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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  November 8, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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it follows attempts to overturn owen paterson's suspension for breaking lobbying rules. the prime minister says there is now finally an opportunity to reform the standards procedure. it's very important that we get this right, and we are going to make every effort to get it right and we are going to hold mps to account. we'll have the very latest live from westminster. also on the programme. relief for airlines as the us opens it's borders to fully vaccinated travellers for the first time since covid. a dire warning from afghanistan. millions face starvation due to famine, unless the international community offers help. the next six months are going to be catastrophic.
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it's going to be hell on earth. the wife of a british man killed in a shark attack off western australia pays tribute, saying he was a wonderful father. and, a lasting memorial to the world war two veteran and the dog who saved his life under fire. and coming up on the bbc news channel. safe standing will return to the english top flight after nearly 30 years when chelsea host liverpool on january 2nd. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. mps will hold an emergency debate about parliamentary standards today, as the government continues to face criticism over
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allegations of sleaze. ministers have been criticised for trying to change the standards body that polices the conduct of mps, after it found the former cabinet minister, owen paterson guilty of breaking lobbying rules. today's debate is being led by the liberal democrats, who are proposing an independent inquiry into corruption allegations against the government, and stricter punishments for mps who break the rules. our political correspondent, jonathan blake has the very latest. the rules for politicians at westminster are under scrutiny again. what is right and what is wrong stop what is allowed and what is not. the prime minister in northumberland this morning after a week where the government was forced to back down from its attempt to overhaul the system.— to back down from its attempt to overhaul the system. what we want to do, and i overhaul the system. what we want to do. and i frankly _ overhaul the system. what we want to do, and i frankly don't _ overhaul the system. what we want to do, and i frankly don't think _ overhaul the system. what we want to do, and i frankly don't think there - do, and i frankly don't think there is much more to be said about that particular case, i really don't. but what we do need to do is look also
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at the process, and that is what we were trying to do last week. mp5 at the process, and that is what we were trying to do last week. mps on all sides agree _ were trying to do last week. mps on all sides agree at _ were trying to do last week. mps on all sides agree at least _ were trying to do last week. mps on all sides agree at least some - all sides agree at least some changes needed. if all sides agree at least some changes needed.— all sides agree at least some changes needed. all sides agree at least some chances needed. , ., , changes needed. if you end up with corru tion changes needed. if you end up with corruntion in _ changes needed. if you end up with corruption in the _ changes needed. if you end up with corruption in the british _ changes needed. if you end up with corruption in the british political- corruption in the british political system, — corruption in the british political system, you can't achieve change. and i_ system, you can't achieve change. and i can'l— system, you can't achieve change. and i can't quite factor into my head _ and i can't quite factor into my head why— and i can't quite factor into my head why some people can't see that corruption _ head why some people can't see that corruption is a problem. the government _ corruption is a problem. the government have _ corruption is a problem. tie: government have driven corruption is a problem. tte: government have driven a corruption is a problem. "tte: government have driven a coach corruption is a problem. tte: government have driven a coach and horses through the standards process, which is agreed on a cross—party and house basis, and i thought it was important that mps had the opportunity to vent their frustrations at that and also look at where we go next.— frustrations at that and also look at where we go next. owen paterson's case prompted — at where we go next. owen paterson's case prompted this — at where we go next. owen paterson's case prompted this debate. _ at where we go next. owen paterson's case prompted this debate. the - case prompted this debate. the former minister was found to have broken the rules by approaching ministers and officials on behalf of companies who were paying him. the government tried to block his suspension and change the system,
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but you turned after a backlash. and mister paterson resigned as an mp. another minister dismissed this as a storm in a teacup. others say it is proof the way the system needs to change and that mps should not be enforcing their own rules. we change and that mps should not be enforcing their own rules.— change and that mps should not be enforcing their own rules. we have a anel of enforcing their own rules. we have a panel of former _ enforcing their own rules. we have a panel of formerjudges _ enforcing their own rules. we have a panel of formerjudges that - enforcing their own rules. we have a panel of formerjudges that deal - panel of former judges that deal with panel of formerjudges that deal with sexual harassment and bullying complaints against mps, and i think we should have a similar small panel of former high courtjudges that can deal with all complaints against mps. i deal with all complaints against mp5. i think it is wrong for mps like me to bejudging other colleagues in the house of commons. this afternoon's debate will be a chance for the labour party to pile pressure on the government over its handling of the owen paterson case and for mps on all sides to air their views and let off steam about their views and let off steam about the standards they have to live up to and the way the rules are enforced. but don't expect much to change in the short term at least. from the outside, it might seem like
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politicians arguing amongst themselves, but some here make the case that parliament's integrity is at stake. you say don't expect much to change in the short term, boris johnson believes this is a chance to change the system wholesale. that is what they were _ change the system wholesale. that is what they were attempting _ change the system wholesale. that is what they were attempting to - change the system wholesale. that is what they were attempting to do - change the system wholesale. that is | what they were attempting to do from the start, but it is proving more difficult than it might have been. and owen paterson's case has prompted broader questions about standards and rules at whence minster. should mps be allowed to have second jobs, for example? what kind ofjobs and how much money should they be allowed to own? some ministers suggested today it might be time to look at that. how do people end up with a seat in the house of lords? and is it time for the system on standards to be overhauled entirely? labour also calling on the prime minister to apologise, and he won't be doing that in person, if at all. you won't be in the commons for the debate this afternoon. the liberal democrats calling for an enquiry
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into standards in general. all eyes will be on the speaker this afternoon, lindsay hoyle saying last week's events did not show democracy in its best light, and it seems there are moves afoot to create some sort of cross—party consensus over the procedures for holding mps to account. doing anything on a cross—party basis is difficult at the best of times at westminster and after last week's events, even more difficult still. america has reopened its borders to fully vaccinated travellers from dozens of countries, including the uk, for the first time since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. ministers here say the the resumption of flights to the us, is �*momentous'. our transport correspondent, caroline davies is at heathrow for us. there has been excitement, balloons and flag—waving, at least by the airlines here at heathrow. this is a major part of the puzzle for
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international travel. piece by piece, the world has started to reopen again and the us route to the uk is a major long haul destination, and this is the first time it has a meaningfully opened up for uk citizens in more than 600 days. preparing for the big send—off. almost 20 months ago, the us banned the majority of travellers coming from the uk. from first thing this morning, that change. if you are double jabbed and have a negative covid. it means families separated by the atlantic and restrictions can reunite, including sarah, who was travelling to see her daughter chloe for the first time in two years. it's been so difficult because we have been worried about everybody staying healthy, and things happen in families where you need to be together. that is what family is all about. and not be able to console each other or keep each other company or whatever or hug each other when we want a good cry, but we will do it today, so i can't wait. to walk through that door and see her there.—
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wait. to walk through that door and see her there. before the pandemic, the us was the _ see her there. before the pandemic, the us was the fourth _ see her there. before the pandemic, the us was the fourth most - see her there. before the pandemic, the us was the fourth most popularl the us was the fourth most popular destination for uk travellers. among the crowds were those taking work trips and holiday—makers who had held out hope for months. we trips and holiday-makers who had held out hope for months. we had it booked and — held out hope for months. we had it booked and we _ held out hope for months. we had it booked and we moved _ held out hope for months. we had it booked and we moved a _ held out hope for months. we had it booked and we moved a couple - held out hope for months. we had it booked and we moved a couple of. booked and we moved a couple of times and when we heard it was opening on the eighth, and we said to virgin atlantic, put us on the eighth, first flight. i’zre to virgin atlantic, put us on the eighth, first flight.— eighth, first flight. i've “oined a different team h eighth, first flight. i've “oined a different team at h eighth, first flight. i've “oined a different team at work _ eighth, first flight. i've joined a different team at work and - eighth, first flight. i've joined a different team at work and it i eighth, first flight. i've joined a l different team at work and it will be greatly able to see them face—to—face rather than on teams calls _ face—to—face rather than on teams calls |n— face-to-face rather than on teams calls. ., face-to-face rather than on teams calls. ~ ., face-to-face rather than on teams calls. ., ., ~ calls. in the week that cop26 focuses on — calls. in the week that cop26 focuses on transport - calls. in the week that cop26 focuses on transport it's - calls. in the week that cop26 focuses on transport it's not i calls. in the week that come - focuses on transport it's not ideal timing to be celebrating the return of a major long haulflight route. but british airways and virgin atlantic say they are pushing to be more sustainable. we atlantic say they are pushing to be more sustainable.— more sustainable. we both set taruets more sustainable. we both set targets for— more sustainable. we both set targets for net _ more sustainable. we both set targets for net zero _ more sustainable. we both set targets for net zero x - more sustainable. we both set targets for net zero x 2015 - more sustainable. we both set targets for net zero x 2015 but| targets for net zero x 2015 but action must start today and now. we are flying the most efficient planes out there for long haul travel. we will be embarking on offsetting and committing to sustainable aviation fuel lrut— committing to sustainable aviation fuel but we are also seeing exciting innovations coming along in the form of hydrogen— innovations coming along in the form of hydrogen technology that we also expect _ of hydrogen technology that we also expect to _ of hydrogen technology that we also expect to be part of the solution,
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so aviation— expect to be part of the solution, so aviation has a good story to telt~ _ so aviation has a good story to tell. ., . , ., �* ~ tell. to celebrate the return, ba and virgin _ tell. to celebrate the return, ba and virgin coordinated _ tell. to celebrate the return, ba and virgin coordinated their- tell. to celebrate the return, ba and virgin coordinated their first two flights to take off simultaneously. more than 600 days later, travelled to the us is off the ground. the airline say there is a major pent—up demand for these flights, however, this does raise questions about the future of business travel. the world has changed during the course of the pandemic with people a lot more used to video calls and many companies are more concerned about their carbon footprint. will business travel return in the same way it used to operate? people in england eligible for covid booster vaccinations are now able to book an appointment up to a month in advance. it's hoped the change will speed up the rollout of booster jabs. more than ten million people across the uk have already had their top—up vaccine. a bus has been hijacked and set on fire in northern ireland, the second such incident in a week. police say four men boarded
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the double decker in newtownabbey last night, ordering passengers and the driver off, before setting it alight. no—one was injured. a similar attack happened in newtownards last monday. politicians from all parties have condemned the incidents. campaigners say the fossil fuel industry has the largest number of delegates at the cop26 climate summit in glasgow. the organisation, global witness, claims 500 people with links to fossil fuels are at the conference. cop—26 is now in its second week, with an address expected today, from the former us president, barack obama. our science editor, david shukman is in glasgow. what is the fear that certain people might have about this rather large size of fossil fuel lobbyist? the big question — size of fossil fuel lobbyist? tte: big question here is can this event put the world on a path that avoids the most dangerous rises in temperature, and the key element of thatis temperature, and the key element of
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that is to use less fossil fuel, particularly coal, but oil and gas as well because when you burn them, you release carbon dioxide that hangs around in the atmosphere for a century at least and the accumulation of that gas in the atmosphere over the last century or two is, scientists say, what is driving up global temperatures and leading to more extremes of weather, melting of the ice caps, challenges to food supplies, a great long list of all the most damaging effects of climate change, so the logic is that if you want to avoid dangerous situations in the future, you've got to cut fossil fuels as soon as possible. and certainly the work that the scientists have done is show you really need to be halving global emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases by the end of this decade. and as things stand, those emissions are rising rather than falling. but that is what the science has laid out and that is why there is such a battleground here
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between the different groups of different parties. the companies, the different countries that may be our big fossil fuel producers and those who say our lives are on the line with climate change. fine those who say our lives are on the line with climate change.- line with climate change. one of those likely _ line with climate change. one of those likely to _ line with climate change. one of those likely to say _ line with climate change. one of those likely to say that - line with climate change. one of those likely to say that is - those likely to say that is president obama. his address, how could that sway certain countries in dealing with all of this do you think? ~ �* , , ., dealing with all of this do you think? ~ 2 , ., ., think? well, it's very hard to say how one speech _ think? well, it's very hard to say how one speech by _ think? well, it's very hard to say how one speech by one - think? well, it's very hard to say how one speech by one person, l how one speech by one person, particularly if they are out of office, howeverfamous particularly if they are out of office, however famous they are could make much of a difference. we will have to see. it's always possible. barrack obama is credited with being a huge influence that led to the paris agreement on climate change, and that is the world's only a court to tackle climate change collectively and he was in office when that happened in 2015 and his relationship in particular with the chinese president is seen as a driving force behind that. so he has
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come here to try to provide energy, a touch of stardust, bit of encouragement, but there are some awkward moments as well because when he was in power he promised the poorest countries $100,000,000,000 a yearin poorest countries $100,000,000,000 a year in aid and that still has not been delivered.— year in aid and that still has not been delivered. the wife of a british man killed after being attacked by a shark in western australia has been paying tribute to her husband, saying he was a "wonderful father." paul millachip, who was 57, was swimming just off the perth shore line when the attack happened on saturday morning. a search operation was called off after failing to locate his body. phil mercer has more details. paul millachip, who was originally from britain, was on his regular swim when he was attacked, about 50 metres from the beach. witnesses say they saw the father of two struggling in the water at fremantle near perth, before being dragged under by a shark.
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an exhaustive air and sea search has found no sign of him. his wife said he was an avid swimmer and died doing what he loved. he was a wonderful man, wonderful father, and he loved his exercise. he had been going down to the beach two or three times a week. we would go running first and then go swimming, and he went for, like he swam for a kilometre, was due to swim for a kilometre on saturday, ijust went into the water and out again because it's cold. four teenage boys who saw the attack have been praised for their bravery, after racing along the shoreline in their dinghy to warn other beach goers. circumstances around the attack have been fully reviewed. witnesses have been spoken to, and we've sought some professional advice in relation to where to go from here, and the decision has been made to cease that search. members of paul millachip's extended
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family have been unable to travel from britain to give their support because of covid—i9 border restrictions. the 57—year—old is being remembered as a lovely man and a great father. phil mercer, bbc news, sydney. the time is 1:15pm. our top story this lunchtime. as mps prepare to debate parliamentary standards, the government rejects calls for a public inquiry into corruption. over 200 volunteers have worked over the weekend to free a trapped cave. we will be live as they work to bring him to the surface. coming up on the bbc news channel. time is running out for lewis hamilton in this year's formula i season, as max verstappen goes 19 points clear in the title race, with just four grand prixes to go.
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the head of the world food programme has condemned the international community for not stepping in to avert a potentially devastating famine in afghanistan. the wfp is warning that around the world 45 million people are on the edge of starvation in more than a0 countries, and in afghanistan, millions are in danger if there isn't more outside help. our world affairs editor, john simpson, reports from the afghan city of bamiyan. winter's coming, and it looks like being a bad one. the camels are on the move to warmer areas. we are heading west, out of kabul, through the taliban road blocks. it's not long before we reach the snow. in this district, food aid is being distributed, flour to make bread. everyone here knows that things are likely to get really bad in a few weeks.
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there is a real possibly we will be frozen this winter, this man tells me. these people are so poor they can't afford to buy food orfuel for heating. a humanitarian disaster could bring the taliban down, so they are cooperating with the international aid agencies even if they don't like them. ahead of the world food programme, visiting kabul a head of the world food programme, visiting kabul doesn't mince his words. the winter months are coming, we are coming out of a drought. the next six months are going to be catastrophic, it is going to be hell on earth. we reach bamiyan, an agriculture centre hit by drought. like many other parts of afghanistan. and of course, there was an infamous taliban crime here. a couple of hundred yards along the cliff from the place where the statues of the buddhas used to stand, until the taliban destroyed them, a woman called fatima lives. she is a widow, raising her seven
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frondly intelligent children on her own. before the taliban took over, she got by with occasional food aid and the money she and her eldest boy earned from weeding the fields and herding sheep. but the drought has put an end to that and food aid doesn't reach here, within weeks they could be starving. some women sell their daughters for marriage, i say would she? if it was absolutely necessary to keep everyone alive she answers but she would hate it. listening to all this it was hard not think of your own family. that is a response which david beasley of the world food programme wants the rich and pour offal testify world to adopt. imagine if this was your little girl or boy or your grandchild, about to starve to death, you would do everything you possibly could, and when there is $400 proal worth of
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wealth on the earth, shame on us that we let any child die from hunger. that we let any child die from hunter. ., ,, that we let any child die from hunter. . ,. that we let any child die from hunter. . . ., that we let any child die from hunter. . , . . ., hunger. fatima's children leave for school, hunger. fatima's children leave for school. those _ hunger. fatima's children leave for school, those who _ hunger. fatima's children leave for school, those who are _ hunger. fatima's children leave for school, those who are allowed - hunger. fatima's children leave for school, those who are allowed to l hunger. fatima's children leave for. school, those who are allowed to go, like millions in this country, their lives are under real threat. the next few months will decide. the interesting thing is the line that the taliban are taking, they are so hostile, normally, to any kind of outside influence, and yet the world food programme, other aid agencies are finding that the taliban are really very enthusiastic, to help them to come and bring food here. why? well, because the taliban themselves are getting scared of a disaster here, and they know that a disaster could pull them down as well as everything else. john, thank you for that. the defence secretary, ben wallace, is meeting army chiefs to discuss
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concerns about the current culture of the military, after a number of high profile scandals. it follows a report led by the conservartive mp and former soldier, sarah atherton, that found that almost two thirds of women had experienced bullying, sexual harassment and discrimination while serving in the army. it's thought the meeting will also discuss recent claims, that british soldiers may have been involved in the murder of a woman in kenya, nine years ago. a teenager has been jailed for a minimum of 16 years and 36 days for murdering his 12—year—old friend, after luring him to woodland and attempting to decapitate him. roberts buncis, seen here with his father, was killed in fishtoft near boston in december last year, just two days before his 13th birthday. 15—year—old marcel grzeszcz stabbed roberts over 70 times. the new chairman of yorkshire county cricket club has begun work, as the row over the handling
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of racism claims made by one of its players continues. lord patel succeeds roger hutton, who quit along with two other board members on friday. our sports correspondent, katie gornall is at headingley. katie, we are going to be hearing from lord patel soon apparently? yes, we are, he is due to give a press conference here shortly and he has a hugejob on his hands, doesn't he, she the man tasked with steering yorkshire through this racism crisis which has engulfed the club and rocked the world of cricket. he's a former social worker, rocked the world of cricket. he's a formersocialworker, he rocked the world of cricket. he's a former social worker, he has been on the board of the ecb previously and she of asian heritage which will be relevant as he tries to convince the wider world yorkshire could be an inclusive club moving forwards. don't forget last week yorkshire lost almost all of their sponsors
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over their botched handling of this cray such crisis. they lost the right to host lucrative england matches here at headingley and half their board resigned with the outgoing chair roger hutton calling on others such as martin moxon the director of cricket and the ceo to follow suit to help yorkshire draw a line under this crisis. before they can draw a line under it there will be more to come out. there is a looming dcms hearing next week, when hutton and rafik are due to give evidence, there is a possibility they might release the bombshell report in advance of that, so a lot for lord patel to deal with ahead of this press conference he is going to give here shortly.— thank you katie. the bbc has been told of bullying and harassment by anti—vaccination campaigners, outside a number of schools in the uk. the shadow education minister, peter kyle, says such incidents are "ubiquitous" in his constituency. he's accusing campaigners of intimidating both children and teachers. there are now calls for schools to go as far as employing fast track exclusion zones, to tackle the problem. our
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correspondent, lebo diseko has more from east sussex. stepping out of school and into the battle over covid vaccinations. these pupils in sussex met at home time by protesters and disinformation. # don't get the vaccine, don't get the vaccine. for some parents, the tactics these campaigners use are a step too far. outside a children's school. these idiots outside a school, move them. i don't agree with their opinion but they are entitled to it. i don't have a problem with that. i don't have a problem with protesting. i have a problem with them doing it right outside the school where the kids are coming out and they might find that a bit, you know, intimidating and all of that. that's the only bit have i have a problem with. earlier, anti—vaccination campaigners entered the school itself, serving papers threatening legal action.
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the leader of this campaign group, who believes a range of extreme conspiracy theories, including that most people in power are paedophiles, says he won't stop until the covid vaccination drive ends. we have spoken to the head teacher of this was school who said he was served papers earlier on today, and he really did seem very shaken up. he should be shaken up, he should be shaken up. teachers have told me, and, you know, there are parents who are saying this is frightening what you are doing. well, if handing a head teacher a letter is frightening, then it's frightening. a lawyer told us that such letters and papers have absolutely no legal standing. i believe it to be pseudolegal nonsense. it's self conflictual, it draws up points about law that are misplaced. it is intended to drive a threat towards teachers, head teachers and otherwise, and i thinkjust has no foundation in law whatsoever. another school served.
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just over 400 school leaders told their professional association they have been targeted by anti—vaccination campaigners, mainly in the form of emails threatening legal action. nearly 70 said they had had protesters immediately outside their premises. the issue here is not that some people have concerns about vaccinating children, it is the protest at and around schools undertaken by a hardened minority. these pupils in east london challenged campaigners outside their school. we were asking him, like, "where did you get these sources from?" he was talking about how it is poison. i was, "ok, where did you get this from?" he couldn't tell us a valid place, a valid point where he got it from. he knew what he wanted to do. he chose a location and he tried to get as much of the leaflets as he had out, distributed everywhere. it didn't really work. some mps are now calling for schools to be able to use exclusion zones, in order to bring an end to scenes
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like this at home time. lebo diseko, bbc news. a major rescue operation is continuing in the brecon beacons, to try to free a man who's been trapped for two days after a fall. more than 50 rescuers are involved in the operation. the man is thought to have injured his back. the weather behind you doesn't look as if it is the perfect conditions as if it is the perfect conditions as it were for this rescue? trio. as if it is the perfect conditions as it were for this rescue? no, it is very hard _ as it were for this rescue? no, it is very hard for— as it were for this rescue? no, it is very hard for us _ as it were for this rescue? no, it is very hard for us to _ as it were for this rescue? no, it is very hard for us to tell- as it were for this rescue? no, it is very hard for us to tell from i as it were for this rescue? no, it. is very hard for us to tell from the base how exactly it is going up there but we know they are trying to slowly bring this person up from the cave, on a stretcher, to one of the higher intra entrances, about a kilometre up in the mist behind me. they will have to bring them down to the ambulance waiting down here. this started saturday lunchtime when the caerphilly, an experienced caerphilly we are told, who had a permit to go into this complex
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network fell and behave injured. world was sent that help was needed and over the cows of the weekend some 242 volunteers have turned out, not just from wales some 242 volunteers have turned out, notjust from wales but some 242 volunteers have turned out, not just from wales but from some 242 volunteers have turned out, notjust from wales but from round the uk, all working shifts, all taking in equipment to reach the person, there has been someone with them now for most of the time, making sure they can communicate. breathe, have enough energy but the hard work is trying to get that stretcher back out through the freezing water, underground, so we are told that while everyone is optimistic this will eventually end in a successful rescue, it may be some time yet, and so more and more volunteers are coming, giving up their own time and energy to make sure this is a success. thank you. a new space telescope, described as one of the greatest scientific endeavours of the 21st century, is on track to launch next month.
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scientists hope the james webb space telescope which is the size of a tennis court will be able to shed light on how the very first stars ignited in space. the project has cost around £600 million so far. it will be sent into orbit by rocket from french guiana. the first constituency garden of remembrance has been opened at westminster ahead of armistice day on thursday. in the past hour, the commons speaker, sir lindsay hoyle, has planted the first tribute at the site just inside the grounds of parliament. in the coming days, each mp will be plant a memorial. it will be the first time service personnel from all 650 constituencies will be represented and remembered in a single place. the heroics of a dog and his handler in the second world war are being commemorated by a community in south lanarkshire. a statue of lance corporal jimmy muldoon, and his german shephard, khan, has been unveiled in strathaven, the town where they lived. they saw active duty in holland, coming under heavy enemy
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fire and alieen clarke, takes up the story. together forever in bronze. lance corporaljimmy muldoon, and his dog, khan, the german shepherd, who served alongside him, and saved the soldier's life. in 1944, during the battle of the sheldt in holland, they were thrown into the sea, and jimmy was in trouble. it was an assault craft they were in, and as they approached the island it got bombarded and sank, and it left everybody in the water. the dog managed to get to shore, but there was no, no handler with it, but he could hear the handler in the water, my father, so he ran down and jumped back in, got him by the scruff of the neck and pulled him out. i think it was about 200 yards, for sure. after the war, khan had to be returned to his owners, a family in surrey. he was awarded the dickin medal for bravery, the animals'
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victoria cross, and jimmy went to the ceremony. people seen there was that much affection between the two of them that they decided he would take him home. and khan was treated in lancashire as local hero. specially in the butcher's shop in strathaven. they allocated it some meat every week, free of charge, so it was well looked after. and what do you think your father would make of it? oh, h'd be over the moon, he would. he would, yes, indeed. there's going to be a strange feeling walking through that green, heading to the pub and have him sitting there, watching me, for a statue. it's going to be very strange. aileen clarke, bbc news. time for a look at the weather news now. louise is here. it is on the change again the weather, last week it was about the cold and the frost, wasn't it. this week it is going to be cloudy but very mild, so far today we have had this east west divide. the best of the sunshine to, further west look at this. it is all about
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the cloud, the wind and

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