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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 8, 2021 1:30pm-2:01pm GMT

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people seen there was that much affection between the two of them that they decided he would take him home. and khan was treated in lancashire as local hero. specially in the butcher's shop in strathaven. they allocated it some meat every week, free of charge, so it was well looked after. and what do you think your father would make of it? 0h, h'd be over the moon, he would. he would, yes, indeed. there's going to be a strange feeling walking through that green, heading to the pub and have him sitting there, watching me, for a statue. it's going to be very strange. aileen clarke, bbc news. time for a look at the weather news now. louise is here. it is on the change again the weather, last week it was about the cold and the frost, wasn't it. this week it is going to be cloudy but very mild, so far today we have had this east west divide. the best of the sunshine to, further west look at this. it is all about
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the cloud, the wind and the rain thatis the cloud, the wind and the rain that is starting to gather into the far north—west of scotland. now this is the beginning of the change in some respect, it is this low pressure moving up to greenland and this frontal system is dragging up very warm airfrom this frontal system is dragging up very warm air from the south—west, and so that means that temperatures once again will be back above the average for the time of year, with perhaps the exception of the far north of scotland, so far today, best of the breaks in the cloud have been to the east, you can see where the rain is gathering. it is pushing across scotland, some of it heavy and a accompanied by gusts of wind. outbreaks of lighter rain and for the rest of england and wales we mightjust cling on to brief glimpses of sunshine across east anglia and kent. look at the temperature, 11—15 degree, the mildest of the weather out to the west has the weather front starts to push in. so the mild air continues to flood across the uk through the
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night. a lot of cloud round, it will turn misty and murky, close to coasts and hills and the rain, well, that will slip out of the borders but look at the temperatures, 9—11; degrees so very mild start to tuesday morning, unfortunately an incredibly cloudy one as well. the weather front still there. not moving very far very fast. it will push into the north of england and north wales, here we will see a band of cloud and light patchy rain, into the south—east we might see some brief glimpses of such and it is breezy and showery to the far north—west and west, the strong winds driving in frequent sharp showers is here, but the temperatures are likely to keep between 10 and 16 degrees. now at this time of the year we should be seeing 8—11, so incredibly mild afternoon for all of us. looking ahead we have a brief drier spell as we move from wednesday but more wet and windy weather is set to arrive into friday. just where the low will
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be sitting, still subject to some uncertainty, but it is worth bearing in mind, yes through will be rain round. it stays on the mild side until the weekend. there is is a chance of seeing more in the way of sunshine but then we could return to some night—time frost as well. many a reminder of our top story... as mps prepare to debate parliamentary standards, the government rejects calls for a public inquiry into allegations it's corrupt. that's it. so goodbye from me. now on bbc one, let'sjoin our news teams where you are. have a very good afternoon. good afternoon. it's 1.30pm and here's your latest sports news. hello, i'm sarah mulkerrins at the bbc sport centre. let's start with the news in the last hour that england opener jason roy has been ruled out of the remainder of the t20
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world cup due to injury. roy retired hurt during england's loss to south africa in their final group game on saturday and a scan revealed he had torn his calf. james vince will replace him, as england prepare for their semi—final against new zealand on wednesday. roy said he was gutted to be ruled out, that it was a bitter pill to swallow — and will stay on to support the team. football fans at selected grounds will be allowed to stand for the first time since 1994, from the start of next year. chelsea against liverpool, on the second of january, will be the first game to feature a safe standing area, with manchester united against wolves the following day also featuring it. chelsea and manchester united, are joined by manchester city, tottenham and cardiff as the five clubs picked to trial standing areas. grounds in the top two tiers of english football have been required to be all seated by law for more than a quarter of a century. lewis hamilton faces an uphill battle to defend his formula one championship title, but says he and the mercedes team will pick themselves up and dig
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deeper, after max verstappen won the mexico grand prix. the seven time world champion was overtaken by his red bull rival on the opening straight in mexico— and hamilton could only cling on to finish second, admitting the red bull car was far superior. with verstappen now leading by 19 points in the title race — hamilton has says he will keep fighting, to keep his hopes alive with just 4 races to go. i feel positive in the sense that i had a good race. i i feel positive in the sense that i had a good race.— i feel positive in the sense that i had a good race. i did everything with the car— had a good race. i did everything with the car that _ had a good race. i did everything with the car that i _ had a good race. i did everything with the car that i had. _ had a good race. i did everything with the car that i had. the - had a good race. i did everything with the car that i had. the car. had a good race. i did everything i with the car that i had. the car was not good today. i did not make a mistake at the start. i was on the inside. i did not break as late as the guys in the clean line. i had a good start. after that was trying to win. i had a good pit stop.
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grand slam—winning sisters serena and venus williams say more needs to be done to tackle racism in tennis and across sport. the tennis superstars told radio 5 live breakfast they hope they have helped to break broundaries and they will continue to inspire future generations. there is a tonne of steps that still need to be made and still have to be made and not only in tennis but we saw from the football match and in every sport ever. i think it is important tojust keep every sport ever. i think it is important to just keep going and every sport ever. i think it is important tojust keep going and do the best that you can. yes. important to just keep going and do the best that you can.— the best that you can. yes, i think it is also important _ the best that you can. yes, i think it is also important that _ the best that you can. yes, i think it is also important that people . it is also important that people continue — it is also important that people continue to break barriers. the best part that _ continue to break barriers. the best part that it— continue to break barriers. the best part that if you are good enough and great _ part that if you are good enough and great enough, you can open the way for other— great enough, you can open the way for other people. i think generations behind us are able to 'ust generations behind us are able to just play— generations behind us are able to just play tennis and don't have to focus _ just play tennis and don't have to focus so — just play tennis and don't have to focus so much on the colour of their skirt _ and you find more on the bbc sport website
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on the comments from england rugby union head coach eddiejones — comparing the breakout success of his fly—half marcus smith to emma raducanu. he warned smith against becoming "ungrounded", in his words, saying the us open champion "hasn't done so well" since — despite her having only played two events since that grand slam title. can read more on that on the bbc sport website. that is the news for now. back to our top story this lunchtime — the debate on mps' standards later this afternoon. we've been hearing from the prime minister, borisjohnson, on a visit to a hospital a hospital in northumberland. he was asked if he should apologise for the way he handled the owen paterson case. what we have got to make sure is that we take all of this very, very seriously and we get it right. and there is a debate to be back today. i cannot be there because i have a
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long—standing engagement appear. labour want to focus on a particular case, a particular mp, who suffered a serious personal tragedy and who has now resigned. with respect... can i finish off? what we want to do, and i don't think there is much more to be said about that particular case. i really don't. what we do need to do is look at the process. that is what we were trying to do last week. and what i hope is that there will be, through the good offices of the speaker, what i read and i hear that may be well founded. there will be cross—party agreement on the way forward, including an appeals process, for a very difficult and very sad cases. you have been _ difficult and very sad cases. you have been in — difficult and very sad cases. you have been in power— difficult and very sad cases. you have been in power for more than have been in powerfor more than ten years, he could have changed the
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parliamentary standards. you are trying to get your mp off the hook. no, absently not. there have been long—standing concerns amongst mps across the house of commons about the process. across the house of commons about the prome— across the house of commons about the rocess. . ., ., , ., the process. what we are seeing now. wh did the process. what we are seeing now. why did you — the process. what we are seeing now. why did you act _ the process. what we are seeing now. why did you act last _ the process. what we are seeing now. why did you act last week? _ the process. what we are seeing now. why did you act last week? what - the process. what we are seeing now. why did you act last week? what we l why did you act last week? what we are seeing now, if i understand things correctly, the speaker is saying he wants to have a cross—party approach to look at the issue of appeals in particularly difficult cases. i issue of appeals in particularly difficult cases.— issue of appeals in particularly difficult cases. i totally support that. to difficult cases. i totally support that- to be _ difficult cases. i totally support that. to be clear, _ difficult cases. i totally support that. to be clear, prime - difficult cases. i totally support i that. to be clear, prime minister, you are not going to apologise? i think it is very important we get this right. we are going to make every effort to get it right. we are going to hold mps to account. what i think... mps, likei going to hold mps to account. what i think... mps, like i said last week, should not break the rules.- should not break the rules. should mps be allowed _ should not break the rules. should mps be allowed to _ should not break the rules. should mps be allowed to have _ should not break the rules. should mps be allowed to have second - should not break the rules. should l mps be allowed to have second jobs or would it be simpler to scrap consultancy work on the side? mi of
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consultancy work on the side? all of those things — consultancy work on the side? all of those things are _ consultancy work on the side? all of those things are issues _ consultancy work on the side? all of those things are issues the - those things are issues the speaker's panel, whatever he sets up, is going to have a look at. i am focused, as you can imagine, on the number one priority for today, which is getting people to get their boosterjabs. you have said that. with great respect to you, it is my possible intention that the most important thing we can do for our country today if we want to protect our nhs, if we want to make sure... if we want to make sure that we don't have excessive pressures on a&e mac, on what promises to be a tough winter, the most important thing we can do is get our booster jabs. i thing we can do is get our booster 'abs. . , thing we can do is get our booster 'abs. ., , ., ., ,~' thing we can do is get our booster 'abs. ., , ., ., ., jabs. i am trying to ask you about this. how jabs. i am trying to ask you about this- how do _ jabs. i am trying to ask you about this. how do you _ jabs. i am trying to ask you about this. how do you respond - jabs. i am trying to ask you about this. how do you respond to - jabs. i am trying to ask you about this. how do you respond to sir i jabs. i am trying to ask you about i this. how do you respond to sirjohn major who said you handling of the case was shameful and wrong. do you not believe the laws apply to you? the particular case of one mp, who
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has suffered over the course of a long investigation suffered personal tragedy, has now resigned his seat. i really don't have any more to add to that. ok. if there is anything positive to come out of the whole thing it is, as far as i can make out, the speaker is determined to try to move us all forward with a system whereby we can have a cross—party approach, which is what we were trying to achieve last week. get everybody together and look at ways we are to the back —— and look at ways we can improve the situation. how do you explain that? i know you are going to keep focusing on this type of issue. i am focused... how do you explain that? i am telling you is i am focused on getting the boosterjabs ruled out so the people of this country. 73%
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of 73 to 79—year—olds have had their booster. 70% of 18—year—olds. tote booster. 70% of 18-year-olds. we have booster. 70% of 18—year—olds. we have talked about that, prime minister. tote have talked about that, prime minister. ~ ., ., ., minister. we have got to get the numbers uo- _ minister. we have got to get the numbers uo- i — minister. we have got to get the numbers up. ithink— minister. we have got to get the numbers up. i think most - minister. we have got to get the| numbers up. i think most people understand. numbers up. i think most people understand-— numbers up. i think most people understand. �* ., , ., ., ., understand. another straightforward . uestion, understand. another straightforward question. can _ understand. another straightforward question. can you — understand. another straightforward question, can you rule _ understand. another straightforward question, can you rule out _ understand. another straightforward question, can you rule out owen - question, can you rule out owen paterson getting a peerage? there have been no _ paterson getting a peerage? there have been no discussion _ paterson getting a peerage? there have been no discussion of - paterson getting a peerage? iuee have been no discussion of that. what is the rule for stone now? i think this is a matter for the speaker. it is a matter. it is going to be debated today. i have the utmost respect for the speaker and his desire to create a cross—party outcome, cross—party reform of the system, which is what we were trying to achieve last week. this the prime minister speaking earlier today. an italian court has sentenced seventy criminals linked to a powerful gang — in the first phase of the country's
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largest mafia trial in more than 30 years. judges handed six of those convicted the maximum twenty—year sentence that prosecutors had asked for. the proceedings are expected to last for another two years. the bbc�*s tim allman reports. their shadow has hung over italy for decades. a web of criminal activity, a history of robbery, kidnapping, drug smuggling and murder. now, in this specially adapted courtroom in southern italy, some of 'ndrangheta finally facejustice. translation: today, - we have an important sentence. 91 defendants, 70 found guilty. i'm not afraid of anything or anyone. i always say what i think and if i can't tell the truth, it's because i can't prove it. there are no problems.
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a large and powerful criminal network, the 'ndrangheta first came to national prominence in the 19705, but it's believed they could date back to the late 18th century. they don't just operate in europe — their activities have been unearthed as far afield as north and south america and even australia. it's estimated the group has an annual turnover of more than 50 billion euros — that's nearly $60 billion — bigger than most companies in italy. this isjust the beginning. in the coming months, hundreds of other suspects will go on trial. but these proceedings are only targeting one of perhaps 150 families that makes up this sprawling criminal enterprise. there is a lot of work to be done. tim allman, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... the government rejects calls for a public inquiry into corruption, after it tried
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to change the sytem that found one of its mps guilty of breaking lobbying rules. the uk government promises 290 million pounds to help poorer nations cope with climate change. and the world food programme warns that millions in afghanistan will die if the international community doesn't help. now it's time for across the uk. a new mum who spent eight days in a coma after contracting is taking legal action against the royal berkshire hospital, saying staff failed to spot the signs of the life threatening condition. shelley young from thatcham says she wants to raise awareness of spesis kills a8,000 people in the uk every year, that's more than breast, bowel and prostate cancer deaths combined. briony leyland has been to meet her.
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max will be two and a few days' time. he is thriving. his mum is still suffering pain and trauma after developing sepsis in the days after developing sepsis in the days after he was born. shelley says the initial signs of his condition were missed. on a home visit, a maternity support worker told her how high temperature and pain were probably down to flu. i temperature and pain were probably down to flu. . , temperature and pain were probably down to flu. ., , ., temperature and pain were probably down to flu— down to flu. i was not making much sense to my — down to flu. i was not making much sense to my husband. _ down to flu. i was not making much sense to my husband. i _ down to flu. i was not making much sense to my husband. i could - down to flu. i was not making much sense to my husband. i could not. sense to my husband. i could not eat. i could barely keep fluids down. there were several times he told me he wanted to call an ambulance, isaid, no, notfor told me he wanted to call an ambulance, isaid, no, not forthe flu. idid ambulance, isaid, no, not forthe flu. i did not know about sepsis, i had not heard about it before. shifter had not heard about it before. after contactin: had not heard about it before. after contacting her— had not heard about it before. after contacting her gp, _ had not heard about it before. after contacting her gp, she _ had not heard about it before. after contacting her gp, she was treated at the hospital. she says there were delays giving her treatment, including surgery. she was put into an induced coma for 15 days. i quite literally felt — an induced coma for 15 days. i quite literally felt like _ an induced coma for 15 days. i quite literally felt like i _ an induced coma for 15 days. i quite literally felt like i was _ an induced coma for 15 days. i quite literally felt like i was dying. - an induced coma for 15 days. i quite
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literally felt like i was dying. my - literally felt like i was dying. my body was complete the shutting down. my body was complete the shutting down. my kidneys were failing, my lungs were failing, my heart was struggling to beat. ijust wanted to close my eyes and for it to be over. surgery to remove an abscess on her women saved shelley's life. as she struggles to regain her health, she is now taking legal action against the hospital and hoping to raise awareness of the symptoms of sepsis, so others may be helped sooner. swimmers and paddle boarders in cleethorpes are calling for more to be done to stop sewage being discharged into the sea. it's claimed the number of reported incidents is on the rise, as storm outlets struggle with heavy rainfall. anglian water says most of what it allows to enter rivers and the sea is surplus water rather than raw sewage. the row comes as mps vote today on tightening the regulations on water pollution. here's look north's environment correspondent, paul murphy.
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the swimmers and paddle boarders find joy in the sea and the surface. they are also finding sewage and say there is more and more of it to contend with with every year. we were contend with with every year. - were doing an evening paddle board session and on the seat that was visible sewage and wipes. this see is the ultimate _ visible sewage and wipes. this see is the ultimate destination - visible sewage and wipes. this see is the ultimate destination for- is the ultimate destination for sewage when the system cannot cope. this is one of the outfalls for the cleethorpes area. it is a beck that leads out to see where the water company is legally entitled to discharge sewage at times a very heavy rainfall. but there rain events are becoming more frequent and more powerful, as our climate changes. the environment agency says raw sewage was discharged in the uk rivers and coastal waters 400,000 times during 2020. it is a sobering
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sign of the times where there is an application where you can monitor this pollution in more detail. so far this year, there have been 21 pollution alerts and warnings in cleethorpes and down the beach, 16. in both cases, that is an increase on last year's figures.— in both cases, that is an increase on last year's figures. they make massive profits, _ on last year's figures. they make massive profits, the _ on last year's figures. they make massive profits, the water - massive profits, the water companies. and they should do more to protect the environment. in a statement. _ to protect the environment. in a statement, anglian _ to protect the environment. in a statement, anglian water says the environment agency issues permits for our storm overflows which play a vital role in our combined waste water network systems as they work like pressure relief valves to protect homes and businesses from flooding during extreme but the calls for tighter regulation on sewage are only going to get louder. particularly from those who swim and paddle in our seas.
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the first flights to america from manchester airport, in 20 months, took today, as the us reopened its borders to british travellers after covid. virgin atlantic flights left terminaltwo, heading for orlando and new york. travellers have to be fully vaccinated, and have a negative covid test. yunus mulla reports. it has been almost two years since flights have headed from the united states from here. the routes to orlando and new york have resumed and more will follow in december. i spoke to some passengers earlier. brute spoke to some passengers earlier. we are spoke to some passengers earlier. - are getting married in disneyland. you must be looking forward to this? yes, it has been one year and over a half we have been planning it. the fliuht half we have been planning it. the fli . ht was half we have been planning it. the flight was cancelled in march, a flight _ flight was cancelled in march, a flight cancelled in september, the fli-ht flight cancelled in september, the flight cancelled in september, the flight cancelled for the 1st of november. this is fourth time lucky.
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we will— november. this is fourth time lucky. we will be _ november. this is fourth time lucky. we will be spending thanksgiving and christmas with the family. that we will be spending thanksgiving and christmas with the family.— christmas with the family. that is treat. christmas with the family. that is great- and _ christmas with the family. that is great- and you — christmas with the family. that is great. and you will— christmas with the family. that is great. and you will be _ christmas with the family. that is great. and you will be seeing - great. and you will be seeing grandchildren?— great. and you will be seeing grandchildren? yes. we have not seen one of them- — grandchildren? yes. we have not seen one of them. really, _ grandchildren? yes. we have not seen one of them. really, first _ grandchildren? yes. we have not seen one of them. really, first time? - grandchildren? yes. we have not seen one of them. really, first time? one l one of them. really, first time? one is for and one _ one of them. really, first time? one is for and one is _ one of them. really, first time? one is for and one is one. _ one of them. really, first time? one is for and one is one. and _ one of them. really, first time? one is for and one is one. and the - is for and one is one. and the one—year—old we have obviously not seen _ one-year-old we have obviously not seen. ,, . one-year-old we have obviously not seen. , . ., one-year-old we have obviously not seen. ,, . ., ~ one-year-old we have obviously not seen. , . ., ~ ., seen. since we got locked down, we booked it. the — seen. since we got locked down, we booked it. the beginning _ seen. since we got locked down, we booked it. the beginning of - booked it. the beginning of lockdown- _ booked it. the beginning of lockdown. what _ booked it. the beginning of lockdown. what are - booked it. the beginning of lockdown. what are you - booked it. the beginning of i lockdown. what are you going booked it. the beginning of - lockdown. what are you going to do when you get to florida? just chill. since now, one that us citizens and a small number who are exempt were allowed entry into the united states. pre—pandemic, around 1.6 million passengers left here. the government says this is a significant moment for uk and us travel. ., ,., ., , . ., travel. the airport agrees. we have been waiting _ travel. the airport agrees. we have been waiting for— travel. the airport agrees. we have been waiting for the _ travel. the airport agrees. we have been waiting for the restart - travel. the airport agrees. we have been waiting for the restart in - travel. the airport agrees. we have been waiting for the restart in us i been waiting for the restart in us flights, notjust for holiday—makers but for tourism as well but also the impact it has on trade and industry for the region. it has been frustrating but ultimately we knew
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it would come back eventually. although the rules of her children are different, before you get on board that plane travellers will have to be double vaccinated, have proof of a negative covid test,. more now on cop26 — where the focus at the conference today, is on adaption and loss. experts say extreme weather events — including powerful heat waves and devastating floods — are now the new normal around the world because of climate change. hurricane ida was a deadly and destructive category 4 storm which hit america in the summer. following that ben rich from bbc weather has been investigating the impact climate change is having.
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welcome to the climate check. in the wake of the hurricane we are looking at how these massive storms happen and whether climate change is making them more powerful.— them more powerful. conditions are deteriorating _ them more powerful. conditions are deteriorating rapidly _ them more powerful. conditions are deteriorating rapidly now— them more powerful. conditions are deteriorating rapidly now that - them more powerful. conditions are deteriorating rapidly now that the i deteriorating rapidly now that the hurricane has made landfall. the winds are clocking in at 60 mph in new orleans. it winds are clocking in at 60 mph in new orleans-— new orleans. it intensified rapidly over the ocean _ new orleans. it intensified rapidly over the ocean before _ new orleans. it intensified rapidly over the ocean before it _ new orleans. it intensified rapidly over the ocean before it made i over the ocean before it made landfall in louisiana as a dangerous category four hurricane, bringing winds of hundred 50 mph, relentless rain and coastal surge that led to flooding. a hurricane starts life as a small weather disturbance in the tropics, just a cluster of thunderstorms. but moving over a warm ocean with temperatures of at least 27 celsius, it can stain start to grow. warm ocean here can arise and forms an area of low pressure, which sucks in even more of the air
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around it. the air inside the star rises and water vapour condenses into water droplets, forming thunder clouds and releasing even more heat energy to power the storm. due to the rotation of the earth, the winds around the hurricane spin faster and faster as the storm grows more powerful. it is when the winds get to 74 mph or more that you have a hurricane. not every storm grows into a hurricane. all the ingredients need to fall into place at the right time. strong winds at different levels of the atmosphere can pull is time apart. violent hurricanes are nothing new. climate scientists believe global warming i'm making them stronger. warm oceans give hurricanes their fuel and as sea temperatures rise, there is more fuel to power stronger hurricanes. ifits that is more fuel to power stronger hurricanes. i fits that pattern. the
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winds in the storm strengthen in just 24—hour is, easily meeting the criteria of what forecasters call rapid intensification. here is the growing storm approaching the us coast, moving over something called the loop current, a flow of very warm water with a temperature of 30 celsius, and warmth extending 150 metres below the ocean surface. that is important because it deep layer of warmth means a bigger supply of energy. the hurricanejust kept on growing before it hits. scientists say rapidly intensifying storms like this one are becoming more common. when the hurricane moved over land, it lost contact with its warm water power source and the winds we can. this time had picked up enough moisture for the rain to keep on falling, even as far north as new york city. a state of emergency was declared as well over one month's
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rain fell in just one day. 80 millimetres came down in just one hourin millimetres came down in just one hour in central park, a new record. a warmer atmosphere holds more water vapour and this translates into heavier and more intense rainfall. to make matters worse it is thought hurricanes are starting to travel more slowly, as global warming weekends the winds high up in the atmosphere that steer the massive storms. the heavier rain files in one place for longer. climate change does not necessarily mean more hurricanes, but those developed have the potential to be stronger, wetter and more destructive. ben rich of bbc whether they are. ben brown is “p bbc whether they are. ben brown is up next. now for the immediate weather forecast. up next. now for the immediate weatherforecast. we up next. now for the immediate weather forecast. we start with contrasting weather conditions in the country. to the east, clear skies but a chilly start. yes,
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frost. not much frost as we go through the week ahead because there is cloud and rain starting to push in from the west. you can see the signs from that in south—west scotland as we speak. a change of wind direction. a south—westerly driving in mild air across the country. the yellow, rustic tones, with us. this has been the story so far. quite a bit of rain pushing into western scotland now. kreider skies to the east. we will see more cloud as we go through the afternoon. ? reader. lighterwinds and quiet, with the exception of the far north west of scotland with the rain. look at these temperatures, mild for the time of year. ten to 14 celsius. we should be seeing temperatures of eight to 11 celsius. tonight, that rain continues to move its way into scotland. some heavy and persistent bursts for a time as
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it gradually drifts towards the borders. quite a lot of cloud pushing on. the temperatures will hold up considerably. as you can see, perhaps into the low to mid teens to start of tuesday morning. in mild started tuesday. our weather front sinks out from scotland into england. it is weakening. tuesday will be a blustery day. a lot of cloud around. outbreaks of showery rain. brighterand blustery rain. brighter and blustery conditions rain. brighterand blustery conditions following on from behind the scattering of showers. once again, the mild theme is set to continue. temperatures between ten and 16 celsius. at a 61 fahrenheit. four orfive degrees and 16 celsius. at a 61 fahrenheit. four or five degrees higher than we should be getting at this time of year. moving out of wednesday, a brief lull in proceedings before a low pressure moves in for thursday and friday. when will it quieten down? yes, more outbreaks of rain and it will stay mild until we get
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to the weekend. high pressure then it looks likely to take over. quietening things down and were in the way of sunshine. it was time to get a little cooler.
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this is bbc news i'm ben brown. the headlines at 2pm. calls for an independent inquiry into corruption in government, as mps debate parliamentary standards. it follows attempts to overturn owen paterson's suspension for breaking lobbying rules. the prime minister says he takes the issue very seriously we are going to make every effort to get it right and we are going to hold mps to account. relief for airlines as the us opens its borders to fully vaccinated travellers, for the first time in over a year and a half. a dire warning from afghanistan. millions face starvation due to famine, unless the international community, offers help.
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the next six months are going to be

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