ust go and publish ti and make decisions before i 'ust go and publish hi and publish it. you have talked a lot about regaining _ and publish it. you have talked a lot about regaining trust. -
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and publish it. you have talked a lot about regaining trust. can i and publish it. you have talked a| lot about regaining trust. can you seep _ lot about regaining trust. can you see, really. — lot about regaining trust. can you see, really, regaining that trust unless— see, really, regaining that trust unless you _ see, really, regaining that trust unless you have a whole new team and the board? _ unless you have a whole new team and the board? anyone is saying to me in the board? anyone is saying to me in the past _ the board? anyone is saying to me in the past you're never going to get that back? — the past you're never going to get that back? | the past you're never going to get that back? ., the past you're never going to get that back? ,, , ., the past you're never going to get that back? ,, ., ,, the past you're never going to get that back? ,, , ., ., ,, ., , that back? i think you make a very valid point- _ that back? i think you make a very valid point. and _ that back? i think you make a very valid point. and i— that back? i think you make a very valid point. and i don't _ that back? i think you make a very valid point. and i don't want - that back? i think you make a very valid point. and i don't want to i valid point. and i don't want to keep sane, as i said, but, as i said, ido keep sane, as i said, but, as i said, i do need time to reflect and speak to people and listen and hear what has happened. i take on board absolutely, you know, when trust like this has been shattered you really do need to look at, you know, inevitably, leadership is important inevitably, leadership is important in any of those circumstances but i need to look across the scale at how people behave, what made that happen, and where we need to go next. i'm conscious of time and i need to do that quickly because you know, one word only go so far to
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regain trust, as i've said. it is a very hard to rebuild and all i can show you is that i will look in great detail, i will look at what's happened, i will listen to people and i will act but i will act with others, notjust by myself. i5 and i will act but i will act with others, notjust by myself. is at others, not 'ust by myself. is at our others, notjust by myself. is at your instinct — others, notjust by myself. is at your instinct that _ others, notjust by myself. is at your instinct that this _ others, notjust by myself. is at your instinct that this club - others, notjust by myself. is at your instinct that this club is institutionally— your instinct that this club is institutionally racist? - your instinct that this club is institutionally racist?- your instinct that this club is institutionally racist? that is why i have institutionally racist? that is why i have been _ institutionally racist? that is why i have been appointed, - institutionally racist? that is why i have been appointed, becausel institutionally racist? that is why. i have been appointed, because of the charge of institutional racism. that is what i intend to look at carefully. that is what the equality and human rights commission will, they are the experts and they will investigate this and that is why i made that the port available to them as soon as they are straight. in its entirety. as soon as they are straight. in its entire . �* ., , ., ~' entirety. and where do you think events of the _ entirety. and where do you think events of the last _ entirety. and where do you think events of the last week - entirety. and where do you think events of the last week have i entirety. and where do you think events of the last week have left the club's — events of the last week have left the club's relationship _ events of the last week have left the club's relationship with i events of the last week have left the club's relationship with the l the club's relationship with the south — the club's relationship with the south asian _ the club's relationship with the south asian community? i the club's relationship with the south asian community? two. the club's relationship with the south asian community? two things, i think. of course _
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south asian community? two things, i think. of course it's _ south asian community? two things, i think. of course it's difficult _ south asian community? two things, i think. of course it's difficult and - think. of course it's difficult and people have said, you know, you are here for everybody, cricket is a game for everybody, is a game for me? of course. the positiveness in this, the light in this, is there was a march outside here i believe on saturday afternoon. people didn't come here baying for blood, they came here for change, and they said they will support us if we are truthful and we are transparent and i want to work with those people. and everybody to regain that trust. we are all yorkshire people. this might be not as light as it is but you can tell from my ex and i am a through and through yorkshireman and so are theyjust like you can tell from my accident. everybody, not just the south asian community, all communities, the kid from the working class a state who says that is not a place for me, i can't afford to come in here. it is about young girls to say cricket is full
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of macho men. it is about everybody and that is what i want to make it a game for everybody, genuinely. what game for everybody, genuinely. what ou sa to game for everybody, genuinely. what you say to form _ game for everybody, genuinely. what you say to form a _ game for everybody, genuinely. what you say to form a high _ game for everybody, genuinely. what you say to form a high profile players — you say to form a high profile players who _ you say to form a high profile players who played _ you say to form a high profile players who played for- you say to form a high profile players who played for this i you say to form a high profile i players who played for this club you say to form a high profile - players who played for this club who in the _ players who played for this club who in the past _ players who played for this club who in the past may— players who played for this club who in the past may believe _ players who played for this club who in the past may believe that - players who played for this club who in the past may believe that they. in the past may believe that they have _ in the past may believe that they have crossed _ in the past may believe that they have crossed the _ in the past may believe that they have crossed the line _ in the past may believe that they have crossed the line in- in the past may believe that they have crossed the line in terms i in the past may believe that they have crossed the line in terms ofi have crossed the line in terms of the language _ have crossed the line in terms of the language they _ have crossed the line in terms of the language they have - have crossed the line in terms of the language they have used? i have crossed the line in terms of. the language they have used? what would _ the language they have used? what would you _ the language they have used? what would you say— the language they have used? what would you say to _ the language they have used? what would you say to those _ the language they have used? what would you say to those players? i the language they have used? what. would you say to those players? what about _ would you say to those players? what about the _ would you say to those players? what about the players? _ would you say to those players? what about the players? who _ would you say to those players? what about the players? who may- would you say to those players? what about the players? who may be i about the players? who may be reflecting — about the players? who may be reflecting on _ about the players? who may be reflecting on their— about the players? who may be reflecting on their own - about the players? who may be reflecting on their own actions? what _ reflecting on their own actions? what you — reflecting on their own actions? what you say— reflecting on their own actions? what you say to _ reflecting on their own actions? what you say to them? - reflecting on their own actions? what you say to them? be i reflecting on their own actions? what you say to them? be are i reflecting on their own actions? - what you say to them? be are welcome more than _ what you say to them? be are welcome more than once — what you say to them? be are welcome more than once and _ what you say to them? be are welcome more than once and going _ what you say to them? be are welcome more than once and going to— what you say to them? be are welcome more than once and going to save i more than once and going to save them _ more than once and going to save them is _ more than once and going to save them is of— more than once and going to save them is of my— more than once and going to save them is of my first _ more than once and going to save them is of my first priorities - more than once and going to save them is of my first priorities is- more than once and going to save them is of my first priorities is to| them is of my first priorities is to see these — them is of my first priorities is to see these players, _ them is of my first priorities is to see these players, see _ them is of my first priorities is to see these players, see all- them is of my first priorities is to see these players, see all the . see these players, see all the players. — see these players, see all the players, because _ see these players, see all the players, because it _ see these players, see all the players, because it is - see these players, see all the players, because it is what i see these players, see all the| players, because it is what we see these players, see all the - players, because it is what we come here for. _ players, because it is what we come here for. to — players, because it is what we come here for, to watch _ players, because it is what we come here for, to watch the _ players, because it is what we come here for, to watch the players, - players, because it is what we come here for, to watch the players, and i here for, to watch the players, and i here for, to watch the players, and i need _ here for, to watch the players, and i need to— here for, to watch the players, and i need to listen— here for, to watch the players, and i need to listen to _ here for, to watch the players, and i need to listen to them _ here for, to watch the players, and i need to listen to them as - here for, to watch the players, and i need to listen to them as well. i i need to listen to them as well. i'm i need to listen to them as well. i'm sure — i need to listen to them as well. i'm sure many— i need to listen to them as well. i'm sure many of— i need to listen to them as well. i'm sure many of them - i need to listen to them as well. i'm sure many of them have - i need to listen to them as well. - i'm sure many of them have reflected on what has happened in the past and they've thought about what has gone on. chat to me. and i will chat to them and let's see where it goes.
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higher. i appreciate you are only 72 hours _ higher. i appreciate you are only 72 hours into— higher. i appreciate you are only 72 hours into the job but from what you know _ hours into the job but from what you know so _ hours into the job but from what you know so far. — hours into the job but from what you know so far, and you talked a lot about _ know so far, and you talked a lot about pride, about being a proud yorkshireman. is this club that you can proud — yorkshireman. is this club that you can proud of? it yorkshireman. is this club that you can proud of?— can proud of? it is a club that i'm auoin to can proud of? it is a club that i'm going to be _ can proud of? it is a club that i'm going to be proud _ can proud of? it is a club that i'm going to be proud of. _ can proud of? it is a club that i'm going to be proud of. but- can proud of? it is a club that i'm . going to be proud of. but right now? riuht now, going to be proud of. but right now? right now. it — going to be proud of. but right now? right now. it is _ going to be proud of. but right now? right now, it is difficult _ going to be proud of. but right now? right now, it is difficult to _ going to be proud of. but right now? right now, it is difficult to stand - right now, it is difficult to stand here and say i'm proud that yorkshire county cricket club is on the front page of every newspaper for the wrong reason. that is very difficult and it is difficult to come at you know, when this is a place you've grown up, you know, and i grew up watching park avenue, you know? when yorkshire were there. so thatis know? when yorkshire were there. so that is tough but we are going to be proud of it. from this moment onwards because we are going to
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accept that wrong decisions are being made and we need to just look at the detail of all those wrong decisions and where we can go forward today but i have to be proud of the club, otherwise what is the use of me sitting here? i have to believe that this is going to be the best place on earth to play cricket and watch cricket, the what am i doing here? i and watch cricket, the what am i doing here?— and watch cricket, the what am i doing here? i appreciate you were sa in: ou doing here? i appreciate you were saying you have — doing here? i appreciate you were saying you have not _ doing here? i appreciate you were saying you have not vetted - doing here? i appreciate you were saying you have not vetted the - saying you have not vetted the report — saying you have not vetted the report yet in full properly but in the 72_ report yet in full properly but in the 72 hours have you spoken personally to mr rafiq? | the 72 hours have you spoken personally to mr rafiq? i spent about six and _ personally to mr rafiq? i spent about six and half— personally to mr rafiq? i spent about six and half hours - personally to mr rafiq? i spent i about six and half hours speaking personally to mr rafiq? i spent - about six and half hours speaking to azeem rafiq. and it was difficult. it was actually quite sad. it was tough for me. it was incredibly tough for me. it was incredibly tough for me. it was incredibly tough for him. and you did feel why
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would we do this to any human being? you know, why would we end up in a position where this young man is you know, has faced these challenges, and they are tough challenges. but that goes for some of the staff here who had sleepless nights because they've had death threats and camino, you wouldn't wish this on anybody —— you know, you wouldn't wish this on anybody and it can't happen again. wish this on anybody and it can't happen again-— wish this on anybody and it can't happen again._ to - wish this on anybody and it can't i happen again._ to move happen again. thank you. to move forward having _ happen again. thank you. to move forward having had _ happen again. thank you. to move forward having had that _ happen again. thank you. to move l forward having had that conversation with azeem — forward having had that conversation with azeem rafiq _ forward having had that conversation with azeem rafiq you _ forward having had that conversation with azeem rafiq you need - forward having had that conversation with azeem rafiq you need to - forward having had that conversation with azeem rafiq you need to bring i with azeem rafiq you need to bring him in _ with azeem rafiq you need to bring him in some — with azeem rafiq you need to bring him in some way— with azeem rafiq you need to bring him in some way back— with azeem rafiq you need to bring him in some way back into- with azeem rafiq you need to bring him in some way back into this - with azeem rafiq you need to bring i him in some way back into this club? i him in some way back into this club? i have _ him in some way back into this club? i have personally— him in some way back into this club? i have personally asked _ him in some way back into this club? i have personally asked him - him in some way back into this club? i have personally asked him to- him in some way back into this club? i have personally asked him to sit- i have personally asked him to sit on my shoulder and challenge me on what i do. he had a lot of things to say, a lot about cricket but camino, i love cricket but i'm not here for
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my cricketing skills or... i'd like to think i was but camino, i'm not. he has phenomenal cricket intelligence. he has phenomenal understanding of what's happened. my understanding of what's happened. my understanding is that this was never about him and other individuals, it wasn't about a particular player, it wasn't about a particular player, it was about... the system, the structures, the processes, the fact that we just missed the obvious so, yes, you know, he is going to need time to reflect and think, you know, i'm not going to say come back but i would hope after camino, he has played here, he was captain here, it would be a shame not to work together and to seek his help to find a way forward. share together and to seek his help to find a way forward.— find a way forward. are the individuals _ find a way forward. are the individuals that _ find a way forward. are the individuals that are - find a way forward. are the individuals that are still- find a way forward. are the i individuals that are still here find a way forward. are the - individuals that are still here that will have — individuals that are still here that
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will have to — individuals that are still here that will have to go _ individuals that are still here that will have to go for _ individuals that are still here that will have to go for him _ individuals that are still here that will have to go for him to - individuals that are still here that will have to go for him to feel - individuals that are still here that will have to go for him to feel he | will have to go for him to feel he can come — will have to go for him to feel he can come back— will have to go for him to feel he can come back in? _ will have to go for him to feel he can come back in? i'm“— will have to go for him to feel he can come back in?— can come back in? i'm sure he feels that in all i — can come back in? i'm sure he feels that in all i can _ can come back in? i'm sure he feels that in all i can do _ can come back in? i'm sure he feels that in all i can do to _ can come back in? i'm sure he feels that in all i can do to reassure - can come back in? i'm sure he feels that in all i can do to reassure him l that in all i can do to reassure him is to say what i said you all, i need to look at the evidence, listen, learn, and i hope i am a kind and passionate man, having been a social worker a of my life and work with some of those vulnerable people in society but i'm not shrinking violet. if somebody has done wrong and if somebody here thinks that pakistani slurs or any other such word is banter on the front door is down there. what front door is down there. what about his sister who _ front door is down there. what about his sister who also _ front door is down there. what about his sister who also had _ front door is down there. what about his sister who also had a _ front door is down there. what about his sister who also had a claim - front door is down there. what about his sister who also had a claim loss l his sister who also had a claim loss against _ his sister who also had a claim loss against the — his sister who also had a claim loss against the club _ his sister who also had a claim loss against the club at _ his sister who also had a claim loss against the club at about _ his sister who also had a claim loss against the club at about the - against the club at about the foundation? _ against the club at about the foundation? she _ against the club at about the foundation? she also - against the club at about the foundation? she also clearly| against the club at about the - foundation? she also clearly feels she has— foundation? she also clearly feels she has not— foundation? she also clearly feels she has not been— foundation? she also clearly feels she has not been treated - foundation? she also clearly feels i she has not been treated correctly? yes, she has not been treated correctly? yes. and _ she has not been treated correctly? yes. and she — she has not been treated correctly? yes, and she will— she has not been treated correctly? yes, and she will be _ she has not been treated correctly? yes, and she will be one _ she has not been treated correctly? yes, and she will be one of- she has not been treated correctly? yes, and she will be one of the - yes, and she will be one of the first people i will be speaking to. i've had the pleasure of actually being with his sister, i think on
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some of your shows. she is a dynamic, from my knowledge, what she did at leicester with asian women and going out there and working and really passionate, that is what it's all about so, you know, if there is all about so, you know, if there is a complaint there, if there is an issue there, if the people here now i'm going to deal with it but that helpline will be set up asap and it will be independent.— helpline will be set up asap and it will be independent. from sky news. the evidence — will be independent. from sky news. the evidence against _ will be independent. from sky news. the evidence against certain - will be independent. from sky news. the evidence against certain playersl the evidence against certain players is there _ the evidence against certain players is there and — the evidence against certain players is there and for— the evidence against certain players is there and for some _ the evidence against certain players is there and for some it _ the evidence against certain players is there and for some it is— the evidence against certain players is there and for some it isjust - is there and for some it isjust attegations _ is there and for some it isjust allegations that— is there and for some it isjust allegations that have - is there and for some it isjust allegations that have been - is there and for some it isjust - allegations that have been denied. in allegations that have been denied. in any— allegations that have been denied. in any ptayers _ allegations that have been denied. in any players who _ allegations that have been denied. in any players who have _ allegations that have been denied. in any players who have been - allegations that have been denied. | in any players who have been found to have _ in any players who have been found to have been — in any players who have been found to have been racist _ in any players who have been found to have been racist continue - in any players who have been found to have been racist continue to- to have been racist continue to represent and play for - to have been racist continue to. represent and play for yorkshire? to have been racist continue to- represent and play for yorkshire? i represent and play for yorkshire? suppose ijust have to look a few months back with what happened with ollie in england cricket. it depends what context, who did what, when, what context, who did what, when, what did it mean, what does it mean for the now? i think by going back
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to the question what the place think about it now? there was a process that was undertaken then. i think it was a very good process that was undertaken so why wouldn't i use that process in the same manner here that process in the same manner here that was done by the governing body? so i don't know if that answers your question but i think that is what i would be tempted to do.- question but i think that is what i would be tempted to do. the play is --erhas would be tempted to do. the play is perhaps have _ would be tempted to do. the play is perhaps have been _ would be tempted to do. the play is perhaps have been wrong - would be tempted to do. the play is perhaps have been wrong in - would be tempted to do. the play is perhaps have been wrong in the i is perhaps have been wrong in the past so _ is perhaps have been wrong in the past so how— is perhaps have been wrong in the past so how can _ is perhaps have been wrong in the past so how can it _ is perhaps have been wrong in the past so how can it piece _ is perhaps have been wrong in the past so how can it piece a - is perhaps have been wrong in the l past so how can it piece a promising future? _ past so how can it piece a promising future? i— past so how can it piece a promising future? , , ., ., . ,, future? i suppose i would go back to the, ou future? i suppose i would go back to the. you know. _ future? i suppose i would go back to the. you know. -- — future? i suppose i would go back to the, you know, -- how— future? i suppose i would go back to the, you know, -- how can - future? i suppose i would go back to the, you know, -- how can that be l the, you know, -- how can that be used as a — the, you know, -- how can that be used as a barometer— the, you know, -- how can that be used as a barometer in _ the, you know, -- how can that be used as a barometer in the - the, you know, -- how can that be| used as a barometer in the future? the, you know, -- how can that be i used as a barometer in the future? i used as a barometer in the future? suppose i would go back to a used as a barometer in the future?“ suppose i would go back to a moment in time someone did something, if it was abhorrent and they recognise it was abhorrent and they recognise it was they need to think about their own futures and what they are going to do and, as i said, if they think what they did was banter of it was
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just mates then there is in a place for them here. just mates then there is in a place forthem here. if just mates then there is in a place for them here. if they reflect it was a moment where they can let you know, is ollie robinson did say, i realised i'd made a big mistake and he was sanctioned and he was disciplined. i suppose you know, he was sanctioned and he was disciplined. isuppose you know, it is notjust about cricket players, it is in any employment, you are going to take action on discriminatory behaviour. you know? but you was to look at the context? can you _ but you was to look at the context? can you sit — but you was to look at the context? can you sit here _ but you was to look at the context? can you sit here today _ but you was to look at the context? can you sit here today and - but you was to look at the context? can you sit here today and say - can you sit here today and say that this witi— can you sit here today and say that this will be — can you sit here today and say that this will be a — can you sit here today and say that this will be a zero _ can you sit here today and say that this will be a zero tolerance - can you sit here today and say that this will be a zero tolerance club i this will be a zero tolerance club to discrimination? _ this will be a zero tolerance club to discrimination? the - this will be a zero tolerance club to discrimination?— this will be a zero tolerance club to discrimination? the fact that i'm sat here if it's _ to discrimination? the fact that i'm sat here if it's not _ to discrimination? the fact that i'm sat here if it's not a _ to discrimination? the fact that i'm sat here if it's not a zero _ sat here if it's not a zero tolerance club they got a real problem and i will fail miserably if it's not a zero tolerance club and it's not a zero tolerance club and it is notjust yorkshire. every club in every first—class county and every, you know, ishouldn't in every first—class county and every, you know, i shouldn't use the world minor counties anymore but every other county, they are all fit
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it in all sport should be zero tolerance. we will all have to work on that. that isn't going to happen overnight. i would on that. that isn't going to happen overnight. iwould be on that. that isn't going to happen overnight. i would be as pretentious as to think i'm going to sit here and say it is zero tolerance and everyone is going to behave themselves tomorrow. we are going to have begun a journey and people will have begun a journey and people will have to understand why to zero tolerance. i'm sure the majority of people here wouldn't think he is in the house of lords and he says racism marred his life all the time. you know, or chased him and he was a young lad. they need to understand... my belief is we need to take people on a journey. if you want to come on the journey. if you don't and you're not willing to take part in it then don't. books i am a social worker. part in it then don't. books i am a socialworker. i part in it then don't. books i am a social worker. i believe human beings change and people can go to the journey and beings change and people can go to thejourney and i believe beings change and people can go to the journey and i believe everybody can change. if i did and i wouldn't be working with drug users or people locked up in prison cells. and
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punishing players? ithink appropriate sanctions where necessary will have to happen, like in any sphere of life. irate necessary will have to happen, like in any sphere of life.— in any sphere of life. we suffice, lord patel, _ in any sphere of life. we suffice, lord patel, that _ in any sphere of life. we suffice, lord patel, that there _ in any sphere of life. we suffice, lord patel, that there were - in any sphere of life. we suffice, lord patel, that there were no . lord patel, that there were no action— lord patel, that there were no action is— lord patel, that there were no action is taking against anybody given— action is taking against anybody given that the feat was found to have _ given that the feat was found to have suffered racial harassment? —— were _ have suffered racial harassment? —— were you _ have suffered racial harassment? —— were you surprised? have suffered racial harassment? -- were you surprised?— were you surprised? yes, i was surprised _ were you surprised? yes, i was surprised that _ were you surprised? yes, i was surprised that i _ were you surprised? yes, i was surprised that i don't _ were you surprised? yes, i was surprised that i don't know- were you surprised? yes, i was surprised that i don't know the | surprised that i don't know the process and proceedings that took place. ifeel process and proceedings that took place. i feel instinctively that, you know, the process was flawed, the investigation, the manner in which it was done, you know, wasn't right. you don't have a whistle—blower... you know, ispent a lifetime helping the mental health worlds employ people called freedom to speak up guardians, full—time people where a staff member would go to speak up, you know, because they wanted a whistle—blower in we had to
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deal with it. here we had a whistle—blower and what did we do? we did the opposite of what we should have done. so we did the opposite of what we should have done.— should have done. so are you referring _ should have done. so are you referring to. _ should have done. so are you referring to, you _ should have done. so are you referring to, you know, - should have done. so are you - referring to, you know, witnesses not coming — referring to, you know, witnesses not coming forward and cooperating? yes, not coming forward and cooperating? yes. i_ not coming forward and cooperating? yes. ithink— not coming forward and cooperating? yes, i think witnesses clearly... so someone like michael vaughan who didn't— someone like michael vaughan who didn't engage with the process and said he _ didn't engage with the process and said he didn't get the legal services _ said he didn't get the legal services his advisors required to do so. services his advisors required to do so what— services his advisors required to do so. what would you say to him and others _ so. what would you say to him and others who — so. what would you say to him and others who didn't engage the process -- legat— others who didn't engage the process —— legal reassurances. others who didn't engage the process -- legal reassurances.— others who didn't engage the process -- legal reassurances. please engage with the process _ -- legal reassurances. please engage with the process now— -- legal reassurances. please engage with the process now i'm _ -- legal reassurances. please engage with the process now i'm not - -- legal reassurances. please engage with the process now i'm not a - -- legal reassurances. please engage with the process now i'm not a legal | with the process now i'm not a legal expert that there will be legal experts possibly with it. does max legal experts supporting me with it. why should they want to represent our county?— our county? because it is their future. this _ our county? because it is their future. this is _ our county? because it is their future. this is their— our county? because it is their future. this is their home - our county? because it is their future. this is their home and | our county? because it is their. future. this is their home and it our county? because it is their - future. this is their home and it is my home. in the next years to come,
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i want to find the nextjoe root, the next sachin tendulkar playing for yorkshire. and what i am saying to those young people is that the door is wide open. and if we make mistakes along the way, we will listen to you and we will change. but, live your dreams here. why should you go somewhere else? why should you go somewhere else? why should you go somewhere else? why should you have to do? this club is for everybody who is in yorkshire. and beyond. you know. iwould for everybody who is in yorkshire. and beyond. you know. i would expect a few lads from surrey and elsewhere to come because this is going to be the best cricket club in the world. even the length of the original investigation, _ even the length of the original investigation, is _ even the length of the original investigation, is there - even the length of the original investigation, is there a - even the length of the original. investigation, is there a timeline on this? — investigation, is there a timeline on this? witi— investigation, is there a timeline on this? will you _ investigation, is there a timeline on this? will you be _ investigation, is there a timeline on this? will you be speaking. investigation, is there a timeline on this? will you be speaking to| investigation, is there a timeline . on this? will you be speaking to all the current— on this? will you be speaking to all the current players, _ on this? will you be speaking to all the current players, even— on this? will you be speaking to all the current players, even those - on this? will you be speaking to alll the current players, even those that are away— the current players, even those that are away on — the current players, even those that are away on international _ the current players, even those that are away on international duty? - the current players, even those that are away on international duty? i. are away on international duty? i want are away on international duty? want to speak to every player personally. and those who are on international duty. when the time is right for them and i can speak to them, absolutely, yes. iwant
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right for them and i can speak to them, absolutely, yes. i want to do this as diligently as possible. i don't want to rush it but i'm very conscious... and you've seen, hopefully, from the last 48 hours, that i have tried to get on with things. the rombys goes —— the longer this goes on, the more it damages us. what do they say, haste, not speed. i want to get on with it. we will open it up now to anyone. please _ we will open it up now to anyone. please raise — we will open it up now to anyone. please raise your— we will open it up now to anyone. please raise your hands. - we will open it up now to anyone. please raise your hands. icame in i came in about an hour and a half ago. i'm not at this moment in time, but
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i'm not at this moment in time, but i'm here now. but i'm not, i'm a chair. i might need to take some executive duties, clearly. inaudible do ou executive duties, clearly. inaudible do you think — executive duties, clearly. inaudible do you think there _ executive duties, clearly. inaudible do you think there are _ executive duties, clearly. inaudible do you think there are bases - do you think there are bases problems there? yeah. look, i've -la ed in problems there? yeah. look, i've played in every — problems there? yeah. look, i've played in every single _ problems there? yeah. look, i've played in every single lead - problems there? yeah. look, i've played in every single lead here. | played in every single lead here. halifax league, you know, bradford lead, sunday cricket... —— bradford league. i've made some amazing friends. i have a network of people that have written to me and people who have played with me that i don't even remember that they've written to me to help. but it is not about saying racism exists in these
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cricket clubs. racism exists in society. we have had black lives matter, we've had, you know, metoo. it's notjust about racism. what really upsets me, sorry, i'm probable going off what you've asked me, but we've just been through the most horrific year—and—a—half. .. me, but we've just been through the most horrific year—and—a—half... —— i'm probably. we had a plate, a virus, that was was killing people. and what did you see in those dark, dark times? we have all suffered from it. ithinkio million dark times? we have all suffered from it. ithink 10 million people volunteered, you knowis goodness in in people. you know, we all do lots of things. sorry, i went off the subject a bit. that young man there.
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inaudible are you saying that neither of them are currently on leave, whether that is compassionate or otherwise? they are still working? figs is compassionate or otherwise? they are still working?— are still working? as far as i am aware. inaudible _ do you think the ecb has a case to answer in all this? you were on the board of the ecb for five years, including some of this period in question. as a board member, do you believe you have questions to answer? ., , believe you have questions to answer? . , ., , answer? if... if any of these allegations _ answer? if... if any of these allegations had _ answer? if... if any of these allegations had come - answer? if... if any of these j allegations had come before answer? if... if any of these - allegations had come before the ecb bought when i was there, i would have been the first to jump in and tackle it. i don't know the details of roger's concerns. i don't know that the ecb as a governing body... i don't know... from the ramin's
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turns, we have 18 separate businesses that deal with... you know, their own hr policies, the ecb's a governing body and the regulator. i don't know the detail of it. i think that is for the ecb to answer, really, to tell the truth. . , �* truth. inaudible should _ truth. inaudible should this - truth. inaudible should this be i truth. inaudible - should this be conducted truth. inaudible _ should this be conducted by the regulator, these investigations? trio. regulator, these investigations? no, not regulator, these investigations? iirr, not necessarily. it depends... i'm a chairman of a regulator. i have set “p chairman of a regulator. i have set up four regulators for government. there there is very specific... responsibilities a regulator has. and where the line does cross. if it happens in the hospital, you know, my first response is the management deals with it, the chief exec deals with it. and if he or she doesn't deal with it, the board and the chair deal with it. it doesn't come to a regulator at that time. that is
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almost abdicating responsibility. oh, sorry. george?— oh, sorry. george? inaudible yorkshire are _ oh, sorry. george? inaudible yorkshire are quite _ oh, sorry. george? inaudible yorkshire are quite heavily - oh, sorry. george? inaudible yorkshire are quite heavily in l oh, sorry. george? mumm- yorkshire are quite heavily in debt. who is paying for the decisions at the moment? the current coaching staff, are they working right now identifying and nurturing the next generation of talent or have they been suspended? as far as i know, nobody has been suspended in the current coaching staff. to your question about whether they are nurturing and enhancing talent, i would love to look at that and talk to how they might do that better, maybe. and what the shortcomings, if any, and what the shortcomings, if any, and what we can do to improve. your
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question about money, nobody is paying for it at the moment. i will be... i will be... paying for it at the moment. i will be... iwill be... i have paying for it at the moment. i will be... i will be... i have been asked to come here to make changes. i will need resources to make those changes. those are the discussions i'll be having with england and wales cricket board. i don't know what the financial situation is here, i need to look at it. inaudible still probably controls the purse strings, doesn't he? his still probably controls the purse strings, doesn't he?— strings, doesn't he? his family trust have _ strings, doesn't he? his family trust have a — strings, doesn't he? his family trust have a chunk _ strings, doesn't he? his family trust have a chunk of _ strings, doesn't he? his family trust have a chunk of money i strings, doesn't he? his family - trust have a chunk of money wrapped up trust have a chunk of money wrapped up in here. he doesn't control any purse strings for me.— purse strings for me. inaudible he doesn't- _ purse strings for me. inaudible he doesn't. his _ purse strings for me. inaudible he doesn't. his two _ purse strings for me. inaudible he doesn't. his two trustees - purse strings for me. inaudible - he doesn't. his two trustees have... if i go through an independent process with the right procedures, and i appoint, not i, but we, the
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board, point, new board members. somebody�*s going to have to have a hell of a good reason why they are going to veto that. did hell of a good reason why they are going to veto that.— going to veto that. did the trust a- oint going to veto that. did the trust appoint you. — going to veto that. did the trust appoint you, lord _ going to veto that. did the trust appoint you, lord patel? - going to veto that. did the trust appoint you, lord patel? no, i appoint you, lord patel? no, absolutely — appoint you, lord patel? no, absolutely not. _ appoint you, lord patel? no, absolutely not. friday - appoint you, lord patel? iirr, absolutely not. friday afternoon, there was trevor straight who is there was trevor straight who is the current nonexecutive. and neil hartley was a nonexecutive director. they voted me in to be a nonexecutive director. then they voted me in to be the chair. subsequently her malik resigned. neil hartley wishes to step down. i am very gratefulfor neil hartley wishes to step down. i am very grateful for him to be staying where he is. my understanding is the constitution allows two non—executives to be
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appointed until the next agm. and thenit appointed until the next agm. and then it has to be done and it will have to be done in the proper process. have to be done in the proper rocess. y have to be done in the proper rocess. , , ., . have to be done in the proper rocess. , . . process. sorry, you are asking... stadium-mac— process. sorry, you are asking... stadium-mac we _ process. sorry, you are asking... stadium-mac we will— process. sorry, you are asking... stadium-mac we will leave - process. sorry, you are asking... stadium-mac we will leave that i process. sorry, you are asking... - stadium-mac we will leave that press stadium—mac we will leave that press conference at headingley, lord patel, the new chairman of yorkshire cricket club. —— racism row that has engulfed a yorkshire cricket club in the last few days. he has apologised specifically to azeem rafiq over the county's handling of his racism and bullying allegations saying, "azeem is a whistle—blower and should be praised as such and should never have been put through this. we are sorry for what you and your family have experience and the way in which we have handled this. i thank azeem for his bravery in speaking out." those are the comments from lord patel. we'd like to apologise if you were offended by the language quoted by lord patel, when he was teling us about how he was himself racially abused when he was younger.
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very vividly. newcastle united have confirmed they have appointed eddie howe as their new manager. not a huge surprise since he was seen at their game over the weekend. widely expected eddie howe would become the new newcastle united manager. of course, under new ownership and potentially with quite a lot of money to spend. mps will hold an emergency debate about parliamentary standards today, as the government continues to face criticism, over allegations of sleaze. ministers have been criticised for trying to change the standards body that polices the conduct of mps, after it found the former cabinet minister, owen paterson, guilty of breaking lobbying rules. today's debate is being led by the liberal democrats, who are proposing an independent inquiry, into corruption allegations
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against the government, and stricter punishments for mp5 who break the rules. while the prime minister won t be present at the debate, he has said this afternoon that he takes the issue very seriously. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, has the very latest. the rules for politicians are under scrutiny again. what's right and what's wrong. what's allowed and what's not. the prime minister in northumberland askedif the prime minister in northumberland asked if he would apologise for his handling of trying to change the system. we will make every effort to get this right. we will hold mps to account. like i said last week, mps should not break the rules.
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mp5 on all sides agree at least some change is needed. if you end up with, um, corruption in the british political system, you can't achieve change. and i... and i can't quite factor into my head why some people can't see that corruption is a problem. the government have driven a coach and horses through the standards i process, which is agreed on a cross—party - and on a house basis. and i thought it was really important that mps had i the opportunity to really- vent their frustrations at that and also look at where we go next. owen paterson's case prompted this debate. the former minister was found to have broken the rules by approaching ministers and officials on behalf of companies who were paying him. the government tried to block his suspension and change the system, but u—turned after a backlash. and mr paterson resigned as an mp. another minister dismissed this as a storm in a teacup. others say its proof the wider
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system needs to change and that mps shouldn't be enforcing their own rules. well, we have a panel of former judges that deal with sexual harassment and bullying complaints against mps, and i think we should have a similar small panel of former high courtjudges that can deal with all complaints against mps. i think it's wrong for mp5, like me, to bejudging other colleagues in the house of commons. this afternoon's debate will be a chance for labour to pile pressure on the government over its handling of owen paterson's case. and for mp5 on all sides to air their views and let off steam about the standards they have to live up to. and the way the rules are enforced. but don't expect much to change in the short term, at least. at a remembrance event this afternoon, the speaker said he was determined for things to change.
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i don't want another dark week like last week, i want to make sure people have faith in parliamentarians and faith in the house of commons. today's debate will be painful, but the one thing is, it's got to cleanse the house and move forward. from the outside, it might seem like politicians arguing amongst themselves, but some here make the case parliament's integrity is at stake. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. you can watch the parliamentary standards debate live a little later this afternoon — we're expecting it to get under way after 4pm. a major rescue operation is continuing in the brecon beacons, to try to free a man who's been trapped in a cave for two days after a fall. he is said to be an experienced caver. more than 50 rescuers are involved in the operation. the man is thought to have injured his back. our correspondent, hywel griffith,
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is at the scene for us... lots of very experienced cavers have joined this a rescue mission, what is the latest you are hearing? that painstaking _ is the latest you are hearing? that painstaking work _ is the latest you are hearing? that painstaking work is _ is the latest you are hearing? trust painstaking work is continuing and now the rescue operation is in its third day and almost 250 volunteers have taken part. every half an hour orso have taken part. every half an hour or so you see people coming down from the mountainside. and more people heading off with their head torches to put in a shift and slowly bring the casualty to the surface. we know this all started on saturday lunchtime, when that caver slipped and fell, injuring themselves. the message was sent back out to land and eventually to rescue teams from across the uk, who had come here to try and help the effort. at no timeline yet as when they expect that person to come to the surface. we know they have been carried on a stretcher. we know that they are
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conscious and lucid and breathing, able to take on some water, may be food, as well. but the difficulty is taking them through very challenging subterranean terrain. it may be ours yet until they can come. if the condition is clear, they could potentially be helicoptered to a hospital. otherwise, there is an ambulance on standby not far from where i am standing in order to finish the rescue effort. but, at the moment, everyone feels upbeat and optimistic this will reach a successful conclusion. theyjust can't tell us when. successful conclusion. they 'ust can't tell us memi successful conclusion. they 'ust can't tell us when. thank you very much indeed _ can't tell us when. thank you very much indeed for _ can't tell us when. thank you very much indeed for that _ can't tell us when. thank you very much indeed for that update. - delegates at the climate change conference, cop26, will today be discussing ways to adapt to the impact of changing weather patterns brought on by climate change. it's something the residents of fishlake in south yorkshire know all about. in november 2019, 90% of the homes in the village were innundated with dirty flood water after the river don burst its banks following days of heavy rain.
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some have only recently been able to get back to their homes. let's speak to simon king who's in fishlake now. i think he is there! simon, people there know all about climate change and its effects? i'm not sure simon... simon, can you hear us, simon... simon, can you hear us, simon king? i don't think he can. and i, that he is! simon king? i don't think he can. and |, that he is!— and i, that he is! yes, i can hear ou and i, that he is! yes, i can hear you now- — and i, that he is! yes, i can hear you now- i'm _ and i, that he is! yes, i can hear you now- i'm in _ and i, that he is! yes, i can hear you now. i'm in fishlake, - and i, that he is! yes, i can hear you now. i'm in fishlake, this. you now. i'm in fishlake, this village flooded in 2019. the river don just village flooded in 2019. the river donjust behind village flooded in 2019. the river don just behind the cameraman burst its banks after what we saw of a months worth of rain falling in the space of a 24 hours. a slow—moving weather system brought all that rain fall down the catchment of the river don. it was a problem that started early on in september. from september until early november, around six months of rain falling in
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six weeks. it meant that river don burst its banks. in the future, climate change tells us that we can see for every one celsius rise in global temperature, there is going to be a 7% increase, the amount of water vapour in the atmosphere. joining me now as professor hannah cloakfrom the joining me now as professor hannah cloak from the university of reading. she is a hydrologist. what does your research and your analysis tell us about climate change and flooding in the uk? it about climate change and flooding in the uk? , ., , ., about climate change and flooding in theuk? , ., , ., ., the uk? it is really important to realise that _ the uk? it is really important to realise that we _ the uk? it is really important to realise that we are _ the uk? it is really important to realise that we are experiencing floods _ realise that we are experiencing floods now, but they will be getting worse _ floods now, but they will be getting worse in _ floods now, but they will be getting worse in the future. many different types _ worse in the future. many different types of _ worse in the future. many different types of floods will be getting worse. — types of floods will be getting worse, particularly these heavy rain falls worse, particularly these heavy rain fails and _ worse, particularly these heavy rain falls and we have seen some devastating scenes from europe and china _ devastating scenes from europe and china this _ devastating scenes from europe and china this summer. we know that with those _ china this summer. we know that with those types _ china this summer. we know that with those types of events will become more _ those types of events will become more likely. —— we know that those are _ more likely. -- we know that those are. ., .,
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are. you mentioned the flooding in germany and _ are. you mentioned the flooding in germany and china. _ are. you mentioned the flooding in | germany and china. unprecedented amount of rainfall that devastated those areas. are you worried that something like that could happen in the uk? , ., ~ , ., ., the uk? fishlake is a reminder that any community _ the uk? fishlake is a reminder that any community is — the uk? fishlake is a reminder that any community is susceptible - the uk? fishlake is a reminder that any community is susceptible to - any community is susceptible to these _ any community is susceptible to these types of floods. we have to adapt _ these types of floods. we have to adapt really quickly in order to protect— adapt really quickly in order to protect communities. and we have to brin- protect communities. and we have to bring everyone along with that. of course. _ bring everyone along with that. of course. the — bring everyone along with that. of course, the developing world, it is much _ course, the developing world, it is much harder for these types of floods — much harder for these types of floods. the point of adaptation is the need — floods. the point of adaptation is the need to take into account the global— the need to take into account the global warming that we have already put into _ global warming that we have already put into the atmosphere. we are kinda _ put into the atmosphere. we are kinda locked into these changes. it is really _ kinda locked into these changes. it is really important that we reduce the emissions so we don't make it even _ the emissions so we don't make it even worse — the emissions so we don't make it even worse the future.— even worse the future. obviously, here in fishlake _ even worse the future. obviously, here in fishlake it _ even worse the future. obviously, here in fishlake it was _ even worse the future. obviously, here in fishlake it was all - even worse the future. obviously, here in fishlake it was all about i here in fishlake it was all about the river flooding and a number of defences along this river don catchment, but in terms of urban flash flooding, i know that's quite a big area that if we have a really
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intense downpours, particularly summat like we saw in london earlier this year, that is more difficult to forecast and adapt to, i guess —— particularly in the summer. it is particularly in the summer. it is really difficult _ particularly in the summer. it is really difficult to _ particularly in the summer. it is really difficult to work out exactly when _ really difficult to work out exactly when these really heavy thunderstorm heavy _ when these really heavy thunderstorm heavy rainfall will occur. we can do something — heavy rainfall will occur. we can do something about it. we can build our infrastructure in our city so we can cope _ infrastructure in our city so we can cope with — infrastructure in our city so we can cope with these heavy downpours and we don't _ cope with these heavy downpours and we don't get our train tracks flooded _ we don't get our train tracks flooded and our shops completely damaged. so, we need to prepare in advance _ damaged. so, we need to prepare in advance and — damaged. so, we need to prepare in advance and we need to do things fast~ _ advance and we need to do things fast we _ advance and we need to do things fast. we need to really adjust the amount— fast. we need to really adjust the amount of— fast. we need to really adjust the amount of drainage we have in our city, _ amount of drainage we have in our city, capture — amount of drainage we have in our city, capture the rain as much as we can to _ city, capture the rain as much as we can to make — city, capture the rain as much as we can to make our city is greener and have _ can to make our city is greener and have bigger— can to make our city is greener and have bigger storage areas to make it greener— have bigger storage areas to make it greener so— have bigger storage areas to make it greener so people's lives aren't affected — greener so people's lives aren't affected. fits greener so people's lives aren't affected. �* , ., greener so people's lives aren't affected. . , . , affected. as a community, individually, _ affected. as a community, individually, we _ affected. as a community, individually, we need - affected. as a community, individually, we need to i affected. as a community, | individually, we need to do affected. as a community, - individually, we need to do more to protect ourselves, be more resilient to potential flooding protect ourselves, be more resilient to potentialflooding in the protect ourselves, be more resilient to potential flooding in the future, as well? it to potential flooding in the future, as well? , i. �*, as well? it is everyone's responsibility. _ as well? it is everyone's responsibility. we - as well? it is everyone's responsibility. we really as well? it is everyone's - responsibility. we really need to look to—
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responsibility. we really need to look to government around the world. they are _ look to government around the world. they are all— look to government around the world. they are all meeting right now and we need _ they are all meeting right now and we need to— they are all meeting right now and we need to take some urgent action. as we _ we need to take some urgent action. as we heard — we need to take some urgent action. as we heard early on the news channel. — as we heard early on the news channel, former president obama was talking _ channel, former president obama was talking about exactly this. we really — talking about exactly this. we really need to make these decisions. there _ really need to make these decisions. there are _ really need to make these decisions. there are big emitters that really need _ there are big emitters that really need to— there are big emitters that really need to take account of their actions — need to take account of their actions in _ need to take account of their actions in the future and have some desperately urgent changes to their plans _ desperately urgent changes to their plans. otherwise, everything isjust going— plans. otherwise, everything isjust going to— plans. otherwise, everything isjust going to get worse. plans. otherwise, everything is 'ust goingtogetworsefi plans. otherwise, everything is 'ust going to get worse. professor hannah cloke, thank — going to get worse. professor hannah cloke, thank you _ going to get worse. professor hannah cloke, thank you for _ going to get worse. professor hannah cloke, thank you forjoining _ going to get worse. professor hannah cloke, thank you forjoining us - going to get worse. professor hannah cloke, thank you forjoining us this i cloke, thank you forjoining us this afternoon. the residence at fishlake looking very different here than it was two years ago, where it was 90% of this village flooded —— residents. after intense rainfall and quite a severe flooding. back to the studio. ., ~ and quite a severe flooding. back to the studio. . ,, , ., and quite a severe flooding. back to the studio. ., ~' , ., , . the studio. thank you very much indeed, simon _ the studio. thank you very much indeed, simon king. _ the head of the un's world food programme has condemned the international community, for not stepping in to avert a potentially devastating famine in afghanistan. the wfp is warning that around
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the world, 45 million people are on the edge of starvation in more than 40 countries — and in afghanistan, millions are in danger if there isn't more outside help. our world affairs editor, john simpson, reports from the afghan city of bamiyan. winter's coming, and it looks like being a bad one. the camels are on the move to warmer areas. we are heading west, out of kabul, through the taliban road blocks. it's not long before we reach the snow. in this district, food aid is being distributed. flour to make bread. everyone here knows that things are likely to get really bad in a few weeks. there's a real possibly we will be frozen this winter, this man tells me. these people are so poor they can't afford to buy food orfuel for heating. a humanitarian disaster could bring the taliban down,
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so they're cooperating with the international aid agencies even if they don't like them. the head of the world food programme, visiting kabul doesn't mince his words. the winter months are coming, we're coming out of a drought. the next six months are going to be catastrophic, it is going to be hell on earth. which has been hit by drought, we reach bamiyan, an agricultural centre, which has been hit by drought, like many other parts of afghanistan. and of course, there was an infamous taliban crime here. a couple of hundred yards along the cliff from the place where the statues of the buddhas used to stand, until the taliban destroyed them, a woman called fatima lives. she's a widow, raising her seven friendly, intelligent children on her own. before the taliban took over, she got by with occasional food aid and the money she and her eldest boy earned from weeding the fields and
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herding sheep. but the drought has put an end to all that and food aid doesn't reach here. within weeks they could all be starving. some women sell their daughters for marriage, i say, would she? "if it was absolutely necessary to keep everyone alive", she answers, but she'd hate it. listening to all this, it was hard not think of your own family. that's a response which david beasley of the world food programme wants the rich and powerful of the world wants to adopt. imagine if this was your little girl or boy or your grandchild, about to starve to death, you would do everything you possibly could. and when there's $400 trillion worth of wealth on the earth, shame on us that we let any child die from hunger. fatima's children leave for school, those who are allowed to go,
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like millions in this country, their lives are under real threat. the next few months will decide. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise. quite a cloudy afternoon out of the west, quite murky with outbreaks of rain, some of it heavy into the far west of scotland. the best of the sunshine to the east but you can see cloud pushing its way east. largely dry for much of england and wales with highs of 12—14 and further north milder and wetter weather gradually starts to push on from the west. that rain will continue to move through northern ireland and scotland over night. heavy bursts from time to time and gusty winds. it will stay very mild indeed as that south—westerly wind drives in warm air from the south—west but it means the first thing tomorrow morning the rain will slip out of scotland into northern england and
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north wales. we will keep quite a lot of cloud across england and wales and bright and breezy further hannah west. staying mild for the next few days to come.
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hello. this is bbc news. the headlines... the government rejects calls for a public inquiry into corruption, after it tried to change the sytem that found one of its mps guilty of breaking lobbying rules. the new chairman of yorkshire county cricket club has said the investigation into racism towards its former player, azeem rafiq was handled badly and that they must do better in future. a dire warning from afghanistan. millions face starvation due to famine, unless the international community, offers help. former us president barack obama warns leaders they're not doing
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enough to tackle climate change at cop26. relief for airlines as the us opens its borders to fully vaccinated travellers, for the first time in over a year and a half. and, a lasting memorial to the world war two veteran, and the dog who saved his life. the bbc has been told of bullying and harassment by anti—vaccination campaigners, outside a number of schools in the uk. the shadow education minister, peter kyle, says such incidents are "ubiquitous" in his constituency. he's accusing campaigners of intimidating both children and teachers. there are now calls for schools to go as far as employing fast track exclusion zones, to tackle the problem. our correspondent, lebo diseko has more from east sussex. kent police have said that more than 400 calls have been made
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to the phone line set up in the wake of the david fuller mortuary offences case. david fuller admitted to sexually abusing at least 100 female corpses, including children — and in some cases filmed himself abusing the bodies in two kent hospital morgues. the health secretary sajid javid will be answering questions from mps in the commons shortly. let's cross to the commons now, where the health secretary sajid javid is answering mps questions on the david fuller case. david fuller's shocking and depraved offensive. the legal process is ongoing, as you havejust offensive. the legal process is ongoing, as you have just said offensive. the legal process is ongoing, as you havejust said mr speaker. david fuller is yet to be sentenced at the some things it would be inappropriate for me to talk about at this time. i'm sure the house will understand why the majority of my statement will focus on the steps that we are taking in response to these crimes and not the crimes themselves. but before i do so, i will briefly update the house on this shocking case. in december
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last year, david fuller was charged with the murder of two young women. wendy nell and caroline pearce. the tunbridge wells area of kent in 1987. last week, he pleaded guilty to the murders. my thoughts and i sure the thoughts of the whole house with wendy and caroline's family and friends. as well as this, the kent and essex serious crime directorate has been coming out and direct an investigation into his offences in hospital settings between 2008 and 2020 and as a result he was charged with a series of shocking offences involving sexual offences committed involving sexual offences committed in a hospital mortuary. he has also pleaded guilty to these offences. a
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sentencing has yet to take place it would be inappropriate for me to comment on the particular case but i willjust comment on the particular case but i will just say this but in comment on the particular case but i willjust say this but in light of what has just happened thejustice secretary will be looking at whether the penalties that are currently available for such appalling sexual offences are appropriate. mr speaker, it has taken months of painstaking work to uncover the event, extent of this man's it offending and the fact that these offences took place in a hospital, a place where all of us should feel safe and fee, free from harm makes this all of this of them are harrowing. this has been an offence, incredibly... police have shown the utmost professionalism in the most distressing circumstances and i would like to thank them for their ongoing work. i would also like to thank the local nhs trust meets
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didn't tunbridge wells for cooperating so closely with the police. mr speaker, officers have tragically found evidence of 100 victims. of these victims, 81 have been formally identified and specially trained family liaison officers have been supporting their families. every family of a known victim has been contacted. we've been working closely with the police, the police and crime commissioner, and the nhs trust to make sure that those families who have been directly affected receive the 24/7 support that they need including access to dedicated caseworkers and mental health support and counselling. if anyone else is concerned that they or their loved ones may be a victim or if
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they have any further this information they should search online for the major incident police portal until it kent police and operation sandpiper. i know how distressing the details of these offences will be for any people. the local nhs trust has put arrangements in trust, in place to support staff who have been affected and regardless of whether someone has been directly impacted by these offences are not they can access the resources that are available on the my support space website. mr speaker, this is a profoundly upsetting case that has involved distressing offences within the health service. the victims are not just those family members and friends who have been abused in this most horrific of ways. they are also those that are left behind. people who have already experienced such
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loss and now experience unimaginable pain and anger. they are victims too. even as we look into exactly what happened, as the secretary of state for health and social care, i want to apologise to the friends and families of all the victims for the crimes that were perpetrated in the care of the nhs and that hurt and suffering their feeling. care of the nhs and that hurt and suffering theirfeeling. mr care of the nhs and that hurt and suffering their feeling. mr speaker, i know that no apology can undo the pain and suffering caused by these offences but with such serious issues of dignity and security we have a duty to look at what happened in detail and have a duty to look at what happened in detailand make have a duty to look at what happened in detail and make sure it never happens again. so i would like to update the house on the steps that we are taking. first, nhs england has written to all nhs trusts asking
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for all access to moshi to reviewed evidence current guidance from the human tissue authority. plus have also been asked to review their ways of working and to take a number of extra steps including making sure that they have effective cctv coverage in place and that entry and access points are controlled with swipe access and that appropriate ebs checks and risk assessments are being carried out. nhs england will report directly to me with assurances that these measures have been taken so that we can be confident that the highest standards are being followed and that we are maintaining security and upholding the dignity of the deceased. next, the dignity of the deceased. next, the local trust has been putting arrangements in place, running a peer review of mortuary practice in conducting an independent investigation into the specific offences. i would like to thank the
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trust of its leadership and initial work to set up that investigation. but, mr speaker, given the scale and the nature of the sexual offences i believe that we must go further. and so today i can announce that i am replacing the trust investigation with an independent enquiry. the enquiry will look into the circumstances surrounding the offences committed at the hospital and their national implications. it will help us understand how these offences took place without detection in the trust, identify any areas where early action by this trust was necessary and then consider wider national issues including for the nhs. i have appointed sirjonathan michael to chair this enquiry. sirjonathan is an experienced nhs chief executive. he is a fellow of the royal college of physicians and a former chief
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executive of the nhs hospital trusts. he had been leading the trusts. he had been leading the trust investigation and will be able to build on some of the work that he has already done. enquiry will be independent and it will report to me as secretary of state. i've asked sirjonathan to split his enquiry into two parts. the first an interim report which i have asked for early in the new year. the second a final report looking at the broader national picture and the wider lessons for the nhs and for other settings. we will publish the terms of reference in due course and i have also asked sirjonathan to discuss with families and others to put into that process. sir jonathan's findings will be public and they will be published. mr speaker, we have a responsibility to everyone affected by these shocking crimes to do right by those we've
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lost. and those still left behind in their shock and their grief. nothing that we can say in this place will undo the damage that has been done but we must act to make sure that nothing like this can ever happen again. i commend the statement of the house. ,, . ., ,, . . , ., the house. shadow secretary of state. thank _ the house. shadow secretary of state. thank you _ the house. shadow secretary of state. thank you mr _ the house. shadow secretary of state. thank you mr speaker i the house. shadow secretary ofl state. thank you mr speaker and the house. shadow secretary of i state. thank you mr speaker and i think the secretary _ state. thank you mr speaker and i think the secretary of _ state. thank you mr speaker and i think the secretary of state - state. thank you mr speaker and i think the secretary of state for - think the secretary of state for advanced site of his statement and for the content of his statement and were, he is announced today. this is an unspeakably vile horrific crime and our thoughts and our hearts across the house about to the families of wendy knell and caroline pierce in the families of those whose deceased loved ones, those 100 victims, who are talking here about the corpses of 100 women who were, as has been reported in the press, violated in the most monstrous, most
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foul sickening way. can the secretary of state confirm that all the families impacted will have immediate access to psychological counselling and support they need to? and will nhs staff at the hospital who many of them themselves will be devastated, but they have access to appropriate counselling and support as well? i particularly welcome the announcement of an enquiry may pay tribute to local members of parliament across kent and sussex who have spoken up in behalf of their communities in recent days, particularly the right honourable memberfor tunbridge honourable member for tunbridge wells, who honourable memberfor tunbridge wells, who said over the weekend that authorities and politicians must, and these were his words, ask serious questions as to how this could have happened and establish that it can never happen again. i agree. that is why an enquiry is so
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important. can he offer some precision as to when the terms of reference will be published? because fuller was caught, of course, because of the murder investigation and i think that in itself forms a number of questions about the regulation of mortuaries. no, the human tissue authority which regulates hospital mortuary reviewed one of the much reasoned question as part of their regulatory procedures. in the much reasoned question as part of their regulatory procedures. and they raise no security concerns but found a lack of full audits, examples of lone working, issues with cctv coverage in another hospital in the trust. so will or perhaps is a of the secretary of state? and, either way, will it be considered? forthe state? and, either way, will it be considered? for the human tissue authority standards be considered in the way in which they review hospital mortuaries and how the standards are enforced, will that be considered? and will be enquiry recommend new processes that the secretary of state will put in place if it is found that mortuary fails
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to meet the high standards for loan workers for security and for care? the nhs has asked trusts to review their procedures and i welcome that silver secretary of state ensure that all mortuaries document and record access of all staff entering a motoring? all the secretary of state ensure that all comic standards the cctv at in false and cctv is in place come pensively across all mortuaries? and the lack of course, mr speaker, other premises where dead bodies are stored such as funeral directors that don't fall under the regulatory remit of the human tissues authority, so will the remit of the human tissues authority be expanded or will be enquiry look at the premises where bodies are stored? but, in closing, mr speaker, when our loved ones are admitted into the hands of medical care, it is done so on the basis of a bond of trust, but
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our loved ones will be cared for when sick and will be accorded dignity in death. that bond of trust was callously ripped apart here. so can i offer to work with the secretary of state to ensure something so sickening is this never happens again?— happens again? secretary of state. mr speaker. _ happens again? secretary of state. mr speaker, first _ happens again? secretary of state. mr speaker, first can _ happens again? secretary of state. mr speaker, first can neighbouring | mr speaker, first can neighbouring be much welcome the words of the right honourable gentleman and also his offer to work together on this. i most certainly would like to take the right honourable gentleman up on that and it is certainly i think what the whole house would want to see us working together on this. in terms of his questions, i would like to reassure the right honourable gentleman that there is comprehensive support rightly available to all families and friends that have been affected by this. as i said a moment ago, every
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family of the known victims has been contacted directly by family liaison officers and they got in touch and that support will continue for as long as necessary, including dedicated caseworker support, a 24/7 telephone support line, and whatever counselling and support of that nature is needed and that includes support. in the nhs and elsewhere who staff will also be affected. in terms of the terms of reference, thatis terms of the terms of reference, that is something that i will work with, my department with sir jonathan who have already started discussions with him on that and he will want to discuss with others, including, of course, families, their representatives, and the members of parliament that represent those families. i'm sure he will want to discuss with them, too. in terms of the work that sirjonathan will take, do, it will be brought in its nature. i think it has to be
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because i think is the right and rubble gentleman has rightly alluded to it has to be beyond just hospitals. there are a number of settings, i think, hospitals. there are a number of settings, ithink, that hospitals. there are a number of settings, i think, that rightly need to be looked at including, for example, local authority mortuaries, private mortuaries, and other settings such as undertakers and i think that the enquiry should be open to all of that i think we would want to see that reflected in the terms of reference and then, lastly, the right gentleman referred to recommendations around access or documentation of cctv. i think is right to resolve these issues but i just want to be careful not to pre—empt the final outcome of what is an independent enquiry but i'm sure all those issues will have rightfully been looked at. that was the home secretary _ rightfully been looked at. that was the home secretary sajid - rightfully been looked at. that was the home secretary sajid javid - rightfully been looked at. that was the home secretary sajid javid just in the comments they're making a statement about what he calls shocking and depraved offences by david fuller the hospital and
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acheson who admitted murdering and sexually assaulting two women before carrying out dozens of six attacks on corpses mortuaries and the health secretary saying that he will say that they are going to be looking, the government, and whether the penalties currently available for such appalling sexual offences of appropriate, in other words, whether they need to be toughened up, those penalties. now, let's bring you the latest from yorkshire club. we were hearing a little early on that the investigation into the allegations of racism by azeem rafiq was handled badly. now we have had a statement from azeem rafiq himself and i'm going to read it to a length. azeem rafiq says... i want to thank my family, the public, politicians, the media and the many players and coaches who have supported me publicly and privately and given me strength to get through the bad times of which there have been too many since i first spoke
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about my experiences. i also want to thank lord patel for making the offer and sorting this out within 72 hours of his appointment. it should not have taken the rest of the club a year to realise that i would not be silenced through an mba. i spoke out because i wanted to create change at the club. i brought in a legal claim because the club refused to acknowledge the problem and create change. for the first time that i can remember, i have hope this might happen —— would not be silenced through a nda. i will be watching and continue to campaign to ensure that it does. the statement goes on from azeem rafiq. as lord patel says, this isjust the goes on from azeem rafiq. as lord patel says, this is just the start of where to make cricket open to everyone no matter their background. yorkshire county cricket club and it sports a large desperately need reform. i will continue to campaign against institutional racism and look forward to speaking at the select committee hearing next week. age others who suffered to come
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forward. there is strength in numbers and i will be right behind you. this has been an exhausting time for me. i need a few days to take a breath and prepare for the select committee hearing next tuesday. i am free to speak openly and will continue to do so. i will continue to campaign for equality and respect falling quickly and to ensure that the game i love is one where everyone is welcome. that statement from azeem rafiq, the former yorkshire cricket club cricketer. the united states has reopened its borders to fully vaccinated travellers from dozens of countries, including the uk, for the first time since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. ministers here, say the resumption of flights to the us, is �*momentous'. our transport correspondent, caroline davies, is at heathrow for us this afternoon....... well, there's been excitement, balloons and flag—waving, at least by the airlines here at heathrow. this is a major part of the puzzle for international travel.
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piece by piece, the world has started to reopen again, and the us route to the uk is a major long—haul destination, and this is the first time it's meaningfully opened up for uk citizens in more than 600 days. cheering. preparing for the big send—off. almost 20 months ago, the us banned the majority of travellers coming from the uk. from first thing this morning, that changed — if you're double—jabbed and have a negative covid test. it means families separated by the atlantic and restrictions can reunite, including sarah, who was travelling to see her daughter, chloe, for the first time in two years. it's been so difficult because, obviously, we've been worried about everybody staying healthy, and, you know, things happen in families, where you need to be together. that's what, you know, family is all about. and not be able to, you know, console each other or keep each other company or whatever or hug each other when we want a good cry, but we'll do it today,
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so i can't wait to walk through that door and see her there. before the pandemic, the us was the fourth most popular destination for uk travellers. among the crowds were those taking work trips and holiday—makers who'd held out hope for months. we've had this booked and we've had to move it a couple of times so we were so happy. when we heard it was opening on the 8th, we said to virgin, "put us on the eighth," first flight there. i work for a company in north carolina. . i've joined a different team - so there's lots of people i've never met before so it will be greatly - able to see them face—to—face rather than on teams calls. in the week that cop26 focuses on transport it's not ideal timing to be celebrating the return of a major long haulflight route. but british airways and virgin atlantic say they are pushing to be more sustainable. we've both set targets for net zero by 2050 but action must start today and now. we're both flying a50s, which are the most efficient planes out there for long—haul travel. we will be embarking on offsetting.
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we'll be committing to the development of sustainable aviation fuel. but we're also seeing exciting innovations coming along in the form of hydrogen technology that we also expect to be part of the solution. so aviation has a good story to tell. to celebrate the return, ba and virgin coordinated their first two flights to take off simultaneously. more than 600 days later, travel to the us is off the ground. the airlines say there is major pent—up demand for these flights. however, this does also raise questions about the future of business travel. the world has changed during the course of the pandemic, with people a lot more used to video calls. many companies are more concerned about their carbon footprint. will business travel return in the same way it used to operate? that was caroline davies, our travel correspondent. the wife of a british man killed after being attacked by sharks in western australia, has been paying tribute to her husband, saying he was a "wonderful father." paul millachip who was 57, was swimming just off the perth shore line, when the attack happened on saturday morning. a search operation was called off,
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after failing to locate his body. paul millachip, who was originally from britain, was on his regular swim when he was attacked, about 50 metres from the beach. witnesses say they saw the father of two struggling in the water at fremantle near perth, before being dragged under by a shark. an exhaustive air and sea search has found no sign of him. his wife said he was an avid swimmer and died doing what he loved. he was a wonderful man, wonderful father, and he loved his exercise. he had been going down to the beach two or three times a week. we would go running first and then go swimming, and he went for, like, he swam for a kilometre, was due to swim for a kilometre on saturday. ijust went into the water and out
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again because it's cold. four teenage boys who saw the attack have been praised for their bravery, after racing along the shoreline in their dinghy to warn other beach goers. circumstances around the attack have been fully reviewed. witnesses have been spoken to, and we've sought some professional advice in relation to where to go from here, and the decision has been made to cease that search. members of paul millachip's extended family have been unable to travel from britain to give their support because of covid—19 border restrictions. the 57—year—old is being remembered as a lovely man and a great father. phil mercer, bbc news, sydney. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. we will be live in the house of
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commons for you shortly. we start with contrasting weather conditions in the country. to the east, clear skies but a chilly start. yes, frost. not much frost as we go through the week ahead because there is more cloud and rain starting to push in from the west. you can see the signs from that in the far north—west of scotland as we speak. a change of wind direction. a south—westerly driving in mild air across the country. the yellow, rustic tones, with us. bar the exception of the far north—east of scotland. this has been the story so far. clearer skies to the east. we will see more cloud as we go through the afternoon. lighter winds and quiet, with the exception of the far north west of scotland with the cloud and rain. outbreaks of light rain into northern ireland, north—west england and north wales. look at these temperatures, mild for the time of year. 10 to 14. we should be seeing temperatures of 8 to 11 celsius. throught the night, that rain continues to move its way into scotland.
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some heavy and persistent bursts for a time as it gradually drifts towards the borders. quite a lot of cloud pushing on. and so those temperatures are going to hold up considerably. as you can see, perhaps into the low to mid teens to start off tuesday morning. a mild start to tuesday. our weather front sinks out from scotland into england. it is weakening. tuesday will be a blustery day with quite a lot of cloud around. outbreaks of showery rain through northern england and north wales. somewhat brighter. blustery conditions following on behind with a scattering of showers. chiefly to the north—west of the great glen. once again, the mild theme is set to continue. temperatures between 10 and 16 celsius. that's 61 fahrenheit. four or five degrees higher than we should be getting at this time of year. moving out of wednesday, a brief lull in proceedings before a low pressure moves in for thursday and friday. when will it quieten down?
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yes, more outbreaks of rain and it will stay mild until we get to the weekend. high pressure then looks likely to take over. quietening things down and more in the way of sunshine. it will start to get a little cooler.
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better in future. this is bbc news. the headlines: the government rejects calls for a public inquiry into corruption, after it tried to change the sytem that found one of its mps guilty of breaking lobbying rules. but the prime minister says he's taking the issue seriously. we are going to make every effort to get it right and we are going to hold mps to account. in the next half hour, we'll be going live to the house of commons, where mps will debate how their conduct should be investigated. the new chairman of yorkshire county cricket club has said the investigation into racism towards its former player, azeem rafiq, was handled badly and that they must do better in future. azeem is a whistle—blower and should be praised as such. and he should never have been put through this.
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and i'd like to apologise to him. the health secretary announces an independent inquiry into crimes carried out by david fuller, who admitted sexually abusing at least 100 female corpses in two kent hospital morgues. former us president barrack obama warns leaders they're not doing enough to tackle climate change at cop26. we are nowhere near where we need to be yet. two years ago to the day, fishlake flooded _ two years ago to the day, fishlake flooded after a period of intense rain and — flooded after a period of intense rain and i— flooded after a period of intense rain and i have been speaking to residents— rain and i have been speaking to residents about cop26 and how we adapt _ residents about cop26 and how we adapt to— residents about cop26 and how we adapt to flooding in the future. and relief for airlines as the us
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opens its borders to travellers. in the next half hour, mps will hold an emergency debate about parliamentary standards, as the government continues to face criticism over allegations of sleaze. ministers have been criticised for trying to change the standards body that polices the conduct of mps after it found the former cabinet minister owen paterson guilty of breaking lobbying rules. today's debate is being led by the liberal democrats, who are proposing an independent inquiry into corruption allegations against the government and stricter punishments for mp5 who break the rules. while the prime minister won't be present at the debate,
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he has said this afternoon that he takes the issue very seriously. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, has the very latest. the rules for politicians at westminster are under scrutiny again. what's right and what's wrong. what's allowed and what's not. the prime minister in northumberland this morning asked if he'd apologise for his government's handling of trying to overhaul the system. i think it's very important we get this right. we are going to make every effort to get this right. we will hold mps to account. what i think it is also... and mps, as i said last week, should not break the rules. mp5 on all sides agree at least some change is needed. if you end up with, um, corruption in the british political system, you can't achieve change. and i... and i can't quite factor into my head why some people can't
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see that corruption is a problem. the government have driven a coach and horses through the standards i process, which is agreed on a cross—party - and on a house basis. and i thought it was really important that mps had i the opportunity to really- vent their frustrations at that and also look at where we go next. owen paterson's case prompted this debate. the former minister was found to have broken the rules by approaching ministers and officials on behalf of companies who were paying him. the government tried to block his suspension and change the system, but u—turned after a backlash. and mr paterson resigned as an mp. another minister dismissed this as a storm in a teacup. others say its proof the wider system needs to change and that mps shouldn't be enforcing their own rules. we go live to the commons. the speaker lindsay hoyle. if the house wishes to remove the system, it must do so on a
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cross—party basis. opposition parties have made it clear that they will not participate in the committee established on thursday. therefore, we need to find a different way forward. i would also expect the chair of committee of standards to be invited to have a role in any process, given the extensive work his committee already undertaken. in finding that way forward. i want to remind the house of two things. firstly, i repeat what i have said before about the importance of not criticising officials in this house who were not able to respond. of course, it's possible to make proposals to improve processes and practices but, please, do not criticise the commissioner for standards, who please, do not criticise the commissionerfor standards, who is commissioner for standards, who is doing commissionerfor standards, who is doing a job that we have appointed her to do. secondly, doing a job that we have appointed herto do. secondly, i know doing a job that we have appointed her to do. secondly, i know there have been concerns about what recent events mean for the icg s —— for the
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icgs. the decision taken last wednesday did not in any way affect the operation of the icgs or the independent expert panel. and let me say to those people who feel that they weren't going to come forward because the icgs wouldn't be there, it is there and do not think there is a barrierfor it is there and do not think there is a barrier for people coming forward. finally, and, again, in the spirit of finding the best way forward, i say to the house that i will do everything i can to help ensure that all members feel confident that we have an effective and fair system. and those that follow proceedings feel the same. i granted this debate today because i thought it was essential to sort out the mess we are in. we can start to do that today but it requires two things for us all to tone down the party political sniping and focus, calmly, making sure the system is effective as it can be. and for
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everyone to recognise that if we are going to achieve progress, we will only do so on a cross—party basis. i also want to remind the house that it is not in order to make allegations of impropriety against other named members. unless the houseis other named members. unless the house is considering a substantive motion dealing with the issue directly. there are other routes for raising such claims. so, please, use the routes that are available. i sincerely hope that all members are going to take this approach and i have recommended that at the end of this debate, we have a clearer sense of how we can move forward together on this very important subject. so, please, let cb house at its best, as we have certainly seen it recently —— let's see the house. so, we now come to the emergency debate on the matter of the consequences of the
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decision of the house on the 3rd of november relating to standards. i now call wendy chamberlain. thank you, mr speaker. i beg to move that this _ thank you, mr speaker. i beg to move that this house has considered the matter— that this house has considered the matter of— that this house has considered the matter of the consequences of the decision— matter of the consequences of the decision of— matter of the consequences of the decision of this house on the 3rd of november— decision of this house on the 3rd of november relating to standards. firstly, _ november relating to standards. firstly, i— november relating to standards. firstly, i would like to place on the record _ firstly, i would like to place on the record my thanks to you, mr speaker. — the record my thanks to you, mr speaker, for facilitating this debate _ speaker, for facilitating this debate. and i would also look to put on record _ debate. and i would also look to put on record my thanks for the work done _ on record my thanks for the work done by— on record my thanks for the work done by all— on record my thanks for the work done by all members of staff in this place _ done by all members of staff in this place i_ done by all members of staff in this place. i must agree with you, mr speaker. — place. i must agree with you, mr speaker. i— place. i must agree with you, mr speaker, i was horrified to learn that the — speaker, i was horrified to learn that the commissioner for standards has received death threats. that is appalling — has received death threats. that is appalling. mr speaker, no one should receive _ appalling. mr speaker, no one should receive death threats for doing their— receive death threats for doing theirjob — receive death threats for doing theirjob. the role of commissioner for standards was one of the key ways _ for standards was one of the key ways that — for standards was one of the key ways that we moved beyond previous scandals. _ ways that we moved beyond previous scandals, which had a rock to this house _ scandals, which had a rock to this house -- — scandals, which had a rock to this house. —— rocked this house.
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the commission was appointed by this house to do a job, and that is what she has done continues to do. mr speaker, the actions of the government last week have tarnished this house's reputation. last week was a uk parliament week, a time on tremarco focus on engaging citizens on the work that we do here. if i had been tuning into parliament for the first time last week, i probably would have turned to television at right back off again. i have only been a member of this place for less than two years, and most of the time i have been proud to have been chosen to represent east fife to act for my constituents and to fight for their corner. i was proud to do the right thing last week, by opposing the government and by voting to uphold the standards procedure. it is hard to be proud as a member of parliament, when as a body we had all tarnish with the government's brush was not in public we are tainted with allegations of sleaze.
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the government because my actions last wednesday have rightly been condemned across the board. sirjohn major said the said the way the government handle that was shameful, wrong and on the periphery of this, or indeed, any government. lord evans, chair of the committee on standards in public life, are set out the proposed reforms to the standards committee were deeply at odds with the best traditions of british democracy. my inbox, and i'm sure others, are full. to give just one example of many — what gives the government the right to have a vote to change the process just because it has adversely affected one of their own? this is an appalling message to send to the wider public. i think my constituent is right. what gives this government the right to think it can change the rules when the decision doesn't suit them? that it can ignore judgments when the decision doesn't suit them? that it can ignorejudgments if it is not in its favour. that it can whip his own mps to achieve the
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outcome they want in violation to the conventions of this house? would she aaree the conventions of this house? would she agree with — the conventions of this house? would she agree with me _ the conventions of this house? would she agree with me that _ the conventions of this house? would she agree with me that the _ the conventions of this house? would she agree with me that the other - she agree with me that the other thing that this did was distract from potentially what is the most important set of debates going on at the moment, cop26? when our constituents were tuning into this place, that is what the focus of parliament should have been, but instead i was on the shenanigans of this government. i instead i was on the shenanigans of this government.— this government. i agree, cop26 is the last chance _ this government. i agree, cop26 is the last chance alone _ this government. i agree, cop26 is the last chance alone for— this government. i agree, cop26 is the last chance alone for this - the last chance alone for this country, the planet, and you have distractions in this place is reprehensible. i distractions in this place is reprehensible.— distractions in this place is reprehensible. distractions in this place is rerehensible. ., , ., reprehensible. i am extremely to the honourable lady _ reprehensible. i am extremely to the honourable lady for _ reprehensible. i am extremely to the honourable lady for having _ reprehensible. i am extremely to the honourable lady for having secured . honourable lady for having secured today's to be on a standards. when i was first elected to less house, i was first elected to less house, i was incredibly proud because i thought that members conducted themselves with honour and integrity, that we were not ruled by a prime minister who was a tinpot dictator, and who himself is now
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mired in the sleaze... fir dictator, and who himself is now mired in the sleaze. . ._ dictator, and who himself is now mired in the sleaze... or dark. we 'ust said mired in the sleaze... or dark. we just said we _ mired in the sleaze... or dark. we just said we want _ mired in the sleaze... or dark. we just said we want to _ mired in the sleaze... or dark. we just said we want to show- mired in the sleaze... or dark. we just said we want to show the - mired in the sleaze... or dark. we i just said we want to show the house at its _ just said we want to show the house at its best — just said we want to show the house at its best i— just said we want to show the house at its best. i want to see us at our best _ at its best. i want to see us at our best. that — at its best. i want to see us at our best, that shows that we take this seriousty~ — best, that shows that we take this seriously. we want to put the house in the _ seriously. we want to put the house in the best— seriously. we want to put the house in the best place forward, so please a language, moderate thoughts. let's do this— a language, moderate thoughts. let's do this right. i do a language, moderate thoughts. let's do this right-— do this right. i do think there is a oint do this right. i do think there is a point here. _ do this right. i do think there is a point here, this _ do this right. i do think there is a point here, this is _ do this right. i do think there is a point here, this is almost - do this right. i do think there is a point here, this is almost the - do this right. i do think there is a | point here, this is almost the sort of behaviour that we would expect to see in moscow, in beijing, not in the house of commons. previous prime ministers and previous governments have all had their failings, but it is a long time since we have seen these issues. the absolute lack of resolve to do anything about it. they say a fish rots from the head down, and i'm disappointed to see at the prime minister has chosen not to turn up today to answer questions
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given that the leader of the opposition is in his place. you can't help but feel that he thinks that the rules do not apply to him. the government has recently failed to properly investigate allegations, failed to declare relevant meetings, and arguably attempted to rig the system to cover their own backs. this is a prime minister who flew to afghanistan to escape a vote on heathrow when he was foreign secretary and has driven to the north east to escape questions today. i north east to escape questions toda . . ~ north east to escape questions toda . . ,, ., ., . , , today. i thank the honourable member for wh and today. i thank the honourable member for why and for— today. i thank the honourable member for why and for securing _ today. i thank the honourable member for why and for securing this _ for why and for securing this debate. as one of those who voted against their government, or defied the three line whip last week on this issue, i think she will agree that it was patently wrong to try and reform a system at this point. the she agree that we need cross—party support going forward? and given that they committee on standards already looking at this
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issue, we should wait for their findings before making any decisions about going forward? i findings before making any decisions about going forward?— about going forward? i thank the honourable _ about going forward? i thank the honourable member _ about going forward? i thank the honourable member for - about going forward? i thank the honourable member for his - honourable member for his intervention, and i'm sure he was present at the debate last week, which is exactly what this side of this house was calling for, for consensus, for the goal not to be moved. it was calling for us to be looking at our ongoing processes and procedures and hold ourselves to account as our bow to do. i have a correspondence from a lifelong conservative voters who are appalled not just at last week was my actions, but actually the last two years of actions... i actions, but actually the last two years of actions. . ._ years of actions... i thank the honourable _ years of actions... i thank the honourable member - years of actions... i thank the honourable member for - years of actions... i thank the | honourable member for giving years of actions... i thank the - honourable member for giving way. the she agree with me that the government has been playing a ridiculous game of the public�*s trust, not only with the foul play in last week's vote but also by a string of corrupt dealings over the last two years? i
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string of corrupt dealings over the last two years?— last two years? i will go on to detail some _ last two years? i will go on to detail some of _ last two years? i will go on to detail some of the _ last two years? i will go on to detail some of the things - last two years? i will go on to detail some of the things she | detail some of the things she is referring to. back in may 2020, dominic cummings trip to barnard castle and flagrant breach of covid regulations. then the home secretary found to have breached the ministerial code, but let off. then the health secretary wrecking covid guidance he had been instructing others to follow. that is just the tip of the iceberg. it others to follow. that is 'ust the tip of the icebergh others to follow. that is 'ust the tip of the iceberg. it has been said and the media _ tip of the iceberg. it has been said and the media that _ tip of the iceberg. it has been said and the media that some - tip of the iceberg. it has been said and the media that some mps - tip of the iceberg. it has been said and the media that some mps are | tip of the iceberg. it has been said . and the media that some mps are out walking through the corridors of westminster feeling invincible. walking through the corridors of westminsterfeeling invincible. does she agree with me that we are accountable to our constituents and they are our boss? i accountable to our constituents and they are our boss?— they are our boss? i thank the honourable — they are our boss? i thank the honourable member _ they are our boss? i thank the honourable member for - they are our boss? i thank the honourable member for the i honourable member for the intervention. i honourable memberfor the intervention. i agree this is one of the challenges in terms of this is not an ordinary the challenges in terms of this is notan ordinaryjob, the challenges in terms of this is not an ordinaryjob, we are not in line management structure. we are accountable to only our constituents. i was appalled at what happened last
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week. i can i say, as a long member, it isn't typical? i've worked with people in this house from all parties for a very long time, and most of the behaviour is good, it's excellent, it's cross party? so this has really done something to damage our reputation, but please don't any of us undermine the fact that normally most of our members on all sides act honourably, work together, and i'm proud to be a member working with you? i and i'm proud to be a member working with ou? ~' ., ., . , with you? i think the honourable member for _ with you? i think the honourable member for his _ with you? i think the honourable member for his intervention. - with you? i think the honourable member for his intervention. as| with you? i think the honourable i member for his intervention. as an memberfor his intervention. as an mp elected in 2019, one of the things that's been a great loss as a result of covid has been the opportunity to meet people in real life and actually engage across the house cross parties, and i'm hoping as we move through qovu there is more opportunity to do that so we can see the behaviour on all sides. just briefly. i’m
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can see the behaviour on all sides. just briefly-— just briefly. i'm grateful to my honourable — just briefly. i'm grateful to my honourable friend _ just briefly. i'm grateful to my honourable friend not - just briefly. i'm grateful to my honourable friend notjust - just briefly. i'm grateful to my honourable friend not just for| honourable friend not just for securing this debate, but for letting me intervene. in recent weeks, we have mourned the loss of two great men who serve their communities well in this house and were decent people, and we talked about how important it is that we conduct ourselves with grace and fruit given us on all sides, that our tone should be different —— forgiveness. what would she be dumb if you agree with me that being gracious does not mean ignoring the reality when one side behaves especially badly? we do not need to be sloppily neutral. the reality is the government made a decision last week which undermined a trust in democracy at every level, locally and here, and that is why her debate is so important? i and here, and that is why her debate is so important?— is so important? i think the honourable _ is so important? i think the honourable member- is so important? i think the honourable member for - is so important? i think the honourable member for his j honourable member for his intervention, we are on the position on our benches to oppose the government unless they can demonstrate otherwise. i'm going to try to make some progress. over the last 20 months, my constituents have had to follow more rules than they've ever had to deal with
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before. while we are sadly governed by ministers who seem to care far less about the rules than any predecessors in living memory, which is why we are here today, ministers who are giggly it's been reportedly over the weekend are focused on pleasing their boss, not on doing what is right for this country. we've seen story after story break, cash for honours and declared —— on declared interest... i cash for honours and declared -- on declared interest. . ._ declared interest... i think my honourable — declared interest... i think my honourable friend. _ declared interest... i think my honourable friend. on - declared interest... i think my honourable friend. on that. declared interest... i think my i honourable friend. on that point declared interest... i think my - honourable friend. on that point for cash for honours, which he agree with me that the house of lords appointments committee should be put on a statutory footing? this would make sure that any recommendations made to the prime minister could not be ignored in the same way the promised or ignored advice given to him by the previous independent adviser when they recommended that the home secretary be sacked for bullying? i the home secretary be sacked for bull inc? ~ the home secretary be sacked for bull in: ? ~' ., ., . , bullying? i think the honourable member bullying? ! think the honourable memberfor— bullying? i think the honourable member for her _ bullying? i think the honourable member for her intervention, i bullying? i think the honourable . member for her intervention, these things need to be looked at on an ongoing basis, and there are areas where the processes are in conflict with one another. i will not
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progress. who is influencing our politics? how is taxpayer money being done? —— i will now progress. that is what we argue that we need a public inquiry with the powers and resources to get to the depths of the situation we are in. people around the country who have played by the rules deserve answers, and instead they are being let down by a prime minister in a government who won't even take the most basic of steps to turn up to this debate. and it is a great shame that the prime minister hasn't graced us with his presence this afternoon because there's still a huge amount that we do not know about the events of last week. and there are many questions that demand answers, and many of those involve the prime minister's personal role in this affair. a prime minister who's been under investigation and more time than any member in recent years, and the question is, who stands to benefit from getting the current standards processes out of the way? and members of the public will have to draw their own conclusions with the prime minister not being here today. the questions don't stop at the
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prime minister, they extend to those in the operation last week. firstly, why was there a whipping operation in the first place? this was house business, it should not have been whipped. the government tried to change the procedures without consent, then it you turned and tried to walk it back. but you can't walk back the events of last week, that's why we're here. we've heard serious concerning allegations today that members breaking the whip were threatened with removal of position, and i would ask the cabinet secretary to addresses whether it's true. this deserves further investigation. the idea that communities should suffer because the representative did the right thing frankly abhorrent. despite all those alleged threats, the whipping operation was only a partial success, and i think those honourable members opposite who stood up for what was right, and those members, including the father of the house, who supported my application last week. i'll give way
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to the honourable member. ijust to the honourable member. i 'ust like to make fl to the honourable member. i 'ust like to make it i to the honourable member. i 'ust like to make it clear i to the honourable member. i 'ust like to make it clear that i to the honourable member. i 'ust like to make it clear that no h to the honourable member. inst like to make it clear that no state were any threats of that nature made to me when i broke the whip last week. i to me when i broke the whip last week. ~' ., ., . , ~ , week. i think the honourable member for the intervention _ week. i think the honourable member for the intervention and _ week. i think the honourable member for the intervention and providing - for the intervention and providing us with that clarity, it's unfortunate the prime ministers not here to do that. the final set of questions is for us in this place to answer, not ministers or the government, but members of this house. how do we go about building trust and confidence in what we do here? i hope we will be able to further discuss this today. mr speaker, no system is perfect, there is always room for improvement. certainly when i thought about the process for investigating complaints against members, but i saw last week made abundantly clear that changes do need to be made. ifind it quite hard to believe that owen patterson was able to vote on his own suspension last week, whilst the votes of members currently under investigation were actually critical investigation were actually critical in the passage of the amendment
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which saved him. it looks like the equivalent of defendants in a court case also taking part in the jury — and it is wrong, and if we are to make changes, i would argue that must be made top of the list of reforms. there is much discussion about the right to appeal, something we've heard a lot from the government as they try to justify their actions, but i would point out that through the borders bill currently going through parliament, the government is attempting to take the government is attempting to take the rights and appeal away from asylum—seekers. mr speaker, no matter what changes are proposed, one thing is clear— those with an... those trying to tear off the rule should not be given the power to do so. they must be done fairly with proper time and consideration by this house. it is this house which invest the authority in the standards committee to act on its behalf and considering the commissioner's reports and whether or not to uphold those reports and the sanctions attached to them. i'm sure the right honourable member in
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the chair of the standards committee will take time to speak about the steps the standards committee is taken to make a taking, which he referred to earlier, mr speaker. as of 2019, i didn't vote in the current rules, but accept them because they are the rules in place. i'm a member of a smaller party. we do not have representation on the standards committee — but those are the rules, and we accept them. if the rules, and we accept them. if the processes are to be changed, that needs to be done properly and with consensus across the house. that's what the leader of the house should have been looking to do, to look after the house and set of his own party. listening to member's contributions, i understand he's not doing so, the ministerfor the cabinet officer tillich office is responding. can he let us know exactly what the... certainly wherever we go from here, without a cross party consensus, reforms will
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simply have no legitimacy. mr speaker, like you, i hope for positive and constructive contributions from all sides of the houses afternoon as we work out how to move forward from the scandal, and i hope the leader of the house and i hope the leader of the house and the prime minister will engage with this process. in closing, mr speaker, one of my other constituents wrote to me saying, "mr patterson's resignation is not the end, it must be the beginning of an uncompromising campaign to end corruption in politics." i hope we can begin that campaign in this place today. the can begin that campaign in this place today-— can begin that campaign in this lace toda . , ., , ., place today. the question is as on the order paper. _ place today. the question is as on the order paper. i _ place today. the question is as on the order paper. i call— place today. the question is as on the order paper. i call the - the order paper. i call the minister _ the order paper. i call the minister-— the order paper. i call the minister. . ~ the order paper. i call the minister. . » minister. thank you, mr speaker. the prime minister _ minister. thank you, mr speaker. the prime minister and _ minister. thank you, mr speaker. the prime minister and me _ minister. thank you, mr speaker. the prime minister and me this _ minister. thank you, mr speaker. the prime minister and me this morning i prime minister and me this morning to say— prime minister and me this morning to say neither of them could be with us -- _ to say neither of them could be with us —— informed me this morning. they've _ us —— informed me this morning. they've given me their reasons, i don't _ they've given me their reasons, i
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don't make — they've given me their reasons, i don't make judgements, they've given me their reasons, i don't makejudgements, but they've given me their reasons, i don't make judgements, but i can say that both _ don't make judgements, but i can say that both leaders, one is at cop and another— that both leaders, one is at cop and another is _ that both leaders, one is at cop and another is visiting hospitals in the northeast. i don't need to hear all the northeast. idon't need to hear all the way— northeast. i don't need to hear all the way through, where is he? i've explained — the way through, where is he? i've explained it. — the way through, where is he? i've explained it, you can make your own decisions _ explained it, you can make your own decisions. . ~ explained it, you can make your own decisions. . ,, , ., ~ . ,, decisions. thank you, mr speaker. i'm decisions. thank you, mr speaker. i'm grateful— decisions. thank you, mr speaker. i'm grateful to _ decisions. thank you, mr speaker. i'm grateful to the _ decisions. thank you, mr speaker. i'm grateful to the honourable - i'm grateful to the honourable memberfirm northeast i'm grateful to the honourable member firm northeast fife for securing an opening this debate. the government has been listening carefully to the legitimate concerns raised by honourable and right honourable members on all sides of the house. �* . the house. laughter. both during _ the house. laughter. both during and - the house. laughter. both during and since i the house. laughter. i both during and since last wednesday's debate. these are vitally important matters to you, mr speaker, and to the whole house. but before i set out the government's position today, i would like first and foremost to express my regret and foremost to express my regret and that of might material colleagues over the mistake made last week —— my... we realised there
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were problems by which the possible breaches of the code of conduct are investigated. yet while sincerely held concerns clearly warrants further attention, the manner in which the government approach last week's debate conflated with them with the response to an individual case. this house shared a collective interest in ensuring that the code of conduct reflects and fosters the highest standards of public life. the government fully recognises that the standards committee is critical to this, including the important goal informed by its chairman, the honourable memberfrom. he’s goal informed by its chairman, the honourable member from. he's already offered one apology, _ honourable member from. he's already offered one apology, can _ honourable member from. he's already offered one apology, can i _ honourable member from. he's already offered one apology, can i ask - honourable member from. he's already offered one apology, can i ask him - offered one apology, can i ask him to give them another? that's for residences who live in constituencies who have mps that his front bench and whips were threatening to withdraw spending in their committee to micro community
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just to punish them for thinking about voting for the moment last week was mike apologise to those residents? they are innocent bystanders and it's not their fault that they could have money taken out of their community simply because of something there impede us on a matter of conscience. i something there impede us on a matter of conscience.— matter of conscience. i feel mr seaker matter of conscience. i feel mr speaker he _ matter of conscience. i feel mr speaker he prepared _ matter of conscience. i feel mr speaker he prepared the - matter of conscience. i feel mr - speaker he prepared the intervention before hearing from my honourable friend who just said that, despite voting against the government, that was a misrepresentation of the conversations. of course i'll give way. i conversations. of course i'll give wa . ~' conversations. of course i'll give wa . ~ ., ., way. i think the right honourable gentleman _ way. i think the right honourable gentleman for— way. i think the right honourable gentleman for giving _ way. i think the right honourable gentleman for giving way. - way. i think the right honourable gentleman for giving way. could | way. i think the right honourable i gentleman for giving way. could he explain why he is doing this debate, and not the leader of the house whose job it is to deal with the issue of the standards decision? isn't this adding insult to injury and showing the government really doesn't understand it? first and showing the government really doesn't understand it?— doesn't understand it? first of all, the leader of— doesn't understand it? first of all, the leader of the _ doesn't understand it? first of all, the leader of the houses _ doesn't understand it? first of all, the leader of the houses in - doesn't understand it? first of all,
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the leader of the houses in the - the leader of the houses in the chamber. �* . chamber. laughter. and secondly, - chamber. laughter. and secondly, as - chamber. laughter. and secondly, as she| chamber. laughter. - and secondly, as she last chamber. laughter. _ and secondly, as she last knows, as the mother of the house, the cabinet overseas cross departments including on a number of issues covered by this issue. of course i'll give way. i'm very grateful for the right honourable gentleman giving way, and i also appreciate his apology on behalf of the government, and i'm sure other members will do. but can he give the house a commitment that for the future disciplinary matters, they are matters for the house and not for the government? has they are matters for the house and not for the government?— they are matters for the house and not for the government? as has been set out by the — not for the government? as has been set out by the prime _ not for the government? as has been set out by the prime minister - not for the government? as has been set out by the prime minister and by| set out by the prime minister and by other colleagues in government, we are committed to working on a cross party basis, including with the chair of the standards committee. and it is for that reason, as i say, i recognise the protocol and formed
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by the chairman, and just pick that out in terms of my remarks. we thank him, mr speaker, and the committee's members for their service as we do the parliamentary commission for standards as well. and i want to reiterate the government has previously taken and will continue to take a cross party approach to standards in this house. i’m to take a cross party approach to standards in this house. i'm very crateful, standards in this house. i'm very grateful. i _ standards in this house. i'm very grateful. i too. _ standards in this house. i'm very grateful, itoo, like _ standards in this house. i'm very grateful, i too, like the - standards in this house. i'm very grateful, i too, like the member| standards in this house. i'm very i grateful, i too, like the member for grateful, i too, like the memberfor newcastle and live, i saw no pressure for how i voted last week. does by our honourable friend, who set out a very gracious apology in terms of what happened last week, will he concede that one of the things i think that wasn't right with the amendment that the government supported was hand—picking the members of that committee? would not be better if the committee should be chaired by someone who is elected by this whole house and the members of the committee are also elected the
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normal way of select committee members? mr normal way of select committee members?— members? mr speaker, we are committed _ members? mr speaker, we are committed to _ members? mr speaker, we are committed to working - members? mr speaker, we are committed to working on - members? mr speaker, we are committed to working on a - members? mr speaker, we are i committed to working on a cross party basis, and we regret that many honourable members did not feel that they had been sufficiently consulted on the proposals last week. but i simply refer to the article in the times by the chair of the standards committee who said, and i quote, "i'm sure we need to review both the code of conduct in the way it operates, and " further went on to wait to say "there are arguments to be made for a more formal process whereby a member could appeal the decision to a subcommittee of the standards committee full cycles ago it was with that the debate turned last week, but i give way. i thank the cabinet secretary for giving way. last week was uk
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parliament week but it was not our finest hour. does the secretary of state agree with me that at the very least a message from this debate must be that we work and our constituents' interest and in the public�*s interest and that the use of this house to work in private interests the tune of hundreds of thousands of pounds will not be tolerated? {lit thousands of pounds will not be tolerated? . ., , . �* thousands of pounds will not be tolerated? , . �* , tolerated? of course i hadn't seen the chair, tolerated? of course i hadn't seen the chair. of _ tolerated? of course i hadn't seen the chair, of course _ tolerated? of course i hadn't seen the chair, of course i _ tolerated? of course i hadn't seen the chair, of course i will - tolerated? of course i hadn't seen the chair, of course i will give - the chair, of course i will give way. we are committed to working on a cross—party basis. i am way. we are committed to working on a cross-party basis.— a cross-party basis. i am very crateful a cross-party basis. i am very grateful and _ a cross-party basis. i am very grateful and i _ a cross-party basis. i am very grateful and i acknowledge i a cross-party basis. i am very| grateful and i acknowledge the apology the minister has given on behalf of the government. we are still in a bit of a whole, the whole of parliament, we still have a motion carried last week which leaves the question of mr paterson and's conduct hanging in the air. i gave earlier today a draft of a
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motion which could be considered by the house tomorrow if the government were to table out tonight, and i think it would have the support of the whole house and clearing up the facts that we haven't actually decided whether mr patterson's behaviour was inappropriate. i think the whole house now accepts that it was. secondly, we have created a committee which i think the honourable gentleman chairing out doesn't even want to be on any more. it would be quite a good idea to cool us up tomorrow. irate it would be quite a good idea to cool us up tomorrow.— it would be quite a good idea to cool us up tomorrow. we will listen to the house _ cool us up tomorrow. we will listen to the house and _ cool us up tomorrow. we will listen to the house and we _ cool us up tomorrow. we will listen to the house and we will— cool us up tomorrow. we will listen to the house and we will listen i cool us up tomorrow. we will listen to the house and we will listen to i to the house and we will listen to the debate... if the honourable lady would just let me answer the chair of�*s point. mr patterson has now resigned so it would not be possible for the house to endorse a sanction of suspension. i simply remind the house that he suffered a series of
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personal tragedy, house that he suffered a series of personaltragedy, he house that he suffered a series of personal tragedy, he has now resigned to a stop in his statement, he said he wants to continue outside of public life in terms of politics. therefore i think we should respect that. mr speaker, i hope through your office there will be some way to engage on a cross—party basis. that is what the government will redouble its efforts to engage on in the days ahead.— redouble its efforts to engage on in the days ahead. very grateful to the minister for — the days ahead. very grateful to the minister for giving _ the days ahead. very grateful to the minister for giving way. _ the days ahead. very grateful to the minister for giving way. there i the days ahead. very grateful to the minister for giving way. there isn't i ministerfor giving way. there isn't anybody in this house that doesn't have the utmost sympathy for mr pattison's plight, but i think we do also have to remember that he did say he would do exactly the same if the opportunity presented. i'm grateful the minister has rendered his apology but does not think a more appropriate that the prime minister attends and gives an apology? if i can assist the speaker, ratherthan apology? if i can assist the speaker, rather than being in the
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north—east of england defending the conduct of his police and crime commissioners, one who has had to resign over inappropriate remarks and another one who is under investigation. i and another one who is under investigation.— and another one who is under investigation. i think mr speaker dealt with that _ investigation. i think mr speaker dealt with that at _ investigation. i think mr speaker dealt with that at the _ investigation. i think mr speaker dealt with that at the opening i investigation. i think mr speaker dealt with that at the opening of| dealt with that at the opening of this debate, and made clear both the prime minister and the leader of the snp had discussed with mr speaker in terms the debate today. i snp had discussed with mr speaker in terms the debate today.— terms the debate today. i abstained last week, terms the debate today. i abstained last week. and _ terms the debate today. i abstained last week, and i _ terms the debate today. i abstained last week, and i thank _ terms the debate today. i abstained last week, and i thank the - last week, and i thank the government absolutely for the apology, which is completely the right thing today. i would also like to say on record that despite the fact i have abstained, the government continues to be nothing but supportive of myselfi government continues to be nothing but supportive of myself— but supportive of myself i think it is helful but supportive of myself i think it is helpful to _ but supportive of myself i think it is helpful to get _ but supportive of myself i think it is helpful to get that _ but supportive of myself i think it is helpful to get that on - but supportive of myself i think it is helpful to get that on the i is helpful to get that on the record. the government will now redouble its efforts to engage on a
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cross—party basis, and ended with you, mr speaker, in the days ahead, because we know what we can achieve when we do so. in collaboration with others, no memberfor others, no member for northamptonshire others, no memberfor northamptonshire worked hard with the leader of the house to establish the leader of the house to establish the independent complaints and grievance scheme, the icgs. the scheme to which the government is wholly committed as a model that i believe has many strengths, it includes an appeals process and ability to adjudicate complex cases by virtue of his independent expert panel led by a by virtue of his independent expert panel led bya high by virtue of his independent expert panel led by a high courtjudge. overall the independent compliance and grievance scheme brings with the expectation of rigour, and fairness for both a complainant and respondent. it for both a complainant and respondent.— for both a complainant and respondent. for both a complainant and resondent. ., , . ., ., , respondent. it would be an enormous hel to the
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respondent. it would be an enormous help to the house _ respondent. it would be an enormous help to the house if _ respondent. it would be an enormous help to the house if we _ respondent. it would be an enormous help to the house if we could - help to the house if we could understand that the government's thinking on this issue. the amended motion last week was passed, i voted against it, but it was passed. what is its status now? there seems to be a general consensus that the rules we deploy with regards to standards are reviewed. are they to be reviewed under the current auspices or the auspices mentioned last week of some shadow or secondary standards committee looking at it? i thought we could know that, that we are going to work through the actual procedures in existence today and effectively expunge the amended motion from the record of last week, that i think the house would find helpful. it that i think the house would find helful. . . . that i think the house would find helful. , . . ., helpful. it is clear that the committee _ helpful. it is clear that the committee would - helpful. it is clear that the committee would not i helpful. it is clear that the committee would not be i helpful. it is clear that the i committee would not be able to develop proposals without cross—party participation. that is why therefore we are continuing discussions and listening to views
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across the house about the best way forward. . ~ across the house about the best way forward. ., ~ , ., across the house about the best way forward. ., ~ in ., ~ , forward. thank you to the minister forward. thank you to the minister for aaivin forward. thank you to the minister for giving way- _ forward. thank you to the minister for giving way- in _ forward. thank you to the minister for giving way. in an _ forward. thank you to the minister for giving way. in an attempt - for giving way. in an attempt to help the government, as in the root cause of all of this mp is trying to get paid even more than the £82,000 a year that mps already get? i shouldn't have to remind the government that 95% of the public get paid less than mps. government that 95% of the public get paid less than mp5. i shouldn't have to remind a government that being an mp is a full—time job. chasing corporate cash is quite simply short—changing the public. will the minister agree to help clean up politics by backing my bill to ban a second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh jobs for members of parliament? i’m fifth, sixth and seventh jobs for members of parliament? i'm not sure whether all on — members of parliament? i'm not sure whether all on his _ members of parliament? i'm not sure whether all on his own _ members of parliament? i'm not sure whether all on his own benches - members of parliament? i'm not sure whether all on his own benches would support that. that is value in mps having a continue connection with the world outside of politics.
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manning all second jobs would have captured some in this house who were, for example, as doctors and nurses and have supported the nhs really pandemic. i would argue it makes sense to build on the recent work of the member for northampton south and the procedure that she developed when leader of the house. mr speaker, we share a commitment to a system which encourages and communicates the right values, attitudes and behaviour, making clear to members that in performing their parliamentary duties they are expected always to act in the public interest, with courtesy, professionalism and respect. grateful to the secretary of state for his apology, as far as it went. but last week i was quite clear that the government did not agree with the government did not agree with the standard committee's recommendations in their support. i'm not clear today, is that the government saying that they now
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agree that owen paterson behave badly or incorrectly, or are they just out polishing today for the process that they impose on us last week? ., . ~ ., ., , week? jack -- apologising. owen paterson has _ week? jack -- apologising. owen paterson has led _ week? jack -- apologising. owen paterson has led parliament, - week? jack -- apologising. owen paterson has led parliament, he| week? jack -- apologising. owen i paterson has led parliament, he has resigned, therefore suspending him from the house would no longer be applicable. it is the work for every member to safeguard parliament's member to safeguard pa rliament�*s reputation member to safeguard parliament's reputation by upholding its principles and abiding by its rules. moving ahead, our show responsibility is to identify and seize opportunities to improve the system, to ensure it is robust and fair, that commands the confidence of members and our constituents, and thatis of members and our constituents, and that is aligned with the fundamental principles naturaljustice. to that end, mr speaker, iwill come forthcoming contributions from colleagues. i can assure you that the government will be listening carefully to the insight and use of
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members from across the house. —— insights and views. members from across the house. -- insights and views.— insights and views. thank you, mr seaker. insights and views. thank you, mr speaker- i — insights and views. thank you, mr speaker- i see _ insights and views. thank you, mr speaker. i see the _ insights and views. thank you, mr speaker. i see the leader - insights and views. thank you, mr speaker. i see the leader of - insights and views. thank you, mr speaker. i see the leader of the l speaker. i see the leader of the house is in the house. so it is a surprise to see the minister for the cabinet office at the dispatch box today. mr speaker, he and i have faced each other across at the dispatch box many times, and is always a pleasure, but i'm sure he, like me, wishes that his days as the night watchman were a thing of the past, defending violently against hostile bowling on a sticky wicket of his prime minister's creation. it is as if 2019 never ended. that is because last week the prime minister damaged himself. despite the bravery of some members opposite, he damaged
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his party. most importantly, he damaged our democracy. we are fortunate in this country, voters may not always agree with politicians, they often don't, but they do trust that disagreements are sincere, that their representatives are acting in the way that they think is in the public interest, and that we can't resolve our disagreements in debates and at the ballot box. —— that we can resolve. but when the prime minister gives the green light to corruption, he corrodes that trust. when he says that the rules to stop vested interests don't apply to his friends, he corrodes that trust. when he deliberately undermined at those charged with stopping corruption, he corrodes that trust. that is exactly what the prime
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minister did last week. now today he does not even have the decency to come here, either to defend what she did, in orderto come here, either to defend what she did, in order to apologise for his actions. ratherthan did, in order to apologise for his actions. rather than repairing the damage that he has done, the prime minister is running scared. when required to lead, he has chosen to hide. his concern, as always, is self—preservation, not the national interest. it is time for everyone in this house, whatever their party, to draw a line and to send a message to the prime minister— enough is enough, we will not stand by while he trashes our democracy. mr speaker, the case for the former
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memberfor north speaker, the case for the former member for north shropshire speaker, the case for the former memberfor north shropshire is simple. everyone in this house has enormous sympathy for the tragic circumstances in which he lost his wife. his playing and his anguish are unimaginable. —— his pain and his anguish was that i wish to express my condolences to him, as i did at the time. the committee on standards rightly took those awful circumstances into account when considering his conduct. there was a serious and robust process. he had a prior notice of the charges against him. he had legal advisors with him. he was invited to appeal against the commissioner �*s findings in writing and in person, and he did so. the findings were clear. an egregious
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case of paid advocacy. he took money to lobby ministers. that is against the rules, as it is in any functioning democracy. and it is corrupt. the prime minister should have told the former member for north shropshire that the right thing to do was to accept his punishment. his duty of care demanded that he do that. his duty to defend a stand there is demanded that he do that. basic decency the mandate that he do that. —— basic decency demanded that he do that. instead, the british people were let down and the former member for north shropshire was let down, used as a pawn on an extraordinary attack on our commissioner for standards. there is to have my taken way from
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schools, hospitals and high street unless members voted to undermine the commissioner. mincer is sent out on the airways in the morning after the vote to call for her to reconsider her position. —— ministers. a sham committee proposed so that the government can set the judge and jury forfuture so that the government can set the judge and jury for future cases. this was a deliberate course of action. but the government was caught off guard by the public outcry and they have climbed down. mr speaker, this wasn't a tactical mistake, and innocent misjudgment swiftly corrected by a u—turn. it was the prime minister of�*s way of doing business. a pattern of behaviour. when the prime minister's adviser on the ministerial code found against the home secretary,
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the prime minister kept the home secretary and forced out the advisor. where no electoral commissioner investigated the conservative party, the prime minister threatened to shut it down. and when the commissioner for standards looked into the prime minister's donations, the prime minister's donations, the prime minister tried to take her down. government corruption, there is no other word for it. mr speaker, it is said that the prime minister doesn't believe the rules apply to him. but it is worse than that. he absolutely knows that the rules apply to him. his strategy is to devalue the rules so they don't matter to anyone anymore, and to go after those charged with enforcing the rules so that regular rules have less consequence. that
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way, politics becomes contaminated. cynicism replaces confidence and trust. the taunt that politicians are all in it for themselves becomes accepted as wisdom. and with that, the prime minister hopes to drag us all into the gutter with him. no way. it only serves to convince people that things can't get better, that government can't improve people's lives. progress is impossible because politics doesn't work. but in the right hands, used in the right way for the right reasons, politics can work — because politics can be a noble cause to build a better country, to build a better world. and for some, it is also a great personal sacrifice. the plaques in this house to every need and joe cox, the empty seats where
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just weeks ago, sir david amess sat, are proof of that price. we have to defeat the politics of cynicism propagated by this spry minister. i'm grateful to the leader of the opposition for giving way. one of the rules we've always observed in this place is that you don't whip house business. and just after everything that has happened since last week, it can be traced back to the determination of the government to with that. does he share my concern that we've heard nothing from the treasury bench today, that if we on the side of the house participate in future explosion of the rules, that when we return to this house, there will be no repetition of whipping the votes either for or against them was mike andindeed either for or against them was mike and indeed without that undertaking, it would be very difficult for anyone on the side to accept what we hearfrom the
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anyone on the side to accept what we hear from the treasury bench is a good faith exercise. i do hear from the treasury bench is a good faith exercise.— hear from the treasury bench is a good faith exercise. i do share that concern, good faith exercise. i do share that concern. it — good faith exercise. i do share that concern, it would _ good faith exercise. i do share that concern, it would be _ good faith exercise. i do share that concern, it would be a _ good faith exercise. i do share that concern, it would be a very - good faith exercise. i do share that concern, it would be a very easy i concern, it would be a very easy thing for the government to say today, and we got another two hours left to run in this debate, so there's plenty time to say it. i there's plenty time to say it. i couldn't agree more with the opposition that house business should never be whipped. ijust want wonder if the leader of the opposition can say whether he whipped his members last week? ho. whipped his members last week? no. we didn't. our members didn't need whipping. to know what the right decision was. mr speaker, there are good ideas across the house about how we can improve standards, to restore the prime minister dashed the trust the promise or is broken. there's talk this afternoon about cross party working, we are willing
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to work cross party and with the expertise of the standards committee to make that happen. but let me be loud and clear — we are not willing to work with the government on their plans to weaken standards. there will be no cross party agreement on weakening standards. there are other ideas, labour�*s long called for the mpe's ideas, labour�*s long called for the mpe�*s code of conduct to the unpaid consultancy rules. those roles are a potential breach of interest, but it doesn't ban them. we voted to fix that in 2015, but we were blocked by the government. a change along those lines has been recommended, but there hasn't been action from the government. it's time to put that right. mr speaker, in addition, the revolving door between ministerial office and the private sector is in full swing. ministers can still regulate a company one minute and
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work for them the next. the business appointments committee is too weak to provide the check and the balance, and it's time to shut the revolving door by banning these job swaps. injust one revolving door by banning these job swaps. in just one second, revolving door by banning these job swaps. injust one second, if revolving door by banning these job swaps. in just one second, if you'll give me a moment, in addition, this weekend we've been reminded of the appalling inevitable pattern — large donation to the conservative party, a stint as party treasurer, and then an appointment to the house of lords. the regulator has been ignored by the prime minister and broken in the process. there is no doubt the house of lords means democrat needs fundamental democratic reform, but we can act now to tough and the rules. i’m democratic reform, but we can act now to tough and the rules. i'm most crateful to now to tough and the rules. i'm most grateful to the _ now to tough and the rules. i'm most grateful to the leader— now to tough and the rules. i'm most grateful to the leader of _ now to tough and the rules. i'm most grateful to the leader of the - grateful to the leader of the opposition. he was the former director of public prosecutions, and
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i'm also aware that in 2003 under a labour government, with the committee for standards set up the investigatory panel with the rules of naturaljustice contained in it if it were to be implemented, which in this case it was not. would he, as a former director of public, agree that the rules of natural justice could be avoided where an investigatory panel could have been set up but was not —— director of public? i set up but was not -- director of ublic? , ., ,., , public? i understand the point, but let's 'ust public? i understand the point, but let'sjust remind _ public? i understand the point, but let'sjust remind ourselves - public? i understand the point, but let'sjust remind ourselves of- public? i understand the point, but let'sjust remind ourselves of the l let's just remind ourselves of the process here. the independent commissioner examines the complaint and comes to a finding. there is then — the charge is known in the individual can be legally represented and advised. and i understand the former member for north shropshire was legally advised throughout the process. the finding
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of the commissioner can then be appealed to the committee. that committee can either agree with the commissioner or disagree. and i'll be corrected if i'm wrong, if on occasion, the committee has disagreed, and therefore the appeal has been allowed. the individual does not face the sanction. before that committee, the individual — and i think the former member for north shropshire can be legally advised, i think he had two legal teams in the process, was able to make a statement setting out his case and defence. every point that was made in his defence last wednesday was made by him to the committee, as anyone who has read the report will know, it was rejected by the committee, he was then questioned for a number of hours by the committee members. that is an appeal, that is due process— and cannotjust say this, appeal, that is due process— and cannot just say this, for cannotjust say this, for millions of working people and down the
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country, that is a much stronger position that they face if they are disciplined in their workplace. we owe it to them to remember that. i'lljust make some prospect democrat progress. on all of these areas where we can improve, we can work together to restore trust and strengthen standards. but instead, we've been invited into a sham process, designed to force out the memberfor process, designed to force out the member for commission standards, and we are told the problem wasn't democrat was there wasn't a right of appeal, when there clearly was one. we have no interest in talking to the prime minister about how to weaken the current system. the lack common ground is fundamental. the government wants to weaken the system because the system keeps investigating and finding against them. the best solution is the simple one — they should change their behaviour. cheering.
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in the prime ministers should show some leadership. he should send a clear message that the rules apply to everyone, and those enforcing the rules to prevent corruption will be supported by the government, rather than forced out. i will.— than forced out. i will. thank you, mr speaker. _ than forced out. i will. thank you, mr speaker, and _ than forced out. i will. thank you, mr speaker, and i _ than forced out. i will. thank you, mr speaker, and i think _ than forced out. i will. thank you, mr speaker, and i think my - than forced out. i will. thank you, mr speaker, and i think my friend | mr speaker, and i think my friend for giving way. doesn't he think though that the sham is even continuing today? because not only is the prime minister not here, given the importance of this issue, the leader of the house is here, but he's completely silent, and the minister who is there in his place when the leader of the house or the prime minister should be when the leader of the house or the prime minister should he can't even answer the basic question from either side of the house about how we proceed now and whether they'll accept the recommendation from sharon standards committee? i sharon standards committee? i couldn't agree more, the promise or should be here, leadership is about taking responsibility. and if there is an apology to be made, that
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paul's democrat apology should be made from the top just as they made from the top last week to engage in this business in the first place. i'll make some progress, then i'll give way. the prime minister could start by making three simple commitments. first, work with us to ensure that the member faces a recall petition. it is completely unacceptable for a member to be found guilty of sexually harassing junior staff, found guilty of sexually harassing juniorstaff, get found guilty of sexually harassing junior staff, get avoid the judgement of the electorate on the basis of a loophole. the government has hidden behind that loophole, it is now time to come out of hiding. secondly, the prime minister needs to agree that no member found guilty of egregious breaches of the mps's code of conduct can be recommended
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for a peerage. the government cannot reward bad behaviour and corruption with a job at making the laws of the land. and third, the prime minister must commit to a full and transparent investigation into the government contracts. mr speaker, what do we know? we know that rand docs has been awarded government contracts worth over £600 million, without competition or tender. we know that the former member for north shropshire lobbied for rand docs. we also know that he sat in on a call between rand docs and the minister responsible for handling the health contracts. against that backdrop, there is obviously a concern that the use of taxpayer money in the effectiveness of our
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pandemic response may have been influenced by paid advocacy from the former member for influenced by paid advocacy from the former memberfor north influenced by paid advocacy from the former member for north shropshire. so if the prime minister is interested in rooting out corruption, he needs to launch a full investigation — if the prime minister is interested in restoring trust, we need full transparency with all the relevant correspondence published. no gifts and no buts. mr speaker, last week the prime minister damaged himself, he damaged his party, and he damaged our democracy. he led his party through the sewers, and the stench lingers. this week he had the chance to clean up, to apologise to the country, and to finally accept that the rules apply to him and his friends. but instead of stepping up, he's hidden away. instead of clearing up his mess, he's left his side knee—deep in it. instead of leading from the
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front, he's cowered away. he's not a serious leader, in the joke front, he's cowered away. he's not a serious leader, in thejoke isn't funny anymore. cheering. mr speaker, it's tempting on all sides of the house to get into a mud bath and start throwing things at each other. i don't think this is the right time, i'd like to congratulate the honourable lady from northeast fife forward requesting this debate, i'd like to think my honourable friend from willingboro for saying last week that there must be cross party support for what we're doing now. the only positive thing i can safely government is if they want to make a mistake in the future, talk to me and we can make it together. i'd like to thank the leader of the house for acknowledging on thursday that things had been done wrong and be put right. i'm sorry to be speaking advanced of the standards
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committee because i'd like to know the terms of this motion or which could restore the consequences of the vote we ought to have taken on wednesday, because it's quite clear in this house should have backed the committee, and i think we need to find a way of showing that, and we ought to acknowledge that in the future, whether it's a member on my side of the house or the other side, the people who resign from parliament don't leave parliament without making a decision of firm recommendation of the standards committee with members of parliament and and dependent members, so they can find a way of making that play. my can find a way of making that play. my right honourable friend left the house, there is widespread support for a system. i'm not part of that support. i believe the system does work, can work, and should work. i'd be interested in knowing what the committee on standards wants to recommend, and a look at that with an open mind just because there's a
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right for me 18

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