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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 8, 2021 4:00am-4:31am GMT

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this is bbc news. welcome if you're watching here in the uk or around the globe. i'm david eades. our top stories: chanting. security forces fire tear gas at protesters in sudan, as the demonstrators call for a return of civilian rule. we report from khartoum. prosecutors in texas file lawsuits against the rappers travis scott and drake, after eight people died in a stampede at a music festival. after more than 18 months, america finally re—opens its doors — and prepares to welcome fully—vaccinated visitors to the country. and 70 members of an italian crime family are sentenced in the biggest mafia trial in decades.
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thank you forjoining us. security forces in sudan have fired tear gas at teachers taking part in pro—democracy protests in the capital, khartoum. demonstrators have set up barricades for what's intended to be two days of civil disobedience against last month's coup. as arab league mediators arrive in the country to try to defuse the crisis, organisers say they want to increase pressure on the military government to transition to civilian rule. our africa correspondent, andrew harding reports from khartoum. chanting. anger on the streets of khartoum today. protesters blocking off neighbourhoods. taking big risks to show their contempt for sudan's military coup.
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right now, a lot of blood, a lot of dead people. this military government is killer. it's a goddamn killer, for real. the protests began two weeks ago when the generals seized power, halting this giant country's admittedly bumpy transition from dictatorship to democracy. so which side will prove stronger? the army or the street? in a khartoum hospital, we found an elderly tailor recovering from a savage beating by the military... can i see your leg? ..and this young student, shot in the leg. a lot of people were shot. his message to the soldiers... they're like animals. maybe animals are better. it's hard to find anyone here who supports the military takeover.
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it's heartbreaking, honestly. to see those young people, the ones that are being killed just for asking for what's rightfully theirs. for a free country with a civilian government. so for me, it's very devastating. it makes me angry. the man leading sudan's coup is general burhan. his spokesman, an admiral, told me the military had done nothing wrong. you've detained the prime minister and other politicians. your troops have killed protesters on the streets. why on earth would the sudanese people trust you for a second? translation: time will show this was not a coup. _ we will hold elections and the military will step aside. this was simply a course correction. but many people here are not convinced. even at night, the protests continue. the determination, the defiance here is impressive.
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and it's possible that sudan's generals will back down under growing international pressure. but for now, this country's democratic revolution remains on hold. on a continent where it seems military coups are firmly back in fashion. andrew harding, bbc news, khartoum. let's get some of the day's other news. the president of sierra leone has declared three days of national mourning after a fuel tanker explosion killed more than 100 people on friday. joseph maada bio said the country must learn from the incident, adding that those injured would be given free treatment. the rappers travis scott and drake are being sued over friday's stampede at the astroworld music festival in the us city of houston, in which eight people were killed. prosecutors in texas have filed lawsuits on behalf of relatives against both artists. the stampede happened
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while scott was performing. criminal investigations are also under way into the crush, the us president, joe biden, has instructed his national security team to help investigate a drone attack on the residence of the iraqi prime minister, mustafa al—kadhimi. the attack targeted the prime minister's home in the high—security green zone of baghdad. the interior ministry said two drones were shot down, but a third hit his house. there've been violent clashes between the security forces and supporters of pro—iranian political groups in recent weeks. the us is set to reopen its borders on monday for vaccinated non—essential travel, ending a 20 month entry ban. the easing of restrictions will open up travel for double jabbed non—us citizens to over 30 countries, including the uk, eu, china and india. well, one us region greatly
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affected by the restrictions is the san ysidro port of entry, the busiest land border crossing in the world. travellers will now be able to make non—essential border crossings. we can now speak to kenia zamarripa, the executive director of international business affairs at the san diego chamber of commerce. i asked her what the impact of lifting these restrictions would have. the international community and business community can work towards complete economic recovery. to give you some numbers that i think will help you understand, the san diego tourism authority has shared that over 4 million mexican visitors, anyone who doesn't spend the night in the san diego county area spent $420 million in 2019 just doing shopping, hotels, parks, other businesses, and if we were to compare 2019
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numbers to 2021 numbers, it has been less than i million visitors and falling short of 85 million, so there is over 300 million loss and economic impact for the region, over 275—280 businesses in the san ysidro area have closed their doors permanently, and they have attributed this directly to water restrictions. not only has it impacted our businesses, but also the quasi— border community. crosstalk. stop thousands of students and people like me that live in mexico and just cross the border to work on a daily basis. it has been a huge hit, that is very clear, those figures as you quite rightly... they illustrate this very well. how easy will it be to get things moving, above all, smoothly again? it's definitely going
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to be a challenge. border wait times, we have several lanes, whether you have a truck or trailer, if you have a little car that helps you cross. fast or now. some workers have been stuck there for four, five, six hours daily basis sometimes. sometimes agents just decided it isn't worth the time, they turn around and leave. it means we have our businesses operating short, they are absorbing extra cost, they are calling on additional workers, they are losing clients because they are not reliable. they are falling short on production. crosstalk. 270 firms you said have closed, how ready is san diego to get up and move again, and get back to those amazing figures you had? well, it will be a challenge. we understand that the cbp,
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customer border protection agencies are pulling agents from administrative work over to the booths, and we have travellers specifically processing all of their permits to go further into the us online, so that they are ready and they're just ready to show their proof of vaccination also, so those lines are moving quickly. as you say, you travel across the border when you can, from a personal point of view, the level of excitement, the anticipation, this huge time, this must be quite a moment. this will definitely be a moment, we will have a press conference tomorrow with all of the mayors, the city and county of san diego just celebrating the moment. again, now our businesses can move towards complete economic recovery and reactivation. someone not as lucky, so we're still looking at our elected officials to bring an economic for those
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families that werejust lost in the pandemic, they were not able to reactivate. an italian court has sentenced 70 criminals linked to the powerful �*ndrangheta gang, in the first phase of the country's largest mafia trial in more than 30 years. the proceedings are expected to last for another two years. the bbc�*s tim allman reports. their shadow has hung over italy for decades. a web of criminal activity, a history of robbery, kidnapping, drug smuggling and murder. now, in this especially adapted courtroom in southern italy, some of �*ndrangheta finally facejustice. translation: today, - we have an important sentence. 91 defendants, 70 found guilty. i'm not afraid of
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anything or anyone. i always say what i think and if i can't tell the truth, it's because i can't prove it. there are no problems. a large and powerful criminal network, the �*ndrangheta first came to national prominence in the 1970s, but it's believed they could date back to the late 18th century. they don't just operate in europe — their activities have been unearthed as far afield as north and south america and even australia. it's estimated the group has an annual turnover of more than 50 billion euros — that's nearly $60 billion — bigger than most companies in italy. this isjust the beginning. in the coming months, hundreds of other suspects will go on trial. but these proceedings are only targeting one of perhaps 150 families that makes up this sprawling criminal enterprise. there is a lot of work to be done. tim allman, bbc news.
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stay with us, we have a story about a diamond mining project, which activists they will ruin the environment and displays thousands, what do the authorities say? the bombastic establishment outsider donald trump has defied the pollsters to take the keys to the oval office. i feel great about the election results. i voted for him because i genuinely believe that he cares about the country. it's keeping the candidate's name always in the public. eye that counts. success or failure depends not only on public display - but on the local campaign l headquarters and the heavy routine work of their women volunteers. i berliners from both east and west linked hands and danced around their liberated territory. and with nobody to stop them, it wasn't long before the first attempts were made to destroy the structure itself. yasser arafat, who dominated the palestinian cause for so long, has died. palestinian authority has
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declared a state of mourning. after 17 years of discussion, the result was greeted with an outburst ofjoy, leaving ministers who long felt only grudgingly accepted among the ranks of clergy suddenly felt welcome. this is bbc world news, the latest headlines. security forces fire tear gas at protesters in sudan, as the demonstrators call for a return of civilian rule. the british prime mininster has been accused of "trashing" the uk's reputation for democratic standards, as a row over the conduct of his conservative politicians escalates. the opposition labour leader, sir keir starmer, said that borisjohnson had shown "corrupt behaviour"in trying to protect a member
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of parliament who was found to have broken lobbying rules. mps will hold an emergency debate on standards on monday. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. mps are forever aware how many people don't much like politicians. it's why, for so many who spend their weeks here, this row over the government's behaviour gets right up their nose, because it leaves a whiff of this being a self—serving place. for the opposition parties, it's also a chance to take aim at the prime minister. instead of upholding standards, he orders his mps to protect his mate and rip up the whole system. now, that is corrupt, it is contemptible and it's not a one—off. and what makes me most angry is the prime minister is trashing the reputation of our democracy and our country. at the heart of this is this man, the former cabinet minister 0wen paterson. he was found to have broken the rules by making the case
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to ministers and others on behalf of companies that were paying him. he was due to be thrown out of the commons for 30 days and potentially face a by—election until the government ordered its mps to back at least a delay to that and a review of the system. then, under intense pressure, it changed its mind. any review would not be applicable to mr paterson. today, this cabinet minister said it wasn't about getting their colleague off the hook. the vote wasn't to reject they report that had been put together. the vote was to establish an appeals process so that mps in the sort of position that, yes, 0wen paterson was in, but others as well in future, would have a right of appeal. and i think that's right. it's still an important objective, to have due process here, to have a right of appeal, but obviously
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we could only take that forward with the agreement and cooperation of other parties. mps will return here tomorrow and spend around three hours debating parliamentary standards. there is real anger on all sides about what's happened. labour's chris bryant, who chairs the commons standards committee, still wants mps to vote to condemn 0wen paterson's behaviour, even though mr paterson has now resigned. plenty feel there's something of a rebuilding job to be done here, for the government and parliament, to restore trust in how this place works. votes are being counted in nicaragua's election where daniel 0rtega is likely to win a fourth term in office. many government critics have gone into exile or already been detained as mr 0rtega — a former guerrilla leader — looks to extend his 1a years in power. so are the results of the election a foregone conclusion? here's the bbc�*s central america correspondent, will grant.
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he decided the outcome in june the outcome injune this year when he sent police to the home of his biggest rival and placed her under house arrest and then followed a slew of arrests and detentions, house arrests and, of course, many people have been either first into excel or are behind bars. seven presidential candidates in total and in that environment this was reallyjust a one horse race and he made sure it was completely toothless. all of the opponents against him had no doubt that they are going to hand him victory very soon and it will probably be a landslide. jae soon and it will probably be a landslide-— landslide. joe biden has described _ landslide. joe biden has described it _ landslide. joe biden has described it as - landslide. joe biden has described it as a - landslide. joe biden has described it as a farce . landslide. joe biden has l described it as a farce and landslide. joe biden has - described it as a farce and he is clearly not happy. there is talk on the state department of
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the sort of measures that could still be taken. the fact is, but will, 0rtega has been around in modern terms forever. there is not much that will shift him. there is not much that will shift him-— there is not much that will shift him. ., , , �* shift him. there really isn't. he is the — shift him. there really isn't. he is the last _ shift him. there really isn't. he is the last of _ shift him. there really isn't. he is the last of the - shift him. there really isn't. he is the last of the cold . shift him. there really isn't. l he is the last of the cold war warriors in a sense after fidel castro died. he has shown incredible resilience over the years and of course in the 19805 years and of course in the 1980s he governed that when mac until he was removed in 1990 but that was during a period when the reagan station was honing in on him and he has returned in 2014 and is still here and it very much looks like he will be around for the next five years. his wife is also very powerful as vice president. as the cop26 climate talks continue, india is grappling with one example of the debate over development versus protection of the environment. billions of dollars' worth of diamond reserves lie in the ground in buxwaha forest in central india. the state government says
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a proposed mine will bring much—needed jobs, but local people say their lives will be destroyed. bbc hindi's nitin srivastava reports. the lungs of central india are under threat. a trek of four hours is the quickest mode to arrive here, but all this could be lost if a proposed diamond mine gets operational. thousands of animals will be displaced, along with local tribes who are totally dependent on this forest. 10,000 people live here in buxwaha forest, but the madhya pradesh state government has given permission for 200,000 trees to be cut down for a diamond mine. translation: medicinal herbs and leaves are found _ in this forest. people have to decide what they want to do. they know that healer brings herbs from the forest. they have to decide if they want to fight for it. i can't do it on my own.
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but the state government says people do want the project. translation: we have gone and met the villagers. - not a single person opposed it. everybody wants to get employment from this. diamond mines require millions of litres of water per day. the state government says it will plant a million trees to compensate for cutting down the forest, but even those trees will need water. translation: if we consider this area in the context - of water supply, this area has been designated as a semi—critical area. the mining project will require 16 million litres of water, so they are building a dam on the river and diverting river water. it will destroy the river. environmentalists taking the state government to court, fearful something unique, like these prehistoric paintings, will be lost. but the failure of the state to educate young people
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who live in the forest is also felt. nitin srivastava, bbc news, madhya pradesh. next — an extraordinary story that's been described as the raiders of the lost ark of wine. in the 1990s, an australian wine merchant set out to buy a multimillion—dollar wine collection — which he was told once belonged to nicholas ii, the last tsar of russia. tens of thousands of bottles — some dating back to the 1700s — were rumoured to be hidden underground in tbilisi, georgia — having been taken there by the soviet dictator joseph stalin during world war ii. john baker is the man who went to find them and hejoins me now. john, this is a story that spanned years — it seems to have everything in it. it it seems to have everything in it. , , , it. it sounds mythical, this wine cellar. _ it. it sounds mythical, this wine cellar. where - it. it sounds mythical, this wine cellar. where did - it. it sounds mythical, this wine cellar. where did you it. it sounds mythical, this - wine cellar. where did you hear about it? it wine cellar. where did you hear about it? . ., wine cellar. where did you hear about it? .., ., , about it? it could have been m hical about it? it could have been mythical we _ about it? it could have been mythical we had _ about it? it could have been mythical we had to - about it? it could have been mythical we had to try - about it? it could have been mythical we had to try and l mythical we had to try and prove it was not or it was,
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that was ourjob. i was running wine stores in sydney and our speciality was buying old and rare wine and private sellers and we had colourful character is and one who would bring us opportunities or deals, as you call them and this one time he sent me a fax and it was 30 pages rolling off the fax machine and the title page had interested and when harry underplays something it means he really has unthankful these wines did not mean anything because they were names that were not the names of wines but the second column was 1847, 1821, 1860, 19 tend. that meant something, 100 years old or more. i decoded the list and worked out that this list was compiled by someone who was reading french labels and
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recording them phonetically, in this case it happened to be georgia and when they wanted to sell the seller which was offered to us it was translated back to english so we ended up with a phonetic list. so a back to english so we ended up with a phonetic list.— with a phonetic list. so a lot of deciphering _ with a phonetic list. so a lot of deciphering going - with a phonetic list. so a lot of deciphering going on - with a phonetic list. so a lot of deciphering going on but| with a phonetic list. so a lot i of deciphering going on but we have the picture there. you got to the seller and it was everything was cracked up to be? , �* ., be? yes. and more. there were 217 bottles _ be? yes. and more. there were 217 bottles of _ be? yes. and more. there were 217 bottles of the _ be? yes. and more. there were 217 bottles of the great - be? yes. and more. there were 217 bottles of the great french l 217 bottles of the great french desert wine from the 1800s and early 1900s and 20 years ago we valued those that may be $5 million. that was only 217 bottles and there were 40,000 bottles and there were 40,000 bottles there.— bottles there. where are they now? bottles there. where are they new? you _ bottles there. where are they now? you will— bottles there. where are they now? you will have _ bottles there. where are they now? you will have to - bottles there. where are they now? you will have to read i bottles there. where are they | now? you will have to read the book. now? you will have to read the book- give _ now? you will have to read the book. give us _ now? you will have to read the book. give us more _ now? you will have to read the book. give us more than - now? you will have to read the book. give us more than that. l now? you will have to read the| book. give us more than that. i take it you _ book. give us more than that. i take it you did _ book. give us more than that. i take it you did not _ book. give us more than that. i take it you did not take - book. give us more than that. i take it you did not take them i take it you did not take them away with you but you had to authenticate this.— authenticate this. part of our agreement — authenticate this. part of our agreement with _
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authenticate this. part of our agreement with the - authenticate this. part of our| agreement with the georgians was that we could take 12 bottles when we left to take them to the chateaus and have them to the chateaus and have them authenticated. we talk one bottle to the chateau, an 1870 bottle to the chateau, an 1870 bottle that had an accident on the way and unfortunately it was broken on a footpath in paris. ., ~' was broken on a footpath in paris-_ not - paris. you drink it? not exactly? _ paris. you drink it? not exactly? it _ paris. you drink it? not exactly? it is _ paris. you drink it? not exactly? it is a - paris. you drink it? not exactly? it is a long - paris. you drink it? not i exactly? it is a long story paris. you drink it? not - exactly? it is a long story but we had a big dinner in london the night before and these things happen. but it was serendipitously it was lucky we did break it because we actually saved the liquid into little bottles and when we got to the chateau the important thing was that they authenticated the wine. they looked at the liquid and said this is our wine. and the director—general said to him that meant to me afterwards, he said they no longer open a
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bottle of the 1945. so we needed the wind to be tasted, not to tell us that it looked like, and they said it was our wine and that was great news for us. . , ., , �* for us. that is great news. but ou for us. that is great news. but you never— for us. that is great news. but you never did _ for us. that is great news. but you never did get _ for us. that is great news. but you never did get the - for us. that is great news. but you never did get the cellar. for us. that is great news. but you never did get the cellar of| you never did get the cellar of wines to distribute around the world, no doubt a vast profit. have you read the book? hat world, no doubt a vast profit. have you read the book? not yet i look forward _ have you read the book? not yet i look forward to _ have you read the book? not yet i look forward to it. _ have you read the book? not yet i look forward to it. we _ have you read the book? not yet i look forward to it. we do - have you read the book? not yet i look forward to it. we do not i i look forward to it. we do not divulue i look forward to it. we do not divulge unending _ i look forward to it. we do not divulge unending in _ i look forward to it. we do not divulge unending in the i divulge unending in the interview because there is a reason. because it spoils the book for readers, what happens. that is a fair point. i tell you what, in the little time we have left what is your favourite tipple? aha, have left what is your favourite tipple? have left what is your favourite ti le? �* . ., favourite tipple? a magnum of 1985 chateau _ favourite tipple? a magnum of 1985 chateau margot. - favourite tipple? a magnum of 1985 chateau margot. that i favourite tipple? a magnum of 1985 chateau margot. that is l 1985 chateau margot. that is -robabl 1985 chateau margot. that is probably slightly _ 1985 chateau margot. that is probably slightly more i probably slightly more available. john baker thank you very much indeed. a pleasure to talk to you.
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you can reach me on twitter — i'm @bbcdavideades hello. after a bright and blustery sunday, lighter winds for monday morning mean it will feel colder out there. in fact, the start of monday looks to be the coldest part of the week ahead but the milder air isn't too far away from coming back with these set of weather fronts about to move in from the atlantic with thicker cloud and some patchy rain, heading into westernmost parts of the uk to begin the day, especially into northern ireland. where skies have stayed clear for long enough overnight across eastern scotland and eastern england, this is where temperatures will have fallen low enough with those light winds for a touch of frost. any early sunshine isn't going to last too long here as cloud increases. the rain from northern ireland will then gradually move across scotland as the day goes on, heaviest in the west, into north west england and wales — though much of the midlands, eastern
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and southern england, will stay largely dry during daylight hours. the milder air lifting the temperature in belfast to 15 degrees. still feeling quite chilly into eastern parts of england with the cloud increasing after that frosty start — around 10 degrees in norwich. further outbreaks of rain overnight and into tuesday through northern ireland and scotland, pushing into parts of northern england. it will be a much milder night overnight and into tuesday — double—figure temperatures for many of the larger town and city centres as we start the day. this weather front is only very slowly edging southwards on tuesday, so from it there'll be cloud and some outbreaks of rain into northern england and wales, eventually pushing into parts of the midlands and south west england. east anglia and the south—east, will stay largely dry — a few hazy, sunny spells. a brighter day in scotland and northern ireland, albeit a few showery bursts of rain spreading their way southwards during the day, and temperatures are definitely on the mild side of average, and that's where they're going to stay for the rest of the week. this weather front is still
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around into wednesday — in fact, there will be another pulse of energy running along it. it looks as if that will bring some outbreaks of rain into parts of wales and england on wednesday. a bright day in scotland and northern ireland. there will be a few showers just edging towards north—west scotland during the day. and again, those temperatures, for the most part, are into double figures. again, that's where they are going to stay for the rest of the week. a fair amount of cloud around, some sunny spells here and there, and another set of atlantic weather fronts beginning to take some rain southwards from scotland and northern ireland into wales and england as we head towards the end of the week. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news — the headlines. sudanese security forces have fired tear gas at multiple pro—democracy protests in the capital, khartoum. they have also been dismantling barricades that had been erected and set on fire by protesters. the demonstrators had called for two days of civil disobedience to protest against last month's coup. the rappers travis scott and drake are being sued over friday's stampede at the astroworld music festival in the us city of houston in which eight people were killed. prosecutors in texas have filed lawsuits on behalf of relatives against both artists. the stampede happened while scott was performing. the us will shortly reopen its land and air borders to travellers from much of the world. visitors who are fully vaccinated against covid—19 will be allowed to enter the country after a 20 month ban, imposed by former president donald trump in march last year.
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now on bbc news it's hardtalk with stephen sackur.

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